Title graphic

PART II
SHIP'S HISTORIES

CGC BIBB

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING
The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Bibb was built at the Navy Yard, Charleston, S.C. and launched in 1937, being commissioned the same year. The ship is 327 feet in length, with a draft of 12½ feet, and has a normal crew of 16 officers and 107 enlisted men. Her propelling plant consists of geared turbines supplied with steam from oil fired boilers and driving twin screws.

ACTIVITIES 1938-1941
The first assignment of the Bibb after her commissioning was to the Fifth Coast Guard District, with Norfolk as her home port. In 1938 the ship made a special practice cruise with cadets from the Coast Guard Academy, and in 1939 spent about three months on temporary duty with the Navy, engaging in joint maneuvers. Later that year the Bibb joined a destroyer squadron for the assistance of shipping in the North Atlantic. In the winter of 1939 she was part of the Grand Banks Patrol. In February 1940, the Bibb inaugurated the Atlantic Weather Patrol, taking up station 35°38'N-53°21'W. During 1940 and 1941 much of her time was spent on weather patrol. Under Executive Order of September 11, 1941 the Bibb became eligible for transfer to the Navy by agreement between the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commandant of the Coast Guard.

1942

FIRST ATTACK
The Bibb made her first attack on an enemy submarine on April 3, 1942, firing five "I" guns and dropping two depth charges on what proved to be a doubtful sound contact. The Bibb was underway on zigzag courses at 5 knots at the time from Norfolk to Casco Bay, Maine. She had barely arrived at Casco Bay on April 3rd, when she was underway again searching for a Navy plane that had been forced down at sea. The search was unsuccessful but the cutter depth charged another submarine contact. Ordered to Boston Navy Yard for repairs, she searched en route for a Coast Guard plane reported down in the vicinity of White Island.

SEARCHES FOR SUB
Standing out from Boston, after repairs, the Bibb received a message from the Modoc on April 13th that a plane had reported a periscope in her vicinity. Proceeding to the area she searched with the Modoc without results.

FIRST CONVOY TO ICELAND
On May 4th the Bibb was en route to Iceland as flagship of Task Unit 24.6.2 with the USS Leary and USS Badger. On the 6th two other destroyers, the Schenk and Babbit were relieved, and the USS Decatur and CGC Duane joined the escort, which had met the 13 ship convoy ONSJ-94 on the southerly course to Iceland. Two depth charges were dropped on a sound contact on the 7th and the search continued for two hours before rejoining the convoy. Again on the 13th, off Skagie Point, Iceland, a charge was dropped on a doubtful contact.

BOMBS FISH
On June 9, 19W the Bibb was underway as escort commander for convoy SCL-85, consisting of 4 ships. Dropping a 600 lb. depth charge on a doubtful sound contact, a school of stunned fish appeared on the surface. While circling the area to renew contact a whale and school of porpoises was also encountered. The search was discontinued.

ICELAND CONVOY ESCORT
On July 6, 191(2 the Bibb was moored in Hvalfjordur, Iceland, while part of the officers and soundmen received training on the anti-submarine attack teacher aboard HMS Blenheim. The cutter assumed its duties of escort commander of convoy ONSJ-110, with 13 ships, on the 7th, in company with USS Babbit. This convoy was part of an east bound trans-Atlantic convoy which had broken off and was headed for Iceland. On the 8th, with Skagi Point abeam to port, the Free French Corvette Roselys joined the task force. Two depth charges were fired on an underseas contact with no visible effects. On the 9th the Roselys sank a floating mine and later dropped one charge on a doubtful contact.

ICELAND BOUND CONVOY ATTACKED
On August 3, 1942, the Bibb with escort commander in CGC Ingham was again on convoy duty. The Iceland Unit, consisting of 7 ships, detached from the main convoy at 1900. At 2210 the Bibb received a challenge on bearing 3ll0° and answering it, the challenge was identified as HM submarine Seawolf on the surface below the horizon. The Bibb was again underway on August 31, 1942 screening the port bow of the eastbound trans-Atlantic convoy SC-97. At 0809, a large explosion was observed on a ship in the convoy. The position was 57°10'N--37°47'W. Shortly after this flames were observed on a second ship, just ahead of the first one. No sounds of any kind were heard but the deduction, from visual impressions, was that both ships had been torpedoed. Five minutes later the ship on which the explosion had occurred sank, bow first. Ten minutes later the second ship sank stern first. Twice during the next two hours, first two and then one ship in the convoy fired into the water, and one of the escorts, HMS Burnham proceeded alongside one of the ships that had fired and dropped 3 depth charges. An hour later, another ship in convoy fired at an unidentified object and soon afterwards the lookout on the Bibb reported a wake crossing the bow from port to starboard at a distance of about 500 yards, which faded. That evening gunfire was sighted on the horizon, presumed to be HMS Broadway in contact with an enemy submarine. Shortly afterwards star shells, denoting a submarine attack, appeared in the same area. Next morning, September 1st at 1110, the Bibb made a sound contact and five minutes later dropped a barrage of six small and two large depth charges. Regaining the contact ten minutes later she again attacked with a barrage of six charges. The contact was not regained after the last attack. That evening eleven ships of the convoy bound for Iceland departed the main convoy with the Bibb, Ingham and Schenk as escorts. Shortly afterwards an American airplane, which had been patrolling

--13--


over the main convoy reported 2 submarines each 24 miles distant on different bearings. On the 2nd the Bibb made a sweep astern and on the 3rd dropped a large depth charge on a doubtful sound contact. By noon on the 3rd the convoy was standing up the swept channel towards Reykjavik, Iceland.

RESCUES 61 SURVIVORS SS PENMAR
Standing out of Reykjavik Harbor on September 21st, 1942 the Bibb awaited the assembly of a convoy of two columns of 5 ships each which was underway by 1600. On the 24th she departed from the westbound trans-Atlantic convoy SC-100 which they had Joined and proceeded to position 58°00N--31°00'W to search for survivors of the SS Penmar and other torpedoed vessels in the convoy, with the Ingham taking a station on the starboard beam. On the 26th at 0710, after sighting a red flare, she proceeded to investigate and three hours later came upon a freshly broken spar, while passing through an area of oil slicks and debris. An hour Later there were numerous red flares and shortly afterwards a Lifeboat and raft were sighted. At noon two boats were lowered and they began bringing 61 survivors aboard, including one naval officer and 23 enlisted men. Within two hours after being brought aboard, all survivors had been fed, showered, wrapped in blankets and placed on mattresses on the mess deck and in the engineer's passageway. There were no seriously ill men among those brought aboard but all were weak and many required aid in going below deck. These men had been some 60 hours in rough seas in an open boat and on rafts and their condition was much better than would be expected. Many of them were suffering from exposure and edema, but after treatment almost all recovered. It is believed that the type of rubber suit worn by the survivors contributed greatly to their withstanding the exposure. Many had edema of the hands, which resulted, it is believed, from the tight fit these rubber suits have about the wrist. If a type of glove had been incorporated in the suit instead of the tight fitting wrist bands, this edema, it is believed, would not have occurred. The Penmar had been torpedoed about 2200 on 22 September, 1942 and had sunk in about 10 minutes. Two and a half hours after this rescue, the Ingham sighted red flares in position 57°58' N--32°38'W and the Bibb proceeded to cover the Ingham while she picked up 8 survivors from the SS Tennessee. There was also an unoccupied lifeboat awash and two unoccupied rafts. On the 27th the Bibb, in company with the Ingham, searched for survivors of the torpedoed SS Athan Sultan, but being unable to sight anything, even though both vessels had a radar signal which was about 2-8 miles distant, they fired three starshells. They rejoined the convoy on the 28th.

BRINGS CONVOY TO ICELAND
The Bibb closed eastbound trans-Atlantic convoy SC-101 on September 30, 1942, screening the 7 ship Iceland bound sector SCL-101 which was breaking off and forming. The Iceland convoy was formed by 0900 and got underway, the Bibb screening the rear. At 0730 on October 1st a plane arrived to provide air coverage. On the 2nd all ships were inside Grotta Point, Iceland, maneuvering for anchorages.

ESCORTS ICELAND CONVOYS
The Bibb remained anchored in Reykjavik Harbor, Iceland until October 19, 1942, and then got underway escorting a convoy of five ships westward. At 0448 on the 21st she attacked a sound contact with a barrage of depth charges with undetermined results, due to darkness and haze. Three hours later smoke was sighted on the horizon and the Bibb advanced speed to investigate, but friendly aircraft in the vicinity, for air coverage, identified the smoke as coming from friendly vessels. Next day she sighted a merchant ship on the horizon and challenged her by blinker. The vessel was identified as the Norwegian Mosdale bound for Liverpool. On the 24th the Bibb changed course to effect a rendezvous with convoy SC-105, joining the convoy on the 26th in position 58°55'N-32°40'W. An hour later the Iceland bound section of the convoy departed the main convoy. That night at 2011 two bright red lights were sighted in the convoy and it was learned that the steering machinery on one of the vessels, the SS Orbis, had broken down. The Duane was directed to stand by while repairs were made. Four hours later the Orbis was underway to rejoin. The convoy stood up the swept channel to Reykjavik Harbor, Iceland cn the 29th and anchored.

COASTAL ESCORT--ICELAND
On October 31, 1942 the Bibb was again underway escorting the SS Nova along the southern coast of Iceland. The Nova discharged and took on U.S. Army personnel at Bey dar Fjord on the 1st of November and then proceeded to Seydis Fjord where she remained over night. On the 2nd they were en route to Raufarhofh, where the Nova discharged and loaded passengers. On the 3rd they stopped at Akueyri. On the 4th they observed a plane,which was providing air coverage, crash at sea. The bodies of the navigator and observer were recovered.

DELIVERS SHIPS TO CONVOY
The Bibb was underway on November 9, 1942 screening the right flank of a west bound convoy of eight ships. She was joined by the Ingham. On the 11th the convoy became scattered about noon by winds of gale force and heavy seas but was reformed six hours later. The Ingham and two merchant vessels were missing. Difficulty was experienced on the 12th in keeping formation due to high winds and heavy seas. At 0900 the Bibb received word that the Ingham had the missing ships in company. On the 15th the Bibb sighted the westbound trans-Atlantic convoy and delivered five ships, the Ingham having delivered two earlier on the same date. The Bibb returned to Reykjavik Harbor, Iceland on the 10th where she remained until the 25th.

TO ARGENTIA
On November 25, 1942, the Bibb stood out of Reykjavik Harbor to screen in the van of westbound convoy ONS-1488 consisting of eight ships. On December 4th two British escort vessels departed with some of the ships of the convoy for St. John's, Newfoundland. On the 5th a friendly plane was sighted. On the 6th the Bibb, together with the USS McLeish was relieved of further escort duty and departed the convoy setting a course for Argentia, where she arrived on the 7th.

ESCORTS RUSSIAN SUBMARINES
The Bibb stood out of Argentia Harbor on December 7, 1942 with the USS McLeish and USS Simpson and on the 11th made rendezvous with two Russian submarines, taking station on them to act as senior escort to Halifax, N.S. On the 12th she delivered the two submarines to a local Canadian escort unit off the Sambro Light vessel. She then proceeded with the two Navy destroyers to point "COLD" to rendezvous with two more Russian submarines. At 1015, the Simpson was ordered to proceed to the rendezvous position at utmost speed. Seven hours later the Bibb fired a barrage of depth charges on a sound contact and a few minutes later the McLeish reported a sound contact which was almost immediately lost. Being unable to re-establish the contact the vessels returned to their former course. At 0810 on the 13th they effected a rendezvous with the Simpson

--14--


and the two Russian submarines and set a course for Halifax, delivering the submarines to the Canadian corvette Liscomb at noon on the 14th. The Bibb then set a course for Boston and moored at Pier 3, South Boston on the 15th. She remained in South Boston Navy Yard until January 16, 1943 undergoing repairs to hull and machinery.

1943

ESCORT TO ARGENTIA
The Bibb remained at South Boston Navy Yard until January 16, 1943, and then stood out of Boston Harbor for Casco Bay, Maine, where on the 18th she went into battle practice with the CGC Comanche making practice runs and simulated attacks on a U.S. submarine. On the 25th she proceeded to Argentia in company with SC-688 and SC-189. Investigating a radar contact astern on the 26th it was found to be the SC-689 which had separated from the company during the night. Later that afternoon the Bibb dropped an eight charge barrage on a sound contact and what appeared to be a torpedo wake. On the 28th she moored at Argentia. On the 31st she was underway escorting USS Saturn to St. John's, Newfoundland, where she arrived at 0900. At 0946 she set a course to rendezvous with convoy SC-118.

RESCUES 202 FROM SS HENRY S. MALLORY 33 FROM SS KALLIOPI
On February 1, 1943, the Bibb was underway from St. John's to join eastbound convoy SC-118 and reported to commander Task Unit 24.6.1 at 1005. On the 3rd information received was that there were some indications that enemy submarines were nearing the convoy. On the 4th the Bibb obtained two high frequency direction finder bearings and began running them down. Eight hours later she dropped one embarrassing [i.e.: harrasing charges intended to force the submarine to break off an attack and evade--not necessarily to sink it. --HyperWar] charge on a contact believed to be using pillenwerfer tactics, which enable a submarine to escape at high speed underwater. The 5th was spent covering the rear of the convoy. Next day, after an airplane had dropped a charge directly ahead, the Bibb fired a "Hedge-Hog" barrage of depth charges on a sound contact. At 0250 on the 7th she sighted four star shells in the vicinity of the convoy and a vessel was reported torpedoed. Additional star shells were fired an hour later, indicating another torpedoing. At 1000 the Bibb sighted a lifeboat ahead and began taking aboard survivors from the SS Henry S. Mallory, a troop transport, bound for Iceland. Rescue operations continued throughout forenoon, 202 survivors being taken from three lifeboats and numerous rafts. Six hours later while returning to convoy the Bibb picked up 33 survivors from the Greek SS Kalliopi. The Mallory had been torpedoed at 0600. No lifeboats are believed to have gotten away from the starboard side of the vessel, which had 499 persons on board. The torpedo struck in a hold occupied by Marines, which probably accounted for the relatively small number of Marines rescued. The occupants of the lifeboats were in excellent condition when brought aboard. As raft after raft was brought alongside the Bibb, it became necessary, to leave dead bodies on the wafts, there being no time for the dead, when the living were clamoring to be saved. The rafts were of the doughnut type and, due to the height of the sea, it was rarely possible to see more than two or three rafts at a time. The temperature of the water was 50 degrees, so that the survivors who wore winter underclothing suffered less in the water. Next day another ship was reported torpedoed. The Bibb made a full pattern attack on a sound contact at 0440 and ten hours later dropped three full patterns on three separate contacts. On the 9th at noon the SCL-118, consisting of seven vessels bound for Iceland, began breaking off from the main convoy, escorted by the Bibb, Ingham and USS Schenk and entered Reykjavik Harbor on the 14th.

ESCORTS CONVOY
On February 15, 1943, the Bibb departed for Hvalfjordur, Iceland. On the 17th she was underway to report to the Escort Commander of Convoy HX-226. The Bibb joined the convoy on the 19th. Next day she departed the convoy in company with the Schenk and arrived at Hvalfjordur that evening, proceeding to Reykjavik next day.

HIGH SEAS SCATTER CONVOY
On February 25, 1943, a convoy was formed with the Bibb, as escort commander, escorting seven vessels, with the USS Babbit in company. Next day, due to high seas, only four ships remained in the convoy while three had passed from the radar range and were scattered. One ship was reported later to have returned safely to Reykjavik. Next day two other missing ships were reported to have returned to Reykjavik safely. At the same time one of the convoyed vessels, the Elizabeth Massey, gradually lost position due to heavy seas and light condition and begun to fall behind. The Babbit was directed to join and try to bring her back to convoy. By the 28th the ships were widely scattered and seldom in contact with each other. At 1340 on that date the smoke of the main body of Convoy ONS-169 was sighted and two of the escorted vessels joined that convoy. The Bibb changed course to join convoy HZ-227.

BRINGS VESSEL TO SAFETY
On March 1, 1943, the Bibb was underway to Join convoy HX-227--which she did at 1625. On the 2nd the Bibb received a report from a ship with call letters KFFL that she had been torpedoed in position 62°10'N--25°28'W. A second message followed an hour later adding that the vessel was now on fire. An hour later the Bibb was ordered to detach from the convoy and return to Iceland, with the SS Toltec. The Bibb left the Toltec at the swept channel buoy No. 4, Reykjavik, on the 3rd and proceeded out of the channel under orders to locate the SS Collis P. Huntington, which was in the vicinity of Sangerdi Light and without navigational information on Iceland. The Bibb located the Huntington and led her safely to anchorage at Reykjavik. She then proceeded to Hvalfjordur, returning to Reykjavik on the 5th.

PICKS UP SURVIVORS FROM TWO MORE VESSELS
On March 7, 1943, the Bibb got underway from Reykjavik to augment the escort of convoy SC-121. Next day she intercepted a message from SS Vojvoda Putnik stating that the vessel had been torpedoed and was sinking at 58°42'N--31°25'W. The Bibb joined convoy SC-121 and maneuvered to a position near the Spencer. An hour later the Spencer sighted a submarine dead ahead on the surface at about 2000 yards and she proceeded to attack. Next day at 0411 the Bibb attacked a doubtful contact which was lost a few minutes later. Ten hours later word was received from a ship in the convoy that a torpedo had crossed her bow and five hours later the Bibb, while sweeping 15 miles astern of the convoy, sighted a submarine fully surfaced about 4 miles away. The Bibb proceeded to the area and heard faint propeller beats but was unable to obtain a sound contact. At 2152 word was received that a vessel in the convoy had been torpedoed. The Bibb proceeded to the area and screened the SS Melrose Abbey, the rescue ship, as she picked up survivors. Soon after midnight on the 10th two more vessels la the convoy were torpedoed. By 0305 the rescue ships had completed operations and were underway to rejoin the convoy. An hour and a half later the Bibb sighted a raft close aboard with survivors, and three hours later dropped two charges on a doubtful sound contact,

--15--


while HMS Dauphin screened the rescue ship. Twenty minutes later she sighted a life raft with three men on it and she directed the rescue ship to pick them up. The rescue ship failed to locate the raft and as the increasingly rough weather and impending snow squall made it imperative that the men not be lost sight of, the Bibb rescued the 3 survivors from the SS Coulmore. A few minutes later another raft was sighted dead ahead and two survivors of the SS Bonneville were taken aboard. The, Bibb now maneuvered near the SS Coulmore and found her in good condition and floating on an even keel, even with the torpedo hole in her bow. There were no persons aboard. Four hours later the Bibb proceeded to the assistance of the SS Rosewood, reported sinking, but could not locate her in the darkness and storm. Next day, the 4th, the Bibb sighted a ship on the horizon and proceeded toward it. It turned out to be the stern of a torpedoed tanker, with no signs of life on board, though one boat and one raft remained on board. The Bibb began searching for survivors and large quantities of debris, including a swamped lifeboat were sighted. Later she returned to the wreck and left it in a sinking condition from gun fire and depth charges. Next day she sighted the bow of the tanker and left it in sinking condition also. Several hours later she again encountered the abandoned SS Coulmore. Soon afterwards she got underway to join RMS Trillium and relieved her of escort of SS Empire Bunting. On the 13th the Bibb set a course for Reykjavik and anchored there on the 15th, later that day proceeding to Hvalfjordur.

ESCORT DUTY
The Bibb left Hvalfjordur for Reykjavik on March 16, 1943 and stood out to sea en route to join Iceland bound convoy HXL-229A. The cutter reported to the escort commander on the 20th and was assigned a station. That afternoon she had an underwater sound contact and made an embarrassing depth charge attack 5000 yards ahead of the convoy with no visible damage. On the 22nd she broke off from convoy HXL-229A and began screening ahead of convoy HXL-229. Entering Reykjavik on the 23rd she proceeded to Hvalfjordur where she entered floating drydock on the 27th and remained there until the 29th.

DELIVERS CONVOY
On April 3, 1943 the Bibb left for Reykjavik and later got underway standing out of the harbor to form convoy ONJ-176, consisting of three vessels with the USS Symbol in company as escort. Next day she identified convoy ON-176 and delivered the section from Iceland. Then she proceeded towards Iceland and arrived at Reykjavik on the afternoon of the 5th.

TO IRELAND AND NORFOLK, VA
On April 6, 1943 the Bibb got underway in company with the USS Vulcan and CGC Ingham and on the 8th moored at the naval anchorage at Moville, Ireland. She remained there only seven hours and at 1729 stood out of Loch Foyle in company with the Ingham and Vulcan for a trip direct to Norfolk, Va. Next day she had a sound contact and carried out an embarrassing attack, dropping two depth charges. The contact was evaluated as probably non-sub. That evening the Ingham made an embarrassing attack on what was reported to be a periscope. The three vessels arrived off the entrance to Chesapeake Bay on the 17th. On the 18th the Bibb dropped the escort of the Vulcan and stood out of the swept channel in company with the Ingham en route Boston, where she arrived on the 19th for ten days availability. On the 30th she departed Boston for Casco Bay, Maine.

FIRES ON PERISCOPE EN ROUTE CASABLANCA
On May 9, 1943 the Bibb proceeded to New York and anchored in Sandy Hook Bay on the 13th in company with Task Force 66 consisting of the Bibb, as flagship, the CGC Ingham and seven Navy destroyers. On the 14th the Task Force got underway escorting convoy UGA-8A for Casablanca. Sound contacts were attacked that day and the next and on the 16th four more destroyers of Task Group 21.3 joined the escort group. On the 26th the USS Card reported a suspected sub 10 miles ahead. Two other destroyers dropped charges on doubtful contacts and the Bibb made an embarrassing attack on a contact at 600 yards at 1430. A submarine periscope was reported close aboard. The Bibb regained contact and slowed for a "Hedgehog" attack. At the same time she opened fire with her 20mm machine guns on a periscope reported ahead. Then she increased to full speed and dropped a full pattern of depth charges. Soon after,a streak of heavy oil, 30 yards long, was sighted. The Bibb was unable to regain contact and rejoined the convoy. On the 31st, the Casablanca section of the convoy, consisting of 27 ships, began breaking off. On June 2, 1943, the Bibb moored in Delpit Basin, Casablanca.

RETURN TO U.S.
The Bibb was underway again on June 9, 1943 as flagship of Task Force 66 in company with the CGC Ingham and six Navy destroyers and six French escort vessels. At 1444 the Casablanca section started joining the main convoy from Mediterranean ports, GUS-8. On the 14th several high frequency direction finder bearings were reported and on the 19th the convoy made an emergency turn on a contact which later proved to be non-submarine. Another emergency turn was made on the 21st on a radar contact at 3000 yards and at 0512 the Bibb dropped one depth charge on an underwater sound contact that disappeared at 700 yards. The New York section of the convoy began breaking off on the 26th, with the Ingham, as senior escort with four Navy destroyers, and the rest of the convoy stood into Chesapeake Bay entrance. On the 27th the Bibb was en route to New York where she anchored in Gravesend Bay, moving over to Brooklyn on the 28th to moor.

BRINGS UP OIL AND DEBRIS EN ROUTE CASABLANCA
Standing down New York Harbor on July 8, 1943, in company with Task Force 63, consisting of four Navy destroyers, the Bibb reported at Buoy "BW" and the force stood out to sea on the 9th covering a section of convoy UGS-12 to Norfolk. That afternoon the Bibb attacked a sound contact with a full nine charge pattern and some heavy oil and light bits of debris resulted. A few minutes later a vessel in convoy fired a machine gun at a reported visual contact. The Bibb picked up oil samples and ordering the USS Portent to remain in the vicinity, rejoined the convoy. Oil was still rising in the area. The Portent made a "Hedgehog" attack and dropped five depth charges on a sound contact one mile north of the Bibb attack. Mooring at Norfolk on the 11th three more destroyers reported to the task force and they departed the same day to escort convoy UGS-12 to North Africa ports. On the 13th Task Group 21.13 joined, departing next day. On the 15th the USS Edwards departed for Bermuda, her sound gear inoperative. On the 21st the Portent stood by to cover one of the convoy vessels that had steering trouble. On the 22nd the Bibb had a sound contact and fired a pattern of nine depth charges with no apparent results. Next day she fired her port K guns on a contact with negative results. On the 24th two destroyers were ordered to cover the carrier Bogue, while another destroyer transferred 15 survivors of an enemy sub sunk

--16--


by one of the Bogue's planes on the 23rd. On the 28th the main convoy was turned over to the British escort and the Casablanca section began breaking off and anchored at the breakwater at 1240. Three hours later the Bibb stood into the harbor and moored, remaining there until the 31st.

SUB SIGHTED ON RETURN TRIP TO UNITED STATES
The Bibb remained moored at Casablanca until August 6, 1943 and then stood out of the harbor, forming Task Force 63 consisting of the Ingham and five destroyers en route Gibraltar, where they arrived on the 7th. On the 8th she stood out of Gibraltar Harbor in command of Task Force to meet convoy GUS-11 at the straits. On the °th the Casablanca section, escorted, by two destroyers, joined the main convoy. On the 13th the carrier Bogue reported an attack by her aircraft four miles astern of the convoy and two destroyers were detached to assist the plane, out rejoined later reporting negative results. On the 16th the Bibb attacked a doubtful sound contact with three starboard throwers without results. On the 18th the USS Portent made a depth charge attack on the starboard quarter of the convoy. Next day the Bibb fired her starboard thrower in an embarrassing attack on what was probably a non-submarine. On the 24th, the New York section of 19 ships detached with it escorts. On the 25th a plane reported sighting a submarine diving 14 miles from the convoy and the Bibb increased speed to search the area. She had a sound contact at 900 yards and dropped a full pattern with negative results. On the 26th the Delaware section of the convoy departed under escort of the Ingham and USS Threat and at 0935 the lead ships were ordered to follow the Bibb to the swept channel of New York harbor. On the 27th the Bibb departed for Boston and moored at the South Boston Navy lard on the 28th.

ESCORTS CONVOY TO GIBRALTAR
The Bibb, with the Ingham, departed Boston on September 8, 1943, for area "R" off Block Island Sound for anti-submarine warfare practice, which consisted of simulated depth charging and head throw weapon runs on a submerged U.S. submarine and also acted as target for PT boats in combined destroyer and PT exercises. On the 11th she stood down Block Island swept channel for Norfolk and moored at the Naval Operating Base on the 12th. On the 14th she stood out of Norfolk preparatory to acting as escort commander of convoy UGS-18 en route to North African and Mediterranean ports. Task Force 63 also included the Ingham and seven destroyers. When completed on the 15th the convoy formation consisted of 12 columns of ships. On the 20th the Bibb investigated a sound contact, which proved to be non-submarine and was probably due to fish. A fire which broke out on the Bibb on the 21st proved to be rags burning in a bucket. On the 27th the USS Chase departed for Gibraltar and on the 2nd the main convoy stood up the main channel through Gibraltar straits. On the same day two vessels broke off for Europe Point and the convoy was joined by the Gibraltar section. British ships took over escorting the convoy on the 3rd and the Bibb with four Navy destroyers proceeded toward Casablanca where they arrived on the 4th.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
On October 7, 1943, the Bibb with the four Navy destroyers departed Casablanca for Gibraltar and on the 9th began escorting the Gibraltar section of GUS-17. Later on the same day the Ingham and a destroyer, joined with the Casablanca section and two PC escorts later departed for Casablanca with four vessels from the main convoy. The passage across the Atlantic continued without incident. On October 25th the New York and Delaware sections broke off, escorted six vessels and the others continued to Norfolk. On the 26th, the escort duty completed the Bibb proceeded to South Boston Navy Yard Annex mooring there on the 28th and remaining through the balance of October.

PATROL DUTY--SAN JUAN
The Bibb departed Boston on November 8, 19lt3 in company with the Ingham en route San Juan, Porto Rico, for duty with Task Group 26.U and arrived there on the 13th. On the 17th the Bibb was patrolling the southeast entrance to Vieques Sound, being relieved by submarine chasers and then escorted the USS Bearn departing San Juan on the 27th. She was relieved at 22°00'N--77°20'W on November 30th by submarine chasers and arrived at Guantanamo Bay on December 1st, 1943.

CONVOY ESCORT DUTY
She departed Guantanamo Bay on December 9, 1943, escorting convoy GAT-104 and arrived at Trinidad on the 14th. Leaving Trinidad on December 20th, escorting convoy TAG-104, the Bibb arrived at Guantanamo Bay on the 25th.

1944

GUANTANAMO-TRINIDAD CONVOY ESCORT
The Bibb departed Guantanamo Bay on December 29, 1943, escorting convoy GAT-108 and arrived at Trinidad January 3, 1944. On January 6th she left Port of Spain, Trinidad escorting U.S. Army Transport S-17 to San Juan. She arrived at San Juan on December 7th and departed on the 8th for Guantanamo Bay where she arrived on the 9th. Departing the same day for Trinidad she arrived at her destination and on the 14th left Trinidad for Guantanamo Bay, arriving on the 19th. Departing Guantanamo on the 23rd she arrived at Norfolk on the 26th.

CONVOY ESCORT TO CASABLANCA
The Bibb was moored at St. Helena Navy Yard, Berkley, Va., until February 10, 19kh undergoing overhaul. On the 11th she was underway proceeding to Norfolk and on the 12th was standing down Hampton Roads, anchoring in Lynnhaven Roads. On the 13th she stood down Chesapeake Bay swept channel and maneuvered while awaiting the formation of the convoy. The commander of Task Force 66 was in the Bibb, while ComCortDiv 45 consisted of six Coast Guard Banned destroyer escorts and one Navy manned destroyer escort. The Task Force was escorting convoy UGS-33, consisting of 78 merchant vessels to North African ports and also the USS Brant (ARS-32) and six LCI's to the Azores. On February 15th the convoy dispersed in heavy weather with four escorts rounding up the stragglers. On the 17th a Navy seaman was transferred by pulling boat from one of the convoyed vessels to the Bibb for an appendectomy. On the 21st a doctor from the USS Babbit was transferred to the Bibb to treat that ship's doctor who had been stricken with pneumonia. On the 27th friendly aircraft were sighted screening the convoy. By March 1st the Azores group had departed and on the same day the Casablanca section of the convoy, consisting of seven merchant vessels and the USS Cassatot (AO-77), with three escorts detached. On March 2nd four merchant vessels detached for Gibraltar and Task Force 66 was relieved of escorting the convoy by a British task force. Task Force 66 relieved course and began standing up the Straits of Gibraltar and on the 3rd entered Casablanca Harbor.

RETURN TO U.S.
On March 7, 1944, the Bibb departed Casablanca with Task Force 66 and on the 8th relieved the senior British escort in HMS Bittersweet of convoy GUS-32. On the same day eight merchant vessels with the oiler USS Cassatot escorted

--17--


by Coast Guard manned destroyer escorts Vance and Chambers, joined the convoy. At the same time eight merchant vessels under escort of PC vessels were detached for Casablanca, making the total number of ships in the convoy 82, plus the oiler. On the 12th three more merchant vessels joined. On the 16th all electric power on the Bibb failed, the rudder jammed and the main turbines stopped. The vessel fell off to northward and commenced drifting toward the convoy. Auxiliary diesel power for radio and lighting systems was cut in and the cutter shifted to hand steering. The breakdown had been caused by the tripping of circuit breakers on the main switchboard and within 35 minutes the Bibb had again shifted to power steering. On the 20th a Liberator was sighted screening the convoy. The barometer dropped and the winds rose with a number five sea. Because of the weather, zigzagging was discontinued. One merchant vessel was detached for St. John's. On the 22nd the Norfolk section of the convoy was detached, escorted by four destroyer escorts, and a little later the Delaware section left under escort of two destroyer escorts. On the 23rd the convoy entered New York Harbor and the Bibb moored at Brooklyn Navy Yard with availability expiring April 2nd.

CONVOY ESCORT TO BIZERTE
The Bibb departed Brooklyn for Casco Bay, Maine, on April 3rd and on the 5th began exercises which continued through the 7th. Standing out of Casco Bay on that day, she moored at Naval Operating Base, Norfolk, on the 9th, moving to Lynnhaven Roads on the 12th. On the 13th she stood down the Norfolk swept channel and then reversed courses and stood up to the Naval Operating Bases for imperative repairs. Later in the day she took station "one" in convoy UGS-39 forming off Norfolk swept channel as flagship of Task Force 60, with six Coast Guard manned, and six Navy manned destroyer escorts. One of the DE's was damaged in collision and returned to Norfolk Navy Yard for repair. The convoy consisted of 102 merchant ships. On the 14th three more destroyer escorts joined the task force. On the 16th two YM's detached for Bermuda. On the 20th a destroyer escort reported picking up Morse Code signals on their underwater sound gear, and an hour later the Bibb picked up the same signals. Ten minutes later escort vessels of the inner screen dropped one depth charge each, followed at short intervals by two more sets of charges, by each escort vessel of the inner screen. Two hours later a white wake was sighted passing astern from port to starboard and the Bibb maneuvered on various courses at 15 knots for a sound contact, resuming normal patrol speed an hour later. On the 23rd the Bibb sounded the submarine alarm on receiving a sound contact and dropped one depth charge 600 yards ahead of one of the convoy columns. The contact was analyzed as doubtful. One merchant vessel detached for the Azores. On the 28th four merchant vessels and one destroyer detached, the vessels to be escorted to Oran by a British task force. An hour later three merchant vessels detached for Casablanca under escort of two U.S.P.C. vessels and a French destroyer. Another merchant vessel from Casablanca joined the convoy. On the 29th a general alarm was sounded on receiving a radar contact at a range of 11 miles, thought to be a possible aircraft. Shortly afterwards the convoy was secured from general quarters as the contact proved to be negative. An hour later a Netherlands war vessel Joined the task force as an anti-aircraft ship. On the 30th the oiler Cossatot and four escorts detached for Oran and two destroyer escorts Joined the task force. On May 1st seven merchant vessels were detached under escort of a destroyer escort for Algiers. On the 2nd five merchant vessels joined the convoy from Algerian ports. On the 3rd the convoy commenced standing up the Tunisian War Channel and six hours later Task Force 60 was relieved of convoy UGS-39 by HMS Dart at the entrance to Bizerte swept channel. The Bibb remained moored at Bizerte until May 11th, 1944 and then was underway as flagship of Task Force 60 relieving HMS Pheasant of convoy GUS-39 in the vicinity of Bizerte swept channel. On the 12th four merchant vessels were detached for Bone, Algeria, while three merchant vessels from that port joined. On the 13th, sixteen merchant vessels detached for Algiers while 23 merchant vessels joined from that port. On the 14th ten merchant vessels were detached for Oran while sixteen joined. On the 15th a destroyer escort fired across the bow of a fishing boat to keep it clear of the convoy after the fisherman had refused to follow orders. Eight merchant vessels were detached for Gibraltar on the 15th. Next day six merchant vessels detached for Casablanca while eight joined. One convoyed vessel detached for Horta, Azores on the 20th and two joined. On the 27th two merchant vessels were detached for New York. On the 28th thirty seven ships detached for Hampton Roads. The New York section, with the commander Task Force 60 in the Bibb, now consisted of 1(6 ships in 8 columns. The convoy arrived at New York on the 30th and the Bibb moored at Brooklyn Navy Yard with an availability period until June 10th.

ENEMY AIR ATTACK EN ROUTE BIZERTE

On 4 June, 1944, Commander H. T. Diehl, USCG, relieved Commander C.A. Anderson, USCG, as commanding officer of the Bibb. On the 10th the cutter stood out for Casco Bay, Maine, where she held exercises and drills until the 18th, when she departed for Hampton Roads. On the 24th she was underway out of the swept channel with Task Force 60, consisting of 6 Coast Guard manned destroyer escorts and six Navy destroyer escorts, the escort oiler USS Mattaponi (AO-41) and two French escorts, escorting convoy UGS-46 to North African ports. The convoy consisted of 69 merchant ships, 19 LST's and one British aircraft carrier. On the 28th one merchant vessel returned to Norfolk unescorted due to machinery failure. On the same day a member of the Naval Reserve (WT3c) was transferred from the USS Mitivier [sic] to the Bibb by breeches buoy for emergency medical treatment. The broken blower crankshaft Of one of the merchant vessels in convoy was repaired on the Bibb and transferred to it by breeches buoy. On the 4th of July, 1944 there were detachments from the convoy for Horta, Azores and for Casablanca on the 9th and 11th. Vessels joined the convoy at Gibraltar on the 10th. Various members of the Task Force departed as escorts for detachments and others Joined for temporary duty. A warning of the presence of unidentified aircraft was received on the 12th. At 0115 the Bibb, at general quarters, began making smoke to cover sector one of the convoy. At 0330 various escorts reported bandit planes closing over the convoy. All escorts were given permission to open fire at will on unidentified aircraft. At 0336 escorts on the convoy's port side began firing and two minutes later escorts on the starboard side began to open fire. The planes drew away at 0440, the escorts ceased firing, and at 0428 the "all clear" was sounded and the Bibb, ceasing to make smoke, was secured from general quarters. The attack took place at 36°23'N--00°26.5'E. No planes came within range of the Bibb during the entire action. Much credit was given to the smoke screen for warding off possible air torpedo attacks. The smoke hung low, never rising above 100 feet, the wind was steady and moderate and from a most favorable position dead ahead of the convoy. The night was dark throughout the action, though the moon was bright and cast a bright path. The convoy proceeded toward Bizerte, where, on the 14th, the Bibb was relieved as escort flagship by HMS Pheasant and moored until the 20th.

--18--


RETURN TO U.S.
The Bibb departed for gunnery exercises on July 20, 1944, and, having completed these, got underway to take station one of Task Force 60, escorting convoy GUS-46. At 1521 she relieved HMS Fleetwood as Task Force Commander. Two merchant ships joined on the 21st; six detached and six joined on the 22nd; and nine detached and seven joined on the 23rd. Also on that day two British escorts detached. The convoy entered the Straits of Gibraltar on the 24th as six merchant vessels detached and seven joined the convoy. Another joined on the 29th. On August 6th the Bibb expended 11 depth charges on a sound contact which was later evaluated as non-submarine. The convoy began break-off operations on the 7th. Thirteen merchant ships under escort of the Bibb and ComCortDiv 45, consisting of 6 Coast Guard manned destroyer escorts, proceeded to New York, while the remainder, under the Navy manned destroyer escorts of Comcortdiv 67, detached for Norfolk. The Bibb was relieved of escort duty on August 8th and proceeded independently to the Brooklyn Navy Yard and moored. On the 19th she proceeded to Casco Bay, Maine, where she engaged in various drills and exercises until tie 20th. Then she departed for Norfolk and moored there for the rest of August.

CONVOY TO BIZERTE
On September 2nd, 1944, the Bibb stood down Chesapeake Bay channel and departed for North African ports as flagship of Task Force 60, escorting, convoy UGS-53. The USS Johnson (DE-683) detached temporarily from the task force on the same day and proceeded to Bermuda for repairs, rejoining on the 6th. Meanwhile, one merchant had joined the convoy and another had detached for Bermuda on the 5th. Between the 8th and 12th, the Bibb took aboard crew members from three merchant vessels in convoy for medical treatment. On the 17th three merchant vessels detached for Casablanca and, on the 18th, one detached for Gibraltar and two merchant ships and three British submarines joined the convoy. On the 19th and 20th a number of ships were detached for Oran and Algiers, others joining from those ports. Three destroyer escorts left to escort three of these detached ships, two of the escorts returning on the 20th and 21st. The other merchant ships who detached proceeded in groups, without escorts from the task force. On the 21st, two merchant vessels joined from Bone, Algeria. On the 22nd Task Force 60 was relieved of escort duty by British vessels and the Bibb stood into Bizerte swept channel and moored.

RETURN TO U.S.
The Bibb departed from Bizerte on September 23, 1944, and was joined by Escort Divisions 45 and 67, forming Task Force 60. She anchored in Palermo outer harbor, moving next morning to the breakwater. On the 27th she stood out of Palermo and on the 28th, following gunnery and tactical exercises, the task force relieved HMS Shield as escort for convoy GUS-53. On the 30th, 2 merchant ships detached and 10 joined from Algiers. On October 1st the convoy was augmented by 30 merchant ships and 3 Navy vessels. Four merchant ships were detached for Gibraltar and one joined just before the convoy changed course to stand through the Straits. Three merchant ships joined the convoy on the 3rd and four were detached for Casablanca; three more joined on the 7th. From time to time on the voyage the Bibb rendered medical assistance to crew members, and to one German prisoner of war, aboard the various convoyed ships. On the 13th the commander of Task Force 60 was transferred aboard the USS Merrill (DE-392) relieving the Bibb as flagship. The Bibb assumed a new patrol station until the 15th, when she departed independently for Charleston, S.C. She arrived on the 17th, remaining there for the rest of October.

CONVERSION TO AGC
During November and December 1944, the Bibb remained at the Charleston Navy Yard, undergoing conversion to an AGC (combined operation communications headquarters ship) type of vessel. A training program for the personnel was in progress during this time.

1945

TOWS A FLOATING DRYDOCK EN ROUTE OKINAWA
The bibb was moored at the Charlestown Navy Yard from January 1 to 29, 1945, undergoing conversion to an AGC. On the 29th and 30th she was depermed, degaussed and tested. Taking on ammunition at the Navy Yard until the 4th of January, when she departed for Hampton Roads, Va. On the 7th she stood up Chesapeake Bay and carried out various exercises and then proceeded to Norfolk, mooring at the Navy Yard there on the 12th. Escorted by the USS Barry (AFD-29) the Bibb departed Norfolk on the 15th of February and arrived at Panama on the 22nd. She passed through to canal and departed Balboa on the 23rd for Pearl Harbor. On the 27th she went to the assistance of the USS Narragansett (ATF-88) and floating drydock ARDC-12. Sighting the Narragansett 15 miles distant, the Bibb came alongside and then proceeded to the floating drydock, 2½ miles away, and took her in tow. On March 1st, 1945, she released the drydock to Tug ATA-225 in position 14°02'N--98°52'W and proceeded to Manzanillo, Mexico. She departed Manzanillo on the 3rd and reached Pearl Harbor on the 11th. The Bibb departed Pearl Harbor on March 25th and arrived at Eniwetok on April 3, 1945. Departing for Palau on the 5th her destination was changed for Ulithi Islands on the 9th and she arrived there next day. On April 14th she departed for Guam where she arrived on the 15th and on the 19th rendezvoused with the Aaron Ward who acted as her escort to Okinawa. She anchored at Kerama Retto, Okinawa on April 23rd.

KAMIKAZE ATTACKS
When an enemy aircraft was sighted coming in from the northwest on April 28, 1945, the Bibb commenced firing. The plane disappeared in a smoke screen. Again on the 29th the Bibb opened fire on an enemy aircraft identified as a Japanese bomber. Three ships in the area fired at the enemy aircraft which was knocked down about 1000 yards to the north of the Bibb. Early on the 30th and again on the 6th of May the Bibb fired on enemy aircraft. All these planes were suicide planes which chose medium sized and large ships at anchor as their targets, and used various tactics, some attacking at night, some at dusk and others during daylight. All came in at low altitude and seemed to approach a target from the stern, going into a steep glide about 800 yards on the quarter of their target. On April 28th one of these planes, undetected and unreported by any unit, approached the southern anchorage, flying at high speed about 100 feet above the water. Very few ships were able to fire on it as it passed, the plane crashed into the starboard side of the USS Pinkney (APH-02), a transport for the wounded. On the same day all hands on the Bibb went to general quarters when another warning was received and the Bibb began making smoke. Then she began firing on an apparent target on the port beam, but was stopped a minute later because the target could be neither seen nor heard. On May 1st a radar picket at 0340 reported a "bogey" coming in 45 miles from the Bibb's position. Fourteen minutes later a "bogey" consisting of probably two planes at low altitude, was reported

--19--


Coast Guard Cutter Bibb
COAST GUARD CUTTER BIBB

Coast Guard Cutter Campbell under way in the Pacific
THE CAMPBELL UNDER WAY IN THE PACIFIC

--20--


as closing rapidly. The Bibb commenced making smoke at 0354, even before SOPA ordered it 4 minutes later. A minute later at 0359 an enemy aircraft was sighted at a range of about 5000 yards and about 1000 feet in altitude. It was a clear night with a bright, full moon which made visibility very good. The plane had just flown over Tokashika Shima and was approaching the southern anchorage near the Bibb. Various vessels near the path of the plane opened fire. The plane was in a slight glide, losing altitude, apparently picking out one of the ships in the anchorage as a suicide crash target. The Bibb's gun fired one round at the target when it was dead astern but did not fire again because the crew had lost sight of the target. Just as the plane entered its steep glide, preparing to crash dive, two of the Bibb's guns picked up the target and began firing. A few seconds later the plane crashed in to the USS Terror (CM-5) starboard amidships. On the morning of May 6th, at 0846, SOPA warned that "bogeys" as well as many friendly planes were within four miles. Hellcat fighters were being vectored to intercept the raid. Two minutes later lookouts on the Bibb sighted one aircraft identified as a "Val" at a range of 8000 yards appearing just over Hokaji Island, at an altitude of about 1000 feet. The 5" battery expended 7 rounds. The target was taken under fire by vessels in the anchorage but apparently escaped, damaged,and disappeared flying north toward Gemma Shima. Another "Val," taken under fire by naval units, westward of Gemma Shima was brought down. Ten minutes later a "Tony" was sighted at about 5000 yards, and the Bibb commenced firing, but the firing was checked as the bearing became foul. The "Tony" crash dived into the stern of the USS St. George (AV-16) causing only superficial damage. No other enemy action took place in the Bibb's vicinity during the rest of May and she remained anchored, continuing as flagship of Cominpac.

