public domain audio recording of Matthew in ancient Greek (the non-modern pronunciation)

Biblical Greek morphology and syntax, aspect, linguistics, discourse analysis, and related topics
m_bauer
Posts: 13
Joined: May 28th, 2018, 11:28 am

public domain audio recording of Matthew in ancient Greek (the non-modern pronunciation)

Post by m_bauer » June 4th, 2018, 8:22 am

Hello,
I am searching a public domain audio recording of Matthew 5,6,7 read in ancient Greek (the non-modern pronunciation)
and found (by the help of the forum search) thankfully:
http://www.letsreadgreek.com/resources/ ... #phemister

Does any one and why got other favorites? Maybe of a male? (As I am one and thought it easy to mime)

Thanks in advance
0 x



RandallButh
Posts: 967
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Re: public domain audio recording of Matthew in ancient Greek (the non-modern pronunciation)

Post by RandallButh » June 5th, 2018, 2:46 am

What does 'non-modern' mean?
The question is not facetious because several pronunciation schemes are non-modern and non-greek. :o And for ancient, I might assume that you don't mean 5th century BC but are more interested in 1cBC-2cAD, especially land of Israel, East Med.
0 x

Jonathan Robie
Posts: 3468
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm
Location: Durham, NC
Contact:

Re: public domain audio recording of Matthew in ancient Greek (the non-modern pronunciation)

Post by Jonathan Robie » June 5th, 2018, 7:19 am

I think he is looking for Erasmian. For that, I guess John Swandt and Maurice Robinson are as good as any, and Robinson is free.

http://forum.focusyourmission.org/files/bg.html

There are really only a few people I know of who use Erasmian pronunciation and sound natural, with good prosody and attention to accents. Christophe Ricco, Stephen Hill stand out. Judging by his flashcards, Rogelio Toledo Martin, but I would need to hear him read text in context. I imagine there are more than I know, but I don't know of a recording of the Greek New Testament by any of these people.

The recordings I know that use Erasmian pronunciation just don't sound that great, they don't draw me into the text. The best recordings I have heard that are freely available use modern pronunciation or some form of restored pronunciation.

I think there's something to be said for using resources with more than one pronunciation and getting used to hear Greek read more than one way. That makes it easier to learn from people in multiple communities.
0 x
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
http://jonathanrobie.biblicalhumanities.org/

m_bauer
Posts: 13
Joined: May 28th, 2018, 11:28 am

Re: public domain audio recording of Matthew in ancient Greek (the non-modern pronunciation)

Post by m_bauer » June 6th, 2018, 6:47 am

Jonathan Robie wrote:
June 5th, 2018, 7:19 am
Robinson is free.
http://forum.focusyourmission.org/files/bg.html
Hi,
thank you very first much,
Jonathan Robie and M. Robinson,
for making this available here.

A note:
If this is free, in terms of free licence such as public domain, I got doubts, because in the other collection the entry M. Robinson is not updated to such. It says "demo here".
Just I wanted to email them http://www.letsreadgreek.com/resources/greekntaudio.htm
for notification, but could not find an address.
0 x

RandallButh
Posts: 967
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Re: public domain audio recording of Matthew in ancient Greek (the non-modern pronunciation)

Post by RandallButh » June 6th, 2018, 9:30 am

Would another person please listen to Matthew 5 and provide a second review?
(see the separate thread https://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek/forum/vi ... =16&t=3862
"I opened Matt 5 to get a sample listen.
My first reaction: unreliable and not recommendable for students.
Intonation is like a crossword puzzle, accents are incorrect, introduction to chapter in English, hestitations not according to sense and unrelated to content, and grating, non-Greek Erasmian. The reader is parroting syllables as he deciphers them, not understanding or thinking with the text being read, and pretty much blocking the listener from doing so.
Why would this be linked to the Greek Byzantine text family? Surely, the Greek Bible Society has something good that can be listened to.")


It is my view that the field of Greek studies, especially NewTestament, should not have this kind of reading as any kind of a standard. I am very sympathetic with a Byz Text approach, no problems there, and it is a great text for memory. But let's have students listen to a reading with correct accents and an intonation pattern that supports the information structure of the Greek. [[Imagine if English studies used a mis-read Chaucerian pronunciation for Shakespeare... We don't want a nait "knight" (obstensibly something like k-NICHT [κνιχτ] with Chaucer) read as kai-nai-GET for the Bard. Or trying to mimic an information structure out of sync with a text in modern English: What!--wood--weesey two thet? ("What would we say to that?")]] I would recommend reading through the 12-page PDF at biblicallanguagecenter.com for a discussion of various options with supporting documentation: https://www.biblicallanguagecenter.com/ ... unciation/.

