Search found 1049 matches

by RandallButh
December 6th, 2020, 12:41 pm
Forum: Composition based on ancient texts
Topic: διηγησις - εν τη οδω
Replies: 10
Views: 352

Re: διηγησις - εν τη οδω

Τινὶ ἠμέρᾳ ἄνθρωπος ἐν τοῖς δένδροις ἔβαινε πότε τὸν ἄρκον εἶδεν. ὀ δὲ ἄνθρωπος ἔκραζεν ὅτι “ἄρκους ἀγαπῶ” καὶ τότε ἐκ τῆς πήρας αὐτοῦ βρῶμα ἔλαβε καὶ αὐτὸ τῷ ἄρκῳ ἔδωκεν. ὁ δὲ ἄρκος ἠγαλλιάσατο καὶ φίλος τοῦ ανθρώπου ἐγένετο. ἄφνω ὁ ἄρκος και ὀ ἄνθρωπος λέοντα εἶδον καὶ ὀ ἄνθρωπος ἔρκραζεν ὅτι “μι...
by RandallButh
October 23rd, 2020, 12:36 pm
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Meta Language
Replies: 23
Views: 1343

Re: Meta Language

For some words we may want to use modern Greek. I am pretty sure that μορφολογία exists in modern Greek, though I haven't checked nor do I know its history. A good place to start is ἡ τέχνη (ὁ Διονύσιος ὁ θρᾷξ) Here is his definition of a word and a sentence: λέξις ἐστὶ μέρος ἐλάχιστον τοῦ κατὰ σύντ...
by RandallButh
October 23rd, 2020, 11:35 am
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Meta Language
Replies: 23
Views: 1343

Re: Meta Language

May I suggest using Greek metalanguage? It might help keeping people in the language, should that be a goal, and probably forces more flexibility because students are learning the metalanguage across a language divide rather than subliminally thinking that it is some kind of bedrock. [I see this thi...
by RandallButh
October 5th, 2020, 2:26 am
Forum: Other Greek Texts
Topic: Reading a handwritten sentence
Replies: 3
Views: 422

Re: Reading a handwritten sentence

ΗΝ ΔΕ ΕΓΓΥΣ ΤΟ ΠΑΣΧΑ Η ΕΟΡΤΗ ΤΩΝ ΙΟΥΔΑΙΩΝ
by RandallButh
October 4th, 2020, 4:41 pm
Forum: Other
Topic: Answer Key to Machen
Replies: 16
Views: 15309

Re: Answer Key to Machen

. . . My oldest son took a year of Classical Greek in one semester at Yale, with the final exam on Plato’s Apology. After forty years of teaching ancient history and classics he has piblished translations of Xenophons Hellenika and two volumes of Polyaenos’ Strategemats. I agree that Athenaze is an...
by RandallButh
August 6th, 2020, 2:41 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Matthew 27:46 hina clause not in subjunctive mood
Replies: 4
Views: 400

Re: Matthew 27:46 hina clause not in subjunctive mood

ἵνα τί με ἐγκατέλιπες Why is this hina clause not in subjunctive mood? The ἵνα clause has no verb. It's just ἵνα τί. You could think of it as "You abandoned me in order to what ?" if it helps you to English it differently. Exactly. Consider the 'subjunctive' to be inside the τί, as if to ...
by RandallButh
June 22nd, 2020, 9:59 am
Forum: Other
Topic: Albuquerque on Mark 2:10
Replies: 9
Views: 1098

Re: Albuquerque on Mark 2:10

For Matthew: the verb ἀφιέναι does not need or require extra phrases that specifies time or place or other marginal/optional information. Also, everything was already taking place "on earth," both the incident and the speech. Relevance Theory states that persons interpret explicit statemen...
by RandallButh
June 20th, 2020, 3:51 pm
Forum: Other
Topic: Albuquerque on Mark 2:10
Replies: 9
Views: 1098

Re: Albuquerque on Mark 2:10

Actually, this is not a simple read for those in the 21st century. There are several of points of background information and word order that are necessary for a good reading. First of all, ἐξουσίαν ἔχει is an idiomatic word order for the verb σχεῖν. This is practically equivalent to a verb-first cla...
by RandallButh
June 6th, 2020, 11:13 pm
Forum: Greek Language and Linguistics
Topic: The 'Lucian Pronunciation' of Koine Greek
Replies: 24
Views: 3331

Re: The 'Lucian Pronunciation' of Koine Greek

The quote (οδε κιτε "here lies") does, in fact, demonstrate merged/dropped length. First, ε is short while the etymological vowel αι was long. This cannot be attributed to pre-Euclidian spelling from 500-700 years (!) earlier because E was used for long-E ("proto-eta") not AI. S...
by RandallButh
May 31st, 2020, 10:15 am
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Expressing a perfect continuous idea
Replies: 6
Views: 756

Re: Expressing a perfect continuous idea

We tend to use πειρᾶσθαι πειραθῆναι for the 'attempt' notion, and προσφάτως is good for 'recently.' However, the tenses are easier in Greek because the choice of πειρᾶσθαι is also conditioned by its hinted outcome. If the attempt was unsuccessful or on going then an imperfect or a continuous partici...

Go to advanced search