Search found 1614 matches

by Barry Hofstetter
September 8th, 2011, 9:56 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Rom 4:25
Replies: 11
Views: 1808

Rom 4:25

Rom 4:25 ὃς παρεδόθη διὰ τὰ παραπτώματα ἡμῶν καὶ ἠγέρθη διὰ τὴν δικαίωσιν ἡμῶν.
I'm interested in comments on the two uses of διὰ. Syntactically, they look like they should be parallel, but conceptually, not so much. Thoughts?
by Barry Hofstetter
September 2nd, 2011, 10:50 am
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Time in the conditional clause
Replies: 5
Views: 1962

Re: Time in the conditional clause

In your proposed example, ancient Greek would use an aorist indicative in both clauses, and ἃν would be prefixed or added to the aorist of the apodosis. εἰ ἐμελήτησα, ἐξέφυγον ἂν τὸ ἐλέγχος. It's clear from the formulation which action must have come first (consequences don't ordinarily precede cau...
by Barry Hofstetter
August 18th, 2011, 5:41 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Ephesians 1:4
Replies: 5
Views: 1379

Re: Ephesians 1:4

I understand Barry. My question pertained to the grammar of the Greek specifically the phrase εἶναι ἡμᾶς, the infinitive followed by 1st person plural in the accusative (or any pronoun in the accusative, for that matter). I just didn't exactly know how to form the question. I was basically wonderin...
by Barry Hofstetter
August 18th, 2011, 8:26 am
Forum: Grammar Questions
Topic: δε and ἀλλα
Replies: 7
Views: 1790

Re: δε and ἀλλα

Good response by Eeli. I would summarize by saying that ἀλλά nearly always adversative -- it's a big but, so to speak, which is what the text means by "stronger," it shows a specific ("strong") contrast. δέ has a much wider usage and is primarily a discourse marker -- with μέν in the preceding claus...
by Barry Hofstetter
August 18th, 2011, 8:06 am
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Ephesians 1:4
Replies: 5
Views: 1379

Re: Ephesians 1:4

καθὼς ἐξελέξατο ἡμᾶς ἐν αὐτῷ πρὸ καταβολῆς κόσμου εἶναι ἡμᾶς ἁγίους καὶ ἀμώμους κατενώπιον αὐτοῦ ἐν ἀγάπῃ My question pertains to εἶναι ἡμᾶς ἁγίους καὶ ἀμώμους κατενώπιον αὐτοῦ, literally "us to be holy and immaculate before Him." Thus, the entire scripture would be translated as, Even as He loving...
by Barry Hofstetter
August 18th, 2011, 7:54 am
Forum: Resources
Topic: Advanced(?) Greek
Replies: 4
Views: 2343

Re: Advanced(?) Greek

I agree that two verses a day and parsing everything in sight is an excellent start. Randall has given good advice – you don't want to stay there, but to wean yourself from parsing and and increase your reading as much as possible. Parsing is always a means to the end, and it's like the alphabet – w...
by Barry Hofstetter
August 17th, 2011, 12:34 am
Forum: Seen on the Web
Topic: Rules for Language Learning
Replies: 7
Views: 3179

Re: Rules for Language Learning

When learning Greek, I think we should take a page out of how children learn. When babies learn the parents' language, they are exposed to the words of body parts. Many body parts are common Greek words found in the NT such as head, face, eyes, ears, hand, finger, arm, elbow, palm, shoulder, chest,...
by Barry Hofstetter
August 11th, 2011, 8:59 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: τί = "why/for what reason": nom./acc. pron. or adverb?
Replies: 3
Views: 721

Re: τί = "why/for what reason": nom./acc. pron. or adverb?

What interests me is that there is a dispute about it. I agree with both of you -- I don't see how it can be anything other than an adverbial/accusative usage.
by Barry Hofstetter
August 10th, 2011, 10:23 pm
Forum: What does this text mean?
Topic: 1 John 2:6
Replies: 11
Views: 2009

Re: 1 John 2:6

[1 John 2] [6] ο λεγων εν αυτω μενειν οφειλει καθως εκεινος περιεπατησεν και αυτος ουτως περιπατειν I found this sentence almost unreadable.. Here is my current understanding of it in "English": "the [one] who says [that] [he] remains in him ought to, just as that [one] walked, also walk in this wa...
by Barry Hofstetter
August 9th, 2011, 9:09 pm
Forum: Writing Greek
Topic: Westminster Μικροτέρα Κατήχησις
Replies: 9
Views: 8738

Re: Westminster Μικροτέρα Κατήχησις

Well, I am somewhat astonished that you've chosen to practice on a task that would daunt seasoned composers of ancient/Biblical Greek. My guess is that the Shorter Catechism would go more easily into the Renaissance Latin that its English composers certainly knew well (as well as they knew their Gr...

Go to advanced search