A Greek Journal

This forum is for practicing composition based on ancient texts
Forum rules
This forum is for discussing how to do Greek composition and practicing writing in Greek.

If you post in this forum, you are inviting people to critique what you have written and suggest ways to improve it.

Private subforums can be created for groups who want to practice together without exposing their mistakes to the world, or this can be done in public.
Wes Wood
Posts: 661
Joined: September 20th, 2013, 8:18 pm

Re: A Greek Journal

Post by Wes Wood » March 26th, 2017, 10:27 pm

Stephen Hughes wrote:
March 24th, 2017, 12:48 am
Wes Wood wrote:
March 23rd, 2017, 11:48 am
Note: From a casual perusal of Greek sources, I didn't notice any phrase similar to, "My _____ will hurt." Is there a better/alternate way to say this than what I have written?
ἀλγήσω + acc. of respect.

(Cf. ὀδονταλγέω and γομφιάζω.)
I didn't think of ἀλγεῖν. I should've. I think I've seen it a few times in Plato's Republic. The other words wouldn't have worked for what I had in mind, but you couldn't possibly have known that. My teeth were fine, and I have only had three cavities in my life. It's the fact that my mouth gets cut to pieces during the cleaning that causes me such grief! Every nick becomes a sore that takes weeks to go away.
Ἀσπάζομαι μὲν καὶ φιλῶ, πείσομαι δὲ μᾶλλον τῷ θεῷ ἢ ὑμῖν.-Ἀπολογία Σωκράτους 29δ

Wes Wood
Posts: 661
Joined: September 20th, 2013, 8:18 pm

Re: A Greek Journal

Post by Wes Wood » March 26th, 2017, 10:42 pm

τήμερον, ἀνέγνων `Τὸ Γένος τὸ Ἄξιον Φονευθῆναι´*

*The Kind Worth Killing

cf. song of the Lord High Executioner in The Mikado.
Ἀσπάζομαι μὲν καὶ φιλῶ, πείσομαι δὲ μᾶλλον τῷ θεῷ ἢ ὑμῖν.-Ἀπολογία Σωκράτους 29δ

Stephen Hughes
Posts: 3271
Joined: February 26th, 2013, 7:12 am

Re: A Greek Journal

Post by Stephen Hughes » March 27th, 2017, 2:45 pm

Wes Wood wrote:
March 26th, 2017, 10:16 pm
After looking at several different examples, I agree with your suggestion that the βάλλειν verbs would have been a better choice for what I was trying to convey. More specifically, I think that its various compounded forms are focused to a larger degree on the result of the action. How well do you think προσβάλλειν would do in that context? I believe that with or without circumlocutions it could be forced into service.
The prefixed preposition προσ- is used:
  • (a) syntactically to add an extra detail to the verb - increase valence in a certain way - ie to make us think about something in addition to the action itself, eg προσμένειν "to remain in a situation where another person / thing is" - we think about two things, and προσεγγίζειν makes us think strongly / clearly about the other person or thing that is being approached.
    (b) semantically to make us thing about something (else), eg προσποιέω "I make somebody think one is doing something".
Βάλλω being a movement, the logical relationship between one thing and another is where it is goin, so προσβάλλω might be okay. Perhaps you could put what you were shooting at in the dative, and the lead in the accusative.
Γελᾷ δ' ὁ μωρός, κἄν τι μὴ γέλοιον ᾖ
(Menander, Γνῶμαι μονόστιχοι 108)

Wes Wood
Posts: 661
Joined: September 20th, 2013, 8:18 pm

Re: A Greek Journal

Post by Wes Wood » March 27th, 2017, 5:17 pm

Stephen Hughes wrote:Βάλλω being a movement, the logical relationship between one thing and another is where it is goin, so προσβάλλω might be okay. Perhaps you could put what you were shooting at in the dative, and the lead in the accusative.
This is what I suspect as well. I will do a little digging this evening, and see what I come up with.
Ἀσπάζομαι μὲν καὶ φιλῶ, πείσομαι δὲ μᾶλλον τῷ θεῷ ἢ ὑμῖν.-Ἀπολογία Σωκράτους 29δ

Wes Wood
Posts: 661
Joined: September 20th, 2013, 8:18 pm

Re: A Greek Journal

Post by Wes Wood » March 27th, 2017, 10:38 pm

τὸ δὲ χρόνον `τῷ παλαιῷ τῆς Ἑλλάδος τρόπῳ´[1] ἐγγράψαι χαλεπόν μοι τράξαι. καὶ `ἐν τοῖς παλαίτατοις καίροις´[2] `ἀνώνυμον´[3] ἐμοὶ δοκεῖ τὸ σάββατον (ἡ ἑπτὰς: ὁ τῶν ἑπτὰς ἡμέρων καίρος).

Note: I intentionally searched for a word in each reference so that one of the words in the link will be highlighted. I hope this will make the references much easier to find for those who wish to do so.

