Re: Definite noun with anarthous attribute

From: Kimmo Huovila (kimmo.huovila@helsinki.fi)
Date: Sun Mar 05 2000 - 14:59:17 EST


<x-charset iso-8859-1>"Carl W. Conrad" wrote:

> I would like first of all to be sure that there are any instances "of the
> type hO ANHR AGAQOS" where the adjective is NOT predicative, i.e. "The man
> is competent."

Robertson's grammar says that in such cases it can be either predicate
(=predicative) or attributive (eg. p. 782, 784). According to him, only
the context can decide. He gives as examples of attributive use (p. 782,
783) Luke 16:10 hO PISTOS EN ELACISTW, 1 Tim 6:17 TOIS PLOUSIOIS EN TWi
NUN AIWNI, Eph 2:11 TA EQNH EN SARKI, and a whole lot of other examples
with a prepositional phrase. (In my question I included adjectives,
prepositional phrases and adverbs.)

Attic Greek Prose Syntax (by Cooper, Kruger) 50.9.6 says "The type hO
AGAQOS ANHR MARAQWNI is a manner much practised in Tragedy, but rarely
found in Attic prose except when the attribute is formulaic with the
substantive involved and in enumerations." This is under a title
"Attributive Positions with Two Attributes or More".

So, based on these two grammars (that give some examples) there are some
examples of this construction. I am not at all sure that we have any
examples with specifically adjectives.

Basically I am interested in getting some idea about how much weight can
we give to the anatrhous form indicating the predicative position
(apparently much more with adjectives, possibly as an absolute rule, but
less with other attributes).

Kimmo

---
B-Greek home page: http://sunsite.unc.edu/bgreek
You are currently subscribed to b-greek as: [cwconrad@artsci.wustl.edu]
To unsubscribe, forward this message to leave-b-greek-329W@franklin.oit.unc.edu
To subscribe, send a message to subscribe-b-greek@franklin.oit.unc.edu

</x-charset>



This archive was generated by hypermail 2.1.4 : Sat Apr 20 2002 - 15:41:01 EDT