Search found 1728 matches

by Barry Hofstetter
July 13th, 2020, 9:20 am
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects
Replies: 48
Views: 1039

Re: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects

The people with the best "feel" for a language, of course, are the native speakers. Unfortunately, native speakers are notoriously poor at describing how their own language works. We expect more out of grammarians, linguistics, and language teachers, but as this ongoing survey of grammars is showin...
by Barry Hofstetter
July 12th, 2020, 4:36 pm
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects
Replies: 48
Views: 1039

Re: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects

νεκρός has a special status as a cultural universal. When used in the plural it generally doesn't require referential disambiguation. This has implications which need to be taken into account when trying to figure out what the lack of the article means. The article is so ubiquitous and important (w...
by Barry Hofstetter
July 9th, 2020, 4:59 pm
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects
Replies: 48
Views: 1039

Re: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects

The Cambridge Grammar of Classical Greek (2019, p. 328 ff.) is a bit clearer with the article in general. Meaning: * "The article is 'definite' because it refers to someone/something that is identifiable." * Reasons for identifiability: ** mentioned before ** obvious from the context or made specif...
by Barry Hofstetter
July 9th, 2020, 12:08 pm
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects
Replies: 48
Views: 1039

Re: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects

Daniel Semler wrote:
July 9th, 2020, 12:05 pm
Barry Hofstetter wrote:
July 9th, 2020, 11:45 am

Almost needless to say, the ECF's tend to use the phrase almost exclusively without the article, perhaps in imitation of the predominant NT usage.
I was following you until ECF's. Early Church Fathers ?

thx
D
Yes, a fairly standard abbreviation.
by Barry Hofstetter
July 9th, 2020, 11:55 am
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects
Replies: 48
Views: 1039

Re: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects

Though it is often a faux pas in linguistic description to appeal to speaker's choice, one has to wonder if the usage or non-usage of the article in (at least certain) prepositional phrases in certain instances was heavily influenced by the personal preferences of the speaker/writer? My favorite ex...
by Barry Hofstetter
July 9th, 2020, 11:45 am
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects
Replies: 48
Views: 1039

Re: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects

I'm speculation everywhere :) And I'm not arguing against you. This is just an interesting topic. Of course, same here. I thought it would be fun to search some extra biblical literature, and came up with this example from Euripides Helen : νεκρῶν φέροντας ὀνόματʼ εἰς οἴκους πάλιν (399) "Bearing th...
by Barry Hofstetter
July 9th, 2020, 8:26 am
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects
Replies: 48
Views: 1039

Re: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects

It's of course interesting to see how it compares to the English definite article, but my native language is Finnish which doesn't have an article at all, and the use of articles is one of the most difficult things in English for me. Seeing two different idiomatics uses of articles of two different...
by Barry Hofstetter
July 9th, 2020, 1:32 am
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects
Replies: 48
Views: 1039

Re: Greek Grammars on the Articulation of Prepositional Objects

Interesting observations, certainly. Of course, I have to say it -- Latin. No article at all, definite or indefinite. I wonder how Latin speakers in ancient times conceptualized the article? Did they say "What is that thing actually doing?" I suspect not, they just learned how to use the language. W...
by Barry Hofstetter
July 8th, 2020, 11:36 pm
Forum: Resources
Topic: Slater's Lexicon to Pindar - normally metaphorical?
Replies: 1
Views: 67

Re: Slater's Lexicon to Pindar - normally metaphorical?

Usually a specialized dictionary or lexicon focuses on the vocabulary as used by that author or body of literature. It should be evident from the specific lexical entry if something is a metaphorical usage or not.
by Barry Hofstetter
July 8th, 2020, 9:30 am
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Mark 2:3 - could missing antecedent be intentional?
Replies: 14
Views: 457

Re: Mark 2:3 - could missing antecedent be intentional?

The generalized third person plural is not all that uncommon: d. When it is a general idea of person, and usually in the third person plural of verbs of saying and thinking: ὡς λέγουσιν as they say D. 5. 18. So φᾱσί they say, οἴονται people think; cp. aiunt, ferunt, tradunt. Smyth, H. W. (1920). A G...

Go to advanced search