Skip to content


Browse Items (13 total)

On this site, you will find general information and a collection of further reading about the Chernobyl disaster and its aftermath. This page is a long-term project of Dr. Sarah Phillips and her anthropology seminar class on Chernobyl at Indiana…

The purpose of the Association for Africanist Anthropology (AFAA) shall be to stimulate, strengthen, and advance anthropology by promoting the study of Africa, as well as Africanist scholarship and the professional interests of Africanist…

The Center for Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill is a recent initiative bringing together university-based researchers/activists with community-based leaders to collaborate on producing knowledge…

A Laboratory of Hope: The Social Movement Working Group at UNC-CH The SMWG is a research-action project based at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. We seek to understand and re-envision social movements. Many of us work within activist…

Finding the Celtic is an experiment to create an online digital humanities collaboratory for Celtic Studies funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. It will enable users to locate, access, and annotate resources for Celtic Studies, to…

An extensive look into the culture of one of Humanity's oldest continuous civilizations. There is always a symbolic meaning behind almost everything in the daily life of the China.

An Interactive Online Database of Artifacts at the Research Laboratories of Archaeology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The Southern Funding Collaborative (SFC) special initiative to promote community organizing is financially supported by The Southern Partners Fund, Fund for Southern Communities, and Appalachian Community Fund. The SFC assists organizations seeking…

Electronic monograph (published by UNC Press) that describes the history and archaeology of Occaneechi Town, an Indian village near present-day Hillsborough, North Carolina, that was visited by explorer John Lawson in 1702.