2 Esdras 4

Forum rules
Please quote the Greek text you are discussing directly in your post if it is reasonably short - do not ask people to look it up. This is not a beginner's forum, competence in Greek is assumed.
Post Reply
Stephen Nelson
Posts: 39
Joined: April 28th, 2019, 1:51 pm
Contact:

2 Esdras 4

Post by Stephen Nelson » November 21st, 2019, 12:24 pm

I'm trying to find the Greek vorlage for this translation of 2 Esdras 4 that mentions the angel Uriel:

https://www.biblestudytools.com/gnta/2-esdras/4.html

This doesn't correspond with Nehemiah 4:1 - https://www.blueletterbible.org/kjv/neh ... onc_417001
0 x



Ken M. Penner
Posts: 785
Joined: May 12th, 2011, 7:50 am
Location: Antigonish, NS, Canada
Contact:

Re: 2 Esdras 4

Post by Ken M. Penner » November 21st, 2019, 2:34 pm

That part is translated from Latin; it didn't survive in Greek or Hebrew.
2 x
Ken M. Penner
St. Francis Xavier University

Barry Hofstetter
Posts: 1621
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:48 pm

Re: 2 Esdras 4

Post by Barry Hofstetter » November 21st, 2019, 3:31 pm

Stephen Nelson wrote:
November 21st, 2019, 12:24 pm
I'm trying to find the Greek vorlage for this translation of 2 Esdras 4 that mentions the angel Uriel:

https://www.biblestudytools.com/gnta/2-esdras/4.html

This doesn't correspond with Nehemiah 4:1 - https://www.blueletterbible.org/kjv/neh ... onc_417001
This might help to orient you:

https://pseudepigrapha.org/docs/intro/4Ezra
4 Ezra was originally composed as a pseudepigraphal Jewish apocalypse, most likely in Hebrew, at some point after 70 CE (see discussion below).

The original Hebrew version, which is now lost, was translated into Greek. The Greek version, which survives only in fragmentary quotations and paraphrases by later Christian authors, was translated into Latin, Syriac, Ethiopic, Georgian, Arabic, Armenian and Coptic. Additional translations from the Latin and Syriac versions also exist (Stone, 4 Ezra, 2). The apocalypse takes the name, 4 Ezra, from the Latin version, which was labeled 4 Esdras to distinguish it from 1 Esdras (=Ezra), 2 Esdras (=Nehemiah), and 3 Esdras (the apocryphal book now normally designated 1 Esdras). To make matters more complicated, 4 Ezra is often called 2 Esdras by modern English translations, such as the KJV, RSV and NRSV, that adopt the traditional Hebrew names for Ezra and Nehemiah and include the apocryphal book of 1 Esdras. The Latin version included as an appendix to the Vulgate was transformed into a Christian text by the addition of an introduction (chapters 1-2) and conclusion (chapters 15-16), commonly designated 5th and 6th Ezra by modern scholars. Most modern English translations follow the Vulgate in printing the Christian 5th and 6th Ezra along with the Jewish apocalypse of 4 Ezra. As a result, the chapter and verse numbering of the apocalypse begin at chapter 3 verse 1.
2 x
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
Instructor of Latin
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
Χαίρετε ἐν κυρίῳ πάντοτε· πάλιν ἐρῶ, χαίρετε

Post Reply

Return to “Septuagint and Pseudepigrapha”