Quoting LXX sources for MONOGENHS

Mr. Timothy T. Dickens (ttd3@columbia.edu)
Sat, 4 Jan 1997 00:44:37 -0500 (EST)

At 01:22 PM 1/3/97 -0800, Luke McNab wrote:

[Tim snips again!]

> It must be remembered that most of the NT writers were also Greek
>speakers and normally used the Septuagint quotations, though at times
>Paul refers back to the Hebrew rather than the LXX. A more exact
>rendering of the above word should bear in mind the usage in the LXX and
>also the Hebrew. The primary meaning of the Hebrew word YACHIYD
>[translated MONOGENHS in LXX] is "only, especially only begotten, only
>child, Gen.22:2, 12, l6; Jer. 6:26; Zec. 12:10; Pro. 4:3; .." [Gesenius'
>Hebrew- Chaldee Lexicon, p. 345].

TTD: Dear brother Luke,
Thank you for your wonderful post this discussion group! I really
appreciated reading your post. There is a question that I have about the
references you quoted. I do not know what version of the LXX Gesenius used
in his Hebrew-Chaldee Lexicon, but the use of the term MONOGHNHS in the LXX
citations above seem to be either incorrect or missing from my Rahlfs
edition. I checked all the instances in Genesis and Jeremiah; I did not
find the term MONOGHNHS used in the passages at all. I only mention this
because I think it is importnat for us all on these biblical lists to be as
accurate as possible when citing sources, particularly when sources give the
impression of being the last word on a discussion.

Peace and Love,
Timothy T. Dickens
Smyrna, GA

MDick39708@gnn.com Home
ttd3@Columbia.edu School

Please visit my website at:

Near Eastern specialist and Egyptologist. . .are too aware of the
isolationism often seen in traditional classics--or more precisely in
studies of Greek civilization--with its emphasis on the events of a
relatively short period, primarily in a particular exemplar of a single
group of cultures. Studies that appear to see fifth-century B.C.E Athens as
the defining experience of all civilization puzzle those whose interest lie
in other areas of the Mediterranean antiquity, and still more those
concerned with other regions of the world.

"On The Aims And Methods of Black Athena"
by John Baines in Black Athena Revisited