Isaiah 9 in LXX -- repsonse to Carl

From: Edward Hobbs (
Date: Mon Mar 31 1997 - 16:50:10 EST

From: LUCY::EHOBBS "Edward Hobbs" 31-MAR-1997 16:48:37.86
To: IN%""
Subj: RE: Isaiah 9:1 (LXX)

Carl, and B-Greek colleagues:

Thanks, Carl, for explaining my (too brief?) reply to Timothy Dickens.

When I wrote
>>--KATHGAGES is plain garden variety 2s, 1 aorist, of KATAGW.
I slipped in my typing--I started to type "2 aorist" then realized that
Tim's confusion was about the person/number of a finite verb, so I
backspaced over "aorist" and typed "s" instead; then meant to say that it
was indeed an aorist, and typed in "1" thoughtlessly. Carl is right; like
any second-semester student, I know a second aorist when I see one--ut I
goofed in typing--as I did in creating the word "drakness". When I see
errors in my typing, I can't go back to any previous line (alas for this
still-primitive pseudo-editor---but I get it free!), so I just leave them.
I can't even go back to look at earlier parts of my message.

Carl wrote, most kindly:

Edward goofed; he knows perfectly well that it's a second aorist; he was
probably just thinking "garden variety aorist." You will catch ME making
that sort of error much more often than you will catch him.
        [That last sentence of Carl's proves that he can play
         a little loosely with the truth at times!]

As a personal kindness, may I ask that unwanted nicknames not be applied to
me. I sign my messages as Carl referred to me-- "Edward" is my name, and
I have never used any other. There are some Edwards who call themselves
"Ned" but I do not; some who call themselves "Ted" but I do not; some who
call themselves "Ed" but I do not. A colleague of mine used to answer
students who tried addressing him by a nickname, "My first name is
Professor." Mine is "Edward."

Edward Hobbs

(who after teaching for decades at Un. of Chicago, S.M.U., Un. of California
/Berkeley, /San Francisco, and /Davis, Claremont, G.T.U., and Harvard
University, is very happy to unwind by teaching New Testament and Greek to
very bright students who have already read Plato, Sophocles, Euripedes,
and Homer, at the most beautiful campus in the country: Wellesley)

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.1.4 : Sat Apr 20 2002 - 15:38:11 EDT