MORE SUICIDE ATTACKS
On June li, 1945 the Bibb stood out of Kerama Retto, in company with two other Navy vessels, and escorted by three destroyers, to ride out a reported storm at sea. She returned to Kerama Retto, next morning and remained anchored there for the balance of June. At 1840 on June 21st the Bibb sighted one "Tojo" and one "Oscar" closing rapidly at about 800 feet altitude. The "Tojo" split off, passing the Bibb's starboard beam by 250 yards, and crash dived into the starboard side of the USS Curtis. The "Oscar" then took a course northward, climbed to about 1000 feet, reversed course and began maneuvering for a crash dive, with her probable target the Bibb, YMS-331, or USS Kenneth Whiting all within close range of each other. The Bibb opened fire on the "Oscar" before it began reversing and maintained fire until it was in the last phase of the crash dive. The plane received several visible hits on the left wing, close to the fuselage at the peak of the dive and began trailing black smoke, crashing into the water near the Kenneth Whiting. The Bibb's fire was thought to be directly responsible for causing the attack to be frustrated and the plane splashing harmlessly into the water.

EVADES TYPHOON
The Bibb continued at anchor in Kerama Retto until July 7, 1945, when she proceeded to Buckner Bay, where she anchored remaining through the 16th. On the 17th she departed in convoy to a clear area, when a typhoon was expected to strike. The Bibb returned on the 21st and proceeded to Buckner Bay, where she remained at anchor during the balance of July. The Bibb remained at anchor in Buckner Bay, Okinawa, during August, 1945, as flagship for Commander, Mine Craft, Pacific Fleet. On 10 September, 1945, the Commander, Mine Craft, shifted his flag to USS Terror (CM-5) and the Bibb became relief flagship for Rear Admiral Arthur D. Struble, USN, newly appointed Commander Mine Craft. On the 16th she got underway in the van of a number of Navy craft who stood out of Buckner Bay and proceeded independently in accordance with the typhoon plan. She returned to Buckner Bay on the 18th and anchored, acting as supply and provision ship for YMS type of vessel. On 28 September the Bibb again departed Buckner Bay. She remained underway except for three days, until October 11, carrying out typhoon plan, X-RAY. On the 11th she anchored in Buckner Bay and acted as flagship for Task Group 52.9 until December 1, 1945, when she departed for the United States.

CGC Bibb

JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctoberNovemberDecember, 1941-November 1942December, 1942-October 1943November, 1943-May 1944June, 1944-December 1945
1941       COMMANDING OFFICER
  STIKA, Joseph E., Commander
  SCHLEITER, Howard W., Lt. (jg)
  BLOOM, Walfred G., Commander
  COLLINS, Paul W., Lt. Comdr.
  BRODIE, Robert D. IV, Ensign
  BLOOM, Walfred G., Commander
  HEMINGWAY, Henry G. Commander
  TYLER, Gaines A., Lt. Comdr.
  BLOOM, Walfred G., Commander
  COLLINS, Paul W., Lt. Comdr.
  KOBLER, Jason S., Ensign
  BLOOM, Walfred G., Commander
  RANEY, Roy L., Commander
  ANDERSON, Chester A. A., Comdr.
  DIEHL, Herman T., Commander


CGC CAMPBELL 1941

CGC CAMPBELL OPERATES AS PART OF THE NAVY
By Executive Order of September 11, 1941, all units, vessels and personnel of the Coast Guard previously transferred to, or under detail with,the Navy and such additional units, vessels and personnel of the Coast Guard as was agreed to between the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commandant of the Coast Guard, would operate as part of the Navy and the personnel be subject to the laws enacted for the government of the Navy. The CGC Campbell was one of these units. She had been on duty with the Navy since early in 1941.

--21--


1942

TEN DEPTH CHARGE ATTACKS
On February 24, 1942, while on convoy duty in the Atlantic, the Campbell made a contact on her underwater sound equipment. She dropped six depth charges and fired two from her "Y" gun. A few minutes later on another contact, a second barrage was fired. Fifteen minutes later a third contact was made, then there were contacts made every ten or fifteen minutes in the next hour and a half. Altogether ten contacts were made during that period, with from two to seven depth charges fired on each one. Increasing speed to overtake the convoy she zigzagged on each side of the course. An hour later another contact was made at 500 yards and during the next 45 minutes she picked up four more contacts none of which was definite enough to drop charges.

ESCORT TO IRELAND
Underway on 22 March, 1942 out of Casco Bay, Maine, the Campbell escorted the American Army transport SS Chatham to Argentia, N.F., being relieved of escort duty on the 25th and anchoring in Placentia Bay, N.F. Early in April she was underway again as part of a Task Force en route to Londonderry, Ireland. There was air coverage by British planes the first day and the trip was uneventful except for various radar and sound contacts which yielded negative results. Sighted Ireland on 10 April and entered River Foyle and moored at Naval Depot at Lisahally at 2030.

ATTACKS SUB
Returning to Boston she laid in at the Navy Yard undergoing repairs. Exchanged a 5" for a 3" gun, installed 6 more 20mm guns, substituted 2 "K" guns for "Y" guns and had splinter protection built around three gun decks, bridge and wheel house. On May 15, 1942 Navy Task Unit Commander reported on board and shortly after she was underway again to Londonderry, in company with 6 escort vessels in "V" formation and 18 ships in convoy. On the 25th two escorts departed the main convoy escorting 6 of the fastest ships to Liverpool. British escort vessels patrolled the port and starboard flanks and British planes provided air coverage on the 24th, radar contacts being made on them at a distance of 24 miles. On the 27th the Campbell dropped a depth charge and fired two "K" guns on a contact which proved doubtful. Fifteen minutes later another contact was made, classified as good, and she attacked laying a full pattern. Twenty minutes later a contact at 2700 yards grew clearer as she approached and she laid another full pattern, getting the hydrophone effect during the first stage of the attack. Fire on the surface for 75 feet around a watertight dropped over the side in the middle of the charges indicated burning oil. Attempts to destroy a floating mine were unsuccessful. Relieved of escort duty she stood into Lough Foyle and launched a pyramid target for battle practice.

CONVOY IS ATTACKED BY A WOLF PACK
On 10 June, 1942, the Campbell was underway from Moville, North Ireland,to join convoy ONS-102 in company with the 6 vessel Task Unit 24. 1.3 with escort commander in the Campbell. Intercepted the convoy on the same day in two sections, the Liverpool section containing 35 ships and the Loch Ewe section 12 ships. On the 14th the convoy was joined by the Iceland escort to swell the number to 63 ships and 10 escorts. On the 15th the Campbell intercepted test dashes on 500 LCS for 1½ minutes apparently very close by. Proceeding, with two other escorts, to check these dashes, she received a true bearing on vessel No. 11 in the convoy, the Flowergate. Closed in for investigation and boarding the vessel with 3 officers and 9 men, the inspection party returned with two operators under suspicion and made prisoners-at-large. All operators denied transmitting any signals and all the crew were questioned. On the 16th a strong HF/DF bearing, thought to be a German U-boat, sending a weather report, was intercepted and an escort vessel was instructed to search 20 miles out on from convoy bearing 176°T. The escort sighted a submarine on the surface and requested another escort. The Campbell went to her assistance, made contact and fired a full pattern of depth charges. Later the Campbell sighted the submarine on the surface 6 miles ahead but it submerged immediately. Going full speed ahead to close she dropped depth charges with negative results. About the same time the Ingham sighted a submarine on the surface bearing 115°T at a distance of about 8 miles and proceeded to close firing a 5" shell at 13,000 yards. A scouting line was farmed to continue the search, which was abandoned four hours later with negative results. Having received 7 submarine sighting reports, sighted 3 subs on the surface to the east and received D/F bearings during the night, the Escort Commander, on the 17th, recommended a radical change of course to starboard after dark. At 0125 on the 18th, the SS Seattle Spirit in the convoy was torpedoed. The Campbell sighted a submarine on the port beam, awash, about 500 yards and gave hard left rudder to try a run, but the U-boat turned left and a minute later dived. The Campbell fired a star shell barrage ahead and began firing a depth charge barrage by eye with the shell pattern, but with negative results. At 0205 the Agassiz reported picking up survivors of the Seattle Spirit, in company with the SS Perth, a rescue ship. She reported the NR-112 had been torpedoed also with three of the crew missing and one critically injured. The escort commander directed the Agassiz to sink her as soon as all survivors were well clear. At 0020 on the 19th the Campbell sighted 3 white wakes, apparently torpedo tracks and fired 2 rockets to broadcast the warning. At the same time the Agassiz fired a depth charge on a swirl of water caused by a diving submarine astern of column 3. Five minutes later the Collingwood felt a violent explosion close by, made by a torpedo at the end of its run after missing her. At 0828 three corvettes sent out by the CCNF joined the convoy to act as a striking force. On the 20th numerous sound and radar contacts were made throughout the day and finally at 2248 the Agassiz sighted a ship 3 miles astern on the starboard bow of the convoy which had fired 2 rockets, blown 6 blasts on its whistle and turned deck lights on, indicating it had been torpedoed. The Agassiz began searching north of torpedoed ship as other escorts were searching south. The Campbell closed convoy at full speed and dropped three depth charges set at 100 feet at intervals of 10 seconds as an embarrassing barrage. The Mayflower heard a loud explosion and immediately thereafter a ship about 2 miles on the port beam showed a red over white light and blew a siren signal. The Mayflower fired starshells over an arc of 90° and swept the starboard quarter of the convoy. On returning to station the ship had extinguished its lights and the Mayflower proceeded with the convoy, having searched for survivors and found none. At 2254 the Collingwood heard an explosion and saw two rockets. Turning toward the lead ship, and in the light of "snowflakes," a submarine was reported on the surface between NR 12 and 13. Machine gun fire was observed from a convoy ship toward the same position and the Collingwood proceeded at full speed to the spot, dropping 5 single depth charges as deterrents, and firing a pattern of five starshells on the outward leg, but observing no contacts. Two red lights in the middle of the convoy seemed to indicate that at least 2 ships had been hit. At 2255, the Mayflower

--22--


reported "ship torpedoed one mile off my port beam," Next day, the 21st, the Campbell began a sweep around the convoy to count ships, check on escorts and determine what ships, if any, had been lost. She did not learn of any torpedoing, but found NR 13 (SS Cantal) missing, with no survivors reported as having been picked up. There were now 60 ships in the convoy and eight escorts after several had departed in various destinations. On the 22nd the Campbell departed the main convoy en route Argentia arriving there on the 23rd.

MAN OVERBOARD
The Campbell was moored in Little Placentia Harbor for minor repairs until 1 July, 1942, when she got underway escorting a convoy of 43 ships to Londonderry, Ireland, with the CGC Spencer and 4 British escorts in company. On the 9th, ship No. 45 reported man overboard. The Campbell went astern to contact the ship and found that the man overboard had no life jacket and was presumably lost. At 0300 on the 10th, with Farad Point Light (Ireland) 25 miles distant, starshell illumination and gun fire was observed on the port side of the convoy ahead. Later more starshells and gunfire were observed at a greater distance. She moored at Londonderry at 1735 without further incident.

STRAGGLER
Standing out of Lough Foyle, Ireland on 21 July, 1942, the Campbell with the CGC Spencer and the 4 British escorts, accompanied a 32 vessel convoy. On the 22nd, ship No. 31 dropped astern being unable to maintain her position. Next day the Spencer searched 30 miles astern for the straggler but was unable to locate her. Depth charges were dropped by the Spencer and two other escorts on the 25th on doubtful contacts with negative results. On the 31st the main convoy passed through the anti-torpedo net into Placentia Harbor, Argentia. The Campbell left Argentia on 3 August, 1942, for Boston Navy Yard for repairs. En route on the 4th she made a radar contact and maneuvering to investigate found a British escort vessel with a convoy 5 miles abeam to starboard. She remained at the Navy Yard until August 25th, 1942, undergoing repairs.

USS WAKEFIELD AFIRE
Having proceeded to Casco Bay, Maine, and spent several days standing out of the harbor for submarine exercises, the Campbell got underway on U September, 1942, escorting two navy tugs en route to assist the USS Wakefield which was afire at sea. She established contact on the 6th with the Wakefield who was in tow of a Canadian tug en route Halifax and the two tugs the Campbell was escorting, were directed to fall in astern. On the 7th a navy tug and two more Canadian tugs joined, and at 0830 salvage party was put aboard the Wakefield from the USS Radford and a Canadian tug maneuvered astern and played the fire hose on the burning vessel, flooding the after magazine. On the 8th the Wakefield hove to off the entrance to Halifax swept channel and was boarded by a pilot. The Campbell relieved of escort duty departed for Argentia.

NEW COMMANDING OFFICERS
From the 8th to the 15th of September, 1942, the Campbell was moored in Little Placentia Harbor, N.F., while officers attended the attack teacher exercises. Commander J. H. Hirshfield, USCG, relieved Commander D. C. McNeil, USCG, as commanding officer on the 12th. Commander McNeil is to assume duties as escort commander for Greenland convoys.

STORM AND U-BOAT ATTACK
On the 15th of September, 1942, the Campbell was underway en route to rendezvous with Ireland bound convoy SC-100, which was sighted on the 16th and consisted of 22 ships, later augmented to 24, and 5 escorts. A report that a U-boat had been sighted was received at 1517 and the Campbell patrolled her sector without results. Eight hours later a sound contact was made and she dropped a pattern of 7 large (600 lb.) and 2 small (300 lb.) depth charges with negative results, the contact being classified as doubtful. On the 19th the Spencer, which was in company, reported a positive contact at 0624 and sighted the sub surface two hours later. The convoy made a 45° emergency turn to port. On the 20th a British escort about 0900 again reported a sub on the surface about 6 miles away. The Campbell was ordered to assist and increased to full speed to intercept the sub ahead of the other escort, but the sub was not sighted. The Campbell continued to search for several hours without sound contacts. At 1145 ship No. 71, the SS Empire, was torpedoed and sank. All searches for the U-boat were negative. It was determined that the convoy was being shadowed by at least five U-boats and extra lookouts were posted. During the night the Campbell became detached from the convoy, due to high seas and westerly storm winds, but intercepted messages from the convoy on the 22nd indicated that 12 ships were riding out the storm on course 250°, while others were on course 111°. The Campbell, with ship darkened and a speed of only 8 knots, had extra lookouts posted. Rejoining the convoy, the Campbell departed on the 24th on a high speed sweep at 0930. At 1035 a plane reported that a sub was bearing 60°T. 10 miles from the convoy and further reports from planes indicated that a total of 7 sightings had been made, with 2 attacks by aircraft and one direct hit. At 1130 the Campbell abandoned her sweep to hunt for the reported submarines, and at noon a plane reported having sighted a sub and dropped smoke floats to mark the U-boat's last position. At 1219 the Campbell's lookout reported a submarine on the surface bearing 65° and all hands were ordered to general quarters. The Campbell opened fire with her 3" guns and reduced speed to 15 knots to search the area where the sub had last been seen, HMCS Rosthern assisting. At 1245 the Rosthern reported a sound contact and dropped depth charges. At 1412 aircraft were sighted apparently dropping depth charges and the Campbell, at full speed, maneuvering to attack, obtained a positive sound contact and dropped a full pattern of six large and three small charges. The aircraft reported bubbles rising in the area of these depth charge explosives and the Campbell then laid a deep pattern in the area where the bubbles were rising and dropped a pattern of 3 large and 2 small charges. Reducing speed the Campbell was unable to make contact, no hydrophone or doppler effect being detected. The search was continued until 1550 with no further results. At 1655 a plane was sighted about 7½ miles distant engaged in dropping depth charges and the Campbell increased to full speed and headed for that position. The plane reported having depth charged a sub with negative results and the Campbell, using the smoke bomb dropped by the plane as the center, searched the surrounding area for two hours without a contact. On the 28th, the convoy entered the swept channel approach to Lough Foyle, Ireland, and moored.

STORMY UNEVENTFUL PASSAGE
The Campbell remained anchored until the 3rd of October, 1942, when she departed with the Spencer as part of T.U. 24.1.3, and rendezvoused with the 30 ship convoy ON-135. Later 6 more ships and 4 British escorts from Loch Ewe joined the convoy. Locating a floating mine, the Campbell warned the convoy by siren, fired 30 rounds without hitting it and then stopped and drifted with it to indicate its position to the convoy. On the 5th the wind increased to whole gale force with

--23--


very rough seas scattering the convoy in poor formation. Two of the ships in the convoy turned back. On the 6th speed was reduced to 6½ knots with the barometer dropping rapidly and the wind at whole gala force. On the 7th, the Campbell proceeded down the starboard flank of the convoy to communicate convoy course and speed to three stragglers and sighted a convoy about 8 miles distant bearing 285°T. On the 8th the wind decreased and the convoy remained somewhat scattered with all 34 ships and 6 escorts accounted for. On the 10th she commenced a five hour high speed sweep 15 miles ahead and then around the convoy. This was repeated on the 11th and on the 12th she contacted stragglers astern. On the 13th intercepted message during the mid-watch indicated that a convoy in the vicinity was being attacked by U-boats. At 1355 sighted a white rocket from the center of the convoy but there were no further developments and two hours later she conducted a 51 mile sweep ahead of the convoy. On the 14th a friendly plane and a Canadian destroyer were sighted and at 1405, along with Spencer she was relieved as escort, and arrived at little Placentia Bay on the 15th.

SIX VESSELS SUNK IN CONVOY
After a preliminary anti-submarine sweep out of Little Placentia Bay on the 21st of October, 1942, the Campbell got underway on the 23rd as flagship of Task Unit 24.1.3 standing out of St. John's Harbor to rendezvous with a 48 ship convoy, HX-212, in company with the USS Badger and 4 British escorts. At 1310 the local escort departed with four merchant ships. After several false sound contacts the Campbell at 1753 obtained an HF/DF bearing on a U-boat transmission, on a bearing 290° dead astern and distant 25 miles, which was possibly reporting sighting the convoy. At 1920 the same message was picked up, the same message probably being relayed from a German shore station. On the 25th the Badger made a high speed sweep ahead, and the Campbell maneuvering astern at 1517 obtained an HF/DF bearing on a U-boat transmission bearing 252°T distant 25 miles and directed the Badger to search out 15 miles on this bearing and then sweep back and astern of the convoy for the rest of the night. Relieved by the Rosthern early on the 26th, the Campbell commenced a 12 mile sweep ahead of the convoy at 1150 and swept across its van. At 1620 she commenced a stern sweep 15 miles out and took her night station. On the 27th the Badger was sent 12 miles out along an HF/DF bearing and at 0215 obtained a sound contact bearing 065°T, range 1200 yards, which was lost at 900 yards and classified as doubtful. At 0310 obtained HF/DF bearing at 194°T range very close, and another at 0298°T very close and dispatched the Trillium to investigate. Another bearing at 0512 was also 298°T. The Trillium returned reporting negative results. The Badger was then sent to investigate a series of transmissions but returned at 0700 without results. At 1210 the Rosthern searched along a transmission bearing 177°T and at 1715 one at 249°T. At 1830 two glows were sighted on the horizon at 150° and 160° and at 1900 two glows were identified as lights, source undetermined. Eight minutes later three ships Nos. 12, 21, and 23 were torpedoed in position 54°40'--30°12'W. Ringing general alarm, commenced "Zombie Crack" maneuvers; fired two white rockets and at 1918 commenced laying starshell barrage, patrolling up and down port flank of convoy, which made 45° emergency turn to starboard at 2000 and at 2022 similar turn to port to avoid 3 neutral Swedish ships, from which previous glow had come. At 0120 on the 28th sighted escorting corvette and at 0245, 6 miles off port quarters of convoy observed what seemed to be an explosion and a burning vessel in the convoy, apparently torpedoed. Convoy Commodore reported ship No. 22 torpedoed on starboard side at 51t°55'N--28°33'W and several ships fired "snowflakes," the Badger firing star-shells. At 0500 commenced a stern sweep and at 0622 observed another explosion bearing 270°T followed by starshells. This was believed to be ship No. 22 torpedoed a second time. At 0630 commenced patrolling starboard flank of convoy. At 1230 obtained sound contact at 1800 yards, ran it down, passed over it and lost it, regaining it at 1243 at 950 yards, dropped 3 large depth charges and lost it again. Classified probably non-sub. At 1307 sighted plane at 7 miles which commenced tight circle at low altitude and reported sub below it which had dived. Headed toward spot and commenced search of area indicated by smoke pot dropped by plane. At 1425 secured from general quarters and dropped astern of convoy 8 miles. At 1540 plane attacked submarine submerging 12,800 yards distant and the Campbell headed down the bearing at 17 knots, picking up sound contact at 1617 at 2000 yards and fired five large and three small depth charges. After reversing course regained contact at 1645, range 1200 yards, lost it, and picked it up again nine minutes later at 650 yards, losing it minutes later. Continued to search the area until 1706 without results. At 0016 on the 29th ship No. 42 in the convoy was torpedoed forward on the starboard side in position 51t° 58'N--23°58'W and fell astern, still afloat and blazing fiercely, the Summerside standing by for rescue work. At 0020 escort commodore ordered a negative "Zombie Crack" and at 0100 commenced stern sweep and at 0200 started up starboard flank at 3000 yards distance. At 0215 obtained HF/DF U-boat transmission at 20 miles. At 0318 convoy ship No. 24 was torpedoed at 55°05'N--23°27'W. Fired two white rockets and began illuminating van of convoy with starshells. At 0454 another ship was reported torpedoed but this proved a false alarm, the ship being disabled by heavy seas. At 1027 on the 31st, a radar contact, range 23 miles, proved to be a British Sunderland plane which was sighted at 8 miles. At 1200 on the 31st the convoy rearranged columns preparatory to splitting up at dispersal point. At 0500 on the 1st of November three ships of the convoy departed for Loch Ewe and the Campbell proceeded to Moville for refueling, the rest of the convoy to Londonderry, where the Campbell joined them later that day.

UNEVENTFUL RETURN TRIP
The Campbell remained at Londonderry until November 8, 1942, standing down the River Foyle to Moville after anti-aircraft firing practice, and on the 10th at 0356 was underway to rendezvous with the 34 ship convoy ON 145, assuming command as flagship of Task Unit 24.1.3, with USS Badger, 3 British escorts and the Polish destroyer Burza which joined on the 12th. On the 14th sighted a merchant ship 4OOO yards ahead of convoy and instructed her to return to station. On the 15th conducted bow and stern sweeps and on the 16th headed down the starboard flank to search astern for stragglers, two of whom were found 2 miles astern and one 7 miles astern. Search for another was abandoned 18 miles astern. On the 17th, 15 ships of convoy were detached and proceeded independently for South African ports, leaving 18 ships with 6 escorts. At 1021 on the 18th, one of the ships proceeding south reported sighting a submarine and the Badger departed to investigate. On the 19th three of the relieving local escorts arrived and with the arrival of the remainder on the 20th, the Campbell departed for Argentia making two radar contacts which apparently were caused by low clouds in an overcast sky. At 0545 received an SOS from a vessel in position 39° 55'N--52°32'W which had been torpedoed with the crew abandoning ship. At 1330 she entered the swept channel at Argentia. At 1710 she searched the northern area off Shalloway Point for a reported

--24--


submarine and on the 21st sighted a convoy 9 miles distant. Continuing she escorted the USS Pontiac towards Boston entering the swept channel at 9856 [sic] and leaving at 1645 en route Curtis Bay Yard mooring there on the 26th. She remained in drydock until the end of November.

ROUGH TRIP TO ICELAND
Remaining at Curtis Bay until the 9th of December, 1942, the Campbell departed for Boston at 1643 and arrived there at 2038. She departed Boston on the 13th proceeding to Argentia escorting the USS Saturn, arriving on the 15th. Proceeding to St. John's on the 16th she departed for Iceland on the 17th, losing a 300 lb. depth charge in a heavy sea on the 18th, with the barometer low and falling and the ship icing up in a heavy, very rough sea, in which three more depth charges were reported lost overboard and a man standing on the main deck appeared to go over the side. The engines were stopped, the ship swung to starboard and a small life raft thrown overboard. Following this, two gasoline drums were washed overboard and the #4 boat struck by heavy seas, lifted from the chocks and carried inboard, where its propeller and shaft were bent. At 1600 with the wind at whole gale force, seas were very rough, the barometer falling to 27.90, with snow squalls and visibility 500 yards, all searchlights were inoperative due to icing. On the 19th waterlights secured to depth charges were ignited by the heavy sea and a life raft broke loose. With the barometer at 27.76 there were snow squalls and heavy seas and No. 3 lifeboat was knocked out of its cradle by the sea. At 1230 the wind moderated to strong gale force and by 1700 to fresh SSW gale with intermittent snow squalls. On the 20th there wars occasional snow squalls with a rising barometer as the Campbell entered Reykjavik Harbor.

1943

WEST BOUND TRIP
On the 28th of December, 1942, she was underway escorting a seven vessel, west bound convoy ONSJ-156 with 3 escorts under CTU-24.6.5, CGC Duane acting as flagship. On the 30th she joined the main body of ONS 156 being detached from T.U. 24.6.5 and becoming member of escort group T.U. 24.1.3 with USS Spencer as flagship. Heavy weather was encountered on the 5th of January, 1943, and two red flares were sighted which were unexplainable. During a very rough sea and occasional rain squalls on the 6th the convoy became badly scattered and the Campbell challenged an unidentified ship which did not answer correctly, claimed the name SS Mosdale bound independently from Liverpool to Halifax. The vessel was instructed to join the convoy. On the 8th the Campbell was relieved of escort duty to proceed to Navy Yard, Boston, independently. Investigations of sound and radar searches on the 10th she received an echo bearing 230°, range 2800. As the target was classified as a possible submarine, she attacked, firing the three starboard "K" guns, the starboard mousetrap and later 3 small depth charges and four mousetraps. Sighting Cape Cod and Cape Ann lights early on the 11th, she grounded between buoy #3 and Castle Island at 0736. She refloated 5 hours later and proceeded up Boston Harbor.

CONVOY SCATTERED BY STORM
On the 16th of January, 1943 the Campbell stood out of Boston, proceeding to Base Roger in company with the Spencer, mooring on the 18th. Proceeding on the 19th with the Spencer she joined convoy HX-223 en route to the British Isles. On the 21st she went to the assistance of ship No. 123, SS City of Lyons, in trouble and straggling, and proceeded to screen her. The ship had been in collision and was taking water in the fore peak and #1 and #2 holds. Later her steering engine became inoperative. On the 22nd, the straggler set her course for St. John's, Rejoining the convoy, the Campbell was unable to keep her position because of heavy seas and wind. Heavy weather continued through the 24th with the convoy badly scattered. Ship No. 75, SS Kollbjorg, split in half in the rough seas. The CGC Ingham with 5 other escorts and 25 merchant vessels of the convoy were 35 miles west on the 25th. The convoy was not brought together until the 25th. On the 27th 4 vessels and 2 escorts departed en route Reykjavik. On the 29th the convoy was again scattered by gale winds, the Campbell rounding up ships by radar contacts. At 2215 she was detached and proceeded to Londonderry. Here the strong current in the Foyle River caused her to ground for a short period before docking on the 31st.

TWO ATTACKS WITHOUT RESULT
The Campbell remained at Londonderry until 10 February, 1943, when she proceeded down river and effected a rendezvous with convoy ON-166 on the 12th. She returned to Lough Foyle for calibration of HF/DF but was underway on the 13th, rejoining the convoy on the 14th. On the 21st the Campbell intercepted several U-boat transmissions and during the ensuing search, echo and sound contacts were made, the cutter releasing 10 large and 11 small depth charges early in the afternoon and nine each of the large and small in the evening. The afternoon contact was at 900 yards and after the attack at 1331 the target moved slowly to the left and then rapidly to the right. An 11 charge pattern was set at 100-150 feet with no visible results. Two minutes later the cutter delivered 3 charges from the starboard throwers set at 250-300 feet, since the Campbell was believed to be passing astern of the target. Again no results. At 1338 the range was opened to 1500 yards for another approach. Double and triple echoes were now obtained, indicating a wake or bubble screen, and the target motion was away and to the right, so a lead of 15° to the right was taken and a 10 charge pattern set to 200-300 feet, fired without visible results. In the evening at 1917, while investigating a smoke float from a plane, a sound contact was obtained at 2000 yards, lost at 900 yards and regained at 1100 yards. A lead was taken at 500 yards. The bearing did not move down the side fast enough so 10° more lead was taken, being all that the time allowed, and a 9 charge pattern set to 200-300 feet was fired. No. 1 and No. 6 throwers misfired. A reverse run to the area revealed an odor of diesel oil, indicating possible damage to the submarine. On regaining contact at 1700 yards, a lead was taken to the left where the target was drawing at 300 yards then the contact was lost, indicating a turn, but too late to correct the course, so a 9 charge barrage was fired without visible results. Then the search was abandoned.

RAMS AND SINKS A SUBMARINE
Next day, 22 February, 1943, at 0603 a submarine was sighted submerging at 2O00 yards. Sound contact was made at 1500 yards which was drawing slowly to the left at 15 knots. A stern chase was assumed and without taking a lead a 10 charge pattern set to 200-300 feet was fired. Diesel oil appeared on the surface. Six hours later a sound contact was made at 1000 yards dead ahead. The bearing remained steady and the course was held. Then a periscope appeared 20 yards off the Campbell's port bow and passed rapidly down the port side. The conning officer watched the boil of the submarine's screws and fired 5 charges set 150-200 feet by eye to straddle the estimated position of the submarine, which appeared to run straight into the exploding depth charge from the #4 thrower. Three surges of

--25--


water were seen after the explosion upheaval but no evidence of damage. Ten minutes later a sound contact was made at 700 yards, was approached and attacked with 4 charges set at 150-200 feet. Again no evidence of damage. Nine minutes later the contact was regained at 800 yards which was classified as depth charge turbulence and no charges were dropped. Eleven minutes later a faint echo was picked up at 500 yards, a lead to the left was taken, and two charges set to 150-250 feet dropped without visible results. Eight hours later at 2015 a radar contact was made at 4600 [yards] and approached at 18 knots. A submarine was sighted on the starboard bow and full right rudder was ordered so as to ram her. The submarine hit the Campbell under the bridge and then in the engine room. At the same time 3" and 20mm gunfire from the cutter riddled the submarine and prevented her from manning her guns. A depth charge attack after the ramming further damaged the submarine. Five survivors from the submarine were picked up. The Campbell's engine room was flooded and her power lost, preventing further action on her part. The submarine was sunk. Survivors, ramming and explosions proved this to be a definite kill and search was abandoned at once.

TOWED TO ST. JOHNS
Shortly after this the Polish destroyer Burza came up with orders to take the Campbell in tow, but because of the risks involved of proceeding without screen it was decided to await further assistance. On the 23rd some 120 members of the Campbell's crew were transferred to the Burza as well as 50 survivors from the torpedoed Norwegian Neilson Alonzo, which the Campbell had picked up. The Burza remained to guard the Campbell until the arrival of the British tug Tenacity on the 26th. The Tenacity took her in tow and with two British escorts as screens, proceeded to St. John's where they arrived on the 3rd of March 1943. On the 15th, after the openings in her hull had been closed she was towed to Argentia where she underwent repairs until the 19th of May, 1943.

ESCORTS CONVOY TO CASABLANCA
The Campbell departed for Boston on May 19, 1943, having one sound contact en route which proved to be non-submarine, and moored there on the 20th. On the 25th she proceeded to New York. On the 29th she stood out of New York harbor as an escort to convoy UGS-9, being a member of Task Force 69. Keeping the convoyed vessels from making smoke and leaving oil slicks, she screened one vessel while it took another in tow and investigated ships that had broken down and were straggling. Frequently carrier based planes were observed as escorts, one of which attacked a submarine 19 miles away, another returning to the carrier safely after being hit by submarine shell fire. On the 12th she screened two convoy vessels that had been in collision, and later picked up a man overboard from another. Her doctor gave medical advice to patients from several convoyed vessels. She anchored in Casablanca Harbor on June 15, 1943.

RETURN TO NEW YORK
On June 21, 1943, the Campbell was underway as an escort to convoy UGS-8A in company with the CGC Duane and 5 Navy vessels. Another Bizerte section joined. Total 43 ships. Many of the convoyed vessels carried prisoners of war. On the 28th two of the Navy escorts dropped depth charges on sound contacts but without results. The Campbell had a sound contact on the 28th and a radar contact on the 29th, both of which proved to be non-sub. On 5 July, 1943, a lookout sighted what appeared to be a white feather wake about a mile distant and the cutter made a complete box sweep without results. Later that day a Navy escort dropped depth charges on a sound contact and the Campbell, with two Navy escorts conducted a sweep for an hour without results. On the 6th a radar contact at 19,000 yards was thought to be probably a rain squall. A doubtful contact on the 7th was classified non-submarine. On the 8th 27 vessels escorted by 5 Navy vessels escorted by the Campbell, Duane, Spencer and one Navy escort headed for New York, where the Campbell anchored on the 10th.

EN ROUTE CASABLANCA
Getting underway to Norfolk on the 26th of July, 1943, the Campbell stood out of Norfolk on the 27th as part of Task Force 64 in company with 3 Navy escorts accompanying convoy UGS-13 to Casablanca. On the 28th made a one mile box search of a contact reported by a Navy escort without results. On the 29th the convoy was badly scattered throughout the first watch due to bad weather and on the 30th the cutter fell back 30 miles, screening two of the convoyed vessels with water in their fuel. Numerous sound contacts were investigated which proved to be non-sub, and stragglers who had fallen back due to bad weather were instructed to close their positions. On the 7th of August a Navy escort dropped depth charges on a sound contact and the Campbell joined her in a box search without results. On the 13th of August she moored at Casablanca.

RETURN TO NEW YORK
On 19 August, 1943, the Campbell stood out of Casablanca Harbor as part of Task Force 64 en route to Gibraltar, arriving on the 20th, and departing the same day escorting the GUS-12 bound for New York. On the 21st a Navy escort dropped a pattern of charges with no further developments and when another Navy escort dropped out of convoy with an engine breakdown the Campbell screened her and next day sent two technicians to her to advise her, the escorts rejoining the convoy later that day. On the 26th a Navy escort reported sighting a submarine and another Navy escort joined her in the search. On 3 September, 1943, the Norfolk section departed with four escorts and the New York section, with the Campbell, as one of the escorts, continued arriving at New York on the 5th. The Campbell proceeded to Boston, with the Duane and Spencer, where she moored on the 6th at the Navy Yard Annex to undergo repairs. She proceeded to Casco Bay, Maine, on the 17th of September, where she conducted drills and exercises for the remainder of the month.

SCORES NEAR HIT
Leaving Casco Bay on 1 October, 1943, the Campbell escorted the U.S. submarine S-16 to area M-2 for anti-sub exercises and next day stood out of Casco Bay for Norfolk, in company with the Duane arriving on the 4th. Next day she departed Norfolk as part of Task Force 65, escorting convoy UGS-20 to Casablanca in company with the Duane and 7 Navy escorts. On the 7th, at 0445, she had a sound contact at 1800 yards which proved positive and dropped a full pattern of depth charges. The recorder trace showed the target to be a probable sub on which she had scored a near hit, but no evidence of debris appeared in the area after daylight. On the 12th she conducted a sound search along an oil slick that paralleled the convoy's course at a distance of about 7000 yards but with no results. On the 14th she had a sound contact identified as probable submarine and dropped a full pattern of depth charges. She regained the contact, lost it, and regaining it made a hedgehog attack at reduced speed. Five minutes later a whale was sighted on the bearing. On the 20th, the Casablanca section of 10 ships departed the main convoy and on the 21st the Campbell moored at Casablanca.

--26--


RETURN TO NEW YORK
On 29 October, 1943, th Campbell was standing out of Casablanca as part of Task Force 65 escorting the Casablanca section of convoy GUS-19 joining the main section at 1355. On the 30th planes covering the convoy were sighted. A contact was made on the 31st and identified as fish. Another contact on 2 November was identified likewise. On the 5th a seaman was transferred from one of the convoyed vessels by stretch stretcher rig for medical treatment. A number of contacts made on the 6th and 7th proved to be fish or non-sub. On the 8th a shallow pattern of depth charges was fired after a suspicious radar contact was made at 0412 at a distance of 6000 yards. On the 13th the convoy divided, the Campbell being assigned to the Norfolk-Delaware Section. On the 15th, while escorting this section, she made a contact at 2700 yards and dropped a full pattern of depth charges. A second pattern was not fired at the regained contact when it was lost but 20 minutes later a hedgehog was fired after a completed box search before rejoining the convoy. Discharged from escort duty on entering New York swept channel the Campbell proceeded to Boston through the Cape Cod Canal on the 16th and moored there at 0813.

CARIBBEAN DUTY
On 29 November, 1943, the Campbell was underway in company with the Duane to Guantanamo Bay as escort to a convoy of two vessels with SC-1281 as additional escort proceeding to San Juan, P.R., where she moored on the 7th. She was in Navy Dry Dock, San Juan until the 11th repairing a ruptured sound dome and on the 12th departed San Juan for Guantanamo Bay arriving on the 4th. On the 14th departed for Trinidad, B.W.I. as escort of convoy GAT-105. On the 18th, 3 merchant ships from Curaçao joined. At 1125 a full pattern of depth charges was dropped on a contact at 1800 yards. Another contact an hour later was classified non-sub. On the 20th the convoy formed a single column for passing through Boca de Navios and moored at Trinidad. On the 25th the Campbell commenced patrolling off Boca de Navios as the convoy TAG-105 came out and formed. A contact on the 29th proved to be non-sub as was another four hours later. On the 30th the cutter having detached two merchant ships for Guantanamo Bay and one for Manati, was relieved of escort duty and on the 31st conducted a sound search south of St. Nicholas Mole, Haiti, returning to Guantanamo Bay at 1740.

1944

TRINIDAD CONVOY
On January 4, 1944, the Campbell departed Guantanamo Bay and relieving the escorts of convoy NG-407, began forming a Task Group of 5 escorts for the 19 ship convoy GAT-109. On the 7th two ships from Curaçao joined as did the Aruba section of 7 ships and 3 escorts. On the 10th the convoy passed through Bocas del Dragon and moored at Trinidad. On the 19th she left Trinidad with 4 escorts and convoy TAG-110. A contact which proved non-sub was investigated. 12 ships from Curaçao joined on the 21st and 5 ships from Aruba. On the 24th the SS Bethore was out of control due to a broken steam line and was screened by the Campbell, after being relieved of escort duty. The cutter's doctor attended a man wounded by the mishap, arriving at Guantanamo Bay on the 25th.

TO NORFOLK
The Campbell and six escorts accompanied convoy GAT-114 which left Guantanamo Bay on the 29th of January, 1944. Vessels from Aruba and Curaçao joined on the 1st of February. On the 3rd she had a contact classified as possible submarine and fired a full depth charge pattern and instituted a standard search. The contact proved to be non-sub. She moored at Trinidad on the lith. On the 5th she escorted the SS Belle Isle to Puerto Rico and on the 7th departed for Norfolk. She arrived on the 10th at Portsmouth Navy Yard and underwent overhaul and replacement until the 20th of February, 1944.

CONVOY TO CASABLANCA
The Campbell left Norfolk on the 23rd of February, 1944, to screen ahead of convoy UGS-3I4 as flagship of Task Force 61 with 15 escort vessels. On 1 March carrier-based fighter planes covered the convoy. On 6 March a man wearing a life ring, who had fallen overboard from one of the convoyed vessels, was picked up and returned to his ship. On the same day the cutter dropped a full depth charge pattern on a target classified as a submarine. The convoy executed 45° emergency turns and the USS Cockrill made two depth charge attacks after reporting sighting a periscope. The USS Cole remained to search the area. Extra lookouts were posted and an extra gun crew was put in standby action. Sweeps were conducted ahead of the convoy. On the 8th air coverage was sighted. On the 9th three vessels departed the convoy. On the 10th a doubtful contact was attacked by two of the escorts. On the same day, at Gibraltar, Task Force 61 was relieved by an English task force, and proceeded to Casablanca on the 11th where it moored until the 16th.

RETURN TO NEW YORK
Standing out of Casablanca on the 17th the Campbell joined convoy GUS-33 as flagship of 11 escorts of Task Force 61, On the 18th an escort dropped charges and remained with the contact half an hour. The escorts took turns of IFF and SG radar guard. On the 23rd a radar contact proved to be a Swedish vessel travelling independently. On the 29th two escorts were assigned to screen two vessels, one in tow when the tow line parted. Air coverage was received on the 30th and 31st. On 2 April the Chesapeake Bay section detached and later the Delaware Bay departed, On 3 April nine fast ships of the New York section detached to proceed independently and later that day the Campbell anchored off Staten Island.

AN AIR ATTACK
After undergoing ten days of repairs and alterations at Brooklyn Navy Yard, the Campbell carried out A/S exercises until 20 April, 1944, when she proceeded with other vessels of Task Force 61 to Norfolk. On the 23rd she commenced screening ahead of convoy UGS-40 as flagship of Task Force 61, air coverage being received until the 27th. The Oran section departed on 7 May and the Casablanca section on the 8th. The cutter dropped a five charge shallow pattern on a contact that day but failed to regain contact. Air coverage was received from the 7th until the 12th. Sound contacts were attacked by two escorts on the 9th and the Campbell dropped a four charge pattern on a contact later classified as non-sub. Later that day the convoy passed through the Straits of Gibraltar. On the 10th the Task Force was augmented to 13 escorts. Enemy aircraft warnings were received six time that day without any aircraft being sighted. On the 11th a smoke screen was laid and an air attack by 5 to 10 planes declared imminent. The Campbell commenced a fixed barrage at 2107 on bearings reported by radar, the target not then being in sight. When a wave of 12 to 15 planes forward of the port beam in line with this barrage, they were found to be below the bursts and the angle was adjusted accordingly. The plane attack lasted 30 minutes and consisted of 4 waves. One enemy plane was observed to go down to the Campbell's gunfire and three were damaged. In all 11 enemy planes were shot down by the convoy and escorts.

--27--


A 19 knot speed was maintained during the attack and the cutter maneuvered radically. One torpedo passed close astern and two others came near. The attacking planes were JU-88's. None of the escorts or convoy ships suffered casualties. On the 12th four embarrassing depth charges were dropped on a contact. On 13 May, the Task Force was relieved and the Campbell proceeded to Bizerte.

RETURN TO NEW YORK
The Campbell proceeded independently on 21 May, 1914, to close GUS-40 as flagship of Task Force 61, relieving the British escort. Air coverage was received daily until the 27th. On the 23rd, the Algiers section joined and on the 24th the Oran section. The Casablanca section joined on the 26th and on that day the Campbell dropped two embarrassing charges on a contact classified as non-sub. On the 30th another escort charged a doubtful contact, and several others were investigated. On 3 June, 1944, one vessel detached for the Netherlands West Indies, and air coverage was received on the 5th and 7th, when the Chesapeake section departed. After dropping a five charge embarrassing pattern on the 7th, the Campbell regained contact and then sighted a whale on the same bearing. On the 8th the Delaware section departed and on the 9th of June the Campbell entered New York Harbor with the remainder of the convoy.

CONVOY TO BIZERTE
After 10 days at the Brooklyn Navy Yard for repairs and replacements the Campbell proceeded to Casco Bay, Maine, on the 20th of June, 1944, and remained there until the 29th for drills and exercises. She proceeded to Norfolk on the 30th. On 4 July she got underway as flagship of Task Force 61 escorting convoy UGS-47. Air coverage was received from the 4th to the 8th of July. From time to time during the trip various escort vessels were absent from their regular stations conducting drills and exercises, screening merchant vessels that dropped astern, giving medical assistance to convoyed ships or diverting vessels from entering the convoy. Several sound contacts were investigated and depth charges dropped. Vessels from the Azores joined on 14 July. Air coverage was received on 17th and 18th of July. Vessels from Gibraltar joined on the 19th. On the 20th ships joined from Algiers and Bone and on the 22nd the British convoy Commodore relieved the U.S. Commodore. The convoy passed through the Tunisian War Channel on the 23rd moored at Bizerte.

RETURN TO NEW YORK
Standing out of Bizerte on the 30th of July, 1944, the Campbell, as flagship of Task Force 61, relieved the British escort of convoy GUS-47. On 1 August, 1944, ships bound for Algiers departed and vessels from that port joined. On the 3rd ships left for Casablanca and others from that port joined. A U.S. Liberator furnished air coverage on the 4th. One vessel detached on the 7th for Angra and two on the 13th. Air coverage was received on the 14th and 15th. The Chesapeake section departed on the 16th. The Campbell, after proceeding up the New York swept channel with the convoy on the 17th, reversed course and proceeded to Navy Yard Annex, Boston, where she remained on availability through the 28th of August, proceeding to Casco Bay to hold exercises until 7 September, 1944.

CONVOY TO BIZERTE
Proceeding independently to Norfolk on the 8th of September, she received camouflage paint until the 11th and on the 12th stood out of Chesapeake Bay as flagship of Task Force 61 accompanying UGS-54. While some of the escorts screened stragglers, two made an embarrassing attack on a contact on the 17th. A neutral vessel with lights encountered proved to be a man-of-war. On the 26th vessels joined from and departed for Casablanca. Next day the convoy passed through Gibraltar. Vessels joined from and departed for Oran. On 1 October, 1944, as ships joined from Algiers one of the escorts dropped an embarrassing charge on a doubtful contact. On the 2nd, ships joined from and departed for Bone. On the 3rd of October, the Campbell and Task Force 61 were relieved and proceeded to Bizerte. Later that day the cutter escorted a DE Division to Palermo, Sicily, returning to Bizerte on 8 October, 1944.

RETURN TO NEW YORK
On the same day, 8 October, 1944, the Campbell, as flagship of Task Force 61, relieved the British senior escort of convoy GUS-54. The Algiers contingent joined on the 10th and on the 11th a sound contact at 1000 yards was investigated and an 11 charge pattern discharged. On the 12th the Oran section joined and the Gibraltar section left. Three vessels departed for Casablanca on the 13th and one vessel joined from the Azores on the 17th. On the 24th, a PBM furnished air coverage. The Chesapeake section broke off on the 26th, with 3 escorts. On the 28th the Campbell proceeded up the New York channel with the convoy, reversed course and proceeded to Boston, where she remained at the South Boston Navy Yard Annex until 9 November, 1944.

CONVOY TO ALGERIA
On 9 November, 1944, the Campbell proceeded to Casco Bay, carrying on drills and exercises until the 16th when she proceeded independently to the Hampton Roads area, anchoring off Yorktown on the 17th. On the 21st she stood down Chesapeake Bay swept channel assuming station as flagship of Task Force 61 escorting the convoy UGS-61. Entering the Straits of Gibraltar on 7 December, she completed escort duties, convoyed ships proceeding independently to their destinations. Task Force 61, with Campbell, moored at Mers-el-Kebir, Algiers on December 8, 1944.

RETURN TO NEW YORK
On 13 December, 1944, the Campbell rendezvoused with convoy GUS-61, passing through Gibraltar next day, the Casablanca sector joined on the 15th. On December 27, the Chesapeake section departed and on the 28th the Delaware vessels left. The Campbell continued as flagship of Task Force 61 and on the 29th entered New York Harbor. She then proceeded as guide with four escorts toward Boston and moored at South Boston Navy Yard Annex on 30 December, 1944.

1945

CONVERSION TO AGC (COMBINED OPERATIONS COMMUNICATIONS HEADQUARTERS SHIP)
During January and February and until 28 March, 1945, the Campbell was at Boston Navy Yard undergoing conversion to an AGC type vessel. This is a combined operations-communications headquarters ship. On the 28th of March she departed for Hampton Roads, Va., arriving there on the 30th. The next day she proceeded to York Spit Channel, to rendezvous with Naval aircraft for training exercises. After various drills and tests she moved to Norfolk Navy Yard on April 7th and after, repair work to Norfolk on the 14th. After exercises conducted until the 23rd, she moored at the convoy escort pier May 13, 1945.

--28--


DEPARTS FOR PACIFIC
On May 13, 1945 she departed for Panama, C.Z., proceeded through the canal next day and set course for San Diego,, California. She was now attached to the Pacific Fleet. Reaching San Diego on the 27th she arrived at Pearl Harbor on 5 June, 1945, and shifted to submarine base for installation of radio equipment and repairs. She conducted training operations under DesPac until 24 July, 1945, when she departed for Saipan where she anchored on 3 August. Departing Saipan on 10 August she anchored in Manila on the 15th. She proceeded to Leyte on the 19th, arriving on the 22nd.

IN JAPAN
On 1 October, 1945, the Campbell was anchored at Wakanoura Wan, Honshu, Japan, as flagship for Communications Service Division 103. On the 30th she proceeded to Sasebo, mooring there on 1 November. On 26 November she was ordered to proceed to San Diego and report to DCGO, 11th Naval District for further orders. She departed Sasebo on the 30th of November, via Midway, arriving at Pearl Harbor on 12 December, 1945. She left Pearl Harbor on 15th mooring at San Diego on the 21st. On the 23rd she proceeded to Charleston, S.C. via Panama, being underway at the end of the year from Balboa, Canal Zone.

CGC Campbell

        COMMANDING OFFICER
December 1941 to
September 1942
  McNEIL, Donald C, Commander
September 1942 to
May 1943
  HIRSCHFIELD, James, A., Comdr.
May 1943 to
January 1944
  COWART Kenneth K., Commander
January 1944   LECKY, Robert S., Lt. Comdr.
February 1944 to
December 1945
  GRAY, Samuel F., Captain
December 1945   GARFIELD, Montague F., Comdr.


CGC DUANE

1942

WEATHER PATROL
The CGC Duane operated as a weather ship on the North Atlantic Weather Patrol during the first four months of World War II. Beginning on February 10, 1940, the Duane along with four other cutters had taken turns patrolling two weather stations maintained by the Coast Guard located as follows:

Station No. 1 --35°38'N--53°21'W
2 --37°44'N--41°13'W

The stations patrolled were areas about 100 miles square and one cutter would patrol a station usually for 21 day periods. Their daily weather reports were designed primarily for the protection of the rapidly Increasing trans-Atlantic air commerce.

ATTACKS UNDERWATER TARGET
It was while on weather patrol on February 9, 1942, that the Duane picked up a strong echo on the echo ranging machine, about 500 yards distant on the port beam. General quarters was sounded and one embarrassing depth charge was released set for 300 feet. The Duane made a run on the target releasing at five second intervals seven large depth charges (600 lb.) set to explode at 300 feet. She fired her "Y" gun with the third charge with depth setting of 200 feet. She continued to search for eight hours in the general area, when a suspicious underwater sound was heard. She sought better contact with negative results. Sea gulls were sighted three hours later with considerable oil on their bodies.

UNDERGOING CONVERSION
On April 1, 1942, the Duane was relieved from further duty in connection with the North Atlantic Weather Patrol and directed to report to the Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet, for convoy escort duty. She was in drydock at the Boston Navy Yard until April 8, 1942, undergoing conversion.

GROUNDED
Departing Boston the Duane passed through Cape Cod Canal on April 10, 1942 in a heavy snow. At 0529 she grounded at Hog Neck Light on the starboard edge of the channel. Attempting to back off without success, she requested aid and two hours later a tug passed her a tow line. The line parted ten minutes later and the current carried the cutter's stern downstream with the bow still grounded. When finally floated, the Duane was maneuvered to the center of the turning basin and returned to Boston for repairs. No hull damage was revealed but the dome for the underwater sound projector was believed crushed and binding on the projector. A board of investigation met to inquire into the facts after the cutter had drydocked for repairs.

ESCORTS CONVOY TO ICELAND
On April 19, 1942, the Duane was joined by the CGC Bibb on anti-submarine exercises. These were followed by attack teacher exercises at Halifax, where the Duane arrived on the 28th escorting a merchant vessel in company with a British escort. On May 2, 1942, the cutter was underway en route Reykjavik, Iceland, Intercepting convoy SCL-81 on May 6th, the convoy consisting of 18 vessels with 5 escorts, including the Duane, Bibb and 3 Navy destroyers. The trip was uneventful, the convoy arriving at Hvalfjordur on the 8th.

MEETS INCOMING CONVOY
On May 15, 1942, the Duane was ordered to meet convoy SC-83 and take over four vessels in it which were bound for Iceland, a Navy Escort assisting. The convoy was sighted on the 17th when the cutter took over 13 vessels. On the 20th she dropped the convoy at Grotta, Iceland, the escort unit then proceeding to Hvalfjordur, Iceland, where the Duane remained moored until the 26th.

JOINS EASTBOUND CONVOY
The Duane stood out of Reykjavik, Iceland, on June 10, 1942, escorting a 15 ship convoy ONSJ-102, with two Navy destroyers to join up with the eastbound convoy ONS-102. She took charge of the main convoy on the 16th as the Campbell and a British escort vessel searched for a submarine. Several hours later the Duane was ordered to assist the Ingham in a search. Ordered to rejoin the convoy at 1900, she and the Ingham were unable to find it during the night, as it had made a sharp evasive turn to shake off the subs. The two, cutters finally sighted the convoy at 1840 on the 4th end after release from further escort duty returned to Reykjavik on the 23rd, mooring at Hvalfjordur the same evening.

--29--


MEETS CONVOY FOR SEARCH
On July 3, 1942 the Duane proceeded to sea In company with two Navy destroyers in search formation to intercept a convoy of 13 ships on the 5th. A report had been received by radio on the "BN" broadcast that two submarines were operating in the vicinity. The submarines failed to materialize, however, and on the 9th the convoy stood up the swept channel and fjord for anchorage at Hvalfjordur.

SIGHTS WHALES IN SUB SEARCH
While anchored at Hvalfjordur on July 25, 1942, the Duane was ordered to proceed to 64°N,--24°W, where a plane had reported sighting a submarine. The Duane got underway immediately and after proceeding for 5 hours at full speed arrived at noon in the vicinity of the reported sub, with the plane nowhere in sight. She began a search on a retiring search curve. Seven hours later she sighted what appeared to be a stick of bombs on the port beam exploding on the surface at the horizon. This was repeated at interval and the Duane changed course immediately and closed in. It soon developed that the high columns of water were spouts of whales, blowing. The Duane resumed the search until 2158 when she was ordered to proceed to Reykjavik.

ADMIRAL KING ON BOARD
Next day the ship was prepared and at 1455 Admiral Ernest J. King, Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet, his Staff, Admiral D. S. Beary, Commander Task Group 24.6, his staff; and Mr. Stephen Early, Secretary to the President, came on board and were received with proper honors. They weighed anchor and proceeded up Hvalfjordur Fjord on an inspection cruise of harbor defenses. The party left ship at 1628.

SEARCHES FOR SUB
While moored at Hvalfjordur on August 3, 1942, the Duane on orders got underway and proceeded down fjord to search for a submarine reported to be 20 miles southwest of Reykjavik. A British destroyer was noted standing in the same direction. The search for the submarine continued on the 4th when a dispatch corrected the position of the sighting as farther westward where a plane was sighted at 0843, circling. On nearer approach the plane was observed to be dropping smoke bombs. The plane left on the arrival of the Duane. Listening conditions were excellent and the search continued throughout the morning. At 1500 the Duane proceeded to port for repairs to her steering gear which had failed and left two Navy and one British destroyer to take up the search in a heavy fog that had set in during the night. The fog obscured Skagi Light and the Duane proceeded by radio compass and soundings to anchor at Reykjavik at 0235 on the 5th.

INTERCEPTS SWEDISH VESSELS
On August 9, 1942, the Duane stood out of Reykjavik in company with a Navy destroyer to rendezvous with an Iceland bound convoy. On the 12th she sighted suddenly, out of a rain squall, the Norwegian MV Vibran, with whom she exchanged signals and who proved to be friendly, after an exchange of messages with Commander in Chief, Western Approaches. She was allowed to proceed east, but was examined closely and found to have no fittings for fueling U-boats. She had clean sides, no unusual armament and a deck cargo of invasion barges. On the 13th she met a British destroyer and two other vessels searching for derelicts and survivors from the convoy. At 1445 the Duane turned the convoy over to a British escort and then proceeded to intercept convoy SC-95.

A TORPEDOED VESSEL
While escorting convoy SC-95 in company with the Navy destroyer USS Schenk, the Duane early on August 15, 1942, heard two explosions, followed by white rockets and "snowflakes." They observed, on closing in, the black bulk of a ship among the ships of the convoy, with no sign of activity on or about her. At first she seemed to have the outline of the Norluna and that vessel was consequently believed to be the ship that had been torpedoed. Smoke seemed to be coming from her but no flames were visible. The Schenk rejoined the convoy but the Duane remained in the vicinity a short while longer in the hope of contacting the submarine. While it was deemed advisable for the Duane to pick up survivors without cover from the Schenk, it was also very hazardous to leave the convoy without protection. When the Schenk rejoined the convoy she reported one straggler and two ships remaining in convoy. The Duane, by changing course, attempted to intercept the straggler, without success. Later in the morning a TBS was heard indicating that an American merchant vessel had been sighted with survivors on board. That night three submarines seemed to be following the convoy, according to signals, to the eastward. Increasing signal strength indicated that they were getting closer and ships were darkened for protection. On the 17th a dispatch received indicated that a plane had on the preceding day sighted the Norluna who proved not to have been torpedoed but the straggler from the convoy with the torpedoed vessel's survivors, 30 miles north of the convoy, proceeding at 9 knots. No attempt was made to bring her back into the convoy as she was several hours ahead of the convoy, had air coverage, and would arrive at port with survivors, some of whom might require prompt medical care, before the convoy. She was believed reasonably safe as no submarines were reported in the vicinity, the convoy, it was believed, having successfully evaded those contacted on the 14th and 15th. The Duane dropped the convoy off at Grotta at 1125 on the 17th.

CONVOY RENDEZVOUS
The Duane remained at anchor at Reykjavik through September 5, 1942, and then stood off Grotta Point with the Navy destroyer USS LEAHY for rendezvous with an outgoing convoy of 4 ships. On the 8th the convoy encountered a fresh gale, blowing from the east and convoy speed was reduced to 3.5 knots, one vessel suddenly dropping out of the convoy because of engine trouble. She was advised to return to Reykjavik. On the 11th the Duane and Leary were relieved by a corvette and proceeded to join the Iceland bound convoy SC-99. This convoy, which consisted of 66 ships, was intercepted on 13 September and the Duane and Leary assigned stations as escorts. On the 17th, the Duane made contact at close range and dropped an "E" charge in close proximity to the convoy and then proceeded through the convoy to the spot where the charge was dropped, searching astern until midnight without results. The convoy was anchored off Grotta Point, in Reykjavik outer harbor, on the 17th without further Incident.

STORM SCATTERS CONVOY
The Duane remained moored at Reykjavik, Iceland, from September 17 to October 4, 1942. On October 5th she began escorting, in company with the CGC Ingham and USS Schenk, the outbound 5 ship convoy, ONSJ-136. On the 7th the weather increased in intensity, blowing a whole gale. The convoy scattered badly, each escort remaining with a small group of ships. The Duane stayed with the Yukon until about noon when contact with her was lost and the Duane began searching for other ships in the convoy. Finally the one ship was found travelling alone, while the Ingham was with another ship 6000 yards to the west.

--30--


The Ingham was instructed to bring the two convoyed ships together and the Duane continued to search for others during the afternoon. The Ingham's radar being superior, the Duane took over the escort of the two ships and the Ingham began to search for the others. The Schenk reported being with another ship of the convoy and sighting others to the northward. The Ingham found and joined the latter group and knowing the course and speed of the others finally brought them all together at 2115, with three ships still missing. What remained of the convoy was kept together with difficulty during the night, which was marked by rain and sleet squalls. At daylight on the 8th the convoy was again badly scattered. Air coverage appeared and the plane was asked to search for the three stragglers. Difficulty was encountered with the SS Peter Helms which was repeatedly cautioned about smoke. The speed was reduced to 7 knots but during the night the Peter Helms left the convoy, her master thoroughly miffed about the admonitions regarding smoke, and proceeded independently. On the 9th the main convoy was sighted and the convoy ONSJ-136 turned over to its escort commander. The Duane, with the Ingham and Schenk, then proceeded to Hvalfjordur, arriving on the 12th.

SABOTAGE SUSPECTED
Weighing anchor on October 18, 1942, to shift anchorage, the steering gear jammed and investigation showed that a vertical shaft on the follow-up link system had been subjected to severe strain and had twisted about 25 degrees. It was noted that the cut adjusting nut on the hydraulic end was loose and the adjusting screw out of place on the starboard side. This was undoubtedly the cause of the accident to the steering gear. It was not believed possible for this to have come out of adjustment unless it had been tampered with. The steering gear had been tested before getting underway but the derangement had not been noted. Precautionary measures were taken in handling the wheel, in case sabotage were being attempted.

ICELAND CONVOY ESCORTED TO MAIN WESTWARD CONVOY
On November 7, 1942, the Duane proceeded to Reykjavik and at 1545 began escorting 8 vessels off Grotta Point in company with the CGC Bibb. On the 9th the Ingham joined the escort group which proceeded westward. On the night of the 10th, the wind increased to force 8, and the radar indicated the convoy was scattering. During the afternoon of the 11th, the Duane was engaged in bringing four vessels together and escorted these until about 1600, when the Bibb joined up with the remaining vessels. Again on the night of the 11th, two vessels were apparently straggling, but not seriously. Due to sea conditions no attempt was made to bring them back. They were rounded up next day, however, and the convoy proceeded intact, except for two vessels believed to be with the Ingham. The weather moderated during the day but the Ingham failed to join. On the 14th the Duane scouted 15 miles ahead and 5 miles south for the main convoy but failed to sight it. The main convoy was sighted on the 15th and the Duane turned her ships over to it and returned to Reykjavik.

ESCORT CONVOYS TO AND FROM ICELAND
On November 25, 1942, the Duane proceeded westward and on the 29th stood in to join convoy HX-216 proceeding from Iceland, with two Navy destroyers. On December 1st they were relieved of further duty with convoy HI-216 and proceeded to contact convoy SC-110 proceeding toward Ireland. On the 2nd, sighted convoy SCL-110 which broke off from SC-110 and set course 350°T at 7 knots with the Duane in the van and the two Navy destroyers on the port and starboard beams. One contact which proved non-sub was investigated and a floating mine was sunk. On the 3rd moored at Reykjavik and on the 4th proceeded to Hvalfjordur.

COLLISION WITH A DRIFTER
On December 17th, 1942, the Duane proceeded to Reykjavik and on the 26th, in standing for anchorage, collided with the Norwegian drifter Boorene, that vessel sinking about 800 yards from Engey Light. All of the crew were taken off by another drifter and the Duane saved 11 bags of mail. On the 27th the convoy ONSJ-156, with seven ships, commenced forming and proceeded out of Reykjavik, having air coverage on the 29th. At 0700 on that day the Campbell augmented the escort force. On the 30th convoy ONS-156 was sighted on a converging course and the Duane, maneuvering in the vicinity of the Spencer was assigned outer screen on starboard bow of the main convoy. On the 31st she was assigned station A.

1943

BRINGS CONVOY TO ICELAND
The Duane and the Navy destroyer Schenk were proceeding from convoy ONS-156 on January 1, 1943, to intercept the eastbound convoy SC-114. At daylight the Duane sighted the British SS Ingman, who proved to be a straggler from ONS-156. She was informed of the rendezvous position for stragglers for 1st and 2nd of January and permitted to proceed. The Schenk sighted friendly aircraft at 0950 on the 2nd and asked whether SC-114 had been sighted. The plane made reconnaissance and returned with the information that the convoy was 25 miles ahead. The Duane and Schenk thereupon reported for escort duty. At 2030 on the 2nd the Navy destroyer Babbit joined. On the 3rd the convoy SCL-114 was detached from the main convoy. It consisted of three vessels in convoy with two stragglers. On the 5th the Duane dropped the convoy off Grotta Point and proceeded to fuel in Reykjavik Harbor. On 14 January, 1943, the Duane received orders to join east-bound convoy SC-116, bound for Iceland, which was threatened with a heavy sub attack. The Babbit joined off Skagi, Iceland on the 15th and the Duane proceeded at 18 knots. The Babbit being unable to maintain this speed, due to the heavy seas, was directed to continue at best speed. Later that evening the Duane slowed to 16 knots due to heavy seas, increasing again early on the 16th at 18 knots and reached the estimated convoy position at noon. She began searching south and east, while the Babbit searched south and west. Two hours later she sighted the convoy 12 miles distant and notified the Babbit. The Duane was directed to act independently in the van of the convoy and the Babbit joining an hour later, took station to her starboard. Eight hours later the Schenk joined and was assigned a station to,starboard of the Babbit. On the 18th the convoy had plane coverage and one of the British destroyers detached to proceed to Reykjavik with leaking fuel tanks and boiler trouble. On the 19th the Babbit detached to escort the USS Polaris to Reykjavik while a PBY furnished air coverage for 4 hours. Another British destroyer departed for Reykjavik. On the 20th the Polish destroyer Burza and FNS Eglantine departed for Reykjavik for fuel. The Duane sank a floating mine. On the 21st machine gun fire was noted from ship #43, the reason not being determined. Another British destroyer departed for Reykjavik for fuel. On the 22nd the wind was force 10 with a heavy sea and a convoyed vessel sent an SOS that her stern post was being carried away. Another reported her No. 1 hatch stove in and the master injured. The Schenk returned to Reykjavik with a man who had sustained serious face injuries and possible skull fracture, due to the rough seas. The Duane was detailed to stand by a straggler reported to have dropped astern

--31--


with steering trouble. On the 23rd air coverage was furnished and the Iceland group detached, with a straggler, escorted by two Navy destroyers. On the 24th the Duane detached from convoy and returned to Hvalfjordur.

SS DORCHESTER TORPEDOED--SIGHTS SUB AND SEARCHES
The Duane was underway again on January 28, 1943, in company with 2 Navy destroyers as escort of the westbound convoy ONSJ-163 consisting of 9 ships. Air coverage was furnished on the 29th. Stragglers from the main convoy ONS-163 were sighted on,the 30th and the main convoy was joined at noon. The two Navy destroyers returned to Reykjavik and the Duane was assigned to the port bow station of the main convoy. On February 2nd a U.S. bomber passed en route to base and the peaks of the mountains behind Cape Farewell, Greenland were sighted. On February 3, 1943, the Duane departed the convoy to proceed to the scene of the torpedoing of the SS Dorchester at 59°22'N, 48°42'W, arriving at that position at 1525. Began diagonal search of a 5 mile area extending 75 miles down wind and at 2000 a rectangular search pattern around same area. Dim lights were reported early on the 4th twice on the same relative bearing. Returning to the position of the torpedoing at daylight, oil patches, empty life jackets, boats and other small wreckage was sighted. At 0937 a submarine was sighted about 8 miles distant and the Duane headed for it at 19 knots. The sub headed directly away after drawing right and than turned right. Half an hour later lt submerged at 10,500 yards range and the Duane began a retiring search curve allowing for the sub's speed of 6 knots. An hour later the cutter began using target speeds of 3 knots for the search curve. The retiring search plan was abandoned after a 300° arc had been completed and the cutter searched 6 miles from the point of submersion without results. The search ems continued using the D.R. plot. At 1445 the CGC Tampa arrived. The Duane passed 8 bodies in life jackets, and two swamped lifeboats, one containing ten, and the other four, bodies of soldiers. On the 5th the search for survivors continued in company with the Tampa. A pattern of depth charges was dropped on an underwater sound contact. At 0572 the search was abandoned and at 0900 a new search was begun to the westward on a rectangular pattern. Ordered to proceed to St. John's, N.F. on the 6th, the Duane encountered a disabled ship from convoy ONS-163 screened by a British escort early on the 7th and later two stragglers from the same convoy. She began screening the first vessel which had made repairs and was steaming at 8 knots for St. John's. Five hours later she dropped a five charge pattern on a good underwater contact with no apparent results, searching the vicinity for 2 hours without regaining contact. On the 8th she stood through a thick fog to locate the escort task unit of convoy ONS-167, but was unable to do so and was ordered to proceed to St. John's where she moored at 1625.

REPAIRS AND EXERCISES
On February 9, 1943, the Duane stood out of St. John's Harbor to escort the USS Orizaba to Boston and arrived there on the 12th. Next day she proceeded to Curtis Bay arriving on the 17th and remained there until March 21, 1943, undergoing repairs. On the 23rd of March she proceeded to Casco Bay arriving on the 27th for anti-submarine exercises, attack teacher drill, and instructions in range finding. Returning to Boston on March 29th, she entered drydock for repairs to her QC (underwater sound apparatus) dome and was underway to Argentia on March 31, 1943.

HELPS DESTROY SUBMARINE
Arriving at Argentia on 2 April, 1943, the Duane remained moored until 11 April when aha became part of CTU 24.1.3 which included CGC Spencer, as flagship, and 4 British escorts. This task unit met convoy HX-233 an route Londonderry on the 12th. On the 17th the SS Fort Rampart, a convoy vessel, was torpedoed and the corvette Arvida took aboard 49 survivors, three in need of medical attention. These the Duane took aboard. At 1110 the Duane was ordered to take the station ahead as the Spencer was dropping back through the convoy, following a contact on which she had already dropped two patterns of depth charges. Five minutes later the Spencer ordered the Duane to close her and take over the contact. The Duane began a search an the indicated location and twenty minutes later a 740 ton German U-boat surfaced about 2700 yards from the Duane's quarter. A minute later the Spencer opened fire and the Duane want ahead at full speed toward the submarine and after clearing her line of fire so as not to hit the Spencer, also opened fire. The submarine was now at right angles to the line of fire and several hits were obtained, all nicely centered on the submarine's coming tower. Seven minutes later, as men on deck were seen jumping overboard, the Duane ceased fire. The conning tower was smoking liberally and the submarine was moving ahead slowly, circling to the right. The Duane began maneuvering to pick up survivors, and by 1158 had picked up 9 German enlisted men and one officer. Then she screened the Spencer while that cutter sent a boat to the submarine. Twenty five minutes later the submarine, later ascertained to be the U-175, sank stern first. The Duane lowered a boat and picked up eleven more German enlisted men and one more officer. Four of the prisoners received medical attention. On the 20th the Duane moored at North Gourock, Scotland, and delivered all prisoners to the custody of the British authorities and then proceeded to Londonderry, arriving on April 21, 1943.

A GERMAN OFFICER TALES
While putting on survivors clothing on the Duane, one of the prisoners from the German submarine, mmmmmm mmmm mmmmmmmmmm began talking freely and rather fluently in English. He had been afraid that the Duane would not stop to pick up the submarine's survivors in spite of his crew's shouts and arm-waiving. He spoke of how cold the water was. He had jumped in soon after the submarine had surfaced. "It is not easy down there" he said. "The bombs were bad. The ship was not hurt, but inside it was all bad. Everything shaking, things fall down. It smelled bad and hurt the eyes." He commented on the excellence of the attack. "We came up and saw you in the periscope, but you saw us and we knew it was all over. Our chance to get you was gone. We don't like the bombs. It is hard when they shake the boat. We went down when you saw us and the bombs started going off--things stopped and would not work---a lot of things broke." He explained that they had raised the flippers and pumped air to try to steady the submarine. Not being able to steady her they surfaced and then our guns started and very soon after that he jumped into the water. "Did you see the other boat?" he asked. "She picked up some of your crew" he was told. Then it was realised that he meant another submarine. He had been in Barbados a year ago and up until two trips ago had been in the South Atlantic where they had sunk a six or seven thousand ton ship full of "cement and things," bound for Moravia from Trinidad. Later he criticised his commanding officer for making a daylight attack, which he considered proper procedure only if the moon shone so brightly at night to make attacks after dark risky for the submarine.

--32--


RETURN TO U.S.
The Duane departed Londonderry for Moville on April 29, 1943, and on May 1st was en route Boston in company with the Spencer. Arriving at Argentia on May 5, the Duane began escorting the Sabine Sun to Boston on the 8th and arrived there on the 12th. She was undergoing repairs until the 24th, proceeding to New York on the 25th.

PLANES DAMAGED BY SUB
Joining Task Force 69 on May 28, 1943, the Duane began escorting convoy UGS-9 to Casablanca. On the 8th of June she had a bearing on a submarine and later aircraft from a carrier attacked a surfaced submarine 17 miles from the convoy. Two destroyers were, sent to attack the submarine but it submerged when they were 7 miles away. One plane returned to the carrier with an engine smoking as a result of gunfire from the submarine. On the 10th an Army bomber was over the convoy and on the 11th Army and Navy planes provided coverage. There was a collision between two convoy vessels on the 12th and on the 13th a Spanish vessel was sighted. On the 14th the Duane dropped three patterns of depth charges on an underwater contact. On the 15th the task force began escorting the Casablanca section o: the convoy into port where they moored next day.

RETURN TO NEW YORK
The Duane stood out of Casablanca on June 21, 1943, in company with the Spencer, Campbell, and three Navy destroyers for a sweep before convoy departure and next day joined the escort of the Casablanca section of convoy GUS-8A which they joined shortly after noon, relieving the British escort. On the 28th and 29th contacts were depth charged and investigated by escort vessels without results. While fueling at sea on July 1st the Duane suffered slight damage to her propeller guard and gun platform sponson support. A sound contact was attacked by an escort destroyer. Another destroyer departed for Bermuda on the 6th to hospitalise an injured merchant vessel seaman. The New York section of 16 ships broke off on the 8th with the Duane (Flag), Spencer, Campbell and a Navy destroyer as escort. The convoy anchored near Ambrose Lightship late on the 10th in a thick fog, moving into the harbor on the 12th of July, 1943.

CONVOY TO CASABLANCA
The Duane proceeded to New London on July 23rd, 1943, standing out next day for training exercises and then left for Hampton Roads in company with the Spencer and 3 Navy destroyers arriving on the 25th. On the 27th stood out to join Task Force 64, escorting UGS-31 to Casablanca. On August 7th one charge was dropped on a doubtful contact classified non-sub. Entering Casablanca on August 13, 1943, the Duane moored in the inner harbor.

RETURN TO NEW YORK AND BOSTON
On August 19, 1943, the Duane proceeded to Gibraltar with Task Force 64 and next day departed as escort to convoy GUS-12. The Casablanca section escorted by the Spencer and three other escorts joined later that day. Obtaining a sound contact at 2200 yards on the 31st the Duane attacked with a shallow pattern of three charges but a study of the recorder trace revealed the contact as non-sub. On September 3rd the Norfolk section departed. On the 5th the Duane detached from the New York section as lt entered the swept channel of New York harbor and, along with the Spencer proceeded to Boston mooring at the South Boston Navy Yard on the 6th.

ATTACKS SUB EN ROUTE CASABLANCA
She remained on availability from the 7th to the 23rd of September undergoing repairs and on the 24th proceeded to Casco Bay for conning, machine gun, anti-sub and anti-aircraft practice. Proceeding to Norfolk with the Campbell on October 2, 1943, she was again underway en route Casablanca on the 5th as escort for convoy UGS-20 in company with the Campbell and 8 Navy destroyers. On the 7th she dropped three depth charges and fired two K guns on a good contact which had no propeller beats or doppler effect. Regaining contact she dropped an eight charge pattern but abandoned further search after two hours. Another pattern of 10 depth charges was dropped on a contact on the 12th without results. On the 20th the Casablanca section detached with the Duane, Campbell and 3 Navy escorts and moored at Casablanca on the 21st.

RETURN TO BOSTON
On October 29, 1943, the Duane, Campbell and 3 Navy vessels began escorting the Casablanca section of GUS-19, joining Task Force 65 with the main convoy later that day. On November 1st and 2nd sen were transferred from two of the convoyed vessels to the Duane for medical treatment. On the 13th the New York section broke off with the Duane and 4 Navy vessels. On the 15th the Duane practiced dropping a shallow 50 foot pattern of charges and conducted tests with hedgehog. Later she detached from the Task Force and proceeded independently to Boston mooring at the South Boston Navy Yard on the 16th for 10 days availability.

CARIBBEAN DUTY
On November 28th the Duane stood out of Boston in company with the Campbell and arrived at Guantanamo Bay on December 2nd. On the 4th she was underway with a Dutch warship and 4 PC's as escort for convoy GAT-103 en route Trinidad, B.W.I. On the 7th the Aruba section of 5 ships detached as did the Dutch warship. An SC escorted two vessels to Curaçao while an unescorted ship from Curaçao joined. On the 9th the convoy entered Bocas de Dragon swept channel and on the 10th moored at Trinidad.

MAKES CONTACT
Underway on December 17, 1943, as Commander, Task Unit 4.1.2, two sound contacts were made and lost on 19 December and a two ship anti-submarine search plan was commenced. Later an area was searched in which a plane had reported contact with a submarine. On the 20th medical aid was rendered for an Argentia vessel contacted. On the 22nd the escort vessels detached from the convoy and the Duane after refueling at Santa Lucia returned to Trinidad on the 25th. On the 30th she was underway escorting convoy TAG-106 as Commander Task Group 26.4 with four PC boats.

1944

CARIBBEAN CONVOY
On January 1, 1944, the Duane was underway escorting TAG-106. Three merchant vessels joined the convoy from Curaçao escorted by an SC which escorted one of the convoy vessels back to that port. That evening six merchant vessels joined from Aruba escorted by two SC's, which later returned to' Aruba. Early on the 4th another convoy (TRUJILLO-28) was diverted southward from the convoy's path. Three merchant vessels were detached at 0730 and at 0810 a Guantanamo section of 3 vessels proceeded independently. Later a Navy destroyer and a

--33--


British escort joined the convoy as did 3 merchant vessels escorted by a YMS. The convoy arrived at Guantanamo at 2249 on the 4th.

CONVERSION TO AGC
On January 12, 1944 the Duane was en route independently to Norfolk where she moored on the 16th at the Norfolk Navy Yard. From January 17th, 1944 until March 6, 1944, she was at Norfolk Navy Yard undergoing conversion to, an AGC (combined operations-communications headquarters ship). Departing the Navy Yard on the 7th she underwent a series of tests and returned to the Yard on the 19th for a period of availability until the 28th when she moved to N.O.B., Norfolk until April 3rd.

FLAGSHIP OF COMEIGHTHPHIB
She departed Norfolk on April 3rd as a member of convoy UGS-38, which was escorted by Task Force 66. On the 18th she reported to the Commander, Eighth Amphibious Force, Mediterranean for duty. She was detached on the 20th and proceeded under escort to Algiers. The Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Northwest African Waters, inspected her on the 22nd. She left Algiers on the 23rd for Naples arriving on the 25th and next day Rear Admiral F. J. Lowry, Commander, Eighth Amphibious Force, Mediterranean shifted his flag to the Duane from the USS Biscayne. The Duane stood out of Naples dn the 28th escorted by the Biscayne and Seer and after the 29th proceeded independently to Bizerte, Tunisia. She proceeded to Palermo, Sicily on May 5th and to Naples on the 9th, returning to Bizerte on the 20th. She departed Bizerte on the 4th for Naples via Palermo where she moored on the 7th returning to Bizerte on the 11th. Between 14th and 21st the Duane made another trip to Palermo, Salerno and Naples, where she remained until 29 July, 19hh. On the 30th Major General O'Daniels and his staff reported on board to take part in assault practice exercise on the 31st.

GUIDES LCT CONVOY TO CORSICA
The Duane remained at Naples until August 9, 1944, when Major General John W. O'Daniels and his operational staff reported on board. That afternoon the Duane got underway as guide to LCT convoy SS-1. She was in radio contact with the Island of Sardinia on the 10th and on the 11th five British minesweepers proceeded ahead of the convoy to sweep Bonifacio Strait. On the 12th the convoy stood into Ajaccio, Corsica and anchored.

GUIDES LCT'S TOWARD SOUTHERN FRANCE
On the evening of the 13th of August she stood out of Ajaccio as guide of the LCT convoy, with its commander and Commander, Task Force 81i embarked on board. Upon reaching point "AN" on the 14th she departed the LCT convoy SS-1 to join convoy SS-1B assuming duty as guide at 1325. On the 15th she was still underway as guide of LCT convoy SS-1B. At 0451 the order "STOP" was passed to the LCT convoy on the outer transport area of Red Beach where the Duane now was and the cutter was released as guide. The Duane got underway at 0506 and at 0531 stopped engines and took station on Queen Red reference vessel.

ASSAULT WAVES DEPART
At 0600 on August 15, 19th, naval bombardment of shore targets commenced. Fighters were circling overhead and enemy aircraft were reported 10 miles northeast. At 0617 Wave No. 1 of assault craft departed and a minute later fire was observed In the LCT convoy, astern to port, either a burning Vessel or barrage balloon on fire. This was followed by a loud explosion and a column of water east of the transport area. Then came a warning-that friendly bombing missions were about to arrive at five minutes intervals from the southeast. Meanwhile Wave No. 2 of assault, craft departed followed at ten minute intervals by Waves No. 3 and No. 4.

AIR BOMBARDMENT
The air bombardment of the beach began at 0700 with 36 medium bombers and the Duane, with all assault craft, proceeded from the outer to the inner transport area. A P-47 plane was observed falling and crashed into the sea, bursting into flames. The pilot, descending by parachute, was picked up by a PC boat. At 0749 wave #1 was one mile from the beach.

LANDING AT "H" HOUR
Wave #1 landed on Yellow Beach at 0800 and 7 minutes later LCT's were proceeding toward the beach. Fifteen minutes after that the LCI wave departed, heading for the beach. This was followed by the DUKW wave and another LCT wave. Little resistance was reported from Red and Yellow Beaches at 0903 and an hour later Alpha Red Beach reported satisfactory progress. Smoke blowing from the beaches reduced visibility. Major General O'Daniels and part of the operational staff (HQ Co. 3rd Infantry Division) departed the Duane in an LCVP at 1044. Two hours later a smoke screen was laid down west of the Duane to prevent attack on shipping by shore batteries, followed by another screen along the western edge of the Inner Red Transport Area.

SHORE BOMBARDMENT
The RMS Orion, lying east of the Duane, commenced a shore bombardment at 1507, firing a shore bombardment at 1507, firing over the Duane for 23 minutes until the gun emplacements ashore which were her targets were reported knocked out. At 1612 the Duane got underway and proceeded to Bale de Cavalaire, anchoring there 35 minutes later. An alert was sounded as sixteen unidentified planes approached. LST's were observed unable to beach directly on Red Beach, a pontoon causeway being used in one case. Fires were still burning or smouldering in the hills and frequent detonations were presumed to be demolitions by Navy units. At 2046 all ships in the vicinity began operating their smoke generators.

FIRES ON PLANE
Next morning, August 16, 1944, the Duane departed for another anchorage and that evening at 2100 all batteries on board fired at a plane identified as enemy. The smoke generator was put in operation and a boat lowered to make smoke with portable smoke pots, laying a screen ahead of the ship. On the 17th the Duane again anchored in Bale de Cavalaire. Vice Admiral Hewitt, Commander Eighth U.S. Fleet,came aboard to visit Rear Admiral Lowry. The Duane made smoke as various alerts were given from the 18th to the 21st with shore and ship batteries frequently firing on unidentified planes.

E BOATS REPORTED
On the 21st of August, shortly after midnight, a report was received that E boats were in the outer Alpha area and that one might have gotten through. All ships were ordered darkened for the rest of the night. On the 25th Transport Division #3 stood into the anchorage, followed on the 30th by Transport Division #1 and #5, which departed that evening.

TRIPS MADE FROM BIZERTE
The Duane remained anchored in Baie de Cavalaire, France, until 10 September, 1944, when she stood out, stopping at

--34--


Coast Guard Cutter Duane
COAST GUARD CUTTER DUANE

Coast Guard Cutter Ingham
COAST GUARD CUTTER INGHAM

--35--


Ajaceio, Corsica several hours next day and scoring at Naples on the 12th. She remained there until the 19th, made a 9-day round trip to Bizerte, and after returning to Naples on the 28th she remained there until October 1, 1944, and then proceeded to Bale de Cavalaire, Toulon and Marseilles, returning to Bizerte on the 8th of October and remaining there until the 24th. Leaving for Palermo on that date aha returned to Bizerte on the 29th of October and remained there until the 13th of November. Departing Bizerte on the 14th she made stops at Naples and Palermo and returned on the 20th. Another trip to Naples and Palermo was begun on the 30th of November returning to Bizerte on December 5th, 1944.

1945

The Duane was stationed at Bizerte until June, 1945, when she departed for Charleston, via Bermuda, arriving there on 10 July, 1945. From that date until the end of 1945, she was at the U.S. Naval Shipyard, Charleston, S.C. undergoing repairs and conversion.

CGC Duane

        COMMANDING OFFICER
December 1941 to
January 1943
  MARTINSON, Albert M., Comdr.
January 1943 to
July 1943
  BRADBURY, Harold O., Captain
July 1943 to
May 1945
  JEWELL, Robert C., Captain
May 1945 to
December 1945
  DIRKS, John A., Commander


CGC INGHAM

1941

ON DUTY WITH NAVY
During 1941 the CGC Ingham was already on duty with the Navy. On April 25, 1941, she relieved the Campbell and took station at Lisbon, Portugal, in furtherance of our national interests there.

1942

FIRST SUBMARINE CONTACT
With our entrance into the war the Ingham returned to Boston and early in 1942 began escorting our convoys to Europe. It was while cruising in convoy formation on February 6, 1942, that the sound operator picked up a sound contact at 1900 yards. The contact was described as "mushy" and one charge was dropped, set at 100 feet. A short while later she regained contact and dropped an embarrassing intermediate pattern of five charges. About one minute after the last detonation a considerable number of large white bubbles were seen in the area. The spot was circled and soundings continued for 45 minutes on all headings before search was abandoned.

SUBMARINE SIGHTED
Next day, February 7, 1942, a Navy escort in the convoy, while patrolling, reported a submarine on the surface distant about 2 miles. The Ingham began running down the indicated bearing at 15 knots but sighted nothing. One Navy destroyer which was searching in the vicinity, dropped a depth charge pattern. After several hours of search another Navy destroyer made contact and dropped a complete pattern in the vicinity of the water light dropped previously by the Ingham. The Ingham and the destroyer then searched an area with a five mile radius from the last contact but failing to regain it, rejoined the convoy.

CONVOY TO IRELAND
The Ingham departed Casco Bay on May 16, 1942, and proceeded alone for Argentia, N.F., to report to Commander Task Force 24 and Task Unit Commander 24.1.3 who was aboard the CGC Campbell. After reporting on the 18th, unloading supplies and taking on miscellaneous small supplies, the Ingham rendezvoused on the 20th with T.U. 24.1.3 consisting of the Campbell and four Canadian corvettes. The convoy HX-190 of 18 vessels was taken over that day. On the 25th the convoy was divided into two parts and the Ingham and Agassiz and six faster merchant vessels proceeded ahead of the main convoy. The convoy was dropped at Londonderry on the 27th and the Ingham continued to Lough Foyle, mooring on the 28th.

RETURNS TO ICELAND
While moored from June 4 to June 10, 1942, parties from the Ingham were detailed to a British Training Unit for instruction in lookout duty, anti-aircraft defense and submarine attack, the latter being with an attack teacher aboard HMS Osprey. On June 10, 1942, she weighed anchor and in company with the Campbell and four Canadian corvettes proceeded out of River Foyle to Intercept the 48 ship convoy ONS-102. While patrolling the starboard bow of the convoy on the 13th, the Ingham obtained a firm contact and fired two "K" gun charges. Regaining the contact she fired a complete pattern of 3 large charges astern and 5 from "K" guns. The contact disappeared and no further action was taken. On the 14th a convoy of 14 vessels from Iceland joined the convoy making a total of 62 vessels and the escort units were augmented by the CGC Duane and two Navy destroyers. Mail from the Ingham for the states was transferred to one of these destroyers. On the 16th the Ingham broke away from the convoy to investigate a light brown smoke on the horizon and on approaching closer definitely sighted a submarine with conning tower and diesel oil smoke from the exhaust plainly visible. The Ingham increased speed to 19 knots and gave chase, firing one round from the forward 5" gun at a range of 13,000 yards. The sub promptly dived and a search of the area produced no sound contacts. One large depth charge was fired and an hour later a full pattern was dropped but with no results. Echo ranging was difficult because of the number of porpoises. Several hours later the Ingham abandoned search and rejoined the convoy. On the 17th the Ingham and Duane departed the west bound convoy to intercept the eastbound convoy SC-87 of nine vessels bound for Iceland. The convoy was escorted by air coverage into the Harbor of Reykjavik on June 23rd. The Ingham proceeded to Hvalfjordur Fjord to moor the same evening.

WEATHER PATROL
The Ingham acted as weather patrol and plane guard vessel in position 64°N and 30°W, reporting weather conditions every six hours until July 13th. While on this duty, on July 1, 1942, her officers and men boarded the El Coston, flying the Panamanian flag out of Sidney, N.S. and bound for Reykjavik, found her to be friendly with papers in order. Relieved of weather patrol duty by the Bibb, the Ingham proceeded to Hvalfjordur and underwent minor repairs until July 26th, 1942. Then she remained at Hvalfjordur until August 24th, maintaining anti-aircraft watches during the day.

--36--


TWO VESSELS TORPEDOED
On August 24, 1942 the Ingham, in company with the Bibb was underway patrolling convoy ONSJ-114, composed of one merchant vessel, to join convoy ONS-124. The escorts delivered the one merchant vessel to the ONS-124 and then changed course to intercept eastbound convoy SC-97 on August 29th. This was composed of two destroyers and five British corvettes acting as escort for 57 merchantmen. On August 31st two vessels of the convoy, the SS Capira and SS Bronxville were torpedoed without warning, the first sinking immediately and the second a few minutes later. Escort vessels carried out a search and a merchantman, previously designated as a rescue vessel, picked up the survivors The results of the sound search were, negative. On the evening of 1st September, 1942, eleven ships bound for Iceland departed the main convoy with the Ingham, Bibb and USS Schenk as escorts. At 2015 an American plane patrolling over the main convoy reported two submarines, each on opposite bearings and each 24 miles distant. The convoy reached Reykjavik at noon on September 3rd without incident.

PICKS UP SURVIVORS OF TWO TORPEDOED VESSELS
The Ingham, in company with the Bibb, stood out of Reykjavik on September 21, 1942, as the ten ship convoy SC-100 assembled and then were underway as its escort. On the 24th they left the convoy to search for survivors of the SS Penmar which bad been torpedoed about 2200 on the 22nd and had sunk in 10 minutes at position 58°00'N, 31°00'W. On the 26th a red flare was sighted at 0710 and, proceeding to investigate, a freshly broken spar was sighted as they passed through an area of oil slicks and debris. Four hours later numerous red flares were, sighted, followed by one lifeboat and one life raft. At noon the Bibb lowered two boats sad began bringing 61 survivors of the Penmar aboard, including one naval officer and 23 enlisted sen. The survivors were cared for, many of them suffering from exposure and edema, and after treatment almost all fully recovered. Four and a half hours later the Ingham sighted red flares in position 59°58'N, 32°36'W, and the Bibb covered the Ingham while she picked up 8 survivors of the Tennessee. A life boat awash was sighted with no occupants, as were two unoccupied rafts. On the 27th the Ingham and Bibb searched for the survivors of the torpedoed SS Athan Sultan. At 0520 a radar contact was reported at 2.8 miles, but being unable to sight anything three starshells were fired. The contact was lost without sighting anything and on the 28th they rejoined the convoy. On September 30th the Iceland section broke off SC-101. The Ingham, in company with the Bibb and USS Leary escorted convoy SCL-101 composed of seven merchantmen with plane coverage during the daylight hours, dropping it and mooring at Reykjavik on October 2nd, 1942. She delivered the 8 survivors from the Tennessee to Army authorities at Reykjavik and proceeded to Hvalfjordur.

MEETS MAIN CONVOY
The Ingham got underway again from Reykjavik on October 5, 1942, as escort, with the Duane and USS Schenk, of the eight vessel convoy ONSJ-136. A few hours later aha dropped one depth charge on a doubtful sound contact. Poor visibility and wind of force 12 on October 7th scattered the convoy and despite searches there were only 5 of the 8 vessels in the convoy on the 9th. The Ingham found one of the stragglers. That afternoon the main convoy ONS-136 was intercepted and the Ingham joined at 1955. Next day she joined convoy SCL-103, consisting of 5 merchantmen bound for Iceland, and dropped it at Reykjavik on October 12th, proceeding to Hvalfjordur with the Duane the same day.

CONVOY TO GREENLAND
The Ingham remained at Hvalfjordur until October 27, 1942, when she moved to Reykjavik and next day began escorting the SS Ozark to Angmagssalik, Greenland. A depth charge was dropped on a sound contact that afternoon. Air coverage was received part of the way during daylight hours. On the 30th the Ingham delivered the Ozark to the CGC Nanok and commenced picking a route through the ice fields easterly toward Iceland, She moored at Reykjavik on November 1, 1942.

16 SHIPS TORPEDOED IN ONE CONVOY
On November 2, 1942, she proceeded to join convoy SC-107 in order to augment that convoy's escorts, along with the USS Schenk and Leary. The convoy was sighted on the 14th, the Ingham being assigned to patrol the van. That evening she dropped one charge on a doubtful sound contact but abandoned search after losing the range. Next morning, the 5th, she and the Leary began scouting the area on opposite courses to regain convoy which had changed course during the night. Regaining bar station aha learned that 16 ships of convoy SC-107 had been torpedoed so far on that voyage. She continued to patrol the van on the 6th with 22 ships in convoy and no air coverage. On the 7th four vessels destines, for Iceland broke away and the Ingham began patrolling the van of this group with the Schenk and Leary. Air coverage was provided daring the day. On the 9th the Ingham departed the convoy as intercept convoy ONSJ-144 five hours later. This consisted of a convoy of 7 vessels escorted by the Bibb and Duane. On the 4th the convoy was separated in a hurricane with wind of force 12 and visibility less than 1 mile. The Ingham patrolled ahead of two at the detached vessels, the position of the rest of the convoy remaining unknown. On the 15th with the two vessels joined convoy ONS-144, and the Ingham departed to proceed independently for Iceland, mooring at Reykjavik on the 16th and at Hvalfjordur on the 17th. On the 22nd she escorted the tanker Culpepper to [Saydesfjordur?], Iceland, returning to Reykjavik with her and the Pleiades on the 2nd of December.

ATTACKS SUBMARINE
The Ingham proceeded to Reykjavik on December 8th, 1942, and an the 4th began patrolling ahead of convoy ONSJ-152 as escort commander with two Navy destroyers. They joined the main convoy on the 15th and the three escorts then departed to meet convoy SC-112 which they joined on the 16th. On the 17th the Ingham dropped three depth charges on sound contact with screw beats Identified as a submarine, dropping ten charge pattern four minutes later. Failing to regain the contact, the Ingham swept the area for half an hour and rejoined the convoy. The two destroyers accompanied the Iceland unit when it separated from the others on December 19th, the Ingham remaining with the main unit, being joined next day ay the Schenck. the Ingham reached Reykjavik on the 23rd and remained moored at Hvalfjordur until the end of the year.

1943

INTERCEPTS TRANS-ATLANTIC CONVOY
On January 8, 1943, the Ingham proceeded to Reykjavik and was underway on the 14th, joining westbound convoy ONSJ-160, composed of eleven merchant vessels, taking her station patrolling the van. On the 15th the convoy received air coverage until the afternoon. On the 16th one of the convoyed vessels returned to Reykjavik with engine trouble and the convoy again received air coverage. On the 17th, the main convoy was sighted and joined, the Ingham patrolling

--37--


the port bow, air coverage continuing on that day and on the 18th. On the 22nd sighted smoke from the east-bound convoy HX-223, which the Ingham joined, taking station on starboard bow. A contact was investigated but classified as non-sub. On the 23rd the Ingham reduced speed and ceased zigzagging as a force 12 hurricane developed. When this decreased to force 9 she increased speed and resumed patrol, commencing van and stern sweeps for stragglers. The convoy, having separated during the hurricane, the Ingham, and three British escorts took over a section and by the 25th had rounded up 25 of the convoy. Air coverage was sighted on that day and the next, and 2 sections of the convoy were merged. On the 27th the Ingham departed the main convoy with 3 merchant ships bound for Iceland. That night about midnight the Ingham identified a radar target as a probable submarine on the surface and headed for it, but it disappeared at 2900 yards and the Ingham fired two depth charges over its estimated position but failed to regain contact. She moored at Hvalfjordur that evening, the 28th.

PICKS UP SURVIVORS OF FIVE VESSELS TORPEDOED
Proceeding to Reykjavik on February 3rd the Ingham de-parted Reykjavik that day and< at 2115 on the 5th joined the Bibb in making a sweep astern searching for a submarine reported by aircraft, but returned to the convoy without results. Two hours later several underwater explosions were felt at 1935 and two white flares were fired in the vicinity of the convoy. These were followed an hour later by gun flashes from the convoy, followed by more underwater disturbances. Early on the 7th more gun flashes and underwater explosions were noted and the Ingham commenced a 10 mile sweep ahead of the convoy. A variety of flares and star shells was observed. At 0505 sighted red light and heard an explosion and three hours later was ordered to search stern for 50 miles to locate survivors. Two hours later sighted a large quantity of lumber, and two life rafts. With the Bibb and two British escorts, the Ingham maneuvered in the vicinity preparing to pick up survivors from three merchant vessels and one transport which had been torpedoed. The Ingham picked up seven survivors in lifeboats and 15 others were removed from rafts and wreckage. The Ingham then secured while other escorts picked up survivors, and then rejoined the convoy escorts picked up survivors, and then rejoined convoy. At 1610 sighted a friendly plane attacking a submarine 5 miles away. At 2220 sighted starshells and gun flashes on the horizon and 30 minutes later obtained radar contact at 3000 yards, losing it at 800, but opened fire with 3" gun on target believed to be a submarine. The target disappeared and the Ingham rejoined the convoy. Early on the 8th the Ingham sighted fire rockets and a red flare and several flashing lights low in the water were later determined to be signals from life boats of a torpedoed ship. Half hour later two explosions were heard and black smoke observed on the starboard bow. Made a sound contact which was lost and shortly thereafter the cutter picked up four survivors from lifeboats and then rejoined the convoy. An hour later other underwater water explosions were heard. Later several doubtful contacts were picked up but faded. Air coverage from Flying Fortresses continued on the 9th when at noon the Iceland group SSL-118 consisting of 7 merchant vessels broke off from the main convoy, with the Ingham as escort commander. A straggler identified as Norwegian SS Annik was ordered to take station astern of the convoy. On the 11th difficulty was experienced in keeping the convoy together due to a whole gale with wind force of 10. On the 12th a gun sponson was damaged by heavy seas and its platform was lost overboard on the 13th. Anchoring at Reykjavik on the 14th, the survivors left the ship, and she then proceeded to Hvalfjordur. On the 28th entered drydock for work on the dome of her underwater sound apparatus.

WRECKAGE WITHOUT SURVIVORS
On March 3, 1943, the Ingham was ordered to sea to search for the survivors of a torpedoed ship and was underway on the 4th. Eight hours later sighted the USS Keywadin who reported her chain lockers flooded and awash continually. The Ingham directed her to return to port, she having indicated that she could proceed independently. The Ingham then proceeded to search the area and on the 5th passed through what appeared to be pieces of cork wreckage, pieces of bulkhead and rubber tires which were strewn over the ocean for a distance of 35 miles. No boats or rafts could be sighted although search was extended for a distance of 40 miles before darkness shut in. Then she proceeded toward Reykjavik, mooring there on March 6th, 1943.

THREE CONVOY SHIPS TORPEDOED
On March 7th, 19ll3, the Ingham stood out of Reykjavik and proceeded to intercept convoy SC-121 which was threatened with a submarine attack. On the 9th she sighted the convoy and assisted the Bibb in an anti-submarine sweep in the vicinity of a convoy ship which had sighted a submarine. Seven hours later ship No. 2 in the convoy was torpedoed. The Ingham fired a star shell and opened fire with 3" guns. Twenty five minutes later ship #74 was torpedoed but able to proceed with the convoy. Next day ship #23 was torpedoed and another merchant vessel (#52) in the convoy reported ramming a submarine. The Ingham made an anti-submarine sweep. On the 11th, B-17 and Sunderland aircraft provided air coverage. Shortly afternoon the Ingham detached from the convoy with the USS Babbit and proceeded to Reykjavik, anchoring at Hvalfjordur on March 12th.

RESCUES ALL HANDS
On the 13th divers inspected the dome on the echo ranging equipment and reported it damaged and inoperative. On the 15th the Ingham proceeded to Reykjavik and on the 16th stood out in company with the Babbit to join convoy SC-122. On the 18th the Babbit detached to join an HX convoy and the Ingham sighted convoy SC-122 an the 19th and took station ahead. At 0954 a column of water from torpedo explosions was sighted, followed by a signal and six minutes later sighted torpedoed ship SS Matthew Luckenbach and maneuvered in the vicinity to pick up the survivors. Succeeded in picking up all of the crew and the armed guard, all hands being saved. Ten hours later the cutter dropped one charge on what proved to be a doubtful contact. On the 20th she had another contact while patrolling ahead of the convoy and expended a pattern of charges with unknown results. Air coverage was provided by a Flying Fortress. On the 21st the Ingham detached from the convoy and proceeded to Londonderry, Ireland, mooring at Lisahally on the 22nd where she landed the survivors. On the 24th proceeded to Liverpool for repairs to the echo ranging sound dome, entering drydock there on March 27th.

RETURN TO U.S.
On April 2, 1943, the Ingham stood out of the Mersey River en route Reykjavik. On the 4th she sighted a plane on anti-submarine patrol and later that day moored at Hvalfjordur, Iceland. Proceeding to Reykjavik on the 5th, she stood out of that port on the 6th in company with the Bibb escorting the USS Vulcan to Londonderry. On the 17th they commenced

--38--


receiving air coverage and anchored at Lough Foyle on the 8th. She departed the same day in company with the Bibb en route Norfolk, Va. Air coverage was received on the 9th from two Sunderlands and the SS Empire Grace was sighted and identified, also a derelict tank lighter on the horizon. Later two charges from K guns were fired on a contact that proved doubtful. Other non-sub contacts on the 14th and 15th were not fired on. On the 16th a friendly plane was sighted. A full pattern was fired on a contact on the 17th without results and air coverage began from a PBM plane patrol. At 2030 stood up swept channel at entrance to Chesapeake Bay and on the 18th stood out of the bay in company with Bibb for Boston where she anchored at the Navy lard on the 19th entering drydock on the 28th.

CONVOY TO CASABLANCA
On 5 May, 1943, after test runs, the Ingham departed for Casco Bay and conducted antisubmarine exercises until the 10th when she proceeded to New York and reported to Task Force 66. On the 13th she stood down the bay to await departure of convoy UGS-8A, checking vessels out on the 14th and then beginning to patrol, her station on the port flank of the convoy. That evening she dropped six charges in an emergency attack on a sound contact. A radar contact on the 21st was run down without results. On the 26th an air bubble streak sighted by escorting aircraft was run down with negative results. Other negative sound contacts were obtained on the 29th and air coverage from land based planes was received on the 30th. On June 1, 1943, the Ingham anchored at Casablanca.

RETURN TO NEW YORK
On 9 June, 1943, the Ingham with the Casablanca section of convoy UGS-8 got underway bound for U.S. and joined the main body of the convoy from African Mediterranean ports in the afternoon. Shore based air coverage was received on the 10th and from the 11th to the 13th medical assistance was rendered patients brought on board and by visual signaling. On the 21st an HF/DF bearing was investigated, indicating a submarine 25 miles distant, but without results. Land based air coverage was had on the 22nd and 23rd and on the 25th a sound contact investigated gave no results. On the 26th the Norfolk section broke off and on the 27th the convoy anchored in Gravesend Bay, New York. The Ingham proceeded to Todd Shipyard, Hoboken on the 28th.

RETURN TO BOSTON
Standing out of Casablanca on August 6, 1943, the Ingham with six other escorts reached Gibraltar on the 7th and on the 8th joined a westbound convoy. Air coverage from a Catalina flying boat on the 10th was augmented when the carrier Bogue and two escorts joined the convoy. On the 16th the Ingham had a probable contact but lost it, Half an hour later another escort dropped depth charges and the convoy made two emergency turns. On the 18th two probable contacts faded out. On the 24th the New York action broke off and next day the Bibb dropped a full pattern where a plane had sighted a submarine 14 miles ahead of the convoy. That evening the single Dolman convoy 13 miles long entered the swept channel to Norfolk. On the 26th the Ingham took a section of the convoy to Delaware Bay and then departed for Boston, arriving there on the 27th.

THREE PATTERNS DROPPED
Leaving Boston on September 7, 1943, the Ingham engaged in anti-submarine exercises off New London, Conn., until the 10th, when she proceeded to Norfolk. On the 14th she stood out of Lynnhaven Roads with a 69 ship eastbound convoy and 9 escorts. On the 15th she made a ran on a sound contact, had a good trace and dropped three depth charges. After regaining contact she made another run and dropped a nine charge pattern set on shallow. This was followed by another nine charge pattern at medium depth. After temporary difficulties to the underwater sound apparatus, the radar and a fuel oil feed line which closed, putting one boiler out of commission, and cutting loose the main flooding valve in #3 magazine, damage control rigged a pump for the magazine, the underwater sound apparatus was put back in order, and a fourth run on the sound contact was made, after 45 minutes delay, with a nine charge deep pattern. No results were noted and the Ingham returned to the convoy. On the 17th No. 13 ship had to return due to engine trouble and a tanker dropped back for repairs on the 19th, On the 20th a patient from one of the convoyed vessels was operated on for acute appendicitis. On the 28th an escort had a contact with no results. On the 30th land based air coverage became plentiful. English escorts took over the convoy off Point Europe in the Mediterranean on October 3rd and the Ingham with two destroyers picked up three tankers and escorted them to Casablanca, arriving on October 5th.

PLANES GET THREE SUBS
The Ingham stood out of Casablanca on October 8th, 1943, escorting two vessels, in company with a destroyer and 2 PC's, to meet the Gibraltar section of a convoy on the 9th. One of the PC's attacked a submarine. On the 14th the aircraft carrier Card reported getting three submarines. On the 25th the New York section of the convoy broke off from the rest of the convoy, proceeded to Delaware Bay arriving on the 26th. The Ingham proceeded to Boston on the 27th and entered drydock at Navy Yard Annex.

ANTI-SUB EXERCISES AT PANAMA
After having a hedgehog installed and her personnel drilled on the Attack Teacher and in Trace Analysis, the Ingham departed Boston on November 8, 1943, for Panama. She passed through the canal on the 14th and moored at Balboa. After two days of attack teacher sessions, she proceeded to Perlas Island Submarine Area where she engaged in anti-submarine exercises until the 28th. Standing through the canal on the 29th she proceeded to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on the 30th, acting as escort commander of convoy GF-51.

CONVOY TO GUANTANAMO
On December 4, 1943, she left the convoy as it joined a New York convoy and went into Guantanamo. On the 5th she departed Guantanamo as Task Force Commander of convoy GF-52, arriving at Cristobal Harbor on the 9th docking at Balboa on the. 10th. On the 19th she proceeded to Saboga Anchorage and continued anti-submarine exercises with the USS Rock and S-13 until the 31st.

1944

HUNTS SUB OFF SPAIN
On January 11, 1944, the Ingham, after undergoing necessary repairs at Balboa, was ordered to proceed to Hampton Roads, Va., where she arrived on the 18th. On the 22nd Task Force 64 was organised consisting of the Ingham (flag), ten destroyers and a tanker, standing out of the swept channel on the 25th as escort to convoy UGS-31. On the 27th two LCI(L)'s rammed as their steering gears jammed simultaneously, a destroyer towing one into Bermuda while the ether made repairs en route. On the 4th ten LCI(L)'s departed for Horta, Azores, escorted by a destroyer.

--39--


Land based Liberators and PBY's furnished air coverage on the 8th. On the 9th the Casablanca section departed and on the 10th two destroyers searched for a submarine reported in the area. The convoy passed through the Straits of Gibraltar on the 11th and the task force, relieved by British escorts, was ordered to hunt a U-boat at 36°20'N, 06°21'W. Five were ordered to patrol the area and the remaining six, including the Ingham hunted the sub south off Cadiz, Spain. Five hours later all but five assigned to patrol duty returned to Gibraltar, without results, after attacking sound contacts. From the 13th to the 15th six escorts patrolled the strait.

RETURN TO NEW YORK
On February 16, 1944, the Ingham relieved the British flagship of the Senior Mediterranean Escort Group and the 66 ship convoy GUS-30 passed through the straits. On the 17th the Casablanca section consisting of a tanker and 4 merchant ships, escorted by 3 destroyers and 2 PC's joined and three merchant ships departed for Casablanca. On the 18th and 19th bearings were obtained on U-boats transmitting messages. On the 20th one ship detached for Aruba and another for New York, while a destroyer and two ships joined just south of Ponta Delgada. On the 21st two ships detached and on the 23rd the Azores section joined. During the last few days of February heavy seas caused quite a bit of straggling. On March 2nd one destroyer left to escort a damaged ship to Bermuda. Aircraft coverage was received from land based PBM's on the 3rd. On the 4th another ship departed for Bermuda because of lack of coal and another detached for Tampa, Florida. The Chesapeake section broke off. On the 6th all escorts secured their sound gear due to heavy seas. On the 8th the Delaware and Boston sections departed and the Ingham detached, stood up to Gravesend Bay, removed ammunition and moored at Brooklyn Navy Yard.

ESCORTS LST TO ORAN
Yard workmen began repairs and alterations on the Ingham on March 9, 1944. Two officers attended Loran school from the 15th to 20th to learn the operation of Loran equipment being installed. On the 22nd the Ingham departed New York arriving at Norfolk next day. After being drydocked for inspection, the Ingham was designated Task Force 65.1 for LST-540 and proceeded on March 27th to escort her to join Com 8th Fleet. On April 9 a concentration of submarines was reported northeast of her position. On the 12th the Ingham moored in Gibraltar Harbor, received 11 sacks of confidential hydrographic material which she delivered at Oran on the 13th where the LST-540 detached. The Ingham proceeded to Bizerte on the 14th and reported there to CTF-65 and Com 8th (Adm) on the 15th.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
On April 21st the Ingham stood outside Bizerte Harbor to hold anti-aircraft firing practice with Task Force 65, which later that day began escorting Convoy GUS-37. The Bone section joined on the 22nd and the U.S. Navy Commodore relieved the British Commodore of the convoy. On the 23rd 15 ships of the Algiers section departed and 18 ships joined from that port. On the 24th 15 ships of the Oran section departed. On the 25th the convoy passed through the Straits of Gibraltar, as Gibraltar ships detached and joined. On the 26th the Casablanca section joined and detached leaving 84 ships in the convoy. Air coverage was received from 21st through the 27th of April. On the 27th the Azores section joined. On the 28th doctors on the Ingham furnished medical advice to a patient on a merchant ship via signal light, and a doctor from a destroyer was transferred to the ship to care for a woman patient. On April 30th a destroyer detached to bring in a joiner from the Azores. (War diaries for May and June 1944 missing.)

RETURN TO NEW YORK
As July 194li began the Ingham was screening the van of convoy GUS-44 en route New York, as one of the escorts of Task Force 65, with Commander of Task Force 65 in the Ingham. In company was ComCortDiv 58 in USS Pride with five destroyers and ComCortDiv 62 in USS Otter with seven destroyers (one French). One destroyer departed on the 2nd and two others on the 3rd. Between the 1st and 9th of July 11 ships with two towboats joined the convoy. Ten ships departed for Oran on the 3rd; three for Gibraltar on the 4th; on the 16th one tanker, escorted by ComCortDiv 76, and three tows escorted by two destroyers, departed for Bermuda: also the Chesapeake section of 14 merchant ships, USS Polaris and four destroyers; three merchant ships escorted by a destroyer departed on the 17th. On July 18th the Ingham detached and moored at Brooklyn. Air coverage had been furnished the convoy almost daily since the 1st. On the 19th the Commander Task Force 65 transferred to USS Stanton (DE-247) and the Ingham carried out port routine until the 23rd.

CONVERTED TO AGC
On July 24, 1944, the Ingham departed New York and proceeded to Navy Yard, Charleston, S.C. for conversion to an AGC (Combined operations communications headquarters ship). Conversion work continued through August, September and until October 21, 1944, with the ship's personnel undergoing training.

SEARCHES FOR HURRICANE SURVIVORS
With conversion work completed, the Ingham departed for Norfolk on October 22, 1944, conducting a ladder search en route for survivors of a ship lost in a recent hurricane. On the 23rd she altered her course to meet two destroyers to assist. A broad front ladder search, with reflection turns, was then begun with Ingham as guide. Excessive vibration of the Ingham's starboard main unit necessitated reduction of speed to 10 knots. A small boat was picked up in position 34°03'N, 75°45'W and the Ingham discontinued the search at 1900 because of engine vibration, reaching Norfolk on October 24th where repairs were begun. Post repair trials were completed on November 20th, 1944, and after four days of shakedown, exercises and practice she stood out to sea on the 24th with orders to report to Commander, Seventh Fleet at Cristobal, Canal Zone.

jOINS SEVENTH FLEET IN THE PACIFIC
The Ingham reported at Cristobal on November 29, 1944, and passing through the canal, proceeded on orders to Bora Bora, Society Islands and thence to Hollandia, New Guinea. She reached Bora Bora on December 13th and Hollandia on the 14th. On the 26th she arrived at Humboldt Bay, reported to Commander, Seventh Fleet and was ordered to report to Task Force 76. On the 31st she moved alongside of destroyer tender USS Dobbin for repairs and alterations.

1945

FLAGSHIP OF TASK GROUP 78.3
On January 21st, repairs completed, the Ingham moved to the firing area for firing practice. On the 24th, as a member of Task Unit 76.4.4, the Ingham got underway with an American and Australian destroyer, holding firing practice en route Leyte, Philippine Islands.

--40--


On arrival on the 28th the Task Unit was dissolved and the Ingham reported to C.T.F. 78. Under escort of a destroyer as Task Unit 78.12.6 she departed for Luzon on the 29th, with good air coverage provided during the afternoon of the 30th from USAAF base on Mindoro. Reaching destination on the 31st the Ingham reported to Commander, Task Group 76.3 who transferred to the Ingham with his staff.

ATTACK ON MARIVELES AND CORREGIDOR
On February 1, 1945, the Ingham moved to Subic Bay and on the 14th the Ingham stood to seaward as the flagship and guide of the Mariveles-Corregidor Attack Group. On the 15th, firing from the north coast of Corregidor caused several casualties to personnel in landing craft (LCP(R's) embarked from troop transports (AFD's). The enemy battery was silenced by counter-battery fire from light cruisers and destroyers. The landings were made on schedule with light opposition. One landing ship (LSM) was damaged severely by an explosion believed caused by a mine. Light cruisers and destroyers continued firing on Corregidor throughout the day. The Ingham maintained a position during daylight hours at the entrance to Mariveles Harbor, directing operations. Phase I of the operations against Mariveles being successful she stood to sea at 1B10. Next day, the 16th, returned to Mariveles and took station at harbor entrance while forming up the Corregidor attack group. At 0835 she commenced standing for Black Beach (San jose) on the south side of Corregidor, in the van of the Corregidor attack groups. Paratroops began dropping on Corregidor at 1840 and at 1005 the Ingham took station about 2500 yards south of Black Beach to direct landing operations. The five waves landed at 1029 with reportedly light opposition. By 1150 the beachhead was reported established and secured. The Ingham remained in position until 1600, then proceeded to Mariveles Harbor until 2000 and stood for Subic Bay, where she anchored early next day. On the 17th she returned to Mariveles Harbor to observe and direct operations. When the USS Hidatsa (YT-102) hit a mine at 1310 the Ingham dispatched medical assistance. She hove to off Black Beach for two hours from 1630 directing landing of reinforcements. Then she stood for Subic Bay. She returned to Corregidor on the 18th, observed and directed operations at Black Beach and then returned to Subic Bay, where she remained until March 5, 1945.

ATTACK ON TIGBAUAN, PANAY
On March 5, 1945, the Ingham departed Subic Bay for Lingayen Gulf with a destroyer and LCI. On the 15th she stood out as flag and guide of an attack group en route to Tigbauan, Panay, P.I. She stood into the transport area off Red and Blue Beaches, Tigbauan, Panay, on the 16th as destroyers began firing at preselected shore targets. Maintaining her position near the line of departure for Red Beach, a boat was dispatched and returned to the Ingham with one of the many natives who had been observed on the beach. This guerilla reported that all Japanese in the immediate vicinity were in the church at Tigbauan where they were surrounded by guerilla forces. The preliminary rocket bombardment which had been planned was, therefore, considered unnecessary and the first wave landed at 0906. No opposition was encountered on the beach. Because of a sand bar off Red Beach the rest of the landing was shifted to Blue Beach, immediately west of the Sibalon River, where LST's made dry ramp landings. The beachhead was established and unloading was carried out throughout the daylight hours. At twilight the landing craft retracted and retired off shore, the Ingham acting as flag and guide of the group. Unloading continued during daylight hours on the 19th and 20th, retiring seaward at twilight. On March 23rd the Ingham proceeded to Iloilo.

ATTACK ON PULUPANDAN, NEGROS
The Ingham returned to the Blue Beach area at Tigbauan, Panay,on March 26th,to supervise and coordinate the loading of ships for carrying out the attack on Pulupandan, Negros, P.I. On the 28th she was underway forming up the Attack Group. Arrived off Green Beach, Pulupandan on the 29th and maintained position to direct landing operations. The first wave landed at 1859. There was no opposition and the landing proceeded according to plan. The Ingham continued to direct operations on March 30th and 31st. (April War Diary missing.)

LANDING AT MACAJALAR BAY, MINDANAO, P.I.
The Ingham left San Pedro Bay off Tolosa, Leyte, P.I., on May 5, 1945, for Ormoc Bay where she conducted landing rehearsals. On the 9th the Macajalar Bay Attack Unit (Task Unit 78.3.4) was formed with the Ingham as flag and guide and departed for Mindanao, P.I. On the 10th a line of departure was established 3000 yards off Brown Beach and destroyers commenced shore bombardment of the beach area, Ingham directing operations. At 0803, Landing Ships, Tanks (LST's) began discharging Tracked Landing Vehicles (LVT's) for the first and second waves, the first wave hitting the beach with no opposition at 0830 and the second 4 minutes later. At 0908 Medium Landing Ships (LSM) began beaching and unloading. The Ingham was 2500 yards off the beach. The operation proceeded as planned and the Army forces pushed inland. Retiring at night the amphibious forces returned to the beachhead daily for the next several days. On the 17th she departed for San Pedro Bay, Leyte, P.I., arriving on the 18th.

TO LEYTE AFTER RETURN TO MINDANAO
Leaving Leyte on May 21st the Ingham stopped at Zamboanga, Mindanao on the 22nd, proceeding to Police Harbor next day and anchoring in Taloma Bay, Davao Gulf on the 25th. Here she soon shifted anchorage because of projectile bursts, presumably of enemy origin in the area. At 1749 she departed for San Pedro, Leyte, and anchored there on the 26th. She remained there until July 5, 1945.

LANDING AT SARACANI BAY, MINDANAO
On July 5, 1945, the Commander of Task Unit 76.6.11 transferred his flag to the Ingham, the Commander of Task Group 78.3 and staff having been transferred to shore headquarters at Tolosa on June 10th, and the Ingham departed for Taloma Bay, Mindanao, P.I., arriving next day. On the 11th she departed as flag and guide of the Sarangani Bay Attack Unit, arriving in the objective area at dawn on the 12th. The first wave landed on the beach and reported no opposition. Next day the Ingham proceeded to Taloma Bay, then to Parang on the 16th. While en route to Zamboanga she was ordered back to Taloma Bay where she anchored on the 19th.

LANDING AT BALUT ISLAND
On July 19, 1945, the Ingham stood out of Taloma Bay as flag and guide of the Balut Island Attack Unit, arriving off Balut Island on the 20th. The Ingham and USS Chester T. O'Brien (DE-421) began a bombardment of the southeast portion of the island in preparation for landing a company of infantry to exterminate 40 or 50 Japanese reported on the island. The first group landed from three LCI's, an LCS and 3 LCM's at 0824, the landing being completed without opposition in 16 minutes. The Ingham returned to Taloma Bay that night, then to San Pedro Bay on the 25th where C.T.U. 76.6.11 transferred his flag. On the

--41--


31st the Ingham moved to Manicani Island Repair Base for availability.

TO SHANGHAI
All during August and until September 6, 1945, the Ingham remained at Guian Roadstead, Samar, P.I. or anchored in San Pedro Bay, off Tolosa, Leyte, P.I. On September 6th she got underway to rendezvous with convoy YF-74 as flag and guide en route Buckner Bay, Okinawa, where she anchored on September 12th. On the 17th the convoy departed for Shanghai, mooring there on September 20th.

TO HAIPHONG
Leaving Shanghai on October 3, 1945, as flag and guide of the convoy formed there, she stood into Hongkong on the 7th. On the 14th she proceeded to Haiphong and Hon Gay Indo-China to carry on liaison work in connection with the lift of the 52nd Chinese Army.

CGC Ingham

        COMMANDING OFFICER
December 1941 to
September 1942
  GREENSPUN, Joseph, Commander
September 1942 to
January 1943
  McCABE, G. E., Commander
January 1943 to
April 1943
  MARTINSON, A.M., Commander
May 1943 to
July 1943
  STINCHCOMB, H. W., Commander
July 1943 to
January 1944
  MOORE, Harold C, Commander
January 1944 to
May 1944
  CRAIK, j. D., Commander
May 1944 to
January 1946
  ZITTLE, Karl 0. A., Commander


CGC SPENCER

1941

TRANSFER TO NAVY
The CGC Spencer became eligible for transfer to the Navy under an Executive Order of September 11, 1941. The transfer could be made by agreement between the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commandant of the Coast Guard. On November 1, 1941, the Coast Guard became part of the Navy.

1942

TO ARGENTIA
On January 1, 1942, while moored at Staten Island, the Spencer relieved the CGC Active of radio and dock guard. Next day she proceeded to the New York Navy Yard where she remained until February 9th, 1942. After loading ammunition at Gravesend Bay that day she returned to her duties at Staten Island until February 16th when she departed for Portland, Maine. On the 18th she left for Portsmouth, N.H. to convoy the USS Sapelo to Portland, where various drills and exercises were conducted until the 22nd. She got underway on the 26th and assumed escort position in a convoy until detached on March 1st and proceeded toward Newfoundland, altering her course as necessary to avoid field ice. She stood into Argentia Bay on March 3rd, 1942.

ESCORTS CONVOY TO IRELAND
After taking on supplies the Spencer departed Argentia on March 5, 1942, in company with a Navy destroyer. She joined an east bound convoy on March 6th, taking her position on the port bow. On the 7th she commenced a run on a contact verified on her underwater sound apparatus and dropped seven depth charges. She rejoined the convoy after losing the contact and failing to regain it. Again on March 8th she fired three depth charges on a contact, reestablished contact on the port beam but lost it in attempting to open range and rejoined the convoy. On the 10th she searched unsuccessfully astern for a straggler. On the 16th she stood into Lough Foyle, Ireland, and proceeded up the river to Lisahally where she moored. Her personnel attended anti-submarine, anti-aircraft firing and signalling schools on shore until the 20th.

RETURNS TO BOSTON
On March 23, 1942, the Spencer got underway in company with a Navy destroyer for Lough Foyle, departing next day with the destroyer and 3 Canadian corvettes to assume assigned escort positions with a west bound 9 ship convoy which was sighted on the 28th. She moored at Argentia on April 2nd and departed next day to escort a Navy tanker to Portland. Relieved of escort duty she proceeded to Boston.

CONVOY TO IRELAND
She departed Boston on April 10, 1942, and arrived next day at Halifax. On the 12th she left Halifax with a Navy destroyer escorting a transport to Argentia. She left Argentia on the 16th acting as escort for the USS Tarazed until 0630 on the 17th when that vessel signalled she was ready to proceed alone. The Spencer then awaited an east bound convoy which she contacted at 1550 and assumed her station as escort. On the 19th she was ordered to stand by a straggler damaged on the starboard bow which at 2150 signalled its intention of proceeding independently to St. John's, Newfoundland, and the Spencer rejoined the convoy. Next day she was ordered to return to the straggler and early on the 22nd encountered HMS Reading who informed her that the straggler was proceeding to St. John's. The Spencer changed course and rejoined the convoy. On the 24th she made a contact on her underwater apparatus and heading toward it released a depth charge. Regaining contact she dropped another. Again regaining contact she dropped a barrage of nine charges. Three hours later another contact was made but lost shortly afterwards and the Spencer resumed her base course. On the 26th all anti-aircraft batteries were placed in readiness for an air attack. The Spencer stood into Lough Foyle on April 27, 1942, and after fueling moored at Lisahally on the 28th.

PICKS UP SURVIVORS FROM TWO TORPEDOED VESSELS
On 21i May, 1942, the Spencer got underway off Lough Foyle making anti-submarine practice runs and conducting other exercises including night submarine sighting with a Navy destroyer and three Canadian corvettes until the 7th. On that date she stood out of Lough Foyle with this group and another corvette and took her position on the port quarter of a west bound convoy. On the 11th a boat was lowered to pick up a seaman from a convoyed vessel who was suffering from appendicitis and an emergency appendectomy was performed by the ship's doctor aboard the Spencer. On the 12th while cruising behind the convoy, searching for survivors from a torpedoed vessel

--42--


and for the attacking submarine, the Spencer made a contact and heard propeller beats. She released a nine charge barrage set at 50 feet. She observed a black column of water about 30 feet high after the last depth charge exploded at 0015. An hour later the Spencer picked up 52 survivors from the torpedoed SS Cristales and SS Mont Parnes. Two hours later she sighted red flares on the starboard quarter and passed close aport of the torpedoed SS Cristales who was down by the bow and awash. The corvette Shediac who was standing by signalled "Intend putting crew back on board at daybreak." Half an hour later the Spencer contacted the rescue ship Burt and was informed that an unidentified freighter dead ahead had been abandoned and the Burt was standing by to see if it were advisable to return the crew to the freighter in the event it proved salvageable. Pending receipt of the report of a survey party aboard the Cristales, the Spencer, after searching further for survivors rejoined the convoy at 0510. Later that day the Spencer's boat made two trips to the Arvada for five injured survivors of the SS Mont Parnes. At 1850 the Spencer sighted a dark object on the horizon which was suspected to be a sub and headed for it. Smoke was sighted at 1925 and the Spencer observed a second submarine. She began firing on the object at 2006 using broadside guns and the U-boat submerged 4 minutes later. The Spencer made asdic contact with the sub at 2028 and fired a depth charge barrage. The contact was renewed and a second barrage fired. At 2045 she lost contact with the sub. On May 13th a submarine was sighted at 0535 submerging five minutes later. The Spencer moored in Argentia Bay on May 19th, 1942, and departed for Boston same day, arriving on the 21st. Survivors from the torpedoed vessels departed in custody of the security officer, U.S. Naval Drydock, South Boston, and on the 30th the Spencer moved to Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston.

CONVOY TO IRELAND
Proceeding to Argentia the Spencer moored in Little Placentia Harbor and was underway on July 1st escorting a convoy of 43 ships to Londonderry, Ireland with the Campbell and 4 Canadian corvettes. The convoy arrived at it destination on July 10th.

RETURN TO ARGENTIA
The Spencer stood out of Lough Foyle escorting a 32 vessel convoy, along with the Campbell and 4 Canadian escorts on July 21st, 1942. On the 22nd ship No. 31 dropped astern, unable to maintain position and the Spencer was directed to search 30 miles astern for it, but rejoined the convoy after being unable to locate it. Depth charges were dropped by the Spencer, and 2 Canadian escorts on the 25th but the results were negative and the contacts classified as doubtful. On July 31st the convoy passed through the anti-torpedo net at Placentia Harbor, Argentia, Newfoundland.

ESCORTS CONVOY TO IRELAND
On August 7, 1942, the Spencer with flag of commander Task Unit 24.1.3, weighed anchor and stood out of Argentia, N.F., in company with the USS Schenk and 4 other escorts to intercept the east bound 41 ship convoy SC-95. The Task Unit relieved the local escorts. On the 10th one of the escorts obtained a radar contact at 1200 yards which closed rapidly to 400 yards and then continued to open, The escort changed course toward the contact but obtained no hydrophone effect. The range remained at about 1000 yards and one lookout reported a low object seen for several minutes but not confirmed. The escort increased speed and dropped two precautionary charges and the rejoined. On the 14th Iceland escorts Duane and Babbit joined the convoy, the Schenk being relieved by the Babbit and leaving the convoy with the Duane and four Iceland ships. On the 17th two escorts and 16 ships of the Loch Ewe section departed and on the 18th another escort left with one ship for Londonderry and the Spencer, relieved of escort duty, anchored in lough Foyle, Moville, Northern Ireland, with the Babbit.

RETURN TO ARGENTIA
On August 31st, 1942, Task Unit 24.1.3 less the Babbitt got underway out of Lough Foyle with the Spencer and five Canadian escorts. On the 30th they intercepted a west bound convoy of 26 ships. (Intervening war diaries being missing it is assumed that the Spencer reached Argentia about September 10th.)

CONVOY TO IRELAND
On September 15, 1942, the Spencer was en route to rendezvous with the 24 ship convoy SC-100 with five escorts including the Campbell. On the 21st the Spencer reported a positive sound contact and sighted a sub on the surface at 0825. The convoy made a 45° emergency turn to port and the Spencer and hour later rejoined the convoy reporting negative results. On the 20th a Canadian escort reported sighting a sub on the surface 6 miles away and at 1145 ship No. 71, the Empire, was torpedoed and sank. The convoy reached Lough Foyle on the 23th.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
On October 3rd the Spencer in company with the Campbell weighed anchor and proceeded to sea as part of Task Unit 24.1.3 to rendezvous with the 30 ship convoy ON-135. On the 5th the wind increased to a whole gale with the seas very rough. The convoy scattered in poor formation and the Spencer commenced a sweep back along the port flank of the convoy to round up stragglers and then commenced patrolling the entire van of the convoy. Only 17 ships were present, but all escorts. Later, at 1545, the Spencer returned and there were 31 ships in the convoy, with all escorts present. On the 14th the Spencer and Campbell were relieved as escorts and got underway for Argentia where they moored on October 15th. (War diaries missing between October 15, 1942 and November 30, 1942).

CONVOY TO IRELAND
The Spencer departed Argentia on December 3, 1942, as one of the escorts of convoy SC-111 bound for Ireland. The convoy arrived at its destination on December 16, 1942.

1943

RETURN TO BOSTON
On December 25, 1942, the Spencer left Northern Ireland as senior escort for convoy ONS-156. On January 7th, 1943, a Canadian escort was detached for St. John's. On the 8th the Spencer was relieved as senior escort by HMS St. Clair, and proceeded independently to Boston, arriving on January 10th.

ONE VESSEL BREAKS IN TWO
On January 16th, 1943, the Spencer departed Boston with the commander, Task Unit 24.1.3 aboard, in company with the Campbell. After mooring for a few hours on the 18th at Argentia, the two escorts stood out to sea and sighted west bound 50 ship convoy HX-223 on the 19th. On the 24th the Task Unit consisting of the Spencer, Campbell, two British and four Canadian escorts relieved the local escort vessels. One of the convoy ships, taking water badly after a collision with another, was ordered to St. John's. Several

--43--


hours later the other ship leaking badly attempted to make herself seaworthy, as the Campbell stood by, but finally also proceeded independently to St. John's. The Ingham joined on the 22nd and the Lincoln was detached. Heavy weather on the 23rd and 24th scattered the convoy and the SS Kollbjorg was reported broken in two. On the 27th a Canadian escort with the Ingham detached to escort four vessels to Iceland. On the 2?th a British and a Canadian escort detached to join SC-117. On the 30th the Campbell left the convoy. Next day a Canadian escort broke off with the Loch Ewe section of the convoy. The Spencer, with the rest of the convoy proceeded to Londonderry where she was relieved of escort duties and moored on February 1st.

SINKS A SUBMARINE
The Spencer stood to seaward on February 12, 1943, after holding anti-submarine exercises in Lough Foyle, and relieved the British escort commander of the 43 ship west bound convoy ON-166, in company with the Campbell, four Canadian and one British escort. The convoy received air coverage and some submarines were reported in the immediate vicinity. On the 14th five more vessels joined, air coverage continued and no submarines were reported. On the 16th the USS Babbit joined with two vessels and then detached to escort one vessel to Iceland. On the 17th about 30 submarines were reported to be between 48 and 56 degrees north and 17 and 39 degrees west. Some were reported ahead of the convoy. On the 18th HF/DF bearings indicated submarines to the north about two or three hundred miles. The course was changed to avoid submarines in the area between 52 and 63 degrees north and 16 to 36 degrees west. Air coverage continued. On the 20th HF/DF bearings with the Campbell definitely fixed a submarine at 52°32'N, 26°32'W, and reports indicated that two or three might be shadowing the convoy. At 2315 the Spencer made a radar contact at 8600 yards, increased full speed to investigate and 20 minutes later sighted the conning tower of an enemy submarine about 5000 yards distant. The submarine dived about 7 minutes later. The Spencer lost the radar contact at about 1800 yards but made a sound contact at 1500 and 5 minutes later fired a depth charge pattern of nine charges. The contact was lost at about 300 yards possibly indicating that the submarine was probably down over 200 feet. 40 minutes later at 0030 on the 21st two more charges were dropped on the probable course of the submarine. Undoubtedly the Spencer sunk this submarine for according to German records unearthed after the war, the Spencer was credited with the sinking the U-225 on 21 February, 1943, at 56°46', 27°28'W. At 0812 aircraft coverage was sighted and the escorts were maintaining a close screen of the convoy ships. At 1250 the Campbell departed to investigate a submarine which HF/DF bearings placed at six miles and dropped two patterns of depth charges 40 minutes later. At 1602 a straggler reported being attacked by a submarine and the Campbell and a British bomber were despatched to investigate. A little later a British escort dropped a pattern of depth charges and at 1825 the bomber reported sighting two submarines 26,000 yards from the convoy. The Spencer departed to intercept these and shortly afterward sighted the marker flare dropped by the aircraft about 6000 yards away. An hour later after a box search she had a radar impulse and sighted a submarine 4000 yards distant. The Spencer fired three shots and the submarine submerged. A sound contact was established at 3500 yards and the attack was commenced with bow charges, without mousetraps. After expending two charges on what appeared a doubtful contact she sighted a white rocket in the convoy.

THREE TRADER VESSELS TORPEDOED
The SS Empire had been torpedoed but was believed salvageable and proceeded, escorted by a Canadian escort. On the 22nd another vessel was reported torpedoed and at 0437, with three escorts absent, radar impulses indicated an unidentified object about 5100 yards distant. As the Spencer increased full speed to investigate the impulse faded. At 0504 the Campbell reported sighting a submarine. A few minutes later the Dauphin had a sound contact and the Dianthus sighted a submarine. HF/DF bearings kept shifting from port to starboard, then both sides and astern. At 1942 the SS City of Chattanooga was torpedoed and ships commenced firing snowflakes. The Burza, a Polish destroyer, attached as additional escort.

CAMPBELL RAMS A SUBMARINE--SEVEN MORE VESSELS TORPEDOED
At 2050 on the 22nd of February, the Campbell reported sinking one submarine by depth charges and colliding with another, her engine roam was flooded. The Burza was sent to her assistance. The Campbell had sunk one torpedoed vessel which had failed to remove classified material when abandoned. During the first four hours of the 23rd there were eleven HF/DF bearings, mostly on the starboard side and at 0426 the SS Winkler was torpedoed on the port side. 25 minutes later the Spencer established a sound contact, then lost it, but commenced dropping charges, reestablished it and dropped a pattern at 0504. At 0513 the SS Eulima was torpedoed on the port side. Four other ships SS Gillitra, SS Hastings, SS Empire Redshank and SS Expositor were reported by 0730 as having been torpedoed at various times during the night. Two escorts were picking up survivors and HMS Salisbury proceeded to assist the Campbell. Between 1200 and 1600 on the 23rd there were four HF/DF bearings on the port and six on the starboard side of the convoy. HMS Cianthus, shadowed by several submarines hesitated to return but sought to divert their attention from the convoy which now had only three escorts present with the main body. At 1810 the Spencer departed on an hour's high speed sweep to intercept and drive down shadowing submarines. Three hours later another vessel in the convoy was torpedoed.

ANOTHER VESSEL TORPEDOED; THREE SUBS SIGHTED AND ATTACKED
On the 24th the Spencer was patrolling the bow and two Canadian escorts the port and starboard bows with the convoy changing course at regular intervals. U-boat transmissions indicated the presence of several in the vicinity. At 0450 the Spencer investigated a radar impulse at 5600 yards and sighted the wake of a submarine at 3900 yards which submerged at 0503. An attack on the sound contact was made with 12 depth charges. When the contact was lost a box search was begun. At 0521 the SS Ingria was torpedoed. A minute later the Spencer had a radar impulse and sighted a submarine ten minutes later at 2800 yards. The submarine submerged as the Spencer commenced firing. The Spencer began an attack and 10 minutes later the submarine passed down the port side as the Spencer fired her 3 port "K" guns, then lost contact and began a box search. Nine minutes later the Spencer had another radar impulse and in 8 minutes sighted a submarine on the surface at 2800 yards. As she commenced firing star shells the submarine submerged. Two minutes later fired 8 more charges, and lost it 2 minutes later after dropping one charge. At 0720 she observed the stern ships of the convoy firing at a U-boat and changed course to intercept but the submarine submerged and no sound contact developed. At 0606 there were 30 ships and 3 escorts in the convoy. A Canadian escort rejoined after picking up survivors from the Ingria. At 1614 a ship in the convoy reported sighting a convoy at 3000 yards. An escort vessel which departed for an attack failed to make contact. At

--44--


1712 a PBY plane was sighted as it searched ahead of the convoy and an hour later the Spencer, while on a high speed sweep released one charge on a contact at 400 yards. 15 minutes later a plane reported attacking a submarine 10 miles away and 3 minutes later the Spencer fired mousetraps on a sound contact.

MORE SUBS SIGHTED, ANOTHER VESSEL SUNK
On the 25th of February, two British escorts joined the convoy as additional support forces. A submarine was sighted at 0517 after several radar impulses. It dived at once but a sound contact was established and a torpedo track sighted. As a mousetrap attack was being prepared a detonation was heard from the direction of the convoy and a message received that the SS Manchester had been torpedoed. The mousetraps failed to fire and one depth charge was released. A sound contact was reestablished 14 minutes later but was classified non-sub. At 0543 a torpedo track was sighted close aboard on the port side and a sound contact established at 2800 yards. The contact was lost at 800 yards but a pattern of five depth charges was released and a box search commenced; 40 minutes later tracers and flashes of gunfire were sighted astern of the convoy. 29 ships and four escorts were now in sight. At 1120 a conning tower of a submarine was sighted at 5700 yards, which submerged after the Spencer's ready gun was fired. Three depth charges were dropped but the contact was not reestablished after a box sweep. At 1500 four local British escorts joined and on the 26th, after transfer of survivors, one British escort was relieved and two others departed for St. John's. At 1652 Task Unit 24.1.3 was relieved of further escort duties with ON-166 and departed for Argentia arriving there on the 27th.

THREE SUBS SIGHTED AND A VESSEL TORPEDOED
On March 1, 1943, the Spencer left Argentia for St. John's with the USS Greer and on the 3rd they stood out of St. John's with two British and two Canadian escorts, rendezvousing on the 4th with the 56 ship east bound convoy SC-121. There were six stragglers on the port and one on the starboard. One British escort returned to St. John's with a faulty-condenser. Sub reports indicated at least three and possibly more in the vicinity of the convoy. At 2205 there was heavy gunfire as a submarine was sighted off the port bow by the convoy commodore. An hour later numerous white lights were observed followed by a message that a submarine had been sighted off the starboard bow of the convoy. The Bibb and Ingham reported as reinforcements to the Task Unit. On the 7th at 0612 an explosion and gunfire from the starboard bow of the convoy was followed 30 minutes later by the sighting of a submarine at 10,000 yards. The Spencer increased to full speed, the sub submerged in 5 minutes and a box search resulted in a sound contact at 0727 which was lost after dropping 3 depth charges. At 0907 a sub was sighted at 4700 yards, after a radar impulse, then lost and 3 charges dropped at estimated position of the sub, without gaining sound contact. A convoy vessel was reported to have been torpedoed on the 6th with only 3 survivors. The USS Babbit and a British escort joined as additional support forces.

FIVE SHIPS TORPEDOED AND ONE ABANDONED
On March 8th the Spencer received a message from an unknown ship using the call letters "Verdo" that she was being attacked and at 0630 the Greer reported that the SS Vosvoda Putnik required assistance due to a rudder casualty. At 0657 the Spencer saw a ship torpedoed about 10,000 yards away and on arrival at the scene saw life rafts, one boat and several persons in the water. The Spencer established a sound contact and released a pattern of six depth charges. Then lost contact and began a box search, reestablished contact and released two more charges. Then she picked up 35 survivors from the torpedoed SS Guido, with 10 unaccounted for. A morning count showed 33 ships and 2 escorts with an unknown number of stragglers. A Canadian escort joined as additional escort. The Greer rescued the survivors of the Vosvoda Putnik abandoned in a sinking condition. TheBibb rejoined the escort. At 1740 the Spencer sighted a submarine submerging and released five charges but failed to regain contact. An hour later she dropped nine charges on a sub sighted at 900 yards. At 1920 one ship reported a torpedo passing her port bow and another a sub on her port bow with which she believed she collided as it passed into the convoy. On March 9th one ship reported coming from port to starboard and another ship reported sighting a strange object between the columns of the convoy. At 1925 a loud explosion was followed by the report that the SS Malantic had been torpedoed. Fifteen minutes later ship No. 74 of the convoy was torpedoed and an anti-submarine search with illumination was ordered. At 2201 two explosions were followed by reports of the torpedoing of the SS Nail Sea Court and the SS Bonneville.

SHIP RAMS A SUB
On March 10th the Bibb was standing by the torpedoed ships when the SS Scorton at 0823 reported sighting a sub close aboard. She had definitely rammed it with no damage to herself. The morning ship count showed 35 ships present and 8 escorts while the submarine report indicated that several U-boats were still shadowing the convoy. Later two escorts dropped charges on sound contacts. On the 11th there were 36 ships and 9 escorts present and the convoy received air coverage, the first plane reporting a submarine 44 miles astern. Three escorts detached. On the 12th twelve ships with an escort departed for Loch Ewe and the Spencer dropped a depth charge on a sound contact later classified as non-sub. On the 13th, being relieved of further escort duty the Spencer proceeded to Londonderry.

U-BOATS AVOIDED
On March 25th, 1943, the Spencer relieved local escorts of the 40 ship west bound convoy ON-175 with two British and two Canadian escorts. Five ships later detached to proceed independently and on the 26th air coverage appeared for the 36 convoy ships while submarine reports indicated several west of the convoy. The Greer joined as escort. On the 28th the base course was changed farther north to avoid the concentration of U-boats reported. On the 29th the convoy hove to in heavy weather, and at 1840, 28 ships and 6 escorts were in sight. No reports indicated that the convoy had been sighted by enemy submarines. Slow progress was made on the 30th due to heavy weather but no submarines were in the immediate vicinity. On the 31st there were 29 ships and 7 escorts present and the submarines appeared to be moving southeast from their previous position. On April 1, 1943, the USS Forest reported her rudder carried away and another ship and escort departed to take in tow to Reykjavik. On the 2nd a radar impulse showed a submarine at 0445 which submerged. After dropping a pattern of depth charges the Spencer commenced a box search with a British escort which reported a positive sound and dropped a pattern. On the 6th three escorts dropped charges on sound contacts. On the 7th the Spencer was relieved of escort duty and proceeded to St. John's arriving on April 8, 1943.

SINKS A SUBMARINE
On April 11, 1943, the Spencer departed St. John's in company with Task Unit 24.1.3 consisting, in addition, of the Duane, two

--45--


British and two Canadian escorts, and rendezvoused with the 56 ship east bound convoy HX-233 relieving the local escort on the 12th. One straggler was reported. The convoy proceeded due east to avoid submarines reported south of Greenland and Iceland. On the 13th one escort was 25 miles to the north with four stragglers. They joined next day as did another Canadian escort. On the 15th the submarine report indicated that the convoy may have been sighted by U-boats. On the 16th the Spencer dropped a depth charge and delivered a mousetrap attack on a sound contact, firing eight more rounds of mousetrap ammunition on another contact an hour later. On the 17th the SS Fort Rampart was reported torpedoed and the Spencer screened the Canadian escort during rescue operations. At 0646 she established a contact and dropped a pattern of 10 charges and half an hour later fired mousetraps on another contact. Subsequent contacts were non-sub or lost and the Spencer rejoined the convoy. At 1050 she had a sound contact and dropped 11 charges and on reestablishing it dropped 11 more. At 1117 she regained it and fired mousetraps. At 1138 a submarine surfaced to conning tower depth at 2500 yards drawing slowly right, still underway but apparently damaged. At 1140 the Spencer commenced firing all guns and observed many hits on the conning tower and at its base. The crew of the submarine was observed to be abandoning ship via the conning tower. The Duane, in the immediate vicinity, assisted, firing all batteries, while merchant vessels in rear columns of the convoy opened fire on the submarine, some projectiles passing it and landing close to the Spencer. At 1145 the Spencer ceased firing and maneuvered in the vicinity of the disabled submarine. The after davit of the Spencer's No. 1 boat had been damaged by a projectile and the superstructure had been damaged by shrapnel, eight of the Spencer's men were injured, one dying of his wounds. At 1215 the Spencer lowered No. 2 boat with a submarine boarding party. At 1220 the sub began sinking and sank stern first at 1227. At 1238 the Spencer began picking up survivors alongside. The submarine boarding party returned at 1255, having boarded the submarine momentarily prior to its sinking. Three Germans were observed to be dead in the conning tower. One German officer and 18 men were rescued by the Spencer and 22 by the Duane.

ATTACK CONTINUES
On April 18th at 0055 a report was received from a plane that a submarine was seen to dive in a position 3i miles distant from the convoy but an investigation brought negative results. Three harassing charges were dropped half an hour later after a search among the convoy ships. Another contact was investigated by an escort vessel but abandoned. Four escorts detached from the convoy to reinforce convoy SC-126. On the 20th the Spencer and Duane, relieved of escort duty proceeded to Gourock, Scotland, and moored, the enemy prisoners being transferred to Naval Officer in Charge, Greenock, Scotland. On the 25th the Spencer moored at Londonderry.

RETURN TO U.S.
On April 30, 1943, the Spencer, in company with the Duane, left Londonderry and proceeded independently. On May 2nd one contact was investigated which proved to be non-sub. On the 3rd the Duane departed on duty assigned. On the 4th a radar impulse was investigated with negative results. The Spencer entered Boston Harbor on May 6th and on the 9th entered drydock for one day. On the 22nd she departed for Casco Bay for training exercises returning to Boston on the 24th. Next day she proceeded, via Cape Cod Canal, to Brooklyn arriving on May 26th.

CONVOY TO CASABLANCA
The Spencer, in company with the Duane and 6 Navy destroyers got underway on May 28, 1943, from Sandy Hook as units of Task Force 69 escorting convoy UGS-9 for Casablanca. The Campbell joined the Task Force on the 30th and next two a merchant vessel and two LST's escorted by two destroyers joined the convoy. Air coverage was received daily from June 2, 1943, and various drills were held. On the 5th Task Group 21.12 joined DesRon 19 to furnish carrier based air coverage for the convoy. On the 8th two escorts departed to investigate a submarine sighted by a plane from the carrier USS Bogue. On the 9th four escorts departed proceeding independently with the Bogue, accompanied by eight aircraft in formation. On the 10th Task Group 21.12 was detached. Next day air coverage was received from U.S. Army bombers. On the 12th two convoy ships were in collision and fell astern. On the 15th the Task Force was relieved and escorted nine merchant vessels to Casablanca. The Spencer patrolled the outer harbor on the 17th and moored in the inner harbor on June 18th.

RETURN TO U.S.
On June 21, 1943, the Spencer in company with Campbell, Duane and three destroyers got underway and next day sighted 15 ships of the Casablanca section of convoy GUS-8A. On the 27th two carrier based aircraft were sighted. On the 28th the three destroyers departed to investigate a sound contact astern. On the 29th the Spencer dropped two charges on a sound contact, and commenced a box search with negative results. On July 8th the convoy divided into two sections, the Spencer, Duane and Campbell escorting the second section of 16 ships to New York arriving on July 12th.

CONVOY TO CASABLANCA
The Spencer remained at the New York Navy Yard from the 12th to the 22nd of July, 1943 when she got underway and following anti-submarine exercises on the 23rd and 24th in the Block Island area proceeded to Norfolk arriving on July 25th. She was underway on the 26th and on the 27th assumed her position on the starboard bow of convoy UGS-13, as a member of Task Force 64. The convoy received air coverage until July 31st and on the 1st of August from planes based on the carrier USS Card. Air coverage was again received from the 8th to the 11th. On the 12th a British escort group relieved Task Force 64 and that group proceeded with the Casablanca section of the convoy mooring at Casablanca on August 13th.

RETURN TO U.S.
On August 21, 1943, the Spencer with a destroyer proceeded out of Casablanca followed by the Casablanca section of convoy GUS-12. The convoy received land based air coverage until the 23rd. On September 3rd the Norfolk section of the convoy was detached with four escorts and the Spencer took her position with the New York section, entering the New York swept channel on the 5th. The Spencer detached and arrived next day at South Boston.

CONVOY TO CASABLANCA
The Spencer was underway on September 17th, 1943, standing out of Boston and after three days at Casco Bay, engaged in exercises, made rendezvous on the 22nd with five Navy destroyers and proceeded to Norfolk where they reported on the 24th as Task Force 64. On the 25th the Task Force took its position with convoy UGS-19 en route Casablanca. Air coverage was received until the 30th, and from the 9th to 11th of October, when the Casablanca section detached and, with the Spencer, arrived at Casablanca on the 12th.

--46--


RETURN TO U.S.
On October 16th, 1943, theSpencer with Task Force 64 departed Casablanca and arrived at Gibraltar on the 17th. On the 19th she took her position with Task Force 6U as escort to convoy GUS-18. On the 20th the Casablanca section joined and four ships detached for Casablanca. Air coverage was furnished until November 5th. The Norfolk section departed on the 4th and the rest of the convoy continued-to New York, entering New fork channel on the 6th, when the Spencer detached and proceeded to South Boston, Here she moored for 10 day's availability reporting to Commander, Caribbean Sea Frontier by dispatch on November 18th, 1943, for duty with Task Group 26.4.

CARIBBEAN DUTY
The Spencer got underway from Boston on November 18, 1943, en route Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and reported there on the 22nd. On the 23rd she departed with SC-1312 as Task Unit 04.6.2 to rendezvous with convoy KG-671, as escort of the San Juan section of the convoy. On the 26th she arrived at San Juan, departing after a few hours to patrol the southern entrance to Virgin Passage until the 27th. After a short patrol at the southern entrance to Vieques Passage, she began escorting, in company with the Bibb, and the French ship Bearn en route Cuba. Air coverage was received on the 26th. The Spencer departed from her station long enough to identify the Swiss SS Kassos, 13 miles distant. She was relieved of escort duty on November 30, 1943.

ATTACKS SUBMARINE
The Spencer was cruising in the vicinity of Porto Rico at 0959 on December 1, 1943, when she had an underwater contact at 1200 yards. She reduced speed and passed directly over the target. Ten minutes later she fired a six charge embarrassing barrage and 15 minutes later an eight charge barrage. Half an hour later she released a 12 charge pattern. Shortly after this, several on board the Spencer thought they saw a periscope on the port quarter about 1700 yards distant. At 1156 there was an underwater sound bearing 800 yards distant but the target echo could not be kept separate from the disturbance resulting from the previous depth charge explosion. A retiring search was started at noon. Half an hour later the Spencer fired an 11 charge barrage on a contact with hydrophone effects and started another retiring search. At 1500 two large oil slicks were noted five miles south of the last attack. A rectangular box search was then begun, ending with a search across the entrance to Mona Passage which ended at 0700 on December 2nd and she moored at San Juan. Next day she entered dry-dock and remained there until December 7th.

TO TRINIDAD
On December 9, 1943, after receiving passengers, mail and supplies, she departed for Trinidad, B.W.I. stopping briefly at Willemsted, Curaçao on the 10th to escort the U.S.A.T. El Libertador until the 12th when the transport was turned over to SC-1302. The Spencer moored at Trinidad on the 13th.

TO GUANTANAMO
With 3 PC's the Spencer left Trinidad on December 15, 1943, escorting convoy TAG-103 to Guantanamo. Air coverage from land based aircraft was furnished during the next five days. On the 17th the Curaçao section departed and sections from Curaçao and Aruba joined" the convoy. On the 19th another PC joined the escort. Three ships were detached on the 20th to proceed independently to Cuban ports, and later the Spencer and 2 PC's were relieved as escorts and proceeded into Guantanamo Bay.

CONVOY TO TRINIDAD
On December 25, 1943, the Spencer and 4 PC's as Task Unit 04.1.3 were underway escorting the Guantanamo section of convoy OAT-107 to Trinidad, meeting the main body of the convoy at 0925, and relieving C.T.U. 02.9.7. Air coverage from land based planes was received daily. One vessel joined that afternoon and another on the 26th. The Spencer departed station to render medical assistance to a convoy vessel on the 26th. On the 29th the Aruba-Curaçao section of 12 ships, escorted by one PC departed. The PC-1239 ordered to divert HV Rio Hacha (Ecuador) on the 30th collided with that vessel and towed her to Bonaire. Seven vessels departed independently for Puerto La Cruz. The convoy reached Trinidad on December 21, 1943.

1944

RETURN TO GUANTANAMO
After conducting exercises in formation with Task Unit 04.1.3 on January 9, 1944, the Spencer and 3 PC's got underway on the 9th, with another PC and a YMS joining later, as escorts of convoy TAG-108. On the 11th the YMS departed and on the 13th one of the convoyed vessels departed independently for Kingston, Jamaica. Later another departed independently for Cienfuegos and six for Guantanamo. The Task Unit moored at Guantanamo on January 14th.

SUB CONTACTED EN ROUTE TRINIDAD
On January 18th, 1944, the Spencer with T.U. 04.1.3 proceeded out of Guantanamo Bay escorting convoy GAT-12 to Trinidad, B.W.I. Later that day convoy NG-410 joined. On the 19th two vessels detached to proceed independently to Kingston, Jamaica. One of the escorts (PC-1239) attacked a sound contact, reattacking 15 minutes later and conducted a search with another PC. On the 21st one vessel in the convoy departed independently for Las Pietras, Venezuela and another for Curaçao. On the 23rd five vessels departed independently for Puerto La Cruz, Venezuela. On January 24th the Spencer and the rest of the Task Unit were relieved of escort duty and moored at U.S. Naval Air Station, Trinidad, B.W.I.

RETURN TO GUANTANAMO
After exercises and tactical maneuvers, the Task Unit (04.1.3) got underway on February 3, 1944 with the Spencer and 3 PC's and screened the sortie of Convoy TAG-113. Another PC joined. At 1755 the Spencer attacked a contact later classified as non-sub, but conducted a box search of the area. On the 5th the Curaçao section joined followed by the Aruba Section, with vessels for Aruba detaching shortly afterwards. A friendly merchant vessel was identified on the 6th. On the 7th three vessels detached for Guantanamo and the Spencer moored after being relieved of escort duty on the 8th.

TO NORFOLK
On February 9, 1944, the Spencer stood out of Guantanamo Bay and proceeded independently to Hampton Roads, Va., where she moored on the 12th reporting for duty to CinCLant. She proceeded to Norfolk Navy Yard on the 14th where she was on availability until March 1, 1944.

ATTACKS UNDERWATER CONTACT OFF GIBRALTAR
After post repair trials, the Spencer stood out of Norfolk on March 4, 1944, with Task Force 62, escorting UGS-35. The convoy received air coverage from land based aircraft on the 6th and from carrier based planes on the 13th and 15th. On the

--47--


21st the Task Force was relieved of escort duty and proceeded to Gibraltar where it moored. Getting underway for Casablanca at 1800, the Spencer had an underwater contact forty five minutes later and fired four hedgehog barrages. Two underwater explosions were heard and she commenced a box search of the area. Another depth charge was fired on the underwater contact. A British and Dutch escort joined in the search which continued until early on March 22nd when the Spencer proceeded to Casablanca and moored.

RETURN TO NEW YORK
Standing out of Casablanca on March 26th, 1944, the Spencer in Task Force 62, relieved a Dutch escort of convoy GUS-34. A sick man was transferred by breeches buoy to the Spencer from one of the convoyed vessels later in the afternoon for treatment. Air coverage was furnished by land based planes through the 27th. A French vessel joined the convoy on the 28th. The Horta section joined on April 1, 1944. The Spencer took aboard several crew members from other vessels for medical treatment during the voyage. Three seamen died. Air coverage from land based aircraft was received from the 4th to the 14th. One vessel departed under escort for Bermuda on the 11th. On the 12th the Norfolk section broke off and the Spencer proceeded with the New York section, mooring at New York Navy Yard on April 14th.

AIR ALARMS ON WAY TO BIZERTE
After 15 days availability the Spencer got underway from Brooklyn on May 1, 1944, and moored at Norfolk on the 2nd. On the 3rd she departed Norfolk with Task Force 62 as escort to convoy UGS-41. Air coverage from land based planes and blimps was received on the 3rd and from planes alone through the 7th. On the 17th a sound contact was classified non-sub. One merchant vessel with escort joined the convoy from Santa Maria, Azores, 60 miles distant. Several men were transferred to the Spencer by breeches buoy from other vessels during the trip for medical treatment. A British submarine and a British destroyer joined the convoy on the 20th, and aircraft coverage by land bases planes was furnished. On the 21st all hands were called to air attack quarters and a smoke screen was laid for 50 minutes from 0603. Seven hours later air attack quarters was again sounded, an unidentified plane being reported 8 miles distant, presumed to be an enemy shadow plane. It disappeared and all hands were secured shortly afterwards. At 20li6 another call to air attack quarters was made and a smoke screen laid for an hour and a half. Three escorts rejoined and the Oran section detached with 11 merchant vessels from that port joining. Two more escorts joined. On the 22nd one merchant ship and one escort detached for Algiers. Air attack quarters with smoke screen was called at various times, through the 23rd. On the 24th the Task Force was relieved and the Spencer proceeded to Gaulet du Lac, Tunisia, where she anchored until the 31st, when she proceeded to Bizerte.

RETURN TO U.S.
After anti-aircraft exercises the Spencer got underway with Task Force 62, as escort of convoy GUS-41 on May 31, 1944. On June 4th she was relieved of her escort station and proceeded alone toward Europa Point where two officers departed to be detached from the Task Force and the Spencer stood out of Gibraltar Bay to regain her convoy escort station. Air coverage was furnished by land based planes on the 17th, 18th and 19th. On the 18th convoy was divided into two sections, the Spencer proceeding with the New York section. Mooring at Brooklyn on June 20th, Task Force 62 flag was transferred to USS Eldridge on the 22nd and on the 25th theSpencer departed for Norfolk where she moored on the 26th to undergo conversion to an AGC (Combined Operations-Communications Headquarters Ship).

JOINS PACIFIC FLEET
The Spencer remained at Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Va., until September 11, 1944, when, after being depermed, she proceeded to N.O.B. Norfolk, leaving there on the 13th for an anchorage in Chesapeake Bay to seek shelter from a reported hurricane. The 36th Signal Detachment Headquarters Company, U.S. Army, consisting of 3 officers and 23 men reported aboard for duty early on the 13th. She underwent a post-conversion shakedown from the 16th to the 23rd and after post-shakedown repairs at N.O.B. Norfolk, stood out on the 27th escorted by the USS Muskegon (PF-24). On October 3rd, 1944, she arrived at Cristobal, Panama, Canal Zone, where she reported to Commander Seventh (Pacific) Fleet for duty.

TO SOUTHWEST PACIFIC
On October 4, 1944, the Spencer passed through Panama Canal to Balboa and, operating independently without surface escort or air coverage, proceeded toward Bora Bora, Society Islands. She arrived there on the 18th and left the same day, proceeding independently for Finschhaven, New Guinea. Arriving on the 29th she received orders to go to Langemak Bay and thence to Hollandia. She anchored in Humboldt Bay, New Guinea on October 31st. While en route to this point from Balboa she had held numerous target practices, four fire, two collision and two abandon ship drills. Crew members had been familiarized with their duties through various classes of instructions.

11 SWIMMERS ASSISTED
The Spencer moved from Humboldt Bay to Hollandia Bay on November 1, 1944, and reported to Com 7th Phib on November 3rd. On the 6th she moored to USS Otus (AS-20) and began undergoing conversion and repair work as directed by Commander Task Force 76. When a swimming party from the Spencer observed three groups of swimmers clinging to flotsam one and one half miles from shore on the 7th, the ship's No. 2 boat picked them up, landing seven of the men at their camp, transferring two Navy reservists and two WAC's to the Spencer, the latter four being covered with fuel oil and the WAC's also suffering from shock. They were issued emergency clothing, fed and sent ashore to their units. Repairs and conversion were completed on November 25th.

GROUNDED ON A REEF
Getting underway with Task Unit 76.4.5 on November 26, 1944, the Spencer proceeded to Leyte where the Task Unit was dissolved on the 30th. The Spencer anchored in the vicinity of USS Mt. McKinley (AGC-7) in San Pedro Bay. Later that day Rear Admiral A. D. Struble, USN,. and staff reported on board and the Spencer became flagship of Task Group 78.3. Later Brigadier General Dunckel and staff reported on board for duty with the Task Group. On the 6th the flag of the Commander, Task Group 78.3 was shifted to the USS Hughes (DD-410). On the 7th, while standing up San Pedro Bay to refuel the Spencer became grounded on a reef. The fire room and compartment A-413 were flooded and the main engines and boilers were secured. The USS Quapaw (ATF-110) arrived to stand by and next day the Spencer was floated, towed by an Army large tug (LT-20) and anchored in San Pedro Bay where divers completed temporary repairs by placing a wooden patch on the hull. While anchored on the 20th the Spencer fired on an enemy plane two miles distant. The 36th Signal

--48--


Detachment transferred to USS Gilliam for temporary duty, and on the 22nd LCC's 92 and 94 reported for duty with the Spencer, who then moved to Leyte Gulf as examination vessel.

1945

LANDING AT NASUGBU, LUZON, P.I.
On 28 January, 1945, the Spencer was underway from San Pedro Bay, Leyte as flagship and guide for the 8th Amphibious Group with Lt. Gen. R.L. Eichelberger, Commanding General, 8th Army and Major General Swing, Commanding General, 11th Airborne Division on board. The landing was made on 31 January, 1945, after a preliminary naval bombardment. Minor opposition was encountered on the beaches, which was quickly wiped out and the 11th Airborne Division dashed up the valley 35 miles to the southern limits of Manila. On February 1st, the Spencer patrolled off Nasugbu Bay, Luzon, P.I., in company with two other vessels. Later that morning Lt. Gen. R. L. Eichelberger, Commanding General, U.S. 8th Army and staff departed to take charge of operations ashore. On the 2nd the Spencer moved under escort to Mangarin Bay, Mindoro, P.I., and left there on the 9th escorted by the USS Flusser receiving air coverage from land based aircraft. Anchoring in San Pedro Bay on the 16th she returned to Mangarin Bay. on the 18th.

LANDING AT PUERTO PRINCESSA, PALAWAN, P.I.
Following a rehearsal exercise with Task Group 78.2 on February 25, 1945, the Spencer stood out on the 26th as flagship and fleet guide, with Brigadier General Harold H. Haney, Commanding General, 41st Infantry on board. The amphibious landing to seize the Puerto Princessa area was made on February 28th. There were estimated to be 3500 enemy troops on Palawan, of which 2000 were thought to be in the Puerto Princessa area. Only 600 of these, however, were combat troops. Beaching conditions were generally unfavorable due to fringing reefs, coral heads and mangrove swamps backing some beaches. 5,322 combat and 2,094 service troops were landed in various types of landing craft. Extensive bombing and strafing had been effected two days before landing. The initial landings were completed with no opposition encountered, our troops advancing rapidly inland, securing both the nearby airfields by 1300. During the afternoon, one infantry company was transported in LVT's and LCM's to the mouth of the Iwahig River, where they landed with only a few rounds of opposition small-arms fire. At 1849 the Spencer was underway patrolling off Puerto Princessa in company with combatant units of Task Group 78.2. She departed on the 3rd and anchored in Mangarin Bay, Mindoro, on the 4th. Leaving there on the 5th, under escort, she anchored in San Pedro Bay on the 7th.

OPERATION AGAINST TALISAY, CEBU
On March 21st, 1945, Acting Commander, Phib Group 8, Captain Albert T. Sprague, Jr., USN, and staff and Major General William Arnold, Commanding General, Americal Division, U.S. 8th Army and staff reported aboard. The Spencer participated in rehearsal for V-2 operations with other units of Task Group 78.2 and on the 24th stood out as flagship and guide for the task group, receiving land based air coverage on the 25th. On the 26th the Spencer anchored in Bohol Straits off Talisay, Cebu to direct V-2 operations against enemy occupied territory. About 14,000 combat and service troops of the Americal Division landed at Talisay Beach, southwest of Cebu City on March 26th. The assault followed a bombardment of the beaches by cruisers and destroyers of Task Group 74.3 and two weeks of aerial attacks which severely damaged enemy defenses and other installations. Except for numerous land mines and mortar fire on the left flank, no opposition was met on the beaches. Underwater log obstructions hampered unloading of the larger landing craft. Pontoon causeways overcame the low beach gradient. Several midget submarines were attacked south of the city during the afternoon. Cebu City was occupied the day after the landing with the docks found essentially undamaged. The rest of the city, however, was largely in ruins, Japanese demolition squads beginning a systematic destruction of all major installations almost simultaneously with our landings at Talisay. At 1555 on the 26th Major General Arnold departed the Spencer to take command of operations ashore and the Spencer got underway patrolling Bohol Strait in company with various units of Task Group 78.2. Patrol duty was completed on the morning of the 27th on which date at 1931 there was an air alert and a single Jap plane, probably a Val, dropped two or three bombs on the beachhead and in the water off Talisay, without causing any damage. The Spencer departed Talisay on March 28th, anchoring in San Pedro Bay on the 29th.

LANDINGS AT PARANG AND MALABANG, MINDANAO, P.I.
On April 17th, 1945, elements of the U.S. 10th Army Corps landed unopposed along the eastern shores of Moro Gulf, Mindanao, P.I. Troops of the 24th Division were put ashore at Parang, about 15 miles north of Cotabato, after a preliminary bombardment of the beachhead by cruisers and destroyers. By midday they had advanced more than 5 miles south of Parang, still meeting light opposition. Meanwhile, farther to the north, other units landed at Malabang. As the amphibious force, of which the Spencer served as flagship, approached Malabang, and a few minutes before the heavy naval bombardment of the beach and nearby air strip were scheduled to begin, a small motor boat put out from shore. As she approached, the American ensign could be identified in the pre-dawn light. The craft was manned by native guerillas and carried three U.S. Army fliers. They reported that the Japanese had fled the area and that the beachhead was unguarded. Troops of the 24th Army Division were landed and took up pursuit of the fleeing Japanese.

ATTACK ON DAVAO
Units of the 24th Division, working overland from Parang, secured Kabacan, an important road junction in the center of the island of Mindanao and moving swiftly through the hills to the east had reached Digos, on the west coast of the Davao Gulf on the 27th of April. Here they spread out while units advancing to the north reached the western outskirts of Davao on May 1, 1945. The same task force that had operated in the Moro Gulf, with the Spencer, as flagship, swept around the southern tip of Mindanao and landed troops and material at Santa Cruz near Digos on May 3rd where the 24th Division had already cleared the beachhead of the enemy. The city of Davao was captured on May 4th and the city seaport, Santa Ana, was taken on May 3rd. The Spencer proceeded to Polloc Harbor on the 4th and then returned to Leyte on the 9th.

LANDING AT BRUNEI, NORTH BORNEO
The Spencer proceeded to Morotai, N.E.I., on May 23, 1945, and anchored there on the 25th. On June 4th she departed, together with other units of Task Group 78.1 having been designated primary fighter direction ship for that Task Group and flagship for Commander of White and Green Beach assault units of "OBOE Six" operation, Brunei, North Borneo. Shortly after anchoring off Green Beach, (Muara Harbor), Brunei Bay on June 10th, there was an air alert

--49--


COAST GUARD CUTTER <i>SPENCER</i>
COAST GUARD CUTTER SPENCER

COAST GUARD CUTTER <i>TANEY</i>
COAST GUARD CUTTER TANEY

--50--


and a Japanese plane, identified as a Nick dropped one bomb near the Transport Area off Brown Beach, but caused no damage. At 1230, Brigadier General William J. V. Windeuer of the Australian 9th Division and staff departed the Spencer. Besides providing communications facilities for the 20th Australian Brigade, which had landed on three beaches on the southern side of the Bay, as they pushed toward Brooketon, the Spencer had acted as radar guard against Jap planes, coming in near the mouth of the Bay. On the 13th a U.S. P-61, night fighter, controlled from the Spencer, shot down one Nick twin engine fighter about 10 miles south. Relieved by the USS Bancroft on the 14th the Spencer returned to Morotai, N.E.I.

ATTACK ON BALIKPAPAN, BORNEO
The Spencer, anchored at Morotai on the 20th and reported to Commander Task Group 78.2 for duty on "OBOE Two" operation against Balikpapan, Borneo. On the 22nd Captain C. W. Gray, USN, and staff and various officers and men of the 7th Australian Division reported aboard. The Spencer was to act as relief group flagship for the operation. After rehearsal on the 24th, officers and men of the First Australian Air Liaison Group reported aboard for duty on June 25th and the Spencer proceeded to her assigned station in the assault echelon on the 26th as the Task Group got underway. On July 1st the Spencer anchored in her assigned station for the Balikpapan operation and staff officers of the Australian 7th Division left the vessel. The Spencer became flagship for Task Group 78.2 on July 3rd. The support force consisted of Seventh Fleet cruisers and escort carriers and elements of the Royal Australian and Netherlands Navies. After preliminary bombardment, the landing was made on July 1st. There was serious enemy mortar fire at the beaches causing temporary withdrawal of some landing craft. This fire was quickly knocked out by destroyer gunfire and the landing operations resumed. Inland, stiff fighting was encountered. On the 7th, escorted by the USS Kline (APD-120), the Spencer departed for Manila arriving there on the 10th. She proceeded independently to Subic Bay on the 17th, returning to Manila on the 19th, where she remained at anchor until August 1, 1945, as flagship for ComPhibGrp 8.

TRIPS TO ZAMBOANGA AND SAN FERNANDO
On August 2, 1945, the Spencer, with Rear Admiral Albert S. Noble, Commander Amphibious Group Eight aboard, got underway en route independently to Zamboanga, Mindanao, P.I., where Rear Admiral Noble was to confer with the Commanding General of the 35th Division. Arriving on the 5th she moored at Government Dock, Zamboanga until the 7th when she returned to Tolosa, Leyte, P.I., for emergency repairs. She arrived at Tolosa on the 8th and on the 10th received unofficial news of the Japanese desire to surrender. On the 11th she proceeded to Manila, escorted by the USS Brazier (DE-345) arriving there on the 12th. On the 25th she departed for San Fernando, Luzon, P.I. where Rear Admiral Noble was to confer with the Commanding General of the 33rd Division. She returned to Manila on August 28th.

TO JINSEN, SHANGHAI AND SAN DIEGO
On September 10th, the Commander, Amphibious Group Eight, transferred to the USS Wasatch (AGC-9) and the Spencer reported to Commander Service Division 101. She proceeded to Leyte on the 11th and on the 17th was underway independently to join the convoy 10K 31, consisting of LCS Flotilla 5 en route Okinawa. On September 22nd she was en route independently to Jinsen, Korea, where she anchored on the 24th, serving as auxiliary communication ship for ComServDiv 101. On October 9, 1945, the Spencer was underway for Shanghai, China. While on the way, several floating mines were sunk by gunfire. She moored at Shanghai on the 12th. On December 5th, 1945, she was released from ComServDiv 101 and was underway independently for Pearl Harbor where she was to receive onward routing to San Diego, California, to report to DCGO, 11th Naval District

CGC Spencer

        COMMANDING OFFICER
December 1941 to
January 1943
  FRITZSCHE, Edward H. Comdr.
January 1943 to
July 1943
  BERDINE, Harold S. Comdr.
July 1943 to
August 1944
  CAPRON, Walter C. Comdr.
August 1944 to
December 1945
  HINNANT, James R. Comdr.


CGC TANEY

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

DESCRIPTION
The CGC Taney was built at Philadelphia in 1936. She was one of the "Secretary" class cutters designated by the Navy as a WPG. She is 327 feet long with a 41 foot molded beam and a draft of 12 feet 6 inches. She has a displacement of 2216 tons and a gross tonnage C.H. of 2141. Built of steel, she is an oil burner and has a speed of 20 knots with a twin screw geared turbine developing 6200 horse power. Early in 1941 she was on duty with the Navy stationed at Honolulu, her commanding officer being Captain G. B. Gelly, USCG. He was succeeded in 1942 by Captain L. B. Olsen, USCG, who was succeeded by Commander H. J. Wuensch, Commander George D. Synon succeeded Commander Wuensch and Commander C. G.Bowman, USCG followed Commander Synon.

ATTACKS AIRCRAFT AT PEARL HARBOR
When anti-aircraft fire was first observed over Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, general quarters was sounded aboard the Taney, stationed in Honolulu Harbor, and all officers not on board were ordered to return. The anti-aircraft battery on the Taney as well as all other guns were ready to fire with their full crew and three officers at their stations within four minutes after the attack begun. Steam was ordered and the vessel was ready to get underway. Without receiving orders from any source, the cutter opened fire on scattering formations of enemy aircraft passing over the harbor between 0901 and 0918, at high altitude, west to east. The 3" guns were used as the machine guns were outranged. At 1135 the Taney opened fire on a small formation of enemy planes which had passed over the city from north to south and were almost overhead at the time of firing. At 1158 a formation of five enemy planes approached the Taney directly from the SSW, over the harbor entrance, on what appeared to be a glide bombing or strafing attack on the cutter, or more probably, a bombing attack on the power plant located north of the vessel's berth at Pier 6, Honolulu. The cutter opened fire with 3 inch guns and 50 caliber machine guns after the planes were in range. There were no direct hits but the planes were rocked by the fire and swerved up and away.

ATTACKS ENEMY SUBMARINE
Proceeding to sea at 0546 on December 8, 1941, the Taney commenced a patrol of the vicinity of Honolulu Harbor entrance. On this patrol she made seven sound contacts

--51--


and dropped depth charges between December 8th and 14th. A contact on December 10, 1941 at 2043, was developed shortly after tracer bullets from the vicinity of the harbor entrance were observed ahead, apparently aimed at a surface vessel. A sound contact was made on the starboard bow shortly thereafter and the Taney made an approach beginning with a sharp turn to starboard to bring the submarine ahead. The rate of change indicated that the submarine was running away. The cutter completed the approach and dropped three charges at 100 yards spread. A very strong odor of fuel oil was noticed aft after the attack and the turn down wind. This was noticeable for several hours afterwards when passing the spot. A definite oil slick persisted at this spot for two days. On December 11th the Taney dropped six charges using the "Y" gun on an urgent approach at full speed on a sound contact made while a cruiser was leaving Pearl Harbor and within torpedo range. On December 14th the cutter dropped five charges on an excellent contact with the range closing fast from dead ahead. This was the best contact made although no visible evidence of damage to the submarine was found.

DEPTH CHARGES OFF HONOLULU
As January 1942 began the Taney was patrolling the entrance to Honolulu Harbor. She remained in the Honolulu area until the 22nd, patrolling for two periods of 6 days each with relief from the USS Southard. While patrolling on the 9th she dropped five charges on a sound contact at 0430 with unknown results. On the 15th she. released five charges on a contact at 21°13.6'N, 157°50'W with unknown results. The Chew (DD) made a depth charge attack about 1000 yards from the Taney who closed but did not make contact. On the 1 7th, however, the Taney followed an attack by a destroyer by three minutes and released four charges at 0753. At 0810 she dropped seven charges on a good sound contact at 21°16'50"N, 157°53'50"W and expended two "Y" arbors and two "Y" gun charges. At 0900 a periscope feathered at 2000 yards but after 45 minutes the Taney, unable to get contact, was secured from general quarters.

ESCORT DUTY
On January 22, 1942 the Taney stood out of Honolulu Harbor as escort of SS Barbara Olson to Canton Island, the Perry (DD) escorting until 1910. While on this duty on January 29, 1942 the Taney made sound contact at 1615 and at 1620 dropping seven charges at 2°06's, 170°20'W, with unknown results. The Olson was then directed to proceed at her best speed as the Taney continued to sound search which was abandoned without making another contact. The convoy reached Canton Island on January 30, 1942 and until February 7, 1942 patrolled off Canton Island sending a working party to assist in unloading the Olson. On the 7th she resumed her escort of the Olson sighting Enderbury Island at 0630 and by 0800 was drifting off the island while three of her boats assisted in landing operations. At 1015 the National Ensign on Enderbury Island was hauled down as four Department of Interior colonists embarked for Honolulu. Houses on the island were destroyed by gunfire. Resuming escort of the Olson they proceeded to Jarvis Island which was reached February 10, 1942. After the National Ensign was hauled down here also all buildings and equipment were burned and four Department of Interior colonists were embarked for transportation to Honolulu. The Taney, trailing the Olson entered Palmyra (Island) Harbor on February 12, 1942 and moored. Here she remained until the 15th and then got underway for Canton Island to patrol the area until the 25th. Then she proceeded to Honolulu arriving March 5, 1942.

PATROL DUTY
Entrance patrol at Pearl Harbor was resumed March 19th, this duty being subsequently exchanged for Honolulu Entrance Patrol relieving the USS Montgomery. This duty continued for 6 day periods through April 18th, the Taney patrolling in Bamala Bay for 6 days and mooring at Honolulu for 2 days. On the 18th the Force Commander's stateroom on the Taney was cleared and converted into a "radar" room. Work on "radar" and depth charge projector installations proceeded through the balance of April as crew members took instruction at the radar school at the Pualloa Rifle Range. (No further war diaries of the Taney are available until April 1944. The September-November 1942 war diaries of the Honolulu District mention the Taney, along with the Tiger and Reliance as continuing operations under Commander, SeaForce, Hawaiian Sea Frontier, with logistics under DCGO, Honolulu. The January 1943 District diary states that the usual logistics operations were maintained for the Taney, Tiger, Reliance and PC-590 by the Districts. According to "History of Coast Guard, 14th District" there was practically no expansion of vessel operations in the Honolulu District during the war. Operational control of the Taney and of the 125 footers Tiger and Reliance was under the Navy. The amphibian aeroplane V-135 which was attached to the Taney at the beginning of the war was turned over to the Navy shortly after the outbreak of the war).

ESCORTS CONVOY UGS-38
The Taney arrived at Boston March 14, 1944 and was at the Boston Navy Yard until March 29, 1944, while combat information centers were being installed. She arrived at Hampton Roads March 31, 1944, and on April 2, 1944, departed Norfolk as a unit of Task Force 66, having Commander Task Force aboard. Next morning she departed Hampton Roads and took her assigned position 4000 yards ahead of the convoy guide as convoy UGS-38 departed. The trip across the Atlantic with the 85 merchant vessels and 2 Navy tankers in convoy UGS-38, the US CGC Duane, 14 YMS's and 10 LCI(L)'s in 13 columns was uneventful. On the 13th vessels of Task Group 66.9 were detached for the Azores and on the 15th the J. E. Campbell detached to proceed to Gibraltar, rejoining on the 18th as the convoy passed through the Straits of Gibraltar and entered the Mediterranean Sea. At Gibraltar the convoy was joined by three British submarines, the tug Vagrant and the HNMS Heemskerck, an anti-aircraft ship. The USS Lanning, which had detached on the 17th to proceed with a straggler to Gibraltar rejoined on the 18th, while the USS Landsdale, USS Speed and USS Sustain joined the Task Force on the 19th.

CONVOY ATTACKED
The convoy was attacked by German torpedo planes about 35 minutes after sunset on April 20, 1944, at 360°59'N, 3°54'E. The convoy was then in 10 columns with 3 British submarines in column 600 yards on the port beam of No. 71 (Convoy Commodore). At the time of the attack several escorts were not in their normal positions due to the proximity of land to starboard. HNMS Heemskerck assumed responsibility for fighter direction, air warning guard, the making of "shad" and "help" messages and the maintenance of contact with fighter sectors. She was given considerable latitude in altering her station as she deemed necessary. The Landsdale, Sustain and Speed were given stations of maximum effectiveness for their jamming equipment. Two days prior to the attack a gunnery doctrine in the event of air attack during darkness had been given, directing all escorts to fire machine guns only at seen targets at night and only when satisfied that their own ship's position was known to the planes' AAA. At longer ranges main battery controlled fire only would be used. Coded signals had been received from radio Algiers between 1947 and 2022 on April 20, 1944 and at 2045 enemy glider bomb's transmissions. At 2048 "tiptree"

--52--


and at 2052 "negative tiptree" reports were received and passed to the Heemskerck. At the same time the Lansdale reported only friendly planes on its screen. Warnings received at 2055, 2057 and 2058 were passed to the Heemskerck and at 2101 the Lowe reported radar contact on five enemy planes from dead ahead and two minutes later reported sighting about 5 enemy planes flying low over water.

PAUL HAMILTON BLOWN UP--LANSDALE SUNK
At 2105 the SS Paul Hamilton was hit with a torpedo and exploded, killing 504 men, all that were on board. At 2106 the J. E. Campbell reported seven planes, flying low, coming on the port bow of the convoy. Thereafter planes were sighted by most of the forward screen. Communications could not be established by the Taney with the Heemskerck to report all these as the Taney's TRC transmitter was inoperative. At 2120 the attacking planes began retirement. The Commander, Escort Division 46 was directed to take charge of rescue operations astern in which the Menges, Newell, Fessenden and Case were directed to participate. Commander Escort Division 21 in the J. E. Campbell was directed to take position astern of the convoy to act as communications relay between rescuing ships and Task Force Commander. It was learned that the SS Paul Hamilton had exploded immediately and USS Lansdale had been sunk in 15 minutes while the Samite, the Stephen E. Austin and Royal Star had been damaged. Tug #136 immediately took one of the damaged merchant ships in tow and two other tugs were requested from Algiers.

HOW ATTACK WAS MADE
It appeared that from 18 to 24 JU-88's and/or HE-111's participated in the attack which took place in three waves of planes. Each wave came in from a bearing of about 100° True, flying very low and making use of shore background. The first wave of nine JU-88's sheared off from shore background and attacked the convoy from deed ahead, the leading aircraft probably being responsible for the sinking of the Paul Hamilton and damaging the Samite. On retiring they were fired upon by the convoy ships and the Heemskerck. The second wave of seven JU-88's apparently followed the first and consisted of seven planes. Part of this wave continued down the starboard flanks of the convoy and attacked, resulting in the damage to the Austin and Royal Star. In this wave two torpedoes seemed to have been dropped at the Lowe and two at the Taney, torpedo wakes being reported close aboard both ships. The third wave of five HE-111's was concentrated on the port bow and probably sank the Landsdale. The Heemskerck saw wakes of three torpedoes apparently dropped by this wave. The attack was well planned, due apparently to effective reconnaissance by enemy aircraft about noon of April 20, 1944. Employing twilight and shore coverage to fullest advantage, the enemy plane further escaped detection by flying Iow over the water and using only torpedoes all of which made straight runs. No shooting was done by the enemy aircraft and only explosions from depth charges, dropped by the Pride for reasons unknown to the Task Force Commander, were heard. No flares, were used by the attacking planes. The Fechteler claimed to have shot down one plane, damaged another and observed a third in flames between columns #1 and #2 of the convoy. The Taney and Speed reported possible damage to one aircraft each and the Mosley damage to two and also to shooting down one. The Lansdale was verbally reported to have claimed three aircraft shot down. 230 survivors from the Landsdale, including two surviving German aviators, were picked up by the Menges and Newell. No concerted effort at smoke laying was made by the escorts. Effective fighter protection was apparently totally lacking in the vicinity of the convoy, although one fighter was reported engaging enemy aircraft near the Landsdale. The low approach over the water and with land as a background rendered SC and RA Radar ineffective. In addition the jamming of the Taney's SC Radar throughout the attack might have been an attempt at I.F.F. (Identification Friend or Foe). The Mosley reported the same experience with its SA Radar. SL and SG Radar was not affected and brought the first detection although at limited ranges. All the damaged vessels reached Algiers, except the Royal Star which sank next day. The convoy continued to a point off Bizerte, North Africa where, on April 22, 1944, Task Force 66 was relieved by a British escort.

TWO ESCORTS TORPEDOED IN GUS-38
The Taney left Bizerte on May 1, 1944 in company with other units of Task Force 66 which relieved the British Escort Commander of GUS-38. On the 2nd an enemy submarine was reported in the area to be traversed that night so convoy vessels streamed nets and balloons. On the 3rd the Taney was patrolling her station at 12 knots when at 0130 the Menges was torpedoed by an enemy submarine. She was towed to Algiers with a damaged stem. During the day ships for Algiers departed the convoy and others joined. At evening all escorts made smoke. On the 4th an enemy U-boat was reported in the area ahead of the convoy, and fixer gear was streamed. This submarine (the U-371) was later confirmed as sunk at 37°49'N, 05°39'E by the Pride, J. E. Campbell, F. S. Senegal and HMS Blankney. On the 5th the Taney picked up a surface radar contact, which was also reported by the outer screen and the convoy made an emergency diversion to starboard as it was investigated, but later lost. Shortly afterwards at 0245 the outer screen sighted a submarine, which submerged, losing contact. At 0346 the USS Fechteler, in a position ahead of the port side of the convoy was torpedoed. The convoy was diverted to starboard and all units searched for the submarine. The convoy proceeded without further incident or loss, passed through Gibraltar and on the 19th the New York and Chesapeake sections separated, the Taney proceeding with the former and entering New York at 1255 on May 21st, 1944.

ESCORTS CONVOY UGS-45
After an availability until June 8, 1944, the Taney proceeded to Hampton Roads and on the 12th, together with Escort Divisions 46 and 21 proceeded to sea escorting UGS-45, the Taney patrolling 4000 yards ahead as convoy guide, and conducting continuous 360° surface radar search, a sound search 60° on either side of the base course and degaussing at all times. On the 18th she investigated a sound contact which proved to be non-sub. On the 26th the Casablanca section departed and on the 27th the Gibraltar section. Shortly afterwards all ships of the convoy passed through the Straits of Gibraltar and began forming a broad front of 13 columns. The Oran section departed and a British cruiser and two destroyers joined, the escort laying smoke around the convoy during the dusk alert. On the 29th joiners from Algiers took assigned stations and smoke was again laid as well as on the 30th during dawn alerts. On July 1st Task Force 66 was relieved by a British escort commander and the Taney stood into Bizerte Harbor. She remained there until the 10th.

CONVOY GUS-45
On May 10, 1944, the Taney departed Bizerte Harbor in company with other units of Task Force 66 and relieved the British escort of convoy GUS-45. Forming a broad front of seven columns, the escorts laid smoke at dawn and disk alerts on the 11th and 12th. Joiners from Algiers and Oran on the 12th and 13th took assigned positions, the convoy clearing the Straits at 1200 on the 13th. Sound contacts investigated on the 16th,

--53--


18th and 19th proved to be non-subs, the Taney leaving her station for twelve hours to escort a straggler on the 21st. On several occasions patients were taken a board from convoy vessels for medical treatment. A depth charge was fired on a contact on the 24th, followed by a hedgehog pattern. The contact was finally evaluated non-sub. On the 28th the Chesapeake and Delaware sections departed the main convoy which, proceeding in four column formation, entered the New York swept channel while the Taney proceeded to Brooklyn Navy lard for availability.

CONVOY UGS-52
After an availability until August 4th, the Taney underwent training exercises at Casco Bay, Me., until the 18th, when she proceeded to Hampton Roads, Va. On the 22nd in company with Escort Division 21 and 46 she put to sea escorting convoy UGS-52 as convoy guide. Drills were conducted on the 24th after which operations continued uneventful. On September 6th the Casablanca and on the 7th the Gibraltar section departed. These were followed on the 8th and 9th by the Oran and Algiers sections. On the 11th the Task Force was relieved by British escorts and the Taney moored at Bizerte.

CONVOY GUS-52
The Taney, with Task Force 66, relieved the British escorts and commenced escorting convoy GUS-52 on September 18, 1944. Additional sections joined from Algiers on the 20th, Oran on the 21st, Gibraltar on the 22nd and Casablanca on the 23rd. Crossing the Atlantic was uneventful and when the Chesapeake section broke off on October 6, 1944, the Taney proceeded with the New York section, which forming a narrow front of two columns entered the New York swept channel. Next day the Taney detached as a unit of Task Force 66 and on the 9th left for Boston Navy Yard where she was to undergo conversion to an AGC type vessel (amphibious force flagship equipped with special communication facilities). She remained at Boston undergoing conversion until January 19, 1945, when she departed for Norfolk.

OKINAWA OPERATIONS
After shakedown and training until the 25th and post shakedown availability until the 28th the Taney proceeded on the 29th with 4 other vessels to Pearl Harbor via the Canal Zone and San Diego, Reaching her destination on February 22, 1945 the vessel reported to Rear Admiral Calvin H. Cobb, USN, for operational control. On the 26th she began undergoing minor repairs and installation of new communication equipment through March 5, 1945. On March 10, 1945 she departed for Eniwetok, operating independently without surface escort, and then on the 19th for Ulithi where she anchored on the 23rd. The Taney remained at Ulithi until April 7, 1945. Rear Admiral Cobb, who was on board, being prospective commander, Naval Forces, Ryukyus (CTG 99.1). Getting underway on the 7th with Task Force 51.8 she proceeded to Hagushi Landing Beaches, Okinawa, arriving amid air alerts on the 11th. On the 12th at 0543 hits were observed on a "Betty" crossing the Taney's bow at 1200 yards and it crashed shortly afterwards. Four more attacks were experienced on the 12th and two on the 13th. Later, on that date, the Taney moved to Kerama Kaiko, Kerama Rhetto and though alerts were received later, no planes were sighted. Returning to Hagushi on the 15th the Taney again fired on enemy aircraft which were eventually shot down by naval gunfire. On the 16th strong concentrations of enemy aircraft attacked the area, most of them being shot down by combat air patrol. Minor attacks were experienced through the 23rd, vessels on radar picket duty receiving the heaviest punishment. Low ceilings prevented air attack on the 24th and 25th, but a small attack came on the 26th and on the 27th planes attacked shipping and shore installations from the North despite cloudy weather. On the 28th strong attacks were made, the Taney opening fire on two planes crossing her bow at 0320 and 0324 with no observable results. Four attacks on the 29th were followed by two on the 30th all directed at vessels and shore establishments in the vicinity. During the 45 days preceding May 26, 1945 it was necessary for the Taney to go to general quarters 119 times, with the crew being kept at battle stations for as long as nine hours at a stretch. During this period the Taney was credited with downing four suicide enemy aircraft plus numerous assists.

CONDUCTS INFORMATION CENTER
During all this period the Taney was assigned full conduct of combat information center duties, maintaining a complete radar and air-net coverage, receiving and evaluating total information of all activities, enemy and friendly, and issuing orders to all activities for which she was responsible. Additional duties included full conduct of visual signals and joint conduct of all other means of rapid communication. Medical personnel attached also gave treatment to numerous battle casualties from other units. In addition to air attacks the enemy used suicide boats, midget submarines and on one occasion shelled the Taney by shore batteries. Because of her exposed position to the north the vessel experienced a disproportionate share of the actual fighting.

ATTACKS CONTINUE DURING JUNE
Suicide air attacks continued throughout June. Most of the enemy planes were intercepted by combat air patrols before they reached the Hagushi Anchorage. Such raids took place on eighteen out of the thirty days in June 1945. On the 6th two vessels were hit with unknown damage but none was at Hagushi anchorages. On the 7th, 10 planes attacked the forward area and all were splashed. The raids continued and on the 10th a plane bombed Ie Shima airfield. On the 11th 8 planes were splashed out of two raids. Again on the 16th an LCVP smoke boat was lost as 10 planes bombed the vicinity in four raids. On the 17th stray shrapnel fragments hit the Taney as lone enemy aircraft made a low level attack. Successful suicide attacks on shipping at Kerama Rhetto anchorage on the 21st and 22nd indicated 30 enemy planes in 15 raids. Later that day 25 planes closed the area, 10 being destroyed and none penetrating the transport area. One out of seven more, attacking later in the day, was destroyed. On the 24th a plane bombing Ie Shima airfield was destroyed and two more, approaching from the northwest, were splashed. Yontan airfield was bombed on the 25th and shore installations on the 26th. When a Japanese float type seaplane passed overhead at low altitude and circled the Taney at 0120 on that day, ship and shore batteries splashed it. Another was destroyed by night fighters on the 27th. In all at least 288 enemy planes attacked the area during the eighteen days in June when attacks occurred and at least 96 were destroyed.

NO LET-UP 'TIL V-J DAY
The suicide raids continued throughout July 1945. On the 19th the Taney led all ships at the anchorage in convoy eastward, to avoid a typhoon which was moving north Northeast and returned on the 20th to anchor in Buckner Bay, Okinawa. On the 22nd an enemy plane dropped a bomb on a vessel 13,000 yards from the Taney. On the 29th picket boats to the southwest were attacked and one ship sunk. Next day a suicide plane crashed into the USS Cassin Young (DD). Again on August 1, 1945 the Taney led Task Unit 95.5.1 to sea to avoid a

--54--


tropical storm, returning to Buckner Bay on the 3rd. Nightly enemy air raids continued. On the 13th, a suicider struck the USS Lagrange (APA-124) amidships and a second scored a near miss off her bow. On the day after VJ-day, the Taney got underway to support the USS Pennsylvania against probable air attack as three enemy planes closed from the northeast. One crashed on land 30 miles north and two dropped a bomb and crashed at Iheya Rhetto. Task Group 95.5 was dissolved August 25, 1945, and Admiral Cobb departed four days later.

TO JAPAN--TYPHOON STRIKES
On September 9, 1945, the Taney departed for Wakayama, Japan, as part of Task Unit 56.16.2 and two days later was proceeding up the Kii Suido channel to anchor in Wakanoura Wan. On the 12th a working party departed to report to the Wakayama Evacuation Unit ashore. On the 17th a typhoon was reported with a center 280 miles distant, bearing 235° T and moving northeast at 17 knots with force eight winds for a 300 mile radius, and force fourteen winds at the center. The Taney was in 9 fathoms of water and had a sticky clay bottom to hold to. She veered to 90 fathoms of chain to starboard anchor and port anchor was dropped underfoot. Engines had steam at the throttles ready for use. On the 18th the barometer fell to a low of 29.11 with winds at 60 knots and gusts at 85 knots. The storm center was 85 miles north of the anchorage moving northeast at 24 knots. The Taney did not drag her anchor, being one of the few ships in the anchorage that stayed in their berths, with ground tackle holding.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
On October 14, 1945 the Taney left Wakayama and returned to San Francisco on October 29, 1945, via Midway. On November 29, 1945 she reached Charleston Navy Yard for reconversion to peacetime operations.

CGC Taney

        COMMANDING OFFICER
December 1941 to
September 1942
  OLSEN, Louis B., Commander
September 1942 to
March 1943
  GELLY, George B., Commander
March 1943 to
April 1944
  PERKINS, Henry C, Captain
April 1944 to
October 1944
  WUENSCH, Henry J., Commander
October 1944 to
August 1945
  SYNON, George D., Commander
August 1945   BOWMAN, Carl G., Commander


COAST GUARD CUTTER <i>Algonquin</i>
COAST GUARD CUTTER Algonquin

--55--


CGC ALGONQUIN (WPG-75)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The CGC Algonquin (WPG-75) was built at Wilmington, Del., in 1934, and her permanent station was at Portland, Maine. At the outbreak of World War II she was on duty with the Navy. She was 155 feet long with a 36 foot beam and a maximum draft of 13 feet, 7 inches. Inches. She displaced 1005 tons with a gross tonnage CH ["Custom House tonnage"] of 718. Her hull was of steel and she had a speed of 13 knots-- being oil driven by a 1500 HP geared turbine.

1942

ON SUBMARINE SEARCH
Departing Portland, Maine, on June 2, 1942, the Algonquin stood to the eastward and at 1915 received a message indicating that a submarine had been sighted along a course at 40°13'N, 66°50'W. At 1959 a "screw" noise was heard at position 43°22'N, 67°54'W and she cruised for an hour and 25 minutes in the immediate vicinity, trying to establish or contact, without success. She stood into Argentia on June 5, 1942.

TO GREENLAND WEATHER PATROL
The Algonquin was underway out of Argentia on June 6, 1942, and on the 10th, stood off Skov Fjord, Greenland, at whose mouth she found heavy pack ice that was however, workable. Replenishing fuel and water at Bluie West One, she proceeded to Ivigtut. After a week of local transportation service she was en route Julianshaab on the 18th Investigating ice conditions. She returned to Bluie West One on the 19th and assumed weather station "AFFIRM" off Narsuk, on the 20th, standing out to sea while investigating ice bergs off shore. She remained on weather station until July 3rd when relieved by the Comanche. On June 29, 1942, she took aboard 12 survivors of the SS Empire Clough from two Portuguese fishing vessels encountered. All had been suffering from 17 days of exposure in a lifeboat prior to rescue.

CONVOYS GS-1 AND SG-2
On July 7, 1942, the Algonquin stood out of Kungnat Bay escorting convoy GS-1 consisting of two vessels in company with the Mojave. They arrived at Sydney, N.S. on the 11th. On the 16th she stood out of Sydney escorting in company with the Mojave convoy SG-2 consisting of five vessels. On the 17th the Mojave dropped a pattern of depth charges on a contact. Occasional icebergs were encountered in the Labrador current. They arrived at Bluie West One on the 22nd.

CONVOYS GS-3 AND SG-4
On July 26, 1942, the Algonquin stood out of Kungnat Bay to form convoy GS-3 consisting of two vessels, one of which dropped out of the convoy en route, which reached Sydney on the 31st. On August 5, 1942, the cutter was underway escorting a seven vessel convoy SG-4 in company with the Mojave, Tahoma, SC-527 and SC-528. The Nogak dropped out on the 6th and the Mojave dropped astern on a possible contact, rejoining an hour later. The Arluk dropped out an hour later due to thick weather. The Mojave detached with the USS Munargo on the 8th and Algonquin assumed the flag. The Arluk rejoined on the 9th. Bluie West One was reached on the 10th.

CONVOYS GS-5 and SG-6--SUB ATTACK
On August 15, 1942, the Algonquin was underway out of Kungnat Bay escorting a 5 vessel convoy GS-5, in company with the Mojave (Flag) and Mohawk. On the 18th the SS Green Mountain proceeded direct to Botwood, N.S. unescorted, the rest of the convoy reaching Sydney on the 21st. On the 25th the Algonquin was again underway escorting the 5 vessel convoy SG-6 in company with the Mohawk, the Mojave escorting the USAT Chatham ahead at increased speed. On the 27th the Chatham was struck by a mine or torpedo and an hour later the Mohawk indicated a sound contact, the Algonquin standing through the convoy to back up the Mohawk at full speed. The object was Identified as a whale which had surfaced. At 1800 a message was received from the Mojave sighted southwestward through Belle Isle Straits "Submarine attack at 1146 in position 51°45'W whether torpedo or mine unknown." At 2132 the Algonquin heard a report and observed a blast and flare of a torpedo striking the Arlyn, apparently amidships on starboard side in position 51°55'N, 55°30'W. While planning to round the Arlyn, which had sheered inshore, another sound was heard and the Alcoa Guard was believed hit. Stood northward and observed Laramie well down by the head. The Algonquin stood eastward and southwestward attempting to gain sound contact and at the same time covering the Laramie from further attack. At 2205 the cutter noted that the Alcoa Guard, Biscaya and Harjurband were steaming full speed toward Cape Bauld with a low bright moon illuminating them, and stood over to cover them. She established no contacts, however. The Algonquin steamed toward each vessel indicating best course to follow to avoid moonlight, maintaining radio silence and avoiding visual signalling, the purpose being to get the vessels eastward of Belle Isle and the coastal waters and yet make northerly progress, so as not to lead submarines, if following, across to the path of the southbound convoy GS-6, and at the same time seek safety afforded by the hazy waters in the path of the Labrador current offshore. At daylight ordered remaining 2 vessels to zigzag and reduce speed to avoid detection of heavy smoke. CTF dispatches indicated to proceed Sandwich Island to await further orders, and D/F fixes on submarines were 53°00'N, 55°00'W, the convoy's position then being 52°53'N, 52°38'W. The course to Sandwich Island being directly in line with reported submarine and requiring a night landfall, course was continued to gain area of reduced visibility of the Labrador current. At 1213 on August 28, 1942, sighted a Canadian patrol plane and a message detailing reasons for not attempting Sandwich Island landing was given for relay to CTF 24. At 1110 on the 29th two submarines with periscopes awash were reported by Canadian planes 90 miles NE of Cape Harrison. This led to conclusion that any further progress northward or westward at this time would subject vessels to possible attack by a number of submarines searching along the designated routing of the convoy. It was accordingly determined to make a direct run to the Greenland Fjord entrances at best possible speed of about 9 knots. On August 30, 1942, at 0800, having arrived at position 58°118'N, 49°05'W without attack, concluded that convoy had severed sufficient distance in NE run toward Greenland to preclude danger from subs, had they assumed the correct intersecting course after report of their position by plane. Continued on base course 30°T. At 1440 received plane coverage from Onoto until dark. After dark encountered number of icebergs in Greenland current but no "storis" ice. At 0245 on August 31, 1942, stood toward entrance of Skov Fjord and at 0919 anchored.

CONVOY TO GREENLAND
On September 1, 1942, the

--56--


Algonquin was underway standing out of Bluie Test One escorting in company with the SC-257 a convoy consisting of two vessels. On 2nd anchored off Ivigtut to install radio equipment with assistance of Army Signal Corps men. On the 5th Algonquin and Tahoma stood out to await merchant ships. Searched possible sound contact considered doubtful. On 6th winds reached gale force by midnight and Norlago headed off to SSE separating after change of convoy course. At 1710 on 7th sighted Norlago which had had boiler trouble. Rejoined convoy and reduced speed to 7 knots. On the 10th two unidentified explosions heard some distance from convoy. Plane coverage during day. On the 12th the Algonquin anchored in Sydney Harbor.

CONVOY ESCORT, GREENLAND PATROL, CONVOY SG-8
The Algonquin was flagship of Task Unit 24.8.2 when Commander D. C. McNeil, USCG, arrived at Sydney, N.S., from Argentia on September 14, 1942, and assumed command of the unit. One other vessel of the unit, the Tahoma, was present on that date. On the 15th the CGC Alatok stood in and moored and on the 16th the USS Bernadou reported for duty with the unit. On September 17, 1942, the Task Unit passed through the boom as escort for convoy SG-8 consisting of five vessels. Contact with several of the convoy was lost because of fog on the 19th. On the 20th warning was received that the convoy was possibly being shadowed by a submarine. On the 21st the Tahoma rejoined after being out of the convoy since the fog cleared on the 20th and took station on the port bow with the Algonquin in the starboard bow. On the 24th the Mojave and Comanche were contacted off Arsuk Fjord. The other vessels departed for various destinations and the Algonquin escorted the Rapidan to Base Bijsed.

CONVOY GS-9
On September 25, 1942, the Mojave and Algonquin escorting the USS Pegasus departed Kungnat Bay for Sydney, N.S. On the 27th the Mojave lost contact with the convoy in poor visibility and very rough sea but regained it as the weather cleared. It was lost again on the 28th in thick fog, which lifted on the 29th. At 2130 on the 29th warning of a submarine attack fifty miles ahead on the course being followed was received. Put the Pegasus on east true for base course and zigzagged her. At midnight changed course to south true with vessel in good visibility. On the 30th coverage was had by PBY's. At 1230 on October 1st possibility of submarine in vicinity was received. At 1400 a mushy contact was made on sound gear. It was not attacked. The contact was regained and was clear with a good trace and a five charge pattern was laid down with negative results. The convoy was sent ahead in charge of the Algonquin and the Mojave searched the area with several doubtful contacts of short duration for over an hour and then departed to rejoin. The escort vessels reached Sydney at 2100.

CONVOY SG-10
On October 6, 1942, the Badger reported for duty with the Task Unit and on the 8th the unit departed Sydney escorting convoy SG-10 with excellent air coverage. On the 10th the SS King joined. On the 14th the USS Munargo and Badger left for the south. On the 15th the Comanche and Algonquin departed escorting four ships and these split again, the Comanche escorting the Margaret Lykes to the east coast of Greenland and the Algonquin escorting the remaining three vessels to Onoto. The remainder of the original convoy continued to the north.

CONVOY GS-11
On October 19, 1942, the convoy GS-11 consisting of four vessels escorted by the Mojave, Comanche and Algonquin, cleared Kungnat Bay for St. John's, N.F. and on the 22nd one of the ships with Comanche as escort left for Botwood, N.F. At 2345 the Mojave dropped an embarrassing pattern about 700 yards on the Oneida's starboard side in an attack on a very probable sound contact. The Oneida because of the shock of the discharge assumed she was torpedoed and broadcast an SOS to Belle Isle Radio Station. On 0015 the Oneida now convinced she was not torpedoed cancelled her SOS. The convoy arrived St. John's at 1800 and the Mojave and Algonquin stood for Argentia at 2000. The USS Sandpiper reported for duty as part of the Task Unit on the 30th.

SG-12 CONVOY
On November 4, 1942, the Algonquin as part of Task Unit 24.8.2 departed St. John's escorting convoy SG-12 to Greenland. The convoy consisted of four American and one Panamanian merchant vessel. On the 9th the convoy divided into a slow section consisting of the Aristides (Pan.) and Tintagel escorted by the Mohawk and a fast section consisting of the Dorchester, Fairfax and Eastern Guide escorted by the Comanche, Algonquin and Sandpiper. On the 10th the Sandpiper fell back to stand by the Eastern Guide which had suffered a steering breakdown. The Algonquin sank a floating mine. Landfall on Skov Fjord was made on the 11th and the Comanche escorted three ships to Onoto.

CONVOY GS-13
On November 13, 1942, Convoy GS-13 was underway consisting of four Panamanian, one Greenland, two Norwegian and four U.S. vessels, escorted by Task Unit 24.8.2. They picked up air coverage on the 18th and arrived off St. Johns, N.F. on the 19th. The Task Unit departed same day for Argentia escorting the USS Bear. On the 20th the Task Force commander shifted his pennant to the Mohawk. On the 29th the Mohawk and Algonquin set out searching for survivors of an attack on a convoy off the Newfoundland coast, returning to St. Johns same day without success. Again set out on search for survivors SS Blair Atholl with Mohawk on 29th, encountering gale force winds. Returned to St. John's on December 2, 1942, no results. Proceeded same day with convoy toward Greenland arriving Arsuk Fjord on December 6, 1942.

CONVOYS GS-15, SG-16 and GS-17
On December 8, 1942, the Algonquin sailed from Kungnat Bay with units of five vessel convoy GS-15 to meet other units with Mojave in Davis Straits. On the 12th the weather moderated and the crew removed some 50 tons of ice from the weather deck and superstructure. The convoy arrived at St. John's on December 13, 1942, and stood out with Mojave for Argentia same day. Returned to St. John's independently on 21st. On 23rd began escorting 2 vessel convoy SG-16 to Greenland arriving off Skov Fjord on 28th. On 29th proceeded Ivigtut and next day December 30, 1942, began escorting with Mohawk and Mojave one vessel convoy SG-17 to St. John's.

1943

SEARCH FOR NATSEK
On January 2, 1943, it was noted that the convoyed vessel SS Norlago had dropped out and the Algonquin changed course to search for her. At 1210 a PBY patrol plane joined in the search and at 2029 the Algonquin changed course to search for the Natsek reported missing while proceeding through Belle Isle Strait toward St. John's. The Algonquin continued

--57--


the search until the 6th proceeding to St. John's on the 7th without locating the Natsek, which was never accounted for.1 Later that day she began escorting the SS Imperoyal toward Boston. En route that day made three runs on sub-surface target dropping 11 charges only 3 of which exploded because of heavy casing of ice that covered the vessel. Arrived Argentia on 8th and Boston on 13th remaining there until February 7, 1943, undergoing repairs.

CONVOY SG-21
Departing for Casco Bay and training exercises she remained there until February 23rd, 1943, and was then underway for Argentia escorting USS Bear in company with two other escorts and three YMS's. Moored at Argentia until March 5, 1943, and then proceeded to St. John's with three other escorts. En route started search for enemy submarine reported by plane continuing it through 6th and arriving St. John's on 7th. On 8th joined 4 vessel convoy SG-21 escorted by eight escorts. On 14th two vessels and two escorts proceeded to Kungnat Bay and the Algonquin with the remainder moored at Narsarssuak on March 15, 1943.

SVEND FOYNE RESCUE
On March 16, 1943, the Algonquin formed a searching party for a wrecked plane anchoring at Julianehaab while the working party removed the salvage materials and 11 bodies of the Navy PBY-5 to the ship. Proceeding to Narsarssuak on 20th, the Algonquin got underway proceeding to the aid of the SS Svend Foyne, reported in collision with an iceberg, and commenced searching south and west of position of distressed vessel, at 58°35'N, 44°50'W. On 21st at 0018 sighted lights of HMS Hastings, CGC Frederick Lee, Aivik and SS Svend Foyne and received visual message from Hastings asking Algonquin to pick up survivors. Picked up 15 men in lifeboat and 3 bodies. The Svend Foyne sank at 0405 approximately 3500 yards ahead of the Algonquin and at 0415 the cutter picked up seven men from a lifeboat. At 0920 proceeded to Cape Farewell with other Coast Guard vessels, transferring 22 survivors to Modoc and receiving 1 body from her. Arrived at Narsarssuak on March 22, 1943.

TO BOSTON
Until April 16, 1943 the Algonquin was occupied in breaking ice and in ice reconnaissance and patrol work, her officers attending Board of Investigation of Svend Foyne disaster on 10th. On 16th she was underway en route St. John's with a four vessel convoy and four other escorts arriving on 21st and proceeding to Argentia same day. On 22nd she departed Argentia for Boston escorting the USS Gumtree, dropping four depth charges en route on a sub contact on the 24th. She arrived at Boston on April 25, 1943, and remained there until May 15th, 1943, undergoing repairs.

CONVOYS SG-25 AND GS-24. LOSS OF ESCANABA
After three days at Casco Bay for training exercises the Algonquin proceeded on escorts, dropping three charges as a nuisance barrage on the 20th. Arriving Argentia on the 24tb she was underway on the 30th escorting convoy SG-25 with Mojave and Tampa. She anchored at Kungnat Bay June 2, 1943, proceeding to Marsarssuak on the 5th. On the 11th she was en route investigating a periscope sighted in Skov Fjord. On the 12th she encountered heavy fog and ice searching for convoy GS-24 and after sighting it took position with four other escorts to the 4 vessels. On June 13, 1943, at 0509 a lookout reported a cloud of smoke from the Escanaba, one of the escorts and two minutes later the cutter sank. At 0523 wreckage was reported by the Storis and the Algonquin covered the Raritan as she engaged in picking up three survivors. Proceeded to Halifax on 20th and then to Argentia.

CONVOY ESCORT DUTY
Standing out of Argentia on June 26, 1943, the Algonquin was escorting a one vessel convoy with Tampa and Modoc, in company, anchoring in Kungnat Bay on the 30th. On July 1st she escorted another vessel with three other escorts to St. John's, arriving Argentia on the 6th. Underway again on the 9th, with 4 other escorts she reached St. John's and departed again on 15th with 6 other escorts and a 16 vessel convoy toward Greenland. On the 20th the convoy split all except the Mana destined for Ivigtut, proceeding to Kungnat Bay. After mooring a few hours the Algonquin began escorting a one vessel convoy with two other escorts toward Argentia. Proceeding on the 24th she separated and proceeded independently toward Boston where she remained until August 2, 1943.

MORE ESCORT DUTY
On August 2, 1943, the Algonquin proceeded to Halifax in company with the Modoc arriving on the 4th and on the 7th at St. John's. On the 12th she, with five other escorts, was proceeding with a 15 vessel convoy to Hudson Bay and Greenland. Six ships were detached for Hudson Bay en route and the Algonquin escorted two vessels with the Modoc to Sondrestrom Fjord. On the 22nd she proceeded to Gronne Dal and to Narsarssuak on the 25th. On the 26th she proceeded to Angmassalik Fjord to investigate ice condition, returning to Skof Fjord on the 31st. September 1, 1943, found the Algonquin escorting the Yarmouth toward Newfoundland, later being joined by USAT Fairfax and three escorts and arriving St. John's on September 5th. On the 9th she began escorting a 15 vessel convoy toward Greenland with 4 other escorts. On the 11th she dropped 11 charges on a sound contact. The Greenland section arrived Narsarssuak on the 16th. Again on 30th the Algonquin was escorting a 4 vessel convoy to St. John's, in company with the Tampa. On October 3, 1943, they were joined by the Mohawk and Mojave, entering St. John's on 5th. On the 6th she was underway toward Boston, via Argentia, escorting the SS Falcon. Here she remained until October 30, 1943, undergoing repairs.

ESCORT DUTY. LOSS OF USAT NEVADA
After 6 days at Casco Bay for exercises the Algonquin proceeded to St. John's with the Storis on November 7, 1943, arriving on the 11th. On the 13th she and the Storis began escorting the SS Primo to Greenland, anchoring in Kungnat Bay on the 17th. After fuelling at Gronne Dal on the 13th she stood out of Kungnat Bay on the 19th with three escorts and five vessels in convoy to St. John's, arriving on the 24th. She returned to Greenland on the 20th with the SS Laramie in company with the Tampa. On December 4, 1943, she and five other escorts were underway with a six vessel convoy for St. John's arriving on the 9th. Two days later she was escorting the USS Kaweah in company with the Storis, Modoc and Tahoma to Greenland arriving at Narsarssuak on the 15th. On that date the Storis departed to search for the USAT Nevada. On the 24th she began escorting the USAT Fairfax to Argentia in company with the Storis, Modoc and Tampa.

--58--


1944

ESCORTING AND ICEBREAKING
On January 1, 1944, the Algonquin was en route Boston from Argentia escorting the SS Sapelo. She reached Boston on the 2nd and was undergoing alterations and repairs for the rest of January, 1944. On February 2, 1944, she stood out of Boston for Casco Bay, Maine, and 14 days of training exercises. Proceeding to Argentia with the Tahoma she departed for Narsarssuak on the 23rd arriving on the 27th. The Algonquin was engaged in icebreaking in Skov Fjord throughout March, 1944. At the end of the month an inspection showed that all 'four of her propeller blades were bent and she was docked until April 16th awaiting arrival of a new propeller. On the 24th she proceeded to Gronne Dal where she moored until May 1, 1944.

TO BOSTON
On May 1, 1944, the Algonquin in company with the Northland and three sub-chasers proceeded toward Argentia, encountering ice fields and icebergs en route. Here on May 10th she entered drydock where damaged propeller was removed and she proceeded on 14th for Boston arriving on 17th for availability until May 30, 1944.

WEATHER PATROL
During the rest of 1944 the Algonquin was on weather patrol duties, relieving the Mohawk, Modoc, Comanche and Tahoma periodically on Weather Stations "CHARLIE" and "ABLE."

1945

WEATHER PATROL AND ESCORT IN GREENLAND
Weather patrol duties of the Algonquin continued during 1945, alternating with the Tahoma and Comanche on Weather Station 1. During the first half of March she was in drydock at Portsmouth, N.H., and from then until April 17th on training exercises at Casco Bay. On the 18th of April 1945 she dropped a full pattern of depth Charges on a target off Boston, while en route Greenland to assume weather patrol duties. Beginning in July 1945, weather patrol duties were succeeded by local escort duties in Greenland. The end of the war on August 14, 1945, found the Algonquin en route Boston to prepare for peacetime activities.


CGC ARGO (WPC-100)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The CGC Argo was built at Camden, N.J. in 1933. Her permanent station at the outbreak of World War II was Newport, R.I. She was 165 feet long, 25 feet 3 inches beam, and drew 9 feet 6 inches, with a displacement of 334 tons. She had a steel hull and could attain a speed of 16 knots. Her twin screw, diesel engine developed 1340 HP.

CONTACTS SUB
While engaged in escort duty on June 22, 1942, the Argo made one depth charge attack when the charges failed to explode. Later on the 27th she made another contact at 1045 but abandoned the search fifteen minutes later. Two minutes later a ship was torpedoed on the starboard bow of the convoy at 34°47'N, 75°19'W, and at 0149 the Argo established a contact at 1500 yards with the target shifting slowly to the right. The cutter closed to 650 yards but lost contact at 150 yards and immediately released a 5 charge pattern, sighting a large oil bubble upon completion of the attack. Investigating the position where the charges were released, she found a Large area all bubbles and an oil slick extending to the horizon, a long oil slick presumably in the vicinity but beyond where the attack was made. At 0210 she released a pattern of three charges and oil was still bubbling to the surface. She then released one charge at 300 feet plus (all previous settings being 200 feet). Assuming the target destroyed she resumed her course to rejoin the convoy. (Further war diaries and log extracts are not available).


CGC BEDLOE (Ex-CGC ANTIETAM) WSC-128

DESCRIPTION
The CGC Bedloe (ex-CGC Antietam) was built at Camden, N.J. in 1926. Her first station was Stapleton, Staten Island. She was 125 ft. long, 23 ft. 6 in. molded beam, and had a maximum draft of 9 ft. With a steel hull she displaced 220 tons and had a speed of 11 knots developed by a 350 HP diesel twin screw engine.

COASTAL ESCORT
The Bedloe was attached to the Eastern Sea Frontier and was engaged in coastal escort duty early in the war. She was operating between Cape Lookout and Norfolk in June, 1944. Her commanding officer was Lt. A. S. Hess, USCG. In July she escorted two small vessels from Cape May to New York. Later she escorted the Charles Fort, carrying high explosives from Cape Lookout to New York. Returning to Cape Lookout she became part of Task Group 02.5 on escort duty to New York. She returned to Norfolk August 9, 1944, and was assigned to assistance work out of Norfolk.

SUNK IN HURRICANE
On September 14, 1944, the Bedloe had gone to the assistance of a Liberty ship which had been torpedoed off the North Carolina coast and almost driven ashore in a later hurricane but had weathered the blows and had been towed to Norfolk with no casualties to her crew and only slight damage to her cargo. Soon the Bedloe found herself in extremely heavy seas. Struck four times by the towering waves, the Bedloe tossed like a matchstick in the ocean before going down. All officers and crew, 38 in all, safely abandoned ship and at least 30 men were able to obtain a hold on life-rafts. However, the strain of fighting the hurricane aboard plus the ordeal of hanging to liferafts for 51 hours before help came, proved too much for most of them. Only 12 were rescued.


CGC BELLEVILLE (WPC-372)

COMMISSIONING AND OPERATIONS
The CGC Belleville had been commissioned March 20, 1943. Her commanding officer was Lt. (jg) Conrad W. Rank, USCGR, On March 25, 1943, she was ordered to Horn Island to escort the Tampa, but was diverted next day to Egmont Key. On April 16, 1944, she was unassigned, being located at Miami, Florida, under the Gulf Sea Frontier. Ordered to the 8th ND for duty April 22, 1944, her permanent station was changed to New Orleans where she transferred from the 8th ND to the Gulf Sea Frontier as a substitute for SC-1292 on escort duly.

DECOMMISSIONED
On June 1, 1945, she was ordered to Coast Guard Yard

--59--


COAST GUARD CUTTER <i>Bedloe</i>
COAST GUARD CUTTER BEDLOE

COAST GUARD CUTTER <i>Comanche</i>
COAST GUARD CUTTER COMANCHE

--60--


where she arrived June 26, 1945. She was decommissioned June 30, 1945. She was sold to Sydney R. Smith May 2, 1946.


USS BIG HORN (AO-45)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

Of the several disguised merchant ships operated by the Navy to help combat the Nazi submarine menace in the Atlantic during the early days of the war, none was more formidable than the Big Horn, formerly the A. H. Bull SS Co. tanker SS Gulf Dawn. These armed vessels were known as "Q ships" and were designed as the answer to the Nazi strategy of concentrating their attacks on tankers. Conversion of the SS Gulf Dawn began on March 1942 at the Bethlehem Shipyards, Brooklyn and construction was continued at the Boston Navy lard where the work was completed in July 1942. The Big Horn completed her shakedown cruise in late August 1942. Her first commanding officer, Commander J. A. Gainard, was formerly the skipper of the ill-fated SS City of Flint, which was captured by the Germans at the beginning of the war and was later sunk by a U-boat.

In May 1943, while the Big Horn was operating with a small task force of PC boats (submarine chasers) she attacked two undersea contacts, dropping depth charges during a four hour period after sighting a periscope on the starboard bow. There was a heavy swirl as the U-boat dove below the surface. Later that day, an oil patch was visible over a wide area and it was presumed that one submarine had been destroyed; and that another U-boat, which had been sighted, had moved out of the area.

On her first cruise, the Big Horn operated out of Trinidad, on the aluminum ore route. Later she travelled in convoy between Trinidad and Norfolk and on at least one occasion, was prevented from attacking Nazi submarines because of other ships of the convoy crossing through the line of fire. After January 1943, when German submarines left U.S. frontier waters, the Big Horn began operations with a small task force of submarine chasers.

In mid-summer 1943, the Big Horn served as the flagship of a small task group (21.8) and Captain Gainard was succeeded by Commander L. C. Farley. This cruise covered the general area of the Azores and as far south as Dakar, Brazil. During one five day period, late in November 1943, the task group was in the midst of a pack of from 10 to 15 German submarines. Nine contacts, sightings or attacks on the submarines took place in her immediate vicinity. Commander Farley expressed the belief that the German raiders were wary of attacking an independent tanker, and that because of the presence of the Big Horn, many independent merchant ships may have escaped attack.

On, January 1, 1944, the Big Horn was assigned to North Atlantic Weather patrol duty under the supervision of the Coast Guard. Her first Coast Guard crew boarded her on January 7, 1944. At the completion of this duty the Big Horn became the IX-207 and was assigned to the Pacific where she operated as a tank supply vessel. Her Coast Guard crew was removed in May, 1946.


CGC COMANCHE (WPG-76)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The CGC Comanche was built at Wilmington, Delaware, in 1934 and at the outbreak of World War II was on duty with the Navy. She is 165 ft. long, with a 36 ft. beam and drew 13 ft. 7 in. of water. With a gross tonnage CH ["Custom House tonnage"] of 718 she displaced 1005 tons, having a steel hull and making 13 knots. Her geared turbine develops 1500 HP, burning oil.

ESCORT DUTY--ASSISTS SURVEY PARTY--GUARDS PLANES
On March 27, 1942, the Comanche left Boston escorting Lightship No. 110 to Portland, Maine. There she engaged in antisubmarine exercises and on the 29th got underway with the Frederick Lee escorting Lightship No. 110 and the SS Omaha to Argentia, arriving there April 4, 1942. Next day she was escorting the Omaha to Greenland anchoring at Bluie West One. On the 15th she departed for Ivigtut. Here until the 28th she transported and assisted a survey party of Army personnel in the preliminary survey and selection of a tank-farm site at Ivigtut, also construction site C at Kajartalik. She returned to Bluie West One April 28th remaining there until May 6, 1942. While there details were arranged for the flight of six PBY's from Argentia to Iceland via Bluie West One, the Comanche taking communication guard of planes in the flight. On May 8th she proceeded to Ivigtut to guard mines there,remaining until May 20, 1942.

ICE BREAKING--WEATHER PATROL
The rest of May, 1942, was employed in ice-breaking activities in Sondre Stromfjord and than in towing the Raritan from Oodthaab to Bluie Test One. Arriving on the 28th she met the SS Dorchester in Tungliarfik Fjord and en route her to Bluie West One arriving May 3, 1942. On June 6, 1942, she patrolled Weather Station "A" where she remained until June 20, 1942, being relieved by the Algonquin. From June 25 to July 2 she was on airplane guard at the mouth of Tungliarfik Fjord being relieved by the USS Bear. From July 4 to 17,, 1942, she relieved Algonquin on weather station "A" and after repairs to steering gear returned to Bluie West One on the 20th.

UNCHARTED AREAS SURVEYED
On July 22, 1942, Captain C. C. Von Paulsen (S.O.P.A. Greenland) and Ensign J. Starr, USCG, came aboard j and she proceeded to Julianshaab whence on the 23rd pilots S. T. Sorenson and Julius Carlson came aboard to cruise through the inside passage of Southern Greenland taking soundings and making observation of uncharted areas. She returned to Julianehaab on the 27th.

LOCAL ESCORT--ESTABLISHES ICE CAP STATION
From July 29, 1942, to August 7, 1942, the Comanche met incoming convoys and relieved their escorts. Than she took on fuel and stores for the Ice Cap Station which was to be established on the East Coast of Greenland and on the 13th embarked ten Army enlisted personnel and two civilians and their gear, leaving Ivigtut with the North Star to escort the Dorchester and Alcoa Pilot to Bluie East Two, where she arrived on the 17th. Here she took on more supplies for the Ice Cap Station and proceeding to Angmagssalik, three enlisted Army personnel departed while three Army officers earns aboard. She departed on the 18th and proceeded down, the East Coast to an unnamed Bay at 65°03'N, 40°18'W which was to be the site of the Ice Cap Station. Arriving on the 18th the Bay was named Comanche Bay. Her five days were spent unloading supplies and on the 24th she left for Angmagssalik and Bluie East Two to get more supplies for the Ice Cap Station. Returning to Comanche Bay the cutter took soundings and established two anchorage markers. On September 21, 1942, the Comanche completed all operations and left

--61--


Army personnel and civilians at the station returning to Bluie East Two. On the 7th she left Bluie East Two escorting the Dorchester to Bluie West One, arriving on the 9th.

LOCAL ESCORT DUTY
From September 11. 1942, to October 19, 1942, the Comanche was engaged in local escort duty in Greenland, escorting with other Coast Guard vessels, various merchant vessels and Army transports between the bases that had been established on the West Coast of Greenland and meeting, incoming convoys. Her duties took her to the East Coast of Greenland as far as Denmark Straits on October 17, 1942. On October 19, 1942, she left Kungnat Bay with the Mojave and Algonquin escorting five freighters to Newfoundland, arriving Argentia on the 24th. She arrived at St. John's on November 3, 1942, and along with three other escorts left St, John's escorting 5 vessels to Greenland. She arrived Bluie West One on November 11, 1942, and on the 13th left Kungnat Bay escorting eight freighters, two Army Transports and the USS Bear to St. John's. On the 19th she proceeded with the Algonquin, Mohawk and USS Bear to Argentia arriving on the 20th and leaving same day for Boston where she arrived November 24, 1942.

1943

DORCHESTER TORPEDOED
On January 29, 1943, the Comanche was underway with the Tampa and Escanaba out of St. John's, N.F., escorting convoy SG-19 consisting of the Dorchester, SS Biscaya and SS Lutz for Greenland. On February 3, 1943, the Dorchester was torpedoed and sank without warning at 0055 at approximately 59°10'N, 49°00'W. Six survivors, American citizens, were landed at Boston from Bluie West One, Greenland on March 3, 1943. 678 persons were lost. One torpedo struck aft amidships sinking the vessel in about 15 minutes. No avoiding or counter action was taken. The ship was abandoned in lifeboats and liferafts and about 230 persons were reported saved. At no time was the submarine sighted. The Comanche and Escanaba landed the survivors at Bluie West One on February 4, 1943. Classified publications went down with the ship. The Comanche served as local escort during the rest of February and late in March departed for Boston. From April [?] to 8, 1943, she was on availability at Boston Navy yard.

ESCORT DUTY
After twenty days of training exercises at Casco Bay the Comanche arrived at Argentia with the Tampa and Mojave escorting two tugs towing sections of YD-25. She departed Argentia for Boston on May 6, 1943, escorting three tugs to Boston stopping 3 days in Halifax while one of them was repaired, and arriving at Boston on the 15th. Departing on the 17th for Casco Bay, the Comanche on the 19th began escorting two tugs towing two more sections of YD-25 to Argentia, arriving on the 24th. Proceeding to St. John's on the 25th the Comanche escorted two vessels as convoy SG-74 with the Storis and Active to Greenland on the 27th. She remained at Gronne Dal from the 3rd to the 5th of June, while the convoy unloaded and then proceeded to Narsarssuak, returning to Gronne Dal on June 6, 1943. On the 10th she began escorting two vessels to Bluie West Eight, breaking through heavy ice. She departed Bluie West Eight June 16, 1943, for Gronne Dal, proceeding with difficulty through the ice, anchoring one day off Godthaab and 3 days at Marrak Point. She escorted 2 vessels to Narsarssuak on June 23rd and anchored with the third at Gronne Dal. Between June 24 and 29 she went to Godthaab bringing back 58 eskimo dogs and other freight and anchoring at Kungnat Bay on June 30, 1943. On July 1, 1943, the Comanche was underway from Gronne Dal with three escorts and a one vessel convoy to St. John's. The Comanche proceeded directly to Boston, arriving on July 9, 1943, and remaining there until the 25th, after which she spent 5 days on training exercises in Casco Bay, returning to Boston on July 30, 1943.

IN EAST GREENLAND
Leaving Boston on August 1, 1943, the Comanche arrived at St. John's on the 7th and was underway on the 12th screening convoy SG-29 to Kungnat Bay which was reached on the 22nd. On the 24th she was escorting convoy GS-27 to placentia Harbor, N.F., arriving on the 30th. On August 31st she was again underway escorting a convoy to Sydney, N.S., and thence to St. John's. After an inspection on September 8, 1943, she began escorting convoy SG-30 with four other escorts to Greenland. En route she depth charged a sound contact on the 11th anchoring in Kungnat Bay the same day before proceeding to Gronne Dal. On the 15th still escorting one section of convoy SG-30 she departed Gronne Dal and reached Ikateq on the 18th. On the 21st she searched Angmagssalik Fjord for a lost ship's motor boat which returned safely later the same day. Another missing motor boat was searched for on the 25th and was picked up by the Bluebird outside Angmagssalik entrance. The Comanche remained in Angmagssalik Fjord until October 18, 1943. She then proceeded to Kungnat Bay escorting three vessels in company with the Northland. On local escort duty until October 25, 1943, the Comanche began escorting the 16 ship convoy GS-34 with seven other escorts on that date. Diverted three times by reported submarine action on charted route the convoy was sent to Cape Race. On November 1st she departed Argentia as escort for a convoy to Boston. On November 4th she proceeded to screen the USAT Nevada, which had slowed down with engine trouble. She moored at Boston on November 5, 1943, for availability until November 27, 1943.

LOSS OF USAT NEVADA--RESCUES SURVIVORS
Departing Boston for Argentia on November 27, 1943, she proceeded at best speed to overtake the Modoc and USS Kaweah taking position as escort on the 28th, as the Modoc dropped back with boiler trouble. Arriving Argentia on December 1, 1943, she departed on the 6th escorting a British tanker to St. John's where she remained until the 13th. Then she proceeded with the Modoc and Tampa to escort the USAT Fairfax as convoy SG-37 to Greenland. On December 15th she detached to investigate a distress message from the USAT Nevada in position 56°35'N, 49°10'W to which position the Comanche proceeded at full speed. At 2100 the Nevada was sighted through snow squalls, a darkened ship lying low in the water, apparently abandoned. The boat falls were hanging empty and no personnel could be seen aboard. Half an hour later a red flare was sighted and proved to be a lifeboat crowded with men. 29 men and a dog were taken aboard, three men being lost as they attempted to jump to the Comanche's deck in spite of heroic efforts to save them. The area was box-searched for other survivors until the 19tb, the Comanche being joined in the search by the Storis, Modoc and Tampa. The Nevada sank on the 18th and the Comanche reached Bluie West One on the 21st, delivering the Fairfax and landing the 29 survivors of the Nevada2 proceeding to Gronne Dal on December 24, 1943.

--62--


CONVOY ESCORT
Departing Gronne Dal on December 25, 1943, the Comanche with three other escorts began screening convoy GS-39 which moored at St. John's on January 1, 1944. On the 3rd she departed for Boston with three other escorts and the convoyed YD-2 arriving on the 7th. Proceeding to Casco Bay on the 23rd she remained there through the 29th undergoing intensive drills, returning to Boston until February 1st. On that day she departed with two other escorts for the USAT Fairfax reaching Argentia on the 4th and remaining there until the 9th. Then she departed for Halifax escorting the SS Pollaland and returned to Argentia on the 13th, departing for St. John's on the 15th. On the 16th she was enroute Greenland escorting,with the Northland, the SS Julius Thomsen to Greenland. She anchored in Kungnat Bay on the 22nd after dropping a 9 charge pattern on a sound contact, bringing up an oil slick and air bubbles. Proceeding to Gronne Dal she remained there until the 3rd of March, 1944.

WEATHER PATROL
During the remainder of March, 1944, the Comanche broke ice in Skov Fjord and engaged in local escort work. On the 14th she departed Gronne Dal to establish Weather Station "ABLE" where she remained until relieved by the Active on the 24th. Returning to Gronne Dal she remained moored there and at Narsarssuak until April 22, 1944 when she departed with the Mohawk escorting the SS Laramie to Boston. Encountering impassible ice she returned to Gronne Dal again departing on April 24, 1944, for Boston. She arrived Boston May 2, 1944, for a 20-day availability, after which she proceeded to Argentia, arriving on the 29th, and at Gronne Dal on June 3, 1944. The balance of 1944 the Comanche spent on weather patrol on Weather Station "CHARLIE" returning to Boston on August 6, 1944, for generator repairs. On returning to Greenland in September, 1944, she acted as escort for convoy SG-52. Again assuming weather patrol duties on Station "CHARLIE" during October, November and December except when she went to the assistance of the German prize Externsteine on October 23, 1944, and acted as screen on October 26, 1944, for the Storis, towing the disabled Northland. On November 8th she searched for the schooner Effie Morrison without results and also on the 13th for a lost plane, also without results. The Comanche was on weather patrol on station "ABLE" as 1944 closed.

1945

WEATHER PATROL--ICE PATROL-- AIR-SEA RESCUE
The Comanche continued on weather patrol, patrolling Station No. 6, during January and February 1945, relieved by the Algonquin and Tahoma. In March, 1945, she returned to the United States and after 30 days availability and ten days of training exercises at Casco Bay arrived at Argentia on May 29, 1945. Here she was assigned to Ice Patrol Duty until June 4, 1945, when the assignment was cancelled. Proceeding to NOB, Iceland on June 20, 1945, she was assigned to Air-Sea Rescue Station at 62°45'N, 29°00'W on July 14, 1945, returning to Iceland on July 20, 1945. She maintained the station again from August 1 to 7, 1945, from August 16 to 23, 1945, during which patrol the war ended, and from August 25 to 28, 1945. From September 9, 1945 she was on 4 hour standby air-sea rescue duty at Reykjavik for the rest of the month. The Comanche was now preparing for her peacetime duties.


CGC DIONE (WPC-107)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Dione was built at Manitowoc, Michigan in 1934. On July 1, 1941, her permanent station was Norfolk, Virginia. She was 165 ft. long, with 25 ft. 3 in. beam and drew 9 ft. 6 in. with a displacement of 33I1 tons. She had a steel hull and could make 16 knots. She was powered with a 1340 HP twin screw diesel engine.

COASTAL CONVOYS ATTACKED
At the beginning of the war the Dione was placed on coastal convoy escort duty. On March 20, 1942, planes from the Elizabeth City Air Station dropped two depth charges on a contact made by the Dione with unknown results. On April 5, 1942, the oil tanker Byron D. Benson was torpedoed at 39°10'N, 75°31'W. The Dione picked up one survivor. Again on April 18, 1942, a plane of the same air station observed the Dione dropping depth charges after a submarine had attacked a tanker, but there were no visible results. On June 24, 1942, at 1900 the Dione while on escort duty made an underwater contact. Five minutes later she dropped one charge from each reach with negative results. At 1910 two ships in the convoy, the SS Nordaland and the SS Manuela appeared to have been torpedoed. The Dione made a sweep search for the submarine which appeared to be on the starboard side of the convoy in position 34°31'N, 75°42'W. At 2000 the Nordaland was in a sinking position with a fire amidships, with the Norwich City standing by to pick up survivors. The Dione made another underwater contact on June 25, 1942, and expended five depth charges resulting in quantities of oil rising to the surface. On the 27th another contact was made at 1054 and the Dione dropped four charges, but the contact was doubtful. (No further details on the Dione's operations are available.)


CGC DIX (WSC-136)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Dix was built at Camden, N.J. in 1927 and on July 1, 1941, her permanent station was Boston, Mass. She was 125 feet long, with 23 ft. 6 in. beam and had a 9 ft. draft with a displacement of 220 tons. She had a steel hull and made 11 knots. She was powered with a 350 HP diesel engine and was a twin screw.

ATTACKS SUB
On July 9, 1942, at 1225 at 22°34'30"W, 78°14'30"W. the Dix picked up a distinct echo at 1200 yards and ran the echo down to 200 yards when she lost contact. The sound operator had reported the sounds of propellers. At 1233 the Dix dropped the first of a pattern of five depth charges. There were some signs of oil and water agitation at the scene. (No further reports of the operations of the CGC Dix in World War II are available.)


CGC EASTWIND (WAG-27?)

COMMISSIONING
The CGC Icebreaker Eastwind was placed in commission on June 3, 1944, at San Pedro, California, where she remained at the builders yard, Western Pipe and Steel Co. San Pedro,

--63--


for fitting out until June 10th, moving to Terminal Island Naval Drydock on that data for continuance of fitting out. On June 18th she departed from Naval Supply Depot at San Pedro where she loaded ammunition, thence to Long Beach for fueling on the 20th. Her first commanding officer Captain Charles W. Thomas, USCG, reported to Commander Task Group 14.4 for duty on the 22rd, trials were conducted on the 24th, and on the 28th she proceeded to Terminal Island and San Pedro for adjustment and repairs. Her shakedown training continued until July 14, 1944, when she reported to Task Group 14.2 at San Diego for anti-submarine warfare training and training of personnel at the West Coast Sound School. On the 24th she finally got underway from San Pedro, setting course for Balboa, Canal Zone.

DESCRIPTION OF ICEBREAKER
The Eastwind was one of five heavily armed ice breakers, designed to serve as warships in the frigid northern waters. They resemble in appearance a miniature battleship. These ships actually "pump the ocean" into huge tanks to free the ships from possible ice traps encountered during the double wartime job of aiding navigation and battling the enemy. These large tanks are located within a double hull on either side, and by swishing 240 tons of water from three port tanks to three starboard tanks and back again in three minute cycles, a slow motion, rocking effect is produced. For extra stubborn ice this "heeling" or rocking is augmented by additional water transferred from single tanks located in fore and aft compartments to cause "trimming," or a teeter-totter effect. Experts explain that this motion keeps the hull moving at all times, even though the ship might be wedged into the ice, and facilitates backing out or continued forward motion. Marine engineers have termed these ships the most unusual ships to come off the ways during World War II. The existence of a third propeller in the bow to chum the water in front of the ship when operating amidst ice flows, and the broad stern with a notch into which the bow of another vessel can fit so that the power of both may be used in breaking through the ice formations, make them unique in appearance. The large number of electrical devices and controls, including an additional set of complete controls in the crow's nest, are less conspicuous but add to the interest of ship designers in the new type.

PHYSICAL DATA
The Eastwind is 269 feet long overall, with a waterline length of 250 feet. Her maximum beam is 63 feet 6 inches and her waterline beam 62 feet. Her normal draft is 25 feet 9 inches and her maximum draft 29 feet 1 inch. She has a normal displacement of 5300 tons and a maximum displacement of 6515 tons. She carries a complement of 145 and has a speed of 16 knots. Her propelling machinery is Diesel electric, her forward engines having 3333 normal horsepower and her after engines 6666 or 10,000 horsepower, depending on whether her bow propeller is in use or not. She has a cruising radius of 10,800 miles. The capacity of her trimming tanks, used for shifting the water ballast used in the icebreaking operation, is 717 tons. The ice belt plating of her hull is 1-5/8".

TO BOSTON
Proceeding through the Panama Canal on August 3, 1944, the Eastwind reported for duty to Commander-in-Chief, Atlantic Fleet, arriving at Boston Navy Yard on August 12, 1944, she underwent repairs and alterations until the 25th followed by various inspections.

TO NORTHEAST GREENLAND
Ordered to proceed as soon as possible to support Commander Task Unit 24.8.5 in Northeast Greenland, she got underway on September 3, 1944, taking on a plane while standing out of Boston Harbor and was proceeding to Reykjavik to top off fuel and take on a cargo of provisions, when she was requested by Commander Task Force 24 to proceed directly to destination unless essential to stop. She replied that she would proceed by great circle course from Cape Race to the edge of the ice off Scoresby Sound, and thence northward to destination. On September 9th, she made three hedgehog runs on an underwater sound contact at 65°50'N, 35°07'W, but the contact was lost, later being classified as doubtful. Later a radar contact was identified as an electrical disturbance or marine life. Encountering an ice field she pushed through a tongue of ice in order to test the bow motor and general ice navigation qualities of the vessel. On September 13, 1944, she arrived at the Northland's position at 75°79'N, 17°45'W and moored alongside. At 0500 she broke out the flag of Task Unit 24.8.5 and relieved the Storis. She made an aerial reconnaissance covering in two flights the East Coast of Greenland from 78°00'N to 73°30'N. Then she stood into Dove Bay on September 14th and exercised a landing force on Grouches Snack. She then made another aerial reconnaissance including a survey of heretofore unsurveyed parts of Eastern Dove Bay in order to locate enemy activity. She broke through one foot of new ice without appreciably slowing down. On the 15th she completed collection of hydrographic data and made an aerial reconnaissance, meanwhile provisioning a sledge patrol station of the Greenland Army. She then proceeded southward.

BREAKS TEN FOOT ICE
Proceeding south on September 17, 1944, the Eastwind pushed through about five miles of closely packed pan ice, breaking floes of estimated thickness of ten feet with her four generators on the line and below full power but not using the bow propeller. Landing supplies at Sandodden on the 16th, the Eastwind pushed through five miles of closely packed "storis" ice on the 19th and found a boat with two missing members of the sledge patrol who were hoisted aboard and returned to Sandodden. Neither the Storis nor the Northland could have penetrated the ice to make this rescue. The cutter stood to northward on the 23rd to locate the limits of the Arctic pack and seek signs of possible enemy infiltrations. Approaches to Franske and Nordske Islands were blocked by solid ice through which the Eastwind pushed far enough to determine that no enemy vessel could have made a landing. On the 29th the Eastwind went to the assistance of the Northland, who had a damaged propeller and steering gear and towed her 40 miles in a whole force gale, casting her off in the lee of Pendulum Island, inside the ice, where the Storis and Evergreen stood by as she made repairs.

CAPTURES GERMAN WEATHER STATION AND TWELVE PRISONERS WITH CONFIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS
On October 1, 1944, the Evergreen with the Northland in tow, escorted by the Storis, departed for Reykjavik, leaving the Eastwind alone. Next day the Eastwind's plane reported sighting a westbound trawler at Little Koldewey Island and the Eastwind stood to northeastward to search. She reached north Flank at Arctic Pack on the 3rd and searched westward through new ice. Her plane observed signs of enemy activity but no signs of life on North Little Koldewey and the cutter worked through heavy "storis" ice off the entrance to Koldewey Straits, heaving to at Storm Bay. Early on the 4th she moved down the southwest side of North Little Koldewey and landed a force on the island in two waves. The force advanced over the island to the east side and captured a German Weather Station with 12 prisoners. The

--64--


Eastwind stood around the north end of the island and loaded seized materials, including confidential publications. The documents contained military secrets whose gist was communicated to Commander, Greenland Patrol on the 5th with request that the Storis report to C.T.U. 24.8.5 aboard the Eastwind in order to get the documents into proper hands quickly. The Eastwind then proceeded to Morkefjord and issued seized food and fuel to the Greenland Army. On the 7th she resumed patrol station off Cape Philip Broke, rendezvousing with the newly arrived sister icebreaker Southwind for fuel transfer, in Freeden Bugt. On the 9th the Southwind assumed the patrol station off the cape, as far as ice conditions permitted navigation, as the Eastwind patrolled south of the Cape. More of the captured supplies were transferred to the Greenland Army at Sandodden, greatly strengthening that force and enabling capture by the "Wind" vessels of enemy forces sighted by the sledge patrol, before such forces could be evacuated. On the 13th the German prisoners, stores and equipment, were transferred to the Storis who had reported and was directed to proceed direct to Reykjavik.

CAPTURE OF THE EXTERNSTEINE
On October 15, 1944, the Eastwind's plane sighted a< ship in the ice 10 miles off Cape Borgen and the Eastwind and Southwind were immediately ordered into action. The Eastwind had her choice of following open leads in the ice, then crashing through heavy ice, or working outside the ice and approaching from the east. The former course was selected and plans were made to take the vessel intact. When the target was definitely identified at 2141 as an enemy vessel, the Eastwind began firing until 2250 expending 28 rounds of 5"/38 cal. illuminating and 13 rounds of service ammunition. There were no casualties. The enemy signalled "we give up" and the Eastwind signalled the enemy not to scuttle the ship. Then the icebreaker began working through the ice closer to the enemy vessel. While swinging stern to bring all guns to bear, the Eastwind had lopped off two blades of her starboard screw, and besides this handicap, she was working through ten feet of polar ice, the heaviest she had ever been in. The Greenland cruiser and ship's plane were wrecks. At 0100 on the 16th the Eastwind finally hove to about 400 yards from the enemy vessel and sent the first platoon of a landing force to take the ship and prisoners. The vessel proved to be the Externsteine, an expeditionary vessel of the weather station seized on the 4th. The 17 prisoners were brought to the Eastwind as a salvage party was disembarked to work over the captured vessel.

SOUTHWIND DAMAGED
When the Southwind hove to about 700 yards distant, her commanding officer came on board and reported that his ship was stuck and her port screw damaged. It was decided that she was in worse shape then the captured vessel, so she was to try to get out of the ice as soon as possible, with the Eastwind breaking her out if absolutely necessary. At 0700 she got underway without assistance, progressing slowly.

EXTERNSTEINE BROKEN OUT
The Eastwind left alone, broke a track across the bow of the Externsteine worked back to a "lake" in the ice about 1200 yards away and then made a second approach through the original track back to the German ship. Then the mining partly blasted the ship loose and the engineering party got up steam. The Eastwind broke the stern out and pushed it around, then towed backward with a hawser from bow to bow, retracting the now well defined path made on her two approaches. After getting her into the "lake" she lay all night raising steam and getting her ready to go through the ice.

TO OPEN WATER
On October 17, 1944, the Eastwind took the Externsteine through the ice into Freeden Bugt where she rendezvoused with the Southwind. Ice conditions along the entire Greenland coast were bad, according to the Southwind's plane and on the 18th the vessels got underway, the Eastwind breaking ice and the Southwind following with the Externsteine in her wake or in tow as conditions required. Open water was reached at 0900 on the 19th and the Southwind was detailed to escort the Externsteine while the Eastwind made ice reconnaissance. On the 21st the captured vessel with 3 officers and a prize crew of 34 men proceeded to Reykjavik without escort where she arrived on the 24th. The two "Wind" vessels continued patrolling and exploiting all leads. By October 31st it was apparent that there were no leads, in spite of northerly gales which often change ice conditions, and that the ice pack was tighter than ever, so patrol was discontinued for the season at noon and the two vessels set course for Reykjavik.

FLIGHTS TO LOCATE SOURCE OF TRANSMISSION
Ice conditions now precluded enemy access to Northeast Greenland, making patrol there no longer necessary. The two ice-breakers arrived at Reykjavik joining the prize on November 2, 1944, and on the 5th the prisoners of war were transferred to the Iceland Base Command, U.S. Army. On the 6th a dispatch was received from Commander, Greenland Patrol, indicating that a transmission had been intercepted on an enemy weather frequency. After a conference on the 7th the Task Unit Commander requested that a flight be authorized to locate the latest source of transmission on 4800 KCs, bearing 315° from Jan Mayen Island, assuming that an enemy vessel was on that bearing. Four planes were to participate but the results were negative, two planes being withheld. On the 8th results of a flight to Northeast Greenland by PBY were negative due to poor visibility and further operations were cancelled.

RETURN TO U. S
Upon departure of Captain Thomas on November 12, Commander R. W. Hoyle, USCG, aboard the Southwind assumed duties as acting CTU 24.8.5 and the vessels proceeded towards Narsarssuak escorting the ex-Externsteine, renamed East Breeze, with the Travis and Faunce. They arrived on the 16th. On the 22nd a convoy formed and proceeded, escorted by the Eastwind and Southwind, to Argentia. On the 30th the Travis collided with the East Breeze at 44°44'N, 60°53'W and the Eastwind was ordered to stand by the Travis. The damaged vessel reported water-tight integrity secured but steering gear out of order, her after lazarette flooded, and the ship slightly down by the stern. The East Breeze took the Travis in tow and, escorted by the Eastwind, proceeded toward Halifax, the rest of the convoy maintaining original course. The three vessels arrived at Halifax on December 2, 1944, after the towing hawser had parted three times. Temporary repairs to the Travis would require three or four days so she would proceed to Boston later. The Eastwind and East Breeze set course for Boston on the 3rd arriving on the 5th, the East Breeze mooring at Constitution Wharf and the Eastwind reporting to FAO for 30 days availability.

ICEBREAKING ESCORT IN GREENLAND
The Eastwind got underway January 20, 1945, for Argentia, arriving on the 23rd. Departing that afternoon, rough seas damaged her slightly and she returned for emergency repairs. She got underway for Narsarssuak on the 4th of February, 1945. She arrived at Bluie West One on the 9th and was soon underway to assist.

--65--


the Northland through the ice returning with her at 2337. She broke ice until the 18th when she proceeded to relieve the USS Tenacity escorting the Danish freighter Linda, convoying her to Julianehaab. On the 23rd she set out to assist the Northland through Fjord ice. On the 27th she assisted the Storis and then the Laurel. On March 3rd she rendezvoused with a convoy consisting of the Laramie, escorted by the Tampa and Modoc, to assist as ice breaking escort, at the mouth of Brede Fjord. Here she lead s column through loosely packed "storis" and float ice to Narsarssuak Reach, again assisting them on the 10th. On the 13th she proceeded to Skoldungen, East Greenland, to evacuate Army personnel at Caroline Amelice Harbor. She passed through "storis" ice most of the way, with a heavy belt of pack ice off the coast. This was very heavy and threatened damage to the propellers and she emerged, skirting it to the north looking for a lead to the coast. During the morning an aircraft advised that the pack was increasingly heavy near the coast with no leads through it. Hence the mission was abandoned and the Eastwind returned to Narsarssuak.

ATTACKS SUB
On March 21, 1945, the Eastwind was ordered to proceed and support aircraft in search of a submarine reported by an Army plane on the surface entering the inside passage to Julianehaab from Skov Fjord. When about one mile from the location indicated the Eastwind obtained a good sound contact broad on the port bow. Reversing course she placed the contact dead ahead. The range was about 400 yards. Strong propeller beats were received. Then they stopped. The target was assumed to be a submarine which had stopped its engines, and the Eastwind fired hedgehogs and dropped a deeply set eleven depth charge pattern on the last position obtained. The results of the attack are unknown. The search continued with negative results. The Eastwind remaining listening all night and on the 22nd the search continued and was finally assigned to the Mohawk, while the Eastwind searched Narsak Passage and Brede Fjord with negative results. On the 23rd the cutter proceeded to rendezvous with an incoming convoy, abandoning search. She moored at Narsarssuak on the 25th. Anti-submarine patrol was re-assumed on the 26th at Narsak Passage and continued until the 30th. On the 31st she began escorting an inbound convoy and moored at Gronne Dal on April 8, 1945. On the 28th she proceeded to Fredericksdal where an inspection party went a shore to inspect Navy 226, returning to Narsarssuak on May 1st, 1945.

TO UNITED STATES
On May 4, 1945, the Eastwind began escorting the Arundel to Argentia, reaching there on the 9th. Escort to Portsmouth, N.H., was continued on the 10th, the Arundel being taken in tow on the 13th because of a casualty to her starboard engine. They arrived on the 14th, a 15-day availability for the Eastwind beginning next day.

TO LABRADOR
Departing Portsmouth on June 3, 1945, the Eastwind proceeded to Casco Bay, Maine, for eleven days of training exercises, arriving at Boston on the 14th. On the 18th she was underway for Argentia, arriving on the 20th. On the 22nd she was underway for Battle Harbor, Labrador, proceeding through Cabot Strait and the Gulf of St. Lawrence and anchoring in St. Charles Channel on the 25th. Here a pontoon raft, being towed by one of the Eastwind's launches and loaded with 30 tons of equipment for Unit 35 at False Harbor, was swept on the rocks at St. Charles Gull Island. On June 28th the Eastwind moored at Narsarssuak.

TO NORTHEAST GREENLAND
The Eastwind continued to moor at Narsarssuak during July, 1945, and on August 6, 1945 departed en route to Scoresby Sound, Northeast Greenland via Reykjavik, Iceland. On the 12th she delivered freight at Army Base, Young's Sound. Here arrangements were made to discontinue sledge patrols at Daneborg and Dove Bay and the possibilities of emergency airfields in the vicinity discussed. On the 15th she anchored off Sledge Patrol Station, Morke Fjord and took aboard personnel and supplies. This day marked the end of World War II. On the 16th the vessel lay off Cape Sussi, Shannon Island while a detail went ashore to investigate the German base previously on the island. A plane reconnaissance aided in laying out an emergency airstrip. Five foot fjord ice was easily broken through. On the 17th she anchored in Freeden Bay and marked out an emergency landing field on the south side of Shannon Island. The strip is 200 feet wide and 4000 feet long, 20 feet above sea level, of unsurfaced clay and gravel. On the 18th at Young Sound, Danish personnel came aboard for further transportation to Bluie West One.

TO JAN MAYEN AND REYKjAVIK
On August 20, 1945, the Eastwind anchored off Jan Mayen Island and sent a detail ashore with commissary supplies and communications for Navy 719. The base was found entirely out of fuel and coal which the cutter could not supply. Anchoring in Reykjavik, Iceland, on the 22nd, the problem of servicing Jan Mayen Island was considered in conference. On the 27th made plans for Jan Mayen Island and loaded supplies for first of two contemplated trips. On the 30th she stood out of Reykjavik en route Jan Mayen Island arriving September 1, 1945. She returned to Reykjavik on the 6th and began loading remainder of supplies for Jan Mayen Island and awaiting relief personnel for that base. On the 26th the Norwegian trawler Honningsvag transferred miscellaneous cargo to the Eastwind for the Norwegian garrison on Jan Mayen Island. On the 27th the relief personnel for Navy 719 on the island was on board and on the 28th the Eastwind was underway en route Jan Mayen Island. En route on the 29th orders to proceed to assistance of a Danish vessel reported sinking at 70°30'N, 21°30'W were cancelled as position of vessel had been erroneously received. After unloading supplies at Jan Mayen Island the Eastwind returned to Boston for peacetime activities.


CGC ESCANABA3 (WPG-64)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Escanaba (WPG-64) was built at Bay City, Michigan in 1932, and on July 1, 1941, her permanent station was Grand Haven, Michigan. She was 165 ft. long with 36 ft. beam and drew 13 ft. 7 in. of water, having a displacement of 1005 tons and a gross tonnage CH ["Custom House tonnage"] of 718 tons. With a steel hull she made 13 knots. She was an oil burner with a 1500 HP geared turbine.

ATTACKS TWO SUBS--USS CHEROKEE SUNK--22 SURVIVORS
On June 15, 1942, while escorting a convoy from Cape Cod to Halifax in position 42°47'N, 66°18'W, the Escanaba had a definite contact on her QC machine and went into the attack immediately. Eight depth charges

--66--


were dropped on a contact held to within 200 yards and stern lookouts and other aft saw the submarine break water, roll over and disappear. At 800 yards the cutter headed for a second attack. As she closed, large groups of air bubbles were noticed dead ahead and a pattern of six depth charges was dropped across the position. Contact was lost. This sinking was not confirmed by German records uncovered after the war and is not included in the list of enemy submarines listed as sunk by the Navy in its release of June 27, 1946. A second submarine was contacted at 1820 and eight depth charges were dropped, five more being dropped on the second run. Shortly after this a dark smoke arose to the surface and a large slick area was noted with messes of brown substance floating about, but the cutter was unable to regain contact. This sinking was likewise never confirmed by German records. Ordered to rejoin the convoy at 1922, flares and rockets indicated a submarine attack on the convoy. The Escanaba came to the position where the USS Cherokee had gone down and survivors were milling around in the water. Rescue operations began and the monomoy surfboat was put over in the dark with a volunteer rescue crew. The order was to pick up singles--men swimming alone, but the men kept floating near to the ship but could not hold on to the liferings attached to the sides that were thrown to them. One man finally got alongside but could not hold on to the rope and husky crew members, held by the feet, went down and as the ship rolled grabbed the man and brought him aboard, This method was soon discarded, however, as too dangerous. The ship was taken to the windward of the rafts and the men allowed to drift down by the rafts and in this manner they were brought right up under the counter and the rafts secured alongside. All other methods of rescue failed. The monomoy surfboat returned with 11 men and 11 had been brought aboard without use of the boat making a total of 22. As the ship's boat was preparing to go out again an unidentified corvette and the Norlago, a small freighter designated as rescue ship, began to use lights to rescue survivors. These were just enough to attract submarines. A destroyer made a quick counter attack on one sub approaching for the attack. The corvette disappeared, as did the Norlago, and the Escanaba had to lift her ship's boat and depart despite the fact that more survivors were awaiting rescue. After a sound sweep the Escanaba began a zigzag evasion course for Boston. She would have remained but her depth charges had been exhausted.

WEATHER PATROL
The Escanaba arrived at Sidney on July 4th escorting five vessels with the Arundel and Bluebird from Casco Bay, Maine. For the remainder of July and until August 23, 1942, she was on weather patrol. On the latter date she moored at Bluie West One and later transported officers to Julianehaab on August 31, 1942, returning to Kinglok Island same day. On September 1, 1942, she stood up Skov Fjord and on September 4th was patrolling weather station "AFFIRM where she remained until the 13th. For the rest of September she was on local transportation and escort duty visiting Kungnat Bay; Ivigtut, Resolution Island, and Frobisher Bay, Baffin Island, returning to Bluie West One on October 2, 19k2.

SURVEY DUTY--ESCORT DUTY
On October 2, 1942 she proceeded to Fredericksdal, Greenland with Army officers aboard to survey a prospective base at the point. Until the 31st she remained on local escort duty and on that date joined a convoy bound for Argentia arriving on November 7, 1942, and remaining until the 14th when she departed for St. John's and thence for Kungnat Bay arriving on the 22nd. On the 24th she departed with another convoy for St. John's, Argentia and Boston arriving December 5, 1944, for repairs until the 29th when she got underway for Argentia.

1943

DORCHESTER RESCUE
Arriving at Argentia on January 2nd the Escanaba proceeded next day to St. John's and on the 6th began escorting a convoy to Kungnat Bay arriving on the 11th. On the 14th she was underway again for Argentia where she arrived on the 14th, breaking ice in the harbor on the 25th and 26th. On the 27th she was again proceeding to Greenland stopping at St. John's on the 28th. On February 3, 1943, 90 miles southwest of Skovfjord, Greenland the SS Dorchester, carrying troops and civilian workers in convoy SG-19 was torpedoed and sank in 20 minutes. By 0922 145 victims had been brought aboard the Escanaba, 12 of whom were dead and one dying, making 132 living rescued. Due to the cold weather many had been unable to assist themselves and Escanaba's personnel had been sent into the water to secure lines to rafts and survivors. Rubber lifesaving suits proved valuable in this work. The Escanaba moored at Bluie West One on February 4, 1943, and disembarked survivors.

ESCORT DUTY
On February 9, 1943, the Escanaba left for Kungnat Bay where on the 22nd she began escorting a convoy to St. John's. On the 28th she detached with the USS Sandpiper and USS Nogak for St. John's. On March 1, 1943 the Escanaba was en route Argentia and on the 2nd stood out of there with a convoy bound for Boston where she arrived on the 7th and went into drydock. On March 17th, 1943, she was en route out of Casco Bay with the USS Arluk and USS Mango putting into Shelbourne Harbor, N.S., as the Arluk became disabled with engine trouble. She arrived at Argentia on the 24th with the Mango and remained there until the 30th when she departed with the Mohawk and Nanok for St. John's, thence proceeding to Narsarssuak, Greenland, escorting a convoy, which arrived on April 9, 1943. She remained moored there until April 30, 1943, effecting repairs to her main unit. (May War Diary missing).

ESCANABA IS SUNK
On June 10, 1943, the Escanaba began escorting convoy GS-24 from Narsarssuak to St. John's, N.F. in company with the Mojave (Flag), Tampa, Storis and Algonquin, the convoy consisting of USAT Fairfax and USS Raritan. Before joining the convoy on the 12th the Storis and Algonquin had been ordered to conduct a search for a submarine, reported by the Army to be in Brede Fjord. Proceeding northwest to skirt the ice, the convoy, early on the morning of the 13th, had passed to west and south and around the ice field to position 60°50'N, 52°00'W when at 0510 dense black and yellow smoke was reported rising from the Escanaba. She sank at 0513. The Storis and Raritan were ordered to investigate and rescue survivors while the rest of the convoy began zigzagging and steering evasive courses to avoid submarines. At 0715 the two cutters returned having rescued 2 survivors and found the body of Lt. Robert H. Prause which was on the Raritan. No explosion had been heard by the other escort vessels. The entire crew of 103 was lost with the exception of these two men.


CGC HAIDA (WPG-45)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Haida (WPG-45) was built by the Union

--67--


Construction Co. at Oakland, California, and commissioned October 26, 1921. Her permanent station was first at Fort Townsend, Washington. She was 240 feet long, 39 foot molded beam and drew 16 feet 6 inches. She displaced 1780 tons with a gross tonnage CH ["Custom House tonnage"] of 1330 tons. With a steel hull she had a speed of 16 knots, developed by 2600 HP turbine electric power and burned oil.

EARLY HISTORY
Between 1921 and 1933 the Haida was annually sent to Alaska on the Bering Sea Patrol. The one exception was in 1930-31 when she was on halibut patrol. In 1927 her permanent station was changed to Seattle. Some time after 1933 her permanent station was changed to Juneau, Alaska, and she was stationed here at the outbreak of World War II.

ESCORT DUTY
The Haida was at Puget Sound Navy Yard undergoing repairs on December 7, 1941. The work was completed January, 1942, and she departed Fort Townsend January 13, 1942. On January 16, 1942, while leaving Grenville Channel en route Ketchikan the Haida assisted in trying to float the USAT Branch aground for some days at Hamer Island, B.C. but after pulling unsuccessfully with the CGC Hemlock on the 17th, she transported some soldiers to Prince Rupert, leaving the Branch to salvage by underwriters. Arriving at Ketchikan January 20, 1942 she began escorting the SS Columbia and the USAT Gorgas in Icy Strait on the 23rd, arriving at King Cove on the 29th. The Haida later escorted the Gorgas to Cape Decision. On February 21st she was escorting the SS Yukon across the Gulf of Alaska mooring at Juneau. Departing on the 27th she started escorting the USAT Chas. L. Wheeler to Seward, but returned to Icy Straits because of heavy weather.

RESCUES SURVIVORS MOUNT McKlNLEY AND ASSISTS YP-86
On March 10 she arrived at King Cove and went to the assistance of the Mount McKinley ashore 1½ miles west of Scotch Cap. The Yukon and Hatfield were standing by off shore but unable to communicate with the stranded vessel and heavy seas prevented a close approach. On the 12th it stopped snowing and 127 passengers, officers and crew were observed pulling seaward in five lifeboats, all being safely rescued and landed at Dutch Harbor. Departing for Akutan with officers and men from the Mount McKinley on March 14, 1942, she intercepted a message from the YP-86 in distress off North Head, Akutan Island. She led the YP safely in Umnak Bight on the 15th, removing machine guns and platform from over the pilot house to stabilize her. On the 16th she convoyed the YP to Dutch Harbor. On the 22nd the Haida returned to the Mount McKinley to salvage such stores and equipment as she could but weather conditions prevented and she returned to Dutch Harbor.

RESUMES ESCORT DUTY
On March 23rd, 1942, the Haida escorted the USAT Delaroff to Nikolaski on Umnak Island and on April 14th accompanied her on trip to Chernofski and return. On the 30th she contacted the USAT Goldbrook off Chernofski and escorted her and the Delaroff past Unimak Pass towards Seattle. On May 1st the Haida escorted the SS Aleutian to Cape Pankof. On the 18th she called at Sitka and loaded 32 tons of torpedoes and ammunition for Women's Bay, then, still heavily loaded, escorted the USAT North Coast to Cold Bay, returning to Dutch Harbor. She helped search for a submarine on the 27th and then proceeded to Chernof aid. to patrol and guard merchant shipping until June 3rd. Returning to Dutch Harbor on the 4th she escorted the USAT Downey to Otter Point guarding her as she unloaded aviation gasoline. Reports on the Haida's movements during latter part of 1942 are partially missing. From August 23 to 29, 1942, she escorted vessels off the Kenai Peninsula, eastward to Seward. During the week ending October 17, 1942, she escorted 16 merchant vessels between Yukitat, Women's Bay and Pleasant Island. After escorting six vessels with one naval escort to Pleasant Island on October 26, 1942, she proceeded to Juneau and returning to Pleasant Island on the 28th escorted 6 vessels to St. Paul Harbor. During the week of November 28, 1942, she escorted convoys west of Cape Spencer, Pleasant Island and St. Paul, heaving to off Kodiak island December 1, 1942, to escort the SS North Pacific to Kodiak, following which she escorted her onward to Pleasant Island. Returning to Juneau she departed for Pleasant Island an the 12th to escort two vessels to Seward where she arrived on the 14th departing same day to escort a vessel to St. Paul arriving on the 15th. On the 20th she escorted two vessels to Juneau arriving on December 26, 1942.

ESCORT AND WEATHER PATROL 1943
On January 1, 1943, the Haida arrived at Seattle where she remained in overhaul status until February 23, 1943. After tests next day she proceeded to Port Angeles where she began escorting a convoy to Alaska. Intensive training was carried on en route and on March 4th she anchored at Cold Bay, reporting to Commander, Alaskan Sector for duty. On the 5th while escorting a vessel to Dutch Harbor she expended two depth charges on an underwater contact with negative results. The remainder of March was spent in escort duty between Dutch Harbor and Chernofski, guarding a cable ship at Kelekta Bay and escorting vessels to Atka Island, returning with a convoy to Dutch Harbor on the 27th. She left for Adak on the 29th. From then until the end of April she was engaged in anti-sub patrol and escort duty between Adak and Atka Islands, dropping depth charges on a doubtful contact on at least one occasion. During May 1943, the Haida was engaged in escort duty between Dutch Harbor and Chernofski Harbor, conducting occasional anti-sub patrol. This duty continued during June, the Haida dropping eight charges on a "fair" contact on the 12th with no results.

WEATHER PATROL 1943
On June 27, 1943, the Haida stood out for weather patrol station "A" at 49°N, 148°W, assuming the station on the 30th. On July 18th she departed station for Seattle returning to the station on August 5th and again returning to Seattle August 27th. Her weather station duties were not again assumed until September 9th, whence they continued until her arrival at Seattle on September 28, 1943. She was on weather patrol between October 10-26. On this patrol she fired 14 projectiles, three depth charges on a possible sub contact. She again patrolled weather station "A" between November 18 and December 9, 1943, and was underway to the station at the end of the year.

WEATHER PATROL 1944, 1945 AND 1946
The Haida continued to patrol Weather Station "A" at fortnightly intervals throughout the year 1944, basing on Seattle. This duty continued through 1945 and until March 18, 1946. Returning to Seattle March 25, 1946, she arrived at Ketchikan April 4, 1946, for a series of operations between Alaskan ports and Continental U.S. ports, which brought her back to Seattle May 6, 1946; Pelican City August 25, 1946; Prince Rupert September 2, 1946; Seattle September 16, 1946, October 2, 1946, and October 20, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONING
The Haida was decommissioned

--68--


COAST GUARD CUTTER <i>Escanaba</i>
COAST GUARD CUTTER Escanaba

33 SURVIVORS OF A GERMAN SUBMARINE ABE LINED UP IN FRONT OF THE U.S. COAST GUARD PATROL CRAFT <i>Icarus</i> WHICH SANK THEIR RAIDER OFF THE CAROLINA COAST
33 SURVIVORS OF A GERMAN SUBMARINE ARE LINED UP IN FRONT OF THE U.S. COAST GUARD PATROL CRAFT Icarus WHICH SANK THEIR RAIDER OFF THE CAROLINA COAST

--69 ---


at Port Angeles February 13, 1947, and sold to Walter H. Wilms of Seattle, January 20, 1948.


USS HIRAM (WPC)

COMMISSIONING
The USS Hiram was commissioned by the Navy on 1 June, 1942, and immediately turned over to the U.S. Coast Guard, Ketchikan, Alaska, for operation. She was first manned with a Coast Guard crew on August 11, 1944. J. Ellsworth Jensen, Bm1c, USCG, was the first man to assume the duties of Officer in Charge. He was succeeded by J. W. McMahon BM1c on December 27, 1943, and V. M. Shakler, BM1c on December 15, 1944.

PATROL DUTY
The Hiram patrolled off Duke Island, Barren Island, Dundas Island, Coos Bay and Chacon from July 6 to July 11, 1942, encountering nothing of a suspicious nature. Her code challenge and reply with Canadian patrols was sometimes confused. During the week ending August 8th, 1942, she patrolled the regular steamer lane, identifying vessels. On August 5th she challenged a blacked out vessel between Free Point and Cape Fox and received identification after some delay, but not before general quarters had been called and guns manned. During the week ending August 15, 1942, she again maintained patrol off Free Point, convoying a troop transport northbound, identifying vessels. The Hiram continued on patrol duty in the 17th Naval District throughout the war. The areas patrolled included Cape Fox, Cape Chacon to Dall Head, North Tongass, Hogan Island to Wales Point, Clarence Strait and Icy Strait.

ASSISTANCE
On April 4, 1943, she answered the distress call of a Navy tank lighter at Wales Point and towed the vessel to Ketchikan Base. She also carried mail and supplies to and from LS-113 Pleasant Island and Port Althrop and Cape Spencer Light, and engaged in boarding, routing and patrol duty at LS-113, Pleasant Island. On August 4, 1943, she assisted in pulling the gas boat Mary Ellen off the beach at Icy Point, near Palma Bay, and on October 11, 1943, she towed a motor sailor from Pleasant Island to Ketchikan. On September 1, 1945, the LS-113 was taken off her station at Pleasant Island and the Hiram proceeded to the Captain of the Port, Juneau, Alaska, and was assigned the hauling of freight, mail and passengers to the five light stations in the Juneau area. Her Coast Guard crew was removed June 30, 1946.


CGC ICARUS (WPC-118)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Icarus was built at Bath, Maine in 1932 and on July 1, 1941 her permanent station was Stapleton, Staten Island, New York. She was 165 feet long, with a 25 foot 3 inch beam and drew 9 feet 6 inches of water. Her displacement was 334 tons. She had a steel hull and a speed of 16 knots. She was powered with a 1340 HP diesel oil During twin screw motor.

MAKES CONTACT
The Icarus was on coastal anti-submarine patrol duty, early in 1942 when on January 18, 1942 she departed Ambrose Sea Buoy at 0745 on the report of nearby submarine activity. At 1725 she had established a sound contact on which she fired her "Y" gun and one depth charge which failed to explode. Next day at 0827 while cruising in the same spot an explosion occurred about 300 yards off her starboard bow, believed to be the unexploded depth charges released the previous day. On the 22nd the cutter made sound contact in the vicinity of Ambrose Channel entrance and observed a slick spot on the surface of the water. The contact was lost at 0730 but the search was continued and calls were exchanged with a Navy Blimp requesting it to search the area. Again on the 31st a submarine was reported in the vicinity and a passing tanker gave the position of the sub as bearing 10°, distance four miles. The Icarus proceeded to search, established several contacts with her sound equipment and dropped five depth charges, after which satisfactory contact was lost.

BRINGS UP CORK AND OI
Proceeding to a position 13½ miles SE of Atlantic City on March 7, 1942, the Icarus investigated a report of a submarine at that position and at 1525 made a contact, dropping one depth charge from the rack and firing tab "Y" guns 14 minutes later. Three minutes later she stopped engines at the point of attack, 39°14'20"N, 74°06'45"W, and ten minutes afterward dropped two depth charges from the racks. Large quantities of cork and oil were observed. Next day she located an oil slick at 0920 and made contact, attacking with two depth charges at 1030, picking up sample of oil and debris. Again on the 11th at 0815 she dropped three charges with negative results. On March 15, 1942, a Navy Blimp dropped smoke flares and the Icarus made contact at 1200 yards at 1150. Forty five minutes later she dropped two depth charges, followed by two more 15 minutes later. Two more were dropped at 1305, two at 1310 and two at 1325. At 1400 the Icarus stood by the scene as oil bubbles were coming to the surface.

SINKS SUBMARINE
On May 9, 1943, while proceeding southward from New York on a routine run at about 1620 the Icarus picked up a "mushy" sound contact at a range of about 1900 yards off the port bow. The contact sharpened and at 1629 a torpedo was seen and heard to explode 200 yards off the port quarter. At no time was the periscope sighted. Reversing her course the Icarus steamed toward the contact which was approaching the spot where the torpedo had exploded and propeller noises were now picked up for the first time on the listening gear. The contact was lost at 180 yards and the Icarus, after a calculated interval, dropped five charges in the shape of a diamond with one charge in the center. Reversing her course, the Icarus now established on her sound gear that the submarine was moving west and she moved to intercept the U-boat. Two more charges were dropped in a V pattern at a point determined by applying a lead to the U-boats apparent track and as the turmoil in the water subsided, large bubbles were observed coming to the surface. The Icarus once again reversed her course and dropped a single charge on the spot from which the air bubbles were seen to rise. Six minutes later she dropped another charge to the right of this location.

SUB SURFACES--ICARUS OPENS FIRE
At 1709, shortly after the last charge had been dropped, the submarine broke the surface, bow first and down at the stern, 1000 yards from the Icarus. The gun crew of the Icarus immediately opened fire with all machine guns able to bear on the target and as the course was changed to the right to ram, the three inch gun was also laid on the target. The first round was short but ricocheted through the conning tower. The second round was over. The next twelve rounds were hits or near misses, seven definite hits being spotted. In

--70--


five minutes the submarine sank in position 34°12.5'N, 76°35'W.

CAPTURES CREW
Two minutes after the submarine had surfaced, the crew abandoned ship. This was done rapidly with clock-like precision as though its members expected an internal explosion, for as soon as they hit the water all tried to swim away from the submarine as rapidly as possible. As the sub sank the Icarus ceased firing but continued to circle the spot and on establishing a contact and hearing propeller noises dropped one more depth charge which brought a large air bubble to the surface. This ended all further signs of the U-boat, except for 35 of its crew members swimming around in the water. At 1750 operations were begun to pick up survivors and 33 German prisoners were taken from the water. Four were wounded. One had lost his left leg and died shortly thereafter. The least wounded man was placed with the other 29 prisoners under guard in the forward crew's Compartment. The commanding officer, Kapt-Leutnant Helmuth Rathke, was among the survivors. The submarine was a 500-ton vessel, the U-352, and had a complement of 4 officers and 41 men. Seven of the crew sank with the sub and died in the water after abandoning ship.

HOW THE ATTACK WAS RECEIVED BY THE U-BOAT
The U-boat had been in the vicinity four days waiting for a convoy to pass and the Icarus was believed to be the lead ship, hence the torpedo was fired. In some manner this was believed to have misfired. The sub submerged and a hail of depth charges followed, one of which destroyed the periscope and killed the conning tower officer. Next the electric motor failed. There followed a second hail of depth charges, the engineering officer was killed and the diving mechanism disabled. At this point the CO decided to scuttle the boat and ordered all hands into life jackets and diving lungs. The tanks were blown and as the boat surfaced the command was given to abandon ship. The accurate fire from the Icarus prevented manning the deck guns.

CAPTIVES TAKEN TO CHARLESTON
Several of the crew spoke English and talked very freely on personal matters but disclosed no information on military affairs. Three of the Icarus crew spoke German and talked a great deal with the prisoners. The Germans were anxious to know how much the Coast Guard crew received for sinking a submarine and if they were promoted for doing so, adding that the German sailors received bonuses and medals for sinking ships, the amount depending on the size and tonnage of the ship. Four of the Germans had relatives living in the United States. The prisoners exhibited high morale and remarkable discipline. They had all expected to be machine gunned in the water after abandoning the submarine and many cried "Dont shoot us" as they were being rescued. They could not understand the good treatment they received on the Icarus. By 1805 all survivors had been rescued and the Icarus proceeded arriving at Charleston Navy Yard at 1130 on May 10, 1942, where the 32 prisoners and the body of the one who had died en route were delivered to the Commandant of the 6th Naval District. The capture was not announced by the Navy until almost a year later on May 1, 1943, for security reasons, and in keeping with the policy of keeping the enemy in doubt as to what had become of submarines which failed to return to base. According to enemy records uncovered and released by the Navy June 27, 1946, the sinking of the U-352 by the Icarus was the second German sub sunk by a United States war vessel after we entered the war. The first had been the U-85, sunk by the USS Roper on April 14, 1942 at 35°55'N, 75°13'W. The first enemy submarine to be sunk by our armed forces in World War II was the Japanese I-170 sunk at 23°45'N, 155°35' by aircraft from the USS Enterprise on December 10, 1941, according to these sources. [CORRECTION: USS Ward sank a small Japanese submarine at the entrance to Pearl Harbor before the attack began. --HyperWar] (No further war diaries on the Icarus are available.)


CGC JACKSON (WPG-3S)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Jackson (WPG-35) was built at Camden, New Jersey in 1927 and on July 1, 1941, was on permanent station at Norfolk, Virginia. She was 125 feet long and 23 foot 6 inch beam, drawing 9 feet of water, with a displacement of 220 tons. Her hull was of steel and she made 11 knots She had two 350 HP diesel, twin screw engines.

COASTAL ESCORT
The Jackson was engaged in coastal escort duty during the first part of World War II. On May 10, 1944, she rendezvoused at Buoy No.4, Delaware Bay, South Channel with the PYc-26 and escorted the SS John E. Sweet with the John E. Suyter on Course B at 11 knots, switching at 0500 to course Q at 11 knots and reaching Norfolk on the 16th. On July 7, 1944, she escorted the Charles Fort off Cape Lookout, 8 miles from Buoy 14, having escorted the vessel from the Delaware Capes. Here she was relieved by the SC-1339 and 1020. On July 20, 1944, she was part of Task Group 02.5 with home base as Little Creek, Virginia and Home Yard, Norfolk, Virginia.

FOUNDERS IN HURRICANE
On September 13, 1944, the Jackson assisted a vessel out of Norfolk. Then she went to the assistance of a Liberty Ship which had been torpedoed off the North Carolina coast and almost driven ashore in a later hurricane, but had weathered the blow and been towed to Norfolk with no casualties. While returning to port the Jackson, with the Bedloe, ran Into the hurricane, which increased in force on the 14th. Borne to the top of a huge swell, the Jackson was struck by two swells and rolled over until the mast dipped water. As the swells subsided, the ship righted but was bit by another hard sea and turned on her side a second time. Struggling out of that the vessel was carried high by a third sea. It seemed then that she hung in the air for a matter of seconds, then the wind seized her, turned her on her side and completely over. She disappeared under a huge wave. 37 officers and men got aboard rafts but 17 died during the second night from, exposure and exhaustion.

SURVIVORS RESCUED BY COAST GUARD PLANES
Nineteen survivors from the Jackson were spotted on life rafts by a Coast Guard plane from Elizabeth City, South Carolina, and picked up by a 36 foot cutter from the Oregon Inlet Lifeboat Station 15 miles away, after being in the water 58 hours. The Coast Guard planes landed in the swells, a plane next to each liferaft and crew members dived into the sea and hauled semi-conscious men onto the wings of the tossing planes where first aid was administered. A Navy Blimp dropped emergency rations. A Coast Guard cutter took them aboard and landed them at Norfolk for hospitalization. 48 officers and men including Lt. (jg) N. D. Call, CO of the Jackson were lost.4

--71--


SURVIVORS OF THE COAST GUARD CUTTER <i>JACKSON</i> WHICH SANK DURING THE SEVERE EAST COAST SEPTEMBER HURRICANE IN 1944
SURVIVORS OF THE COAST GUARD CUTTER JACKSON WHICH SANK DURING THE SEVERE EAST COAST SEPTEMBER HURRICANE IN 1944

THE COAST GUARD CUTTER <i>Modoc</i> KEEPING THE NORTHERN SUPPLY ROUTES SAFE FOR THE VITAL ALLIED SUPPLY CONVOYS
THE COAST GUARD CUTTER MODOC KEEPING THE NORTHERN SUPPLY ROUTES SAFE FOR THE VITAL ALLIED SUPPLY CONVOYS

--72--


CGC LEGARE (WSC-144)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Legare (WSC-144) was built at Camden, New Jersey in 1927. Her permanent station on July 1, 1941, was Norfolk, Va. She was 125 feet long, 23 foot 6 inch beam, and drew 9 feet with a displacement of 220 tons. She had a steel hull and made 11 knots, powered by a 350 HP diesel oil burning twin screw engine. She was fitted to service Aids to Navigation.

BRINGS UP OIL
On March 19, 1942, at 1645, while patrolling 18 miles southeast of Wimble Shoals the Legare received a message that a submarine was 8 miles south of Hatteras and observed four Army and Navy bombers circling the position and dropping smoke bombs. The Legare picked up a sound contact and prop beats with her QC bearing where the smoke bomb had been dropped and proceeded at full speed to track down the sound contact. The contact was lost at 500 yards due to a plane dropping bombs ahead of the Legare but at 1700 was picked up again and two depth charges released over the submerged object. Revising course the cutter stood over the position and observed oil debris and bubbles coming to the surface. Two more depth charges were released bringing up a large quantity of oil. Again standing over the position the cutter released two more charges and stopped engines to observe results. Oil and large air bubbles came to the surface. One more charge was released over the position, with air bubbles still coming to the surface. Still another charge was released. All of the Legare depth charges having been released, the cutter stood by to pick up samples of oil, debris and obtain soundings while depth charges were being released by the Legare, planes continued to drop bombs over the position. The sinking of a submarine at this position on this date was never confirmed by enemy records when they became available after the war.

RESCUES 3 FROM SS DAVID H. ATWATER
On April 2, 1942, while on Naval Patrol, the Legare observed gunfire at 37°58'N, 75°06'W and saw a vessel sinking, with only two feet of mast showing above the water. She located an empty lifeboat with one body and on signal from CO-218 found she had picked up 3 survivors and 3 bodies. Directed her to proceed to Chincoteague. On April 3, 1942, the Legare, assisted by Navy and civilian planes, picked up 9 bodies wearing life jackets of the SS David H. Atwater. Later 4 more bodies were picked up. The Atwater had been sunk by gunfire.

BOMBS SUB
On May 30, 1942. the Legare proceeded to 34°38'N, 75°45'W where CGCs 406 and 483 were standing by a submerged submarine which was leaking oil, having been stopped by CGC 406 and a plane the day before. After getting the range of the sub by QC from a buoy working position, the Legare dropped 14 bombs in 12 hours, set to explode for 150 to 200 feet, delayed action. Oil and bubbles resulted after each attack and at 1755, the sub not having moved since 0615, the Legare departed assuming the sub destroyed. No sinking of an enemy submarine at this position or on this date, however, was contained in enemy records uncovered after the war.

GEYSER OF OIL
On June 20, 1942, the CGCs Legare, Jackson, Rush and Colfax were ordered to proceed to Charleston from Norfolk patrolling the 100 fathom curve en route. On the 21st the Legare was ordered to proceed to 34°55'N, 75°27'W to contact the Dione and assist her to find and destroy a hostile submarine. The other cutters were assigned to patrol a small sector east of Hatteras minefield. Directed to resume assigned duty the Legare set a course to rendezvous with the Rush off Cape Lookout Shoal and in company with the Jackson the three cutters entered Charleston Harbor on the 23rd. On the 25th the four cutters proceeded to report to Commander, Caribbean Sea Frontier. On the 28th while approaching Miami, the Legare fired four charges on what turned out to be a shoal, and they failed to explode. The Colfax detached to escort a tanker. The other three moored at Key West on the 29th. On June 30, 1942, they were directed to escort the SS Alcoa Patriot to Curaçao and then proceed to Trinidad. On July 3, 1942 the Legare sighted a periscope slightly on the port bow and signalling the convoy to keep clear, the Rush finally made contact dropping two depth charges at 200 feet. A large geyser of oil and air appeared. The convoy arrived at Curaçao on the 6th and ordered to depart next day escorting four vessels to join convoy WAT #1 at rendezvous. On the 10th a depth charge was released on a contact in the rear of the convoy at 2105. On the 11th the convoy dispersed, the Legare standing to Trinidad escorting two vessels with the Jackson and Rush. (The above constitutes all available material on the activities of the CGC Legare in World War II.)


CGC MODOC (WPC-46)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Modoc (WPC-46) was built at Oakland, California in 1921 her permanent station on July 1, 1941 being at Wilmington, N. C. She was 240 feet long, with a 39 foot beam and drew 16 feet 6 inches with a gross tonnage (CH ["Custom House tonnage"]) of 1330 tons, she displaced 1780 tons. She was built of steel, made 16 knots and was powered by a 2600 HP turbine electric engine burning oil.

GREENLAND PATROL
The CGC Modoc reported for duty with the Navy on June 1, 1941, and was designated flagship of the South Greenland Patrol. She returned from Greenland on January 19, 1942, and proceeded to Norfolk Navy Yard for 6 weeks repairs and alterations. On April 1, 1942, she began anti-submarine warfare training at Casco Bay, Maine. She proceeded to Little Placentia Harbor, Newfoundland, on April 18th, in convoy, and began escorting the USS Laramie to Greenland on the 26th. On May 5th she departed Greenland for Casco Bay, escorting the USS Laramie, SS Omaha and SS Azra. Arriving on the 15th, she proceeded next day to a position 70 miles east of Boston to search for a German submarine, sighted in that vicinity. After a 3 hour search without results she proceeded to Boston.

ESCORT DUTY
Leaving Boston on 29 May, 1942, she escorted three vessels to Newfoundland and thence to Greenland. En route she made a contact on her sound apparatus and expended a depth charge. Escorting the SS Dorchester and the Norwegian SS Biscaya to a rendezvous, she turned them over to two destroyers and returned with the Mojave to Newfoundland on the 17th of June. Next day she was off again to Greenland with the Mojave and USS Hobson, escorting two Army transports. On July 2nd, together with the Tampa, she escorted three more vessels to Sydney and on the 6th was on her way to Greenland with three others. En route, a Portuguese fishing schooner was boarded and warned against disclosing movements of

--73--


Allied vessels by radio. She returned to Sydney with two vessels on July 21st and then, with the Tampa and Mohawk, escorted the Norwegian SS Askepot to Greenland. During the rest of 1942 the Modoc was engaged in escorting convoys of from one to ten vessels from Newfoundland to Greenland and return. These trips were uneventful.

1943

SVEND FOYNE RESCUE
Early in January 1943, while searching for survivors of the SS Maiden Creek, the Modoc sighted a lifeboat awash, with a body lashed to it, but could not recover it. Large fields of floe ice were encountered on February 11th and on March 18th, while escorting a convoy to St. John's she changed her course to seek the SS Svend Foyne, who had collided with an iceberg. On the 21st she reached the distressed vessel at 58°35'N, 40°48'W and began picking up survivors. Other survivors were taken over from the CGCs Aivik, Algonquin and Frederick Lee, on the scene, and the Modoc reached St. John's on the 25th with 128 survivors. Due to the deep roll of the Modoc, operating without lights in the middle of the night, the taking on of the half frozen survivors was a difficult feat. Several of her crew distinguished themselves by going down the net and working waist deep in the icy water to haul half numb survivors aboard. One man, Leonard W. Campbell (101-707) CBM, almost lost his life in this rescue work. He and two others--John T. Hendrix (200-373) CEM, and William F. Coultas (251-300) Sea1c, were commended and each of them later received the Navy and Marine Corps Medal. The Svend Foyne finally sank with 24 persons reported trapped aft. When the vessel sank the Modoc and Algonquin searched the position and heard cries for help but could not sight any survivors. Nearly four hours later she took aboard one man who died of heart failure an hour later due to the extreme cold of the water in which he had been immersed for hours. Many of the survivors were Lascars, without identification papers and unable to communicate in English and a competent interpreter could not be found. The 12,795 ton Svend Foyne was a British oil ship, and was in convoy. When she struck the iceberg her port quarter was in bunkers. The impact broke the oil lines to the fireroom and tore a hole in the bilge. She started to abandon ship at 2300 on the 20th, and seven boats and seven rafts were away within 3 hours. The eighth was lowered at 3:45 a.m. Five minutes later the vessel sank suddenly, with one motorboat still in the falls.

ESCORT DUTY
During the rest of 1943 the Modoc was engaged in uneventful convoy escort duty between Boston, Halifax, Argentia and Greenland. Leaving Greenland on 17 December 1943, in company with the Tampa, the Modoc proceeded to search for the survivors of the USAT Nevada. Next day, while approaching the position she sighted the CGCs Storis and Comanche and, a search line was formed with the three cutters, three miles apart. No survivors were found and the search was abandoned on 21 December.

1944

LOCATES HMT STRATHELLA
During 1944 the Modoc was on convoy escort duty between Greenland and North American ports. On 14 February she left Greenland on rescue patrol and located HMT Strathella, in June she proceeded to the Grand Banks to board Portuguese fishing vessels, which she located by radar before sighting them. The rest of the year was spent in convoy escort duty.

1945

ICE PATROL
On the 20th of February, 1945, the Modoc departed convoy in search of a downed plane, but got no trace of it. On the 7th of June she relieved the Mojave on ice patrol duty, the purpose being to maintain a close scrutiny of the ice in the Grand Banks region, guarding the southeastern, southern and southwestern limits of iceberg drift in order that trans-Atlantic and other passing vessels might be informed of the extent of the danger. In November 1945, she went to the assistance of the Chippewa and also assisted RMS Begun on December 19, 1945.

1946

ICE PATROL
The Modoc went to the assistance of the SS Henry Baldwin, in distress, on January 15, 1946. She reported to Boston on the 26th for installation of weather equipment and repairs. On March 26, 1946, she inaugurated the first post-war International Ice Patrol, using radar and LORAN (electronic navigational aid system) for the first time on this patrol. Also for the first time patrol aircraft were used to assist the cutter.


CGC MOHAWK (WPG-78)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

DESCRIPTION
The CGC Mohawk was built by the Pusey and Jones Corporation, Wilmington, Delaware in 1934 at a cost of $499,800. She is 165 feet in length, with a 36 ft. molded beam, and a draft of 13 feet 7 inches. She has a displacement of 1005 tons and a gross tonnage of 716. Her hull is of steel and she has a speed of 13 knots. She is equipped with a 1500 HP geared turbine oil engine. At the beginning of World War II her permanent station was Cape May, New Jersey.

1942

ICE BREAKING
As part of the Greenland Patrol, the Mohawk was standing down the west-coast of Greenland, in Davis Strait on May 1, 1942, en route to Godthaab from Sondre Stromfjord with the CGC Raritan, who had lost her propeller breaking ice in tow. The Mohawk resumed ice breaking operations on the 5th and on the 9th, when she was forced to discontinue because of a bent propeller. She proceeded to Bluie West One at reduced speed, furnishing local weather and ice information to six amphibious planes on patrol en route.

CONVOY TO BOSTON
She departed Bluie West One on June 1, 1942 to rendezvous with the SS Julius Thomsen and escort her to Boston arriving there on the 9th. The trip was uneventful with the exception of expending one depth charge on a sound contact on June 3rd. At Boston Navy Yard the Mohawk underwent extensive alterations .

CONVOY TO GREENLAND
On July 5, 1942, she left the Navy Yard and on the 7th was underway to Casco Bay, Maine. Due to personnel changes while in overhaul status, one fourth of her crew were apprentice seamen (Reserve) without preliminary training. She remained at Casco Eay from

--74--


the 9th to 13th of July during which time evidence of sabotage were found, steel filings having been placed in two Q circuit meters. She got underway on 13 July in company with the North Star, Hydrographer, Driller, and Nanok as a special task group under the command of Lt. Comdr. W. P. Hawley, in the North Star, and proceeded along the coast of Nova Scotia. On the 19th the Hydrographer and Driller left the group for an undisclosed destination. The Mohawk remained at Sydney through July 24, 1942. On the 26th she began escorting the Canadian ice-breaker Maclean to Hudson Straits, in company with the CGC Tampa (Escort Commander), Modoc and SS Askepot. Proceeding by way of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Straits of Belle Isle, the Tampa detached at Belle Isle on the 27th and the Mohawk proceeded to Skov Fjord escorting the Askepot.

CONVOY TO SYDNEY, N.S.
On August 9, 1942, the Mohawk escorted the USAT Chatham and the Panamanian freighter SS Aristides to Ivigtut, in view of the numerous submarine and floating mine reports. On August 16th the Mohawk departed Bluie West One and rendezvoused with a five ship convoy, escorted by the Mojave and Algonquin for Sydney, N.S., where she arrived on August 21, 1942.

USAT CHATHAM, SS ARLYN AND LARAMIE TORPEDOED
The Mohawk departed from Sydney, N.S. as junior escort for Convoy No. 6 to Greenland on August 25, 1942. The convoy was in two groups. One consisting of the USAT Chatham and Mojave, departed the group at Sydney outer buoy and proceeded on the same route at a higher speed. The second group, with the Mohawk and Algonquin as escorts, consisted of the Laramie, SS Biscaya, SS Arlyn, SS Alcoa Guard and SS Harjurand in convoy. At 0900 on August 27, 1942, the Mohawk received a radio message that the USAT Chatham had been mined or torpedoed near the north end of the Belle Isle Straits and at 1600, the Mojave and a corvette loaded with Chatham survivors were sighted south bound. Later at 2133 on the same day, while passing through oil slicks believed to have been from the Chatham at the north end of Belle Isle Straits, a torpedo explosion was heard and a faint white glow was observed in the vicinity of the Laramie's port bow. This was followed by a second explosion and another glow. There was a third explosion a minute later. The Laramie sent up two white rockets and the Mohawk headed in their general direction. Five minutes later the Algonquin' was making a depth charge attack on the starboard quarter of the Laramie, who was at the head and listing to port. At 2232, the Mohawk sighted the Algonquin and two ships standing to the southeast between Cape Norman and Belle Isle. It was decided that the safety of the Laramie took precedence over the investigation of red flares. At this time the sinking of the SS Arlyn was unknown, but it was reasoned that if the red flares were from life boats, the survivors were within five miles of shore. The fact that the submarine had remained in the vicinity after sinking the Chatham in the morning gave rise to the belief that if the Laramie was left unescorted, the submarine might attempt to finish her off, while the Mohawk was engaged in hunting survivors. It was not until 2259 that the Mohawk received the first positive information that the SS Arlyn had been torpedoed. On making contact with the Laramie at 2350, it was learned that she had had an echo bearing 165° T, distant 2000 yards and the Mohawk ran down this bearing, without obtaining a sound contact, and dropped four depth charges from her stern racks as an embarrasing attack in the best estimated position. Three of them failed to explode as they were set too deep for the depth of the water. The Mohawk continued to escort the Laramie until relieved on August 29th off Cap Ray in Cabot Straits by the USS Bristol and then proceeded to Sydney, N.S.

CONVOY TO GREENLAND
The Mohawk stood out of Sydney en route to Greenland via Belle Isle Strait and contacted the SS Harjurand in Henley Harbor, Labrador on September 1, 1942, escorting her to Greenland. She arrived in Greenland on the 6th where the Harjurand was detached to begin salvage work on the SS Montrose.

ASSISTS USAT ARMSTRONG
While moored at Onoto, Greenland, the Mohawk was ordered on the 17th to proceed to the assistance of the USAT Armstrong which was reported leaking badly at an indefinite location some place in the area between Simlutak Island and Julianehaab. She proceeded down Skov Fjord and an hour later sighted the Armstrong close to the beach near the northeast corner of Simlutak Island in position 60°42'N, 46°30'W. Her engines were flooded. Because of the darkness and uncharted and numerous exposed rocks, damage control pumps were placed aboard her by motor launch. A tow line was put aboard her and next morning the Mohawk took her in tow astern and proceeded to Skov Fjord. After clearing the swells, the Mohawk brought her alongside and rigged the wrecking eductor to keep her afloat, as all her pumps were failing. At 1800, the Armstrong was turned over to the Comanche in the vicinity of Narsak and the Mohawk proceeded to join escort of convoy GS-8.

SEARCH FOR SS OZARK
Entering Skov Fjord with convoy GS-8 on October 3, 1942, the Mohawk remained anchored off Onoto, Greenland, until the 14th. On the 15th she escorted two merchant vessels to Bijsed and then anchored off Ivigtut on the 16th. On the 18th she proceeded to assist SS Ozark reported in distress NE of Cape Farewell. She arrived in the vicinity on the 20th and commenced a search which continued until the 23rd. The search was without results and she returned to Kungnat Bay on the 23rd. Next day she was on her way to St. John's, Newfoundland where she arrived on the 28th and escorted two vessels to Argentia.

CONVOY DUTY--RESCUES SURVIVORS
Departing Argentia on November 3, 1942, the Mohawk proceeded to St. John's and began escorting a convoy to Kungnat Bay, Greenland. On the 9th she took over the escort of two vessels unable to keep up with the convoy, but lost contact on the 11th due to a snowstorm. She entered Kungnat Bay on the 12th. Next day she departed escorting a convoy to St. John's where she arrived on the 19th. On the 22nd she was dispatched to search for survivors of the SS Blair Atholl. On the 26th she took on 25 survivors of the SS Barberry and returned with them to St. John's.

ASSISTS SS MALTRAN
The Mohawk departed St. John's with the Algonquin for Greenland on December 2nd and anchored in Kungnat Bay on the 6th. Two days later she departed as a member of Task Unit 24.8.2 escorting convoy GS-15 to St. John's. Due to a heavy snow squall and a moderate gale she lost contact with the convoy on the 10th and, while endeavoring to regain contact under poor visibility conditions, dropped three depth charges as an embarrassing charge on a possible submarine contact on the 13th. After searching the area with negative results the contact was classified as non-sub. Abandoning efforts to regain contact with GS-15 she proceeded to Argentia on the 14th. On the 20th she departed for St. John's. At 2200 she sighted the Travis assisting the SS Maltran. Strong northwest gales were blowing both ships toward the rocky, poorly charted lee shore

--75--


which had no navigational aids. Icing conditions were severe. At 2145 the Travis requested help. Visual signal devices were so iced as to make communication difficult. The Mohawk assumed to take the Maltran in tow, the Travis having parted her hawser and the Maltran drifting rapidly toward shore. The Travis was assigned to anti-submarine sound screen during the assistance operations. After three attempts, a 10-inch manila hawser was finally gotten aboard the Maltran on the 21st. The vessels were now within a mile of the rocky lee shore, with numerous uncharted reefs and rocks. By 0527, she had towed the Maltran well clear of all immediate danger and about 5 miles from shore. In attempting to place the chafing gear on the hawser it had to be cut to save the arm of the Chief Boatswain Mate which became jammed and the Maltran cut her end to keep it from fouling her propeller. The USS Junalaska now took the Maltran in tow, while the Mohawk maintained an anti-sub screen with the Travis, until the Maltran was safely within the swept channel of Argentia.

1943

CONVOY TO GREENLAND AND RETURN--SEARCHES FOR NATSEK AND YMS-25
Arriving at St. John's, the Mohawk departed on December 23rd as a member of Task Unit 24.8.2 escorting convoy SG-16, consisting of the SS Aragon to Greenland. Arriving at Skov Fjord on the 28th, she departed on the 29th with the Algonquin and Sandpiper to escort the Laramie to Ivigtut. Later encountering the Laramie in Arsuk Fjord, she learned that the vessel was bound for Kungnat Bay whence the Mohawk escorted her. The Mohawk stood out of Kungnat Bay on the 29th escorting the convoy GS-17, consisting of the SS Norlago to St. John's. On January 2nd to 4th, 1943, having lost contact with the convoy due to poor visibility and high winds, she was assigned to search for the Natsek but abandoned search on the 5th and moored at St. John's. Proceeding to Argentia on the 6th she remained there until the 13th, when, while en route to St. John's the Mohawk intercepted a call from the YMS-25 and proceeded to her assistance. She continued to search for the YMS-25 in the vicinity of entrance to Placentia Bay until she was Informed that the Faunce was in contact with the YMS-25, whereupon she returned to Argentia.

CONVOY TO GREENLAND AND RETURN--IN ICE FIELDS
On January 15, 1943, the Mohawk departed Argentia, in company with the Mojave, escorting the SS Sapelo to St. John's. On the 18th she departed St. John's as a member of Task Unit 24.8.2 escorting convoy SG-18 to Greenland. She delivered the convoy at Bluie West One on the 24th. She then escorted the SS Rocha to Kungnat Bay. Here with the Storis she joined the Task Unit which departed on the 28th escorting GS-18. The Mohawk lost contact with the convoy on the 29th due to snow squalls and mountainous seas, and on the 30th a huge comber broke over the bridge, smashing the motor launch and partially flooding compartments through the ventilator system. On February 1st, still trying to regain contact, the Mohawk entered a wide area of ice field off the Newfoundland coast. After traversing this field, which was 70 miles wide, she was ordered to proceed to Argentia. On the 3rd she departed Argentia escorting the Travis, Arvek and Albatross to Boston. On the 4th she entered an ice field in the vicinity of Ataman Bank clearing it on the 5th. Contact could not be regained by scouting and a rendezvous at Sambro Lightship was arranged for 1400 on the 6th, when all vessels met and proceeded, the Mohawk maintaining the anti-sub screen. Visual contact was again lost on the 7th but radio contact was maintained and the Mohawk arrived at Boston an the 8th, with the other three arriving an hour later. The Mohawk departed Boston on the 10th arriving at Curtis Bay, Coast Guard Yard on the 14th for two weeks of overhaul.

SOB CONTACTS EN ROUTE ARGENTIA
Departing Coast Guard Yard on February 14, 1943 the Mohawk arrived at Boston on February 16th and departed on the 20th for Argentia. En route on the 21st aha sighted, at 0045, , an object believed to be a submarine on the surface, about 1800 yards on the port bow. The sighting was confirmed by a Q.C. contact. The sighting and contact were lost at 1500 yards and an attempt to regain contact by searching the area was unsuccessful. It was believed that the sub moved out of range on the surface. At 1510 she obtained another sound contact and expended three depth charges in what was later analyzed as a doubtful submarine attack. At 1750 a third contact was attacked and 16 anti-sub MX 20 mouse trap charges were expended in two attacks. This contact was later analyzed as also doubtful. The Mohawk discontinued further search and moored at Argentia on the 24th.

CONVOY TO GREENLAND AND RETURN
On March 30, 1943, the Mohawk departed Argentia en route Greenland, with the Escanaba and Nanok and arrived at Onoto on the 6th. Proceeding to Kungnat Bay she patrolled the entrance to Arsuk Fjord until the 15th and then left Kungnat Bay an the 16th as escort to convoy GS-22 to St. John's. En route she dropped three charge patterns on sound contacts. She arrived at St. John's on the 21st and proceeded to Argentia next day. She returned to St. John's on April 30, 1943.

CONVOY TO GREENLAND AND RETURN
On May 1, 1943 the Mohawk departed St. John's for Base One, Greenland and moored there on the 7th. She patrolled the entrance to Arsuk Fjord until the 14th. On the 20th she was underway with the Northland, Tahoma and 4 other vessels to St. John's as convoy GS-23, arriving on the 26th. On the 29th she was en route Boston, arriving on the 31st.

ATTACKS SUBS--ASSISTS USS ALBATROSS
On June 10, 1943, the Mohawk began escorting the USS Pontiac to Argentia in company with the Modoc, Tahoma and SC-704. On the 16th she made a Q.C. contact and dropped a pattern of 8 depth charges. She arrived at Argentia on the 19th. Departing the same day for St. John's she dropped nine charges on a Q.C. contact. She departed St. John's on the 22nd escorting the convoy SG-26 to Greenland, arriving on the 29th. She proceeded immediately to assist the USS Albatross reported aground at the western entrance of Arsuk Fjord. On arrival, the vessel had already floated and the Mohawk escorted her to Base One. On July 1, 1943 she departed Gronne Dal for Argentia escorting convoy GS-25 to Argentia. She arrived at St. John's on the 5th.

ASSISTS USAT FAIRFAX
The Mohawk departed St. John's for Gronne Dal again USAT Fairfax who was aground. The vessel was floated with the Mohawk and Tahoma pulling bow and stern. On the 22nd the Mohawk departed for Hudson Straits and Argentia, escorting convoy GS-26. On the 24th five vessels detached for Hudson Straits and on the 27th another

--76--


detached for Botwood, N.F. The remainder arrived at Argentia on the 31st. The Mohawk arrived at Sydney, N.S. on August 1, 1943. She proceeded to St. John's on the 5th. On the 7th she departed for Argentia for repairs.

CONVOY TO GREENLAND AND RETURN
On August 9, 1943, the Mohawk departed Argentia for St. John's, Hudson Straits and Greenland escorting convoy SG-29