Writing software to analyze Biblical Greek

Tell us about interesting projects involving biblical Greek. Collaborative projects involving biblical Greek may use this forum for their communication - please contact jonathan.robie@ibiblio.org if you want to use this forum for your project.

Re: Writing software to analyze Biblical Greek

Postby Jonathan Robie » June 20th, 2011, 6:14 pm

Patricia Walters wrote:I used the Chi-Square Contingency Table Test, after numerous consultations with a statistics professor who guided me through the statistical maze. One example of a Null Hypothesis is this: "There is no difference in dissonance between the Luke and Acts passages beyond normal, random variability."

When the Chi-Square Contingency Table Test returns a P-Value indicating a highly significant result, another intrinsic explanation for the differences in dissonance is required. (Normal, random variability is not a sufficient explanation.) By logical deduction and a review of other possible explanations, I believe it must come down to different authorship.


How did you measure normal, random variability?

A much fuller description is contained in the book...


And I'm not trying to put you on the spot ... so if you'd rather not go to the effort, that's fine.
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
Jonathan Robie
 
Posts: 1304
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm

Re: Writing software to analyze Biblical Greek

Postby Patricia Walters » June 21st, 2011, 8:15 am

Jonathan Robie wrote:
Patricia Walters wrote:I used the Chi-Square Contingency Table Test, after numerous consultations with a statistics professor who guided me through the statistical maze. One example of a Null Hypothesis is this: "There is no difference in dissonance between the Luke and Acts passages beyond normal, random variability."

When the Chi-Square Contingency Table Test returns a P-Value indicating a highly significant result, another intrinsic explanation for the differences in dissonance is required. (Normal, random variability is not a sufficient explanation.) By logical deduction and a review of other possible explanations, I believe it must come down to different authorship.


How did you measure normal, random variability?

A much fuller description is contained in the book...


And I'm not trying to put you on the spot ... so if you'd rather not go to the effort, that's fine.


I "measured" normal, random variablity by what it is not; that is, it is not abnormal. If the Chi-square Contingency Table Test returns a value greater than the range 0.05-0.01 (the range for which the statistical term "significant" applies), then the variability is abnormal and must be explained by something other than normal and random.

(Likewise, if the Chi-square Contingency Table Test returns a value greater than 0.01, then the statistical term "highly significant" cannot be applied and another explanation of the variability is required.)

I hope this helps.
Patricia Walters, Ph.D.
Department of Religious Studies
Rockford College
Beloit College
Patricia Walters
 
Posts: 7
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 12:23 pm

Re: Writing software to analyze Biblical Greek

Postby Jonathan Robie » June 21st, 2011, 8:34 am

Thanks - I think I wasn't clear enough about my main question. You're saying that Luke and Acts are no more like each other than the similarities found in some set of texts that were written by different authors. What set of texts did you use for this? What sample did you use for comparison?

I'd assume, for instance, that the first chapter of Luke and the first chapter of Acts are much more like each other than either is to the first chapter of John. If you did clustering on some set of criteria on Luke, Acts, John, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, and the Revelation, I would expect Luke and Acts to fall into one group, John and 1-3 John in another group, and the Revelation to fall into a third group. I think many Greek readers would intuitively group text from these books in the same way. Would your technique also see Luke and Acts as more similar to each other than either is to these other texts?
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
Jonathan Robie
 
Posts: 1304
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm

Re: Writing software to analyze Biblical Greek

Postby Patricia Walters » June 21st, 2011, 9:51 am

Jonathan Robie wrote:Thanks - I think I wasn't clear enough about my main question. You're saying that Luke and Acts are no more like each other than the similarities found in some set of texts that were written by different authors. What set of texts did you use for this? What sample did you use for comparison?

I'd assume, for instance, that the first chapter of Luke and the first chapter of Acts are much more like each other than either is to the first chapter of John. If you did clustering on some set of criteria on Luke, Acts, John, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, and the Revelation, I would expect Luke and Acts to fall into one group, John and 1-3 John in another group, and the Revelation to fall into a third group. I think many Greek readers would intuitively group text from these books in the same way. Would your technique also see Luke and Acts as more similar to each other than either is to these other texts?


To analyze just any passage or chapter from Luke or Acts was not a rigorous enough standard for me. The question of sources looms large in Luke and obscurely in Acts. So, I spent a long time identifying those passages whose authorship is the least contested - that is, seams and summaries. I consulted a set of experts and their commentaries for the experts' opinions as to which seams and summaries were judged to be authorial. In so doing, I eliminated as much idiosyncrasy as possible in data selection. Thus, when finished, I had a set of passages from Luke and a set of passages from Acts, deemed authorial by a majority of experts; it is those I analyzed.

I did not venture into the books of 1, 2, 3 John or Revelation. It was a gigantic task to do what I did, although as a future project it might be interesting. Assuming that Luke and Acts could not be the only Greek ever written by the author/s, I was satisfied that sampling the seams and summaries offered a reliable set of data.
Patricia Walters, Ph.D.
Department of Religious Studies
Rockford College
Beloit College
Patricia Walters
 
Posts: 7
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 12:23 pm

Previous

Return to Projects

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest