2 Cor 1:3 articulation within a Granville-Sharp construction

Stephen Carlson
Posts: 2977
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

2 Cor 1:3 articulation within a Granville-Sharp construction

Post by Stephen Carlson » April 2nd, 2020, 11:52 pm

In 2 Cor 1:3 ὁ πατὴρ τῶν οἰκτιρμῶν καὶ θεὸς πάσης παρακλήσεως, why does τῶν οἰκτιρμῶν take the article but πάσης παρακλήσεως does not?
0 x


Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D.
Melbourne, Australia

Stephen Carlson
Posts: 2977
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

Re: 2 Cor 1:3 articulation within a Granville-Sharp construction

Post by Stephen Carlson » April 3rd, 2020, 3:03 am

Here's another example: Mark 6:3 ό υιός τής Μαρίας καί αδελφός Ιάκωβου. The first one takes the article but the second does not.
0 x
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D.
Melbourne, Australia

Barry Hofstetter
Posts: 1818
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:48 pm

Re: 2 Cor 1:3 articulation within a Granville-Sharp construction

Post by Barry Hofstetter » April 3rd, 2020, 7:35 am

In your first example, I think because it's not unusual for feminine abstract nouns to omit the article, and particularly in the oblique cases. In the second, ἀδελφός is clearly appositional to the already articular ὁ υἱός, so no need to repeat the article.
0 x
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
Instructor of Latin
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
καὶ σὺ τὸ σὸν ποιήσεις κἀγὼ τὸ ἐμόν. ἆρον τὸ σὸν καὶ ὕπαγε.

Eeli Kaikkonen
Posts: 473
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 7:49 am
Location: Finland
Contact:

Re: 2 Cor 1:3 articulation within a Granville-Sharp construction

Post by Eeli Kaikkonen » April 3rd, 2020, 2:17 pm

Barry Hofstetter wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 7:35 am
ἀδελφός is clearly appositional to the already articular ὁ υἱός, so no need to repeat the article.
Or did Stephen mean τής Μαρίας ~ Ιάκωβου?
0 x

S Walch
Posts: 184
Joined: June 13th, 2011, 4:27 pm
Location: Manchester, UK

Re: 2 Cor 1:3 articulation within a Granville-Sharp construction

Post by S Walch » April 3rd, 2020, 4:23 pm

Eeli Kaikkonen wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 2:17 pm
Or did Stephen mean τής Μαρίας ~ Ιάκωβου?
Yeah, I was thinking this.

Only pattern with these two are the genitives are either articular or anarthrous if the governing substantive is also (θεὸς/αδελφός), hence Stephen's question.

Are there any other places with this pattern, or just these two?
0 x

Stephen Carlson
Posts: 2977
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

Re: 2 Cor 1:3 articulation within a Granville-Sharp construction

Post by Stephen Carlson » April 3rd, 2020, 7:01 pm

Barry Hofstetter wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 7:35 am
In your first example, I think because it's not unusual for feminine abstract nouns to omit the article, and particularly in the oblique cases.
Never heard of this rule.
Barry Hofstetter wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 7:35 am
In the second, ἀδελφός is clearly appositional to the already articular ὁ υἱός, so no need to repeat the article.
Talking about the names Mary and James. The ἀδελφός is not articular because it's in a Granville-Sharp construction.
0 x
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D.
Melbourne, Australia

Stephen Carlson
Posts: 2977
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

Re: 2 Cor 1:3 articulation within a Granville-Sharp construction

Post by Stephen Carlson » April 3rd, 2020, 7:01 pm

Eeli Kaikkonen wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 2:17 pm
Barry Hofstetter wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 7:35 am
ἀδελφός is clearly appositional to the already articular ὁ υἱός, so no need to repeat the article.
Or did Stephen mean τής Μαρίας ~ Ιάκωβου?
Yes.
0 x
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D.
Melbourne, Australia

Stephen Carlson
Posts: 2977
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

Re: 2 Cor 1:3 articulation within a Granville-Sharp construction

Post by Stephen Carlson » April 3rd, 2020, 7:08 pm

S Walch wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 4:23 pm
Eeli Kaikkonen wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 2:17 pm
Or did Stephen mean τής Μαρίας ~ Ιάκωβου?
Yeah, I was thinking this.

Only pattern with these two are the genitives are either articular or anarthrous if the governing substantive is also (θεὸς/αδελφός), hence Stephen's question.
Yeah, it's almost like the individual nouns in a Granville-Sharp construction obey Apollonius' Canon.
S Walch wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 4:23 pm
Are there any other places with this pattern, or just these two?
Most G-S constructions don't have modifiers so these two are the clearest. There are possible counter-examples like Heb 3:1 τὸν άπόστολον καὶ άρχιερέα τῆς ὁμολογίας ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦν, but this could be a parsing issue.
1 x
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D.
Melbourne, Australia

S Walch
Posts: 184
Joined: June 13th, 2011, 4:27 pm
Location: Manchester, UK

Re: 2 Cor 1:3 articulation within a Granville-Sharp construction

Post by S Walch » April 4th, 2020, 7:40 am

Stephen Carlson wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 7:08 pm
Most G-S constructions don't have modifiers so these two are the clearest. There are possible counter-examples like Heb 3:1 τὸν άπόστολον καὶ άρχιερέα τῆς ὁμολογίας ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦν, but this could be a parsing issue.
Is this because both substantives don't have modifiers, thus the only modifier in a G-S- clause will be articular?

If it was phrased something like:

τὸν άπόστολον τῆς ὁμολογίας καὶ άρχιερέα [πίστεως] ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦν...

With two modifiers, it would've looked a bit more like this.

There any G-S with at least one modifier which isn't articular?

(Guess it won't help that some of the G-S- constructions are the modifiers - Acts 20:28 (majority reading); Eph. 5:5 etc.)
0 x

Barry Hofstetter
Posts: 1818
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:48 pm

Re: 2 Cor 1:3 articulation within a Granville-Sharp construction

Post by Barry Hofstetter » April 4th, 2020, 12:02 pm

Stephen Carlson wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 7:01 pm
Barry Hofstetter wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 7:35 am
In your first example, I think because it's not unusual for feminine abstract nouns to omit the article, and particularly in the oblique cases.
Never heard of this rule.
Barry Hofstetter wrote:
April 3rd, 2020, 7:35 am
In the second, ἀδελφός is clearly appositional to the already articular ὁ υἱός, so no need to repeat the article.
Talking about the names Mary and James. The ἀδελφός is not articular because it's in a Granville-Sharp construction.
Of course you haven't heard of it, because I made it up. If you look at Smyth, he states that abstract nouns generally do have the article. But using παράκλησις as an example:

ὁ ἄνθρωπος οὗτος δίκαιος καὶ εὐλαβὴς προσδεχόμενος παράκλησιν τοῦ Ἰσραήλ...(Lk 2:25)

Why no article? Would τὴν παράκλησιν mean anything different?

Now my rule (which you so summarily dismissed, humph) is based on impression formed over years of reading the language, and not on any scientific analysis, but it works for me... :).

As for the second, I wonder if it isn't simply an Apollonius' Canon thing.

Snark comment: Why is it that nobody outside of a narrow range of NT people ever talk about Granville Sharp?
0 x
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
Instructor of Latin
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
καὶ σὺ τὸ σὸν ποιήσεις κἀγὼ τὸ ἐμόν. ἆρον τὸ σὸν καὶ ὕπαγε.

Post Reply

Return to “Syntax and Grammar”