Search found 1550 matches

by Barry Hofstetter
September 22nd, 2011, 6:57 am
Forum: Writing Greek
Topic: Westminster Μικροτέρα Κατήχησις
Replies: 9
Views: 6092

Re: Westminster Μικροτέρα Κατήχησις

One of my lecturers at Bible College told me of a time that he and another lecturer composed an exam for Romans in which the passages proffered for translation were randomly selected from the church fathers. Apparently the students sat in stunned disbelief straining at these passages until somebody...
by Barry Hofstetter
September 18th, 2011, 6:38 am
Forum: Grammar Questions
Topic: First Person Imperative
Replies: 5
Views: 2422

Re: First Person Imperative

Greetings, Robert. I believe you would simply use the second person imperative -- in your English example, it's as though you are talking to yourself in the second person. Somewhere I have seen examples of this in Greek, but can't think of an example right now.
by Barry Hofstetter
September 14th, 2011, 9:37 pm
Forum: What does this text mean?
Topic: 1 Peter 1:1-2
Replies: 3
Views: 1010

Re: 1 Peter 1:1-2

I found an article that addresses the basic issue I raised. It is at: Bibliotheca Sacra vol 137 Jan-Mar 1980 Designation of the Readers in 1 Peter 1:1–2 D. Edmond Hiebert From the article: Peter may here have intended [ἐκλεκτοῖς] as a noun, but the grammatical structure does not suggest it. It is m...
by Barry Hofstetter
September 11th, 2011, 9:39 am
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Rom 4:25
Replies: 11
Views: 1771

Re: Rom 4:25

Lest what I wrote previously be misunderstood, I don 't believe that your explanation has any basis in the Greek itself: the construction involving διὰ + acc. means that a reason is being offered. That there are different kinds of reasons is something that we didn't have to learn from Aristotle's a...
by Barry Hofstetter
September 10th, 2011, 7:18 am
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Rom 4:25
Replies: 11
Views: 1771

Re: Rom 4:25

I agree with Barry that the two διά's here have marginally different forces. However, to explain this, one would either have to translate, which is treasonous, or one would have to use meta-language jargon like "prospectively" and "retrospectively," which is a different kind of treason. Thanks, Mar...
by Barry Hofstetter
September 9th, 2011, 7:03 am
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Rom 4:25
Replies: 11
Views: 1771

Re: Rom 4:25

Rom 4:25 ὃς παρεδόθη διὰ τὰ παραπτώματα ἡμῶν καὶ ἠγέρθη διὰ τὴν δικαίωσιν ἡμῶν. Am I missing something? διὰ τὰ παραπτώματα and διὰ τὴν δικαίωσιν both are instances of διὰ with the accusative and the accustive noun in each is qualified by ἡμῶν. It would seem to me that the same usage of διὰ is invol...
by Barry Hofstetter
September 8th, 2011, 9:56 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Rom 4:25
Replies: 11
Views: 1771

Rom 4:25

Rom 4:25 ὃς παρεδόθη διὰ τὰ παραπτώματα ἡμῶν καὶ ἠγέρθη διὰ τὴν δικαίωσιν ἡμῶν.
I'm interested in comments on the two uses of διὰ. Syntactically, they look like they should be parallel, but conceptually, not so much. Thoughts?
by Barry Hofstetter
September 2nd, 2011, 10:50 am
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Time in the conditional clause
Replies: 5
Views: 1951

Re: Time in the conditional clause

In your proposed example, ancient Greek would use an aorist indicative in both clauses, and ἃν would be prefixed or added to the aorist of the apodosis. εἰ ἐμελήτησα, ἐξέφυγον ἂν τὸ ἐλέγχος. It's clear from the formulation which action must have come first (consequences don't ordinarily precede cau...
by Barry Hofstetter
August 18th, 2011, 5:41 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Ephesians 1:4
Replies: 5
Views: 1324

Re: Ephesians 1:4

I understand Barry. My question pertained to the grammar of the Greek specifically the phrase εἶναι ἡμᾶς, the infinitive followed by 1st person plural in the accusative (or any pronoun in the accusative, for that matter). I just didn't exactly know how to form the question. I was basically wonderin...
by Barry Hofstetter
August 18th, 2011, 8:26 am
Forum: Grammar Questions
Topic: δε and ἀλλα
Replies: 7
Views: 1714

Re: δε and ἀλλα

Good response by Eeli. I would summarize by saying that ἀλλά nearly always adversative -- it's a big but, so to speak, which is what the text means by "stronger," it shows a specific ("strong") contrast. δέ has a much wider usage and is primarily a discourse marker -- with μέν in the preceding claus...

Go to advanced search