The principle:
When a person learns a language for literature, they usually want to be able to read through or listen to a text at the speed of relaxed speech as a basic goal. We should help our students toward this goal. Pedagogically and rhetorically, readings should enhance communication. Sound alone is not magic, it can even be a detriment, but naturally flowing, comprehensible input works wonders for language learning and for literature appreciation.
0 x

Jonathan Robie
Posts: 3468
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm
Location: Durham, NC
Contact:

Re: public domain audio recording of Matthew in ancient Greek (the non-modern pronunciation)

Post by Jonathan Robie » June 6th, 2018, 11:39 am

RandallButh wrote:
June 6th, 2018, 9:30 am
Would another person please listen to Matthew 5 and provide a second review?
(see the separate thread https://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek/forum/vi ... =16&t=3862
"I opened Matt 5 to get a sample listen.
My first reaction: unreliable and not recommendable for students.
But is there a good free audio with Erasmian pronunciation? This is about as good as I can find:

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lb2HPeO00I[/youtube]

Are there better Erasmian recordings?

If someone like Cristophe Ricco or Stephen Hill created a free audio of the GNT, I could listen to it without pain. I haven't found an existing Erasmian recording that isn't painful to my ears. And I think it's simply a lot harder to have a natural prosody using Erasmian pronunciation.
RandallButh wrote:
June 6th, 2018, 9:30 am
Surely, the Greek Bible Society has something good that can be listened to.")
Absolutely, the Vavilis recordings are the ones I listen to most, freely available together with the text on Bible.is. I would love to have a good alternative at a slower, more relaxed pace - and there are some good recordings like this on Youtube.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHSlJPA06QQ[/youtube]

So if you are open to using Youtube, this is one good choice.
RandallButh wrote:
June 6th, 2018, 9:30 am
The principle:
When a person learns a language for literature, they usually want to be able to read through or listen to a text at the speed of relaxed speech as a basic goal. We should help our students toward this goal. Pedagogically and rhetorically, readings should enhance communication. Sound alone is not magic, it can even be a detriment, but naturally flowing, comprehensible input works wonders for language learning and for literature appreciation.
I agree. But if you want a free audio, I think that tends to steer you toward recordings that use modern pronunciation, using restored pronunciation for learning.
0 x
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
http://jonathanrobie.biblicalhumanities.org/

RandallButh
Posts: 967
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Re: public domain audio recording of Matthew in ancient Greek (the non-modern pronunciation)

Post by RandallButh » June 6th, 2018, 12:02 pm

But is there a good free audio with Erasmian pronunciation? This is about as good as I can find
Not everything that is free should be used.
0 x

Jonathan Robie
Posts: 3468
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm
Location: Durham, NC
Contact:

Re: public domain audio recording of Matthew in ancient Greek (the non-modern pronunciation)

Post by Jonathan Robie » June 6th, 2018, 12:12 pm

RandallButh wrote:
June 6th, 2018, 12:02 pm
But is there a good free audio with Erasmian pronunciation? This is about as good as I can find
Not everything that is free should be used.
OK, is there any really good audio recording with Erasmian pronunciation? I haven't explored the non-free recordings. How is, say, John Schwandt?
0 x
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
http://jonathanrobie.biblicalhumanities.org/

RandallButh
Posts: 967
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Re: public domain audio recording of Matthew in ancient Greek (the non-modern pronunciation)

Post by RandallButh » June 6th, 2018, 4:39 pm

I've never understood the obsession with Erasmian. Why do people go out of their way to get things wrong? This isn't a close call, as they say.
You would think that people going to the trouble of reading the original texts would want some kind of feel for what the speakers and audience were experiencing, not to mention a better facility in reading ancient papyri and NT manuscripts.
0 x

Jonathan Robie
Posts: 3468
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm
Location: Durham, NC
Contact:

Re: public domain audio recording of Matthew in ancient Greek (the non-modern pronunciation)

Post by Jonathan Robie » June 6th, 2018, 4:49 pm

RandallButh wrote:
June 6th, 2018, 4:39 pm
I've never understood the obsession with Erasmian. Why do people go out of their way to get things wrong? This isn't a close call, as they say.
Well, if that's what your teacher insists on, it makes sense. I just don't know good GNT audio recordings with Erasmian.

There are people who prefer Erasmian and could produce them. They would be used more if they were freely available and free. Hint hint hint ...
0 x
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
http://jonathanrobie.biblicalhumanities.org/

Post Reply