[1] http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/tex ... a%2Fdos%2C
ὅμως δὲ οὔτε ξυνοικισθείσης πόλεως οὔτε ἱεροῖς καὶ κατασκευαῖς πολυτελέσι χρησαμένης, κατὰ κώμας δὲ τῷ παλαιῷ τῆς Ἑλλάδος τρόπῳ οἰκισθείσης, φαίνοιτ᾽ ἂν ὑποδεεστέρα), Ἀθηναίων δὲ τὸ αὐτὸ τοῦτο παθόντων διπλασίαν ἂν τὴν δύναμιν εἰκάζεσθαι ἀπὸ τῆς φανερᾶς ὄψεως τῆς πόλεως ἢ ἔστιν.
[2] http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/tex ... %2Ftois%2C
Εὐφορίων δὲ ἐν τοῖς Ὑπομνήμασι λέγει τὴν Σάμον ἐν τοῖς παλαιτάτοις χρόνοις ἐρήμην γενέσθαι: φανῆναι γὰρ ἐν αὐτῇ θηρία μεγέθει μὲν μέγιστα, ἄγρια δέ, καὶ προσπελάσαι τῳ δεινά, καλεῖσθαί γε μὴν νηάδας. ἅπερ οὖν καὶ μόνῃ τῇ βοῇ ῥηγνύναι τὴν γῆν. παροιμίαν οὗν ἐν τῇ Σάμῳ διαρρεῖν τὴν [p. 425] λέγουσαν ῾μεῖζον βοᾷ τῶν νηάδων.᾿ ὀστᾶ δὲ ἔτι καὶ νῦν αὐτῶν δείκνυσθαι μεγάλα ὁ αὐτός φησι.
[3]http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/tex ... 2Fnumon%2C
τάχα μὲν οὖν ἂν φαίη τις οὐδ᾽ ἄρχοντας εἶναι τοὺς τοιούτους, οὐδὲ μετέχειν διὰ ταῦτ᾽ ἀρχῆς: καίτοι γελοῖον τοὺς κυριωτάτους ἀποστερεῖν ἀρχῆς. ἀλλὰ διαφερέτω μηδέν: περὶ ὀνόματος [30] γὰρ ὁ λόγος: ἀνώνυμον γὰρ τὸ κοινὸν ἐπὶ δικαστοῦ καὶ ἐκκλησιαστοῦ, τί δεῖ ταῦτ᾽ ἄμφω καλεῖν.
Ἀσπάζομαι μὲν καὶ φιλῶ, πείσομαι δὲ μᾶλλον τῷ θεῷ ἢ ὑμῖν.-Ἀπολογία Σωκράτους 29δ

Wes Wood
Posts: 661
Joined: September 20th, 2013, 8:18 pm

Re: A Greek Journal

Post by Wes Wood » April 2nd, 2017, 9:29 pm

The following sentences are additional practice with Eleanor Dickey's Greek Composition Book. I am trying to avoid any exercises from the book on the chance that a student might stumble upon them. Instead, I am trying to make up sentences that use the same vocabulary and focus on the same skills. Hopefully, I will find some measure of success.

Chapter 1 Practice Sentences:
1) Some women are sacrificing, but others (women) are not.
2) The horses are carrying books in the marketplace.
3) Today's men want to find good women.
4) The master is wanting to find his slave, but the slave is not wanting to be found.
5) The messengers are teaching the brothers well.
6) The master is teaching the slaves, but they are not learning.
7) The master is carrying his brother to sacrifice in the market. (to be sacrificed :twisted: )
8) Today's men cannot find horses to eat.
9) The poets do not eat by teaching.
10) The horse wants to eat slaves.
Ἀσπάζομαι μὲν καὶ φιλῶ, πείσομαι δὲ μᾶλλον τῷ θεῷ ἢ ὑμῖν.-Ἀπολογία Σωκράτους 29δ

Wes Wood
Posts: 661
Joined: September 20th, 2013, 8:18 pm

Re: A Greek Journal

Post by Wes Wood » April 2nd, 2017, 10:22 pm

Chapter 1 (Attempted) Answers:
1) αἱ μὲν θύουσιν, αἱ δὲ οὐ.
2) οἱ ἵπποι βιβλία φέρουσιν ἐν ἀγορᾷ.
3) οἱ νῦν τὰς ἀγαθὰς εὑρίσκειν ἐθέλουσιν.
4) ὁ δεσπότης τὸν δοῦλον εὑρίσκειν ἐθέλει, ὁ δὲ οὐκ ἐθέλει εὑρίσκεσθαι.
5) οἱ ἄγγελοι τοὺς ἀδελφοὺς εὖ παιδεύουσιν.
6) ὁ δεσπότης τοὺς δούλους παιδεύει, οἱ δὲ οὐ μανθάνουσιν.
7) ὁ δεσπότης τὸν ἀδελφὸν τοῦ θύεσθαι φέρει.
8) οἱ νῦν ἵππους τοῦ φαγεῖν οὐ εὑρίσκουσιν.
9) οἱ ποιήται οὐ ἐσθίουσι τῷ παιδεύειν.
10) ὁ ἵππος δούλους φαγεῖν ἐθέλει.
I'm trying not to go beyond (or at the very least much beyond) the information in chapter one, and this is not the way that I would feel comfortable writing some of these sentences. Do numbers 7, 8, and 10 even work?
Ἀσπάζομαι μὲν καὶ φιλῶ, πείσομαι δὲ μᾶλλον τῷ θεῷ ἢ ὑμῖν.-Ἀπολογία Σωκράτους 29δ

Stephen Hughes
Posts: 3271
Joined: February 26th, 2013, 7:12 am

Re: A Greek Journal

Post by Stephen Hughes » April 26th, 2017, 2:19 pm

Wes Wood wrote:
April 2nd, 2017, 10:22 pm
Do numbers 7, 8, and 10 even work?
Reading your Greek before your English, yes, except "in the market."
Γελᾷ δ' ὁ μωρός, κἄν τι μὴ γέλοιον ᾖ
(Menander, Γνῶμαι μονόστιχοι 108)

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest