Timeline

1950s

  • 1951: Dr. W. M. Whyburn began planning for a University high-speed computer
  • 1955: Bureau of the Census expressed interest in cooperating on the University's efforts to secure a large computer
  • 1957: Proposals: Sperry-Rand for a 1103-A and IBM for a modified 701
  • 1957: An addition to Phillips Hall has been authorized
  • 1959: The Psychometric Laboratory had an LGP-30 computer
  • February 1, 1959: Dr. John W. Carr III begins as first Director of UNC Computation Center
  • Spring Semester, 1959: Dr. Carr teaches first programming course at UNC using the IBM 650 at North Carolina State University (card decks driven to Raleigh once a week)
  • August 1959: Univac 1105 installed in the basement of Phillips Hall — photos

1960s

  • March 30, 1960: Dedication of the Computation Center — see Dedication Program
  • January 1965: Payroll put on Univac
  • Summer 1965: Triangle Universities Computation Center (TUCC) formed
  • February 1966: IBM 360/30 replaced Univac 1105
  • April 1966: IBM 360/40 at TUCC
  • September 1966: IBM 360/75 installed at TUCC and 360/30 connected
  • August 1967: IBM 360/40 replaced 360/30 at Computation Center
  • Summer 1967: Separate Administrative Data Processing group
  • October 1967: RCA Spectra 70/35 installed at ADP
  • 1967: NC Memorial Hospital connects IBM 2780 to TUCC
  • September 1968: J.W. Hanson resigned as Computation Center Director, Paul Oliver became the new Director
  • September 1968: Vol. 1, No. 1 Computation Center Newsletter
  • October 1969: RCA Spectra 70/46 replaced 70/35 at ADP

1970s

  • 1970: RCA Spectra 70/45 installed at NC Memorial Hospital
  • January 1970: Paul Oliver resigned as Computation Center Director, James J. Batter became the new Director
  • September 1970: IBM 360/50 replaced 360/40 at Computation Center
  • September 1971: IBM 370/165 replaced 360/75 at TUCC, and TUCC's 360/75 replaced 360/50 at Computation Center
  • October 1972: Univac Series 70/7 (Ex-RCA) replaced 70/46 at ADP
  • November 15, 1973: CALL-OS, interactive time-sharing system, available at UNC, accessible from teletypes
  • March 1974: Terminal rooms with clusters of Model 38 Teletypes opened in Connor and James residence halls providing students access to remote batch, CPS, TSO, and CALL-OS
  • October 1974: Morrison terminal room open
  • January 1975: Bibliographic search system available for chem abstracts, engineering index, and psychological abstracts
  • March 1975: Craige terminal cluster open
  • Fall 1975: Honeywell 66/40 replaced 70/45 at NC Memorial Hospital
  • Spring 1976: Computation Center adds an IBM 370/155 II
  • March 1976: Danziger's History of Data Processing 1930's - 1976 [Page 1 of 2] [Page 2 of 2]
  • November 1976: Some staff move from Phillips Hall to new space in the NCNB building on Franklin Street
  • March 1977: A second IBM 370/165 is in use at TUCC
  • January 1978: Diablo model 1620 replaced IBM 2741 in the terminal room -- excellent print quality, recommended for printing final copy
  • August 1978: Terminal facility open at Ehringhaus
  • January 1979: Distributed Computing Services group formed to support interactive services and decentralized computing
  • January 1979: Operating system for IBM computers moving from MVT to MVS
  • January 1979: Move staff, the Programming Services group, moved to NCNB
  • March 1979: Microcomputers: The North Carolina Educational Computer Services, a division of UNC General Administration, held a meeting of those interested in educational and research uses of microcomputers
  • November 1979: Amdahl 470 V/7 installed at TUCC
  • November 1979: Terminal cluster in Carroll Hall
  • November 1979: Computation Center report on word processing equipment

1980s

  • September 1981: CALL-OS to be replaced by OBS WYLBUR
  • September 1981: APPLE II Plus microcomputers installed in the new UNCCC Microcomputer Laboratory in 28 Phillips Hall, some reserved for Computer Science COMP 14 students
  • September 1981: Three microcomputers on state contract: Texas Instruments 99/44A, TRS-80 Model III, and Apple II Plus
  • September 1981: Interface from UNCCC computers to Printing and Duplicating's Compugraphic EditWriter 7700 phototypesetter for SCRIPT users. Also spell checker and text entry through OCR
  • December 1981: IBM 3081 to replace IBM 165 and Amdahl 470 V8 at TUCC
  • August 1982: UNC Division of Student Affairs provides six machines for use of the visually handicapped in room 32 Phillips Hall
  • January 1983: UNCCC Memos (documentation) online at TUCC, and Newsbrief online
  • February 1983: Seminar on networking communications: the coaxial cable communications on campus, presented by Dr. William Huffines of Pathology; the microwave network to TUCC (through Duke), presented by Vernon Chi of Computer Science; and national data-sharing networks, presented by John Stephenson of TUCC. The proposed coaxial cable network, which will allow a microcomputer or minicomputer within one department to interact with other computers on campus, will start with four buildings: Phillips Hall, Peabody, Bennett, and Preclinic Building in the Medical School/Hospital complex
  • February 1983: Replaced 16-year old IBM 360/75 with an IBM 4341-L1. See the photos
  • March 1983: Jim Kitchen became Acting Director of the Computation Center replacing James J. Batter
  • March 1983: Dial-in communications to UNCCC operate at 300 baud and 1200 baud
  • April 1983: Replaced 7-year old IBM 370/155 with an IBM 4341-M11, now operating two 4341s
  • April 1983: Organizational meeting for IBM Personal Computer (PC) User Group
  • Spring 1983: Seminar series on parallel computing systems, at TUCC
  • May 28, 1983: "Report of the Provost's Committee on the Study of Computing Resources and Services Devoted to Instruction and Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill," commonly known as the Garner Report, recommends that planning begin for a regional large-scale computing capability to be installed at TUCC.
  • June 1983: Microcomputers on State Contract: Apple IIe and III, Atari 800 and 1200XL, Franklin Ace 1000 and 1200, Radio Shack I, II, III, and 12, Texas Instruments 99/4a, DEC Professional, IBM PC
  • June 1983: Replaced IBM 4341-L1 with an IBM 4341-M2
  • July 1983: MVS operating system available for testing at UNCCC
  • September 1983: BITNET: Because It's There. Article in UNCCC Newsletter Volume 16, Number 1 -- TUCC connecting to nearest member, Virginia Polytechnic Institute in Blacksburg, Virginia.
  • September 1983: "TUCC's Role in the Microcomputer Explosion" article in UNCCC Newsletter Volume 16, Number 1 discusses what was happening at Duke, UNC, NCSU, and the North Carolina Educational Computing Service (NCECS).
  • September 29, 1983: User Meeting, summary in Newsbrief #92 includes "The major topic of the September 29 user meeting was the University's need for a 'truly interactive' computing service as expressed in the 'Report of the Provost's Committee on the Study of Computing Resources and Services Devoted to Instruction and Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.' The users expressed a need to be able to run programs interactively, particularly Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) program..."
  • January 1984: SAS82.3 replaced SAS79.6
  • January 1984: MVS replaced MVT as the operating system at UNCCC.
  • January 1984: Electronic mail service, UNIX news/mail, available through North Carolina Educational Computing Service
  • March 1984: FPS-164 attached array processor installed at TUCC, access to a Control Data CYBER-205 through TUCC, TUCC's 3081 upgraded from Model D to Model K
  • April 1984: IBM Corporation grant to the college of Arts and Sciences to conduct a computer-aided curriculum program (3-year grant valued at $750,000, 53 IBM personal computers, supporting equipment and software, and funds to develop instructional materials)
  • April 1984: Data Collection at IRSS on the Data General
  • July 1984: Seven-track tape drive at TUCC removed
  • July 1984: Converting 3330 disk to 3350
  • July 30, 1984: IBM 4381 P2 replaced IBM 4341 M2 and 4341 M11
  • August 29-30, 1984: UNCCC 25th Anniversary Celebration
  • September 1984: T1 line replaced existing communication lines to TUCC
  • October 1984: 10 IBM PCs installed in microlab (with 32 Apple IIs)
  • October 22, 1984: First meeting Macintosh Users Group
  • November 1984: Three PCs in the microcomputer lab now communicate with the mainframes at UNCCC and TUCC
  • January 1985: TUCC has email (BITNET), UNCCC is looking at it
  • January 1985: Electronic class rolls available
  • January 1985: Supercomputing at TUCC — an FPS-164 scientific computer attached to the IBM mainframe and access (via a 9600 baud line) to a Control Data Corporation CYBER 205 at Colorado State University
  • February 1985: One Apple Macintosh (512K of memory) acquired for PC lab
  • March 1985: Dr. John H. Harrison appointed Associate Provost with responsibilities in the computer and biotechnology areas
  • March 1985: SAS unveils PC software, for IBM PC XT and PC AT with at least 512K memory
  • March 1985: Report to the Provost on Interactive Services and Computer Networking at UNC-CH
  • March 1985: Colloquia on uses of microcomputers in higher education
  • March 1985: First meeting, electronic mail task force (currently UCLA/Mail and BITNET systems at TUCC)
  • April 1985: Microcomputer consulting services available in the Ram Shop of Student Stores
  • May 1985: Office Systems Service Center, offers repair service for University microcomputer equipment, B-12 Venable Hall
  • May 1985: Four IBM PCs in the UNCCC Microcomputer Lab are now equipped to use a Microsoft Mouse
  • June 1985: Work continues on campus broadband cable services
  • July 1985: Faculty members may apply to borrow an IBM PC from the Resource Center for Instructional Computing
  • July 1985: Handicapped Student Services provides equipment for visually handicapped students
  • July 1985: Terminal clusters installed in Parker and Spencer dormitories. Granville Towers provides residents with fourteen Televideo 910 terminals and two IBM PCs
  • August 1985: Microcomputing Support Center formed
  • August 1985: Computer labs in Phillips, Undergrad library, Cobb, Conner, Craige, Ehringhaus, Hinton-James, Morrison, Parker, and Spencer
  • September 1985: Second computer fair
  • September 1985: Telecommunications Advisory Committee formed
  • September 1985: Large screen projection for classrooms
  • September 1985: MAIL system from UCLA runs under WYLBUR at UNCCC and TSO at TUCC, documentation is "Communicating with Electronic Mail," GI-089
  • October 1985: SAS/GRAPH is available, with plotting using a Calcomp 1051 4-pen plotter
  • October 1985: Microcomputing Support Center maintains a library of PC software available for review by the UNC community
  • December 1985: Electronic mail used in the classroom (Masters degree program in the School of Library Science
  • December 1985: The VAX computer in the School of Public Health is part of BITNET - node UNCSPHVX
  • December 1985: Bulletin board discussions via email
  • January 1986: Remote access to the online catalog at UNC is available. Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN) allows online searches of Duke, NCSU and UNC-Chapel Hill libraries.
  • January 1986: Draft documentation available for using Interactive System Productivity Facility (ISPF) full-screen services, including using line-by-line terminals emulating full-screen terminals through an IBM 7171
  • January 1986: Dissertation style sheet available for Microsoft Word
  • January 1986: Erwin M. Danziger presented the 1985 CAUSE Recognition Award
  • January 1986: UNCCC Newsbrief goes online
  • January 1986: Conversational Monitoring System (CMS) available at TUCC under the VM (Virtual Machine) operating system, includes the SCRIPT text formatter from the University of Waterloo along with PL/I, FORTRAN, Pascal, C, and APL programming languages
  • February 1986: UNC Center for Public Television offers "The New Literacy: An Introduction to Computers"
  • February 1986: TSO available at UNCCC
  • February 1986: Data Facility Hierarchical Storage Manager (DFHSM) migrates unused disk data to compressed format (level 1) and to tape (level 2)
  • March 1986: Resource Access Control Facility (RACF) replaces password protection for computer resources
  • March 1986: Free email accounts are available for all faculty, staff, and students
  • March 1986: Computer Based Training (CBT) available for beginning SAS users
  • March 1986: Short course: "Introduction to Data Communications with UNCCC and TUCC"
  • April 1986: Anne Parker is appointed director of the Microcomputing Support Center
  • April 1986: Dialup access to search online catalog
  • May 1986: SAS World Map available with SAS/GRAPH at UNCCC
  • May 1986: QMS 2400 laser printer available for use, resolution of 300 dots per inch
  • May 1986: AT&T reduces price of PCs, for example, 3703-060, 20MB H.D.-512K, $1785
  • July 1986: Dr. William M. Groves appointed director of the UNC Computation Center
  • July 1986: Removal of burster and decollator
  • September 1986: SAS available for PCs, the University has a site license
  • October 1986: CompuFest '86, October 2, 3, and 4
  • October 1986: The last keypunch machines are removed from Phillips Hall
  • November 1986: TUCC's IBM 3081K upgraded from 24 meg to 32 meg
  • November 1986: Online documentation, especially for email
  • December 1986: Microcomputing Support Center moves from Davis Library to 4th floor Hanes Hall
  • December 1986: Last card reader removed
  • February 1987: 2400 bps dial-up access to campus is available (most access is 1200 bps, some 300bps)
  • March 1987: Satellite videoconference on supercomputing
  • March 1987: Hypertext software, GLOSSA and GUIDE, demonstrated at a Microcomputing Support Center luncheon colloquium
  • March 1987: UNC Computation Center has a DEC VAX 11/780 running VMS on eight megabytes of memory with three 120 meg disk drives
  • March 1987: Email addresses are included in the University telephone book
  • March 1987: Davis Library is offering the opportunity for library users to do their own database searches
  • March 1987: Modern Language Association has set up an email address on BITNET
  • April 1987: A document describes access to remote computers through Internet, a loose confederation of interconnected networks
  • April 1987: Classroom Technologies Service Center is a new service unit, Kathryn Conway director, reporting to Associate Provost John Harrison
  • April 1987: Electronic mail directory available under UNC TSO
  • May 1987: A few Master classrooms are equipped with microcomputers and projection units
  • May 1987: A new journal, Academic Computing, is dedicated to technology and higher education
  • June 1987: UNCCC Newsbrief production changes from preparation on the mainframe, formatting with University of Waterloo SCRIPT, and transmission to Printing and Duplicating's Compugraphic Typesetter to final editing on a Macintosh, layout using Aldus Pagemaker, and printing on an Apple LaserWriter
  • June 1987: Newsbrief #264, page 2, Newsbrief History describes the evolution of Newsbrief from the first newsletter
  • June 1987: Computation Center becomes Academic Computing Services (ACS)
  • July 1987: UNC Computation Center becomes Academic Computing Services
  • September 1987: CompuFest '87, September 17, 18, and 19, Student Union
  • September 1987: The UNC link to MCNC's Communications Network begins its fifth year of operation, sharing classes with Duke, NC State, UNC-Charlotte, and NC A&T in Greensboro
  • September 1987: Sitterson Hall dedication — see Newsbrief article
  • January 1988: Dr. Joseph Janis joined Academic Computing Services as Assistant Director
  • February 1988: Documentation available on accessing supercomputing
  • February 1988: Facsimile (FAX) service offered at Academic Computing Services
  • March 1988: Two master classrooms on campus are connected to the Sytek network on the campus broadband cable and are capable of sending and receiving video and data transmissions — they have access to the mainframe computers at ACS and TUCC, the Triangle Universities Library Network, and the Internet.
  • April 1988: Convex C210, upgraded in August to C220, dual processor supercomputer, with both parallel and vector processing capabilities, installed at Academic Computing Services
  • April 1988: Molecular Modeling Lab christened by NC Governor James G. Martin, UNC School of Pharmacy
  • May 1988: A campus information system, called "Info," is being developed on the Academic Computing Service's DEC VAX 780 using VTX software
  • May 1988: Presentation: a technical orientation to the IBM Personal System/2
  • May 1988: Automatic email forwarding available
  • May 1988: Trojans, worms, and viruses exist. A Christmas greeting was mailed to everyone in the address book of each participant. A program being circulated draws a picture of a turkey while destroying files.
  • June 1988: 4381 model 23 with 32 meg replaced 4381 model 2 with 16 meg
  • August 1988: Convex C220 replaces C210
  • August 1988: Campus information system INFO announced (using VTX on VAX)
  • August 1988: 4381 model 24 with two processors and 48 meg replaced model 23
  • September 1988: CompuFest '88, September 29, 30, October 1. Special interest group started for campus computer support personnel
  • September 1988: The Office of Research Services is placing requests for applications and requests for proposals into the News section of INFO
  • October 1988: Cray Y-MP/432 supercomputer selected for the North Carolina Supercomputer Center and design plans for its building in Research Triangle Park approved
  • November 1988: Listserver ready for use
  • November 1988: NeXT demonstration (a high performance computing workstation designed for higher education)
  • November 1988: VAX 6220 with two processors and 64 meg replaces 11/780 (five times faster)
  • November 1988: All TUCC services to end by June 30, 1990
  • November 1988: Independent Study Catalog in INFO
  • December 1988: Campus faculty and staff directory online in INFO
  • December 1988: Everyone on campus has an email userid. Mail sent to an assigned userid is printed and delivered to the recipient's office
  • January 1989: VM (Virtual Machine) and CMS (Conversational Monitoring System) available at Academic Computing Services
  • January 1989: Documentation is online
  • February 1989: Student directory in INFO
  • April 1989: Student organizations in INFO
  • April 1989: Office of Data and Video Communications (ODVC) formed, directed by Norman Vogel
  • April 1989: INFO accesses information on the DEC computer at North Carolina State University via DECNET
  • May 1989: Printing of Newsbrief suspended due to budget cuts. Distribution is through INFO and an email list
  • May 1989: Job openings now in INFO
  • May 1989: The new Visitors Center in Morehead Planetarium includes an INFO terminal
  • May 1989: VAX 6330 with three processors replaced 6220
  • May 1989: Conference for computer support staff across campus
  • May 1989: INFO can be accessed from public terminals, from DEC computers on campus, and through the Internet via telnet to uncvx1.acs.unc.edu
  • June 1989: Files can be sent from one computer to another using a variety of commands depending on the network, BITNET, DECNET, Internet
  • June-July 1989: Fred Palmdahl, Operations Manager of Academic Computing Services, and Rayvon Sturdivant, Office of Data and Video Communications, both have 30 years service with ACS.
  • July 1989: 16 meg added to 4381 for a total of 64 meg
  • August 1989: Test version of JMP graphics software for Macintosh computers is available from SAS
  • September 1989: Associate Provost John Harrison IV resigned
  • October 1989: CompuFest '89, October 12-14, Carolina Union
  • October 1989: 9600 bps dial-in service available
  • November 1989: UNC policy on software piracy issued
  • Fall 1989: Cray YMP/432 to NC Supercomputing Center
  • December-January 1989: Major upgrades in ACS systems: IBM 3090-170J processor with 64 MB of central storage and 64 MB of expanded storage and a vector processor, upgrade to Convex 240, a STK Tape Robotics System, and enhanced cooling systems

1990s

  • March 1990: "Exploring the Internet" presentation by Paul Jones (ACS) sponsored by the Office of Information Systems (OIS)
  • March 1990: Reception at the Carolina Inn sponsored by Convex, DEC, IBM, and Storage Technology to celebrate the renovation and expansion of ACS's computing facilities and to mark ACS's thirtieth anniversary
  • March 1990: Video "Computing at Carolina 1960-1990" was made for the 30th anniversary celebration. There's a description of this video in a Newsbrief article.
  • March 1990: Chapel Hill Transit Guide and student part-time jobs are in INFO
  • March 1990: BITNET usage guidelines published
  • April 1990: Computer Science Department installed a MasPar MP-1 parallel computer, the first MasPar machine to be installed at a University
  • April 1990: "Creating Animation Using MacroMind Director" presentation by Larry Harris, mathematics instructor and Microcomputing Support Center trainer
  • April 1990: Newsbrief now distributed in PostScript format
  • April 1990: The Institute for Academic Technology (IAT), operated by UNC-Chapel Hill and supported by IBM, focuses on academic tools
  • June 1990: North Carolina Supercomputing Center dedicated
  • June 30, 1990: Triangle Universities Computation Center (TUCC) closed
  • July 1990: Compuserve/Internet gateway available
  • July 1990: Demonstration of hypermedia applications created with Asymetrix's Toolbox, MS-DOS software comparable to HyperCard for the Macintosh
  • August 1990: Jim Gogan, Office of Data and Video Communications, presented a plan for wiring the entire campus for data and video communications
  • August 1990: Workshop sponsored by the Microelectronics Center of North Carolina (MCNC) and NSF provides insights into Internet
  • September 1990: Netnews (also known as Usenet News and Internet News), available on campus computers, includes over 900 discussion groups
  • September 1990: The Internet Resource Guide, compiled by the National Science Foundation (NSF), is available
  • September 1990: CompuFest '90, September 27-28
  • September 1990: The North Carolina Supercomputing Center is conducting seminars broadcast on CONCERT (Communications for North Carolina Education, Research, and Technology), the statewide teleconferencing communications network
  • October 1990: The Institute for Research in Social Science (IRSS) has developed an electronic retrieval system for its public opinion archives, including the Louis Harris public opinion data
  • October 1990: Newsbrief #433 defines terms like flame and snail mail, abbreviations (like IMHO), and emoticons (like ;-) ). Copyright, software piracy, computer ethics, computer viruses, ergonomics, and tips for keeping your computer running are addressed by 1990. Email lists are becoming very popular.
