Main menu:

Site search

Feeds

Categories

July 2014
S M T W T F S
« Mar    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Archive

Translation of Apple’s “Network” ad

My friend Sachiko Iwabuchi just wrote this great translation and interpretation of Apple’s “Network” ad, and she gave me permission to post it here. I love these ads, and I’m happy to know what this one means now.

The ad might have been out for a while, but last night I saw Mac’s new TV ad on “Network.”
If you don’t watch TV like me, visit http://www.apple.com/getamac/ads/.

In the TV commercial, Mac talks to Japanese Digital Camera in Japanese.

Mac: Hajimemashite. [Nice to meet you]
DC: Hajimemashite. [Nice to meet you, too]
Mac: Yoroshiku onegai shimasu.*

PC/Gates: Wait, wait, wait, do you speak her language?

DC shows a digital photo.

Mac: Ah, arigato.

DC: Ne, ne, ne, [this part is inaudible, even to me, but I am guessing], dare ano hito?
Chotto otakuppoku nai?
[Hey, hey, hey, [inaudible] who is that guy? He looks like a geek a bit , doesn’t he?]

I don’t think I don’t need to translate “Buon giorno.”

*”Yoroshiku (onegai shimasu)” is very difficult to translate.
One one-line Japanese-English translation tool gave me “Please kindly look after (me).”
But it sounds so odd if I translate Mac’s speech literally as “Please kindly look after me.”

One site has a really good explanation about “yoroshiku.”

I suppose every language has a number of expressions that defy translation into another language. One of the Japanese phrases that belong to this category would be “Yoroshiku onegai shimasu.” Let’s look at a few examples first.

1
Watashi wa Romi desu. Yoroshiku onegai shimasu.
My name is Romi. Nice to meet you.

2
Getsumatsu madeni ohenji o kudasai. Yoroshiku onegai shimasu.
Please reply by the end of this month. Thank you in advance.

3
Douka musume o yoroshiku ongegai shimasu.
Please look after my daughter.

“Yoroshiku” is a word with a number of meanings. Its etymological cousin, “Yoroshii” is an adjective meaning good, approved, desirable, and convenient. “onegai shimasu” consists of “o” ( a prefix of politeness), “negai” (originally, a noun denoting wish, hope, and the like), “shi”, which is an inflectional form of the general verb “suru” (do), and “masu”, an auxiliary verb of politeness. Thus, if I were to be forced to translate the phrase “Yoroshiku onegai shimasu.” into English, I would say, “I hope you will take care of ( someone / something ) in a way that is convenient for both you and me. (I count on your cooperation.)” Again, the group-oriented mentality of our agrarian society seems to be reflected in this expression.

[Source: http://www3.ocn.ne.jp/~romisdg/bj/ue.html]

Conclusion: Get a Mac!
–Sachiko

Write a comment