Page 3 of 3

Re: The negation of perfect verb forms

Posted: September 14th, 2018, 4:39 am
by RandallButh

Re: The negation of perfect verb forms

Posted: September 14th, 2018, 9:36 am
by Barry Hofstetter
Stephen Carlson wrote:
September 12th, 2018, 11:12 pm
Barry Hofstetter wrote:
September 12th, 2018, 10:41 pm
Stephen Carlson wrote:
September 12th, 2018, 5:09 pm
Where’s the reference to a completed action?
For which verb that we've been discussing?
ἔοικεν
If indeed from εἴκω, "to have resembled, to have been like" becomes the completed or settled state represented by our English "seem."

Re: The negation of perfect verb forms

Posted: September 14th, 2018, 10:01 am
by Stephen Carlson
Barry Hofstetter wrote:
September 14th, 2018, 9:36 am
If indeed from εἴκω, "to have resembled, to have been like" becomes the completed or settled state represented by our English "seem."
Excellent. I’ll take “completed or settled state” over “completed action.” That’s a big step in the right direction.

Re: The negation of perfect verb forms

Posted: September 14th, 2018, 11:36 am
by Barry Hofstetter
Stephen Carlson wrote:
September 14th, 2018, 10:01 am
Barry Hofstetter wrote:
September 14th, 2018, 9:36 am
If indeed from εἴκω, "to have resembled, to have been like" becomes the completed or settled state represented by our English "seem."
Excellent. I’ll take “completed or settled state” over “completed action.” That’s a big step in the right direction.
:D The key words being "completed" and "settled."

Re: The negation of perfect verb forms

Posted: September 17th, 2018, 4:56 pm
by MAubrey
Stephen Carlson wrote:
September 12th, 2018, 9:18 am
It's one example out of many. I also gave ἔοικα. Please tell me how "the perfect refers simply to completed action" in James 1:6: αἰτείτω δὲ ἐν πίστει μηδὲν διακρινόμενος · ὁ γὰρ διακρινόμενος ἔοικεν κλύδωνι θαλάσσης ἀνεμιζομένῳ καὶ ῥιπιζομένῳ.
Really? You're doing this?

State predicates don't behave like that.

Re: The negation of perfect verb forms

Posted: September 17th, 2018, 7:03 pm
by Stephen Carlson
MAubrey wrote:
September 17th, 2018, 4:56 pm
Stephen Carlson wrote:
September 12th, 2018, 9:18 am
It's one example out of many. I also gave ἔοικα. Please tell me how "the perfect refers simply to completed action" in James 1:6: αἰτείτω δὲ ἐν πίστει μηδὲν διακρινόμενος · ὁ γὰρ διακρινόμενος ἔοικεν κλύδωνι θαλάσσης ἀνεμιζομένῳ καὶ ῥιπιζομένῳ.
Really? You're doing this?

State predicates don't behave like that.
Who are you asking? Barry was claiming that there's a completed "action." I disagree and so I want to know from him where he thinks the action is in a state predicate.

Re: The negation of perfect verb forms

Posted: September 18th, 2018, 7:03 pm
by Barry Hofstetter
Stephen Carlson wrote:
September 17th, 2018, 7:03 pm
MAubrey wrote:
September 17th, 2018, 4:56 pm
Stephen Carlson wrote:
September 12th, 2018, 9:18 am
It's one example out of many. I also gave ἔοικα. Please tell me how "the perfect refers simply to completed action" in James 1:6: αἰτείτω δὲ ἐν πίστει μηδὲν διακρινόμενος · ὁ γὰρ διακρινόμενος ἔοικεν κλύδωνι θαλάσσης ἀνεμιζομένῳ καὶ ῥιπιζομένῳ.
Really? You're doing this?

State predicates don't behave like that.
Who are you asking? Barry was claiming that there's a completed "action." I disagree and so I want to know from him where he thinks the action is in a state predicate.
And I actually answered that.

Re: The negation of perfect verb forms

Posted: September 18th, 2018, 8:56 pm
by Stephen Carlson
Barry Hofstetter wrote:
September 18th, 2018, 7:03 pm
And I actually answered that.
I have a feeling Mike's comment came in media res.