  • November 1990: Vital statistics data (births, deaths, marriages), in North Carolina, 1968 to 1989 are available on the ACS MVS operating system.
  • November 1990: The North Carolina Supercomputing Center plans a statewide high school competition to bring the world of supercomputing and computational science to every high school in the state — "SuperQuest: the North Carolina Connection"
  • November 1990: Data provided by the University of North Carolina at Greensboro can now be accessed through INFO.
  • November 1990: A computer graphics lab, with 16 networked Macintosh 1Icx computers with expanded memory and graphics capability is operational and integrated into courses offered through the Department of Geography
  • November 1990: William H. Graves is appointed Associate Provost for Information Technology
  • November 1990: At a UNC-Chapel Hill Computer Support Conference, Steven Weiss, Professor of Computer Science, discussed new and recent computer applications including Caroline (computerized telephone class registration), the financial reporting system, online business manual, electronic grade reports, electronic grant submission forms, and email.
  • December 1990: Bulletin Board Systems (BBSs) are accessible from campus VAX computers on the Internet. These include the University of North Carolina BBS, TELNET SAMBA.ACS.UNC.EDU, and the Cleveland Free-Net BBS, TELNET FREENET-IN-A.CWRU.EDU.
  • December 1990: UNC Wilmington data is now accessible through INFO
  • March 1991: ACS becomes part of Office of Information Technology (OIT)
  • April 1991: Tape robotics system on IBM (MVS)
  • May 1991: TCP/IP available on MVS
  • May 1991: WAIS document searching in test
  • September 1991: Ehringhaus computer cluster opens
  • September 1991: Portable workstation for testing: 17 lbs 20MHz
  • October 1991: Sun unveils multiprocessing servers
  • December 1991: Extended Bulletin Board Service (BBS) available
  • April 1992: Conference on distance learning (at NCSU)
  • May 1992: MS Windows on lab machines
  • May 1992: Email aliases available
  • June 1992: SunSITE agreement, ftp repository
  • July 1992: UNC library system offers UnCover, a database of tables of contents for thousands of periodicals
  • September 1992: Campus directory searchable
  • October 28, 1992: Sun Microsystems Computer Corporation and the Office of Information Technology announced the establishment of SunSITE, an interactive information repository for members of the education and research world. SunSITE, sunsite.unc.edu, is based on anonymous ftp
  • Fall 1992: OIT operates an IBM 3090-J running MVS/ESA and VM/XA operating systems, a DEC VAX 6620 running the VMS operating system, and a CONVEX C240 running the UNIX-based ConvexOS operating system
  • Fall 1992: Campus phone directories searchable online using WAIS
  • December 1992: BBS becomes LaUNCpad
  • January 1993: SunSITE has web server
  • January 1993: One millionth micro lab user signed in
  • February 1993: USA Today available via new readers
  • April 1993: Internet courses offered
  • May 1993: Info available through Gopher
  • July 1993: List of email lists available on SunSITE
  • Summer 1993: Email moved from BITNET to Internet
  • August 9, 1993: UNC-Chapel Hill ceased being a member of the BITNET network for electronic mail; the Internet not only handles email, but also file transfers (FTP) and remote logins to other computers (TELNET)
  • Fall 1993: Article in the OIT Review on Gopher
  • Fall 1993: INFO is available in Gopher on the OIT Convex (gopher gibbs.oit.unc.edu or telnet gibbs.oit.unc.edu and login as info), as well as the VTX implementation on the OIT DEC VAX. The Gopher version of INFO is available from the laUNCpad Bulletin Board Service and from the SunSITE Gopher
  • December 1993: Library has gopher server
  • July 1994: Microcomputing and mainframe help desks combined and moved to Wilson Library
  • October 1994: Daily Tar Heel on the web
  • November 1994: Journalism school to offer cyberpublishing and cybercasting course
  • December 1994: INFO moved to the web
  • December 1994: IBM gives $1 million in computer equipment
  • February 1995: OIT begins site licensing
  • Spring/Summer 1995: OIT migration to UNIX begins
  • June 1996: OIT becomes Academic Technology and Networks (ATN)
  • August 1996: First RESNET connection
  • September 1996: The Fifth Estate debuts
  • March 1997: Internet 2 initiative
  • May 1997: Metalab receives grant
  • July 1997: Marian Moore comes to ITS
  • January 1998: ResNet opens on South Campus
  • February 1998: Carolina Computing Initiative (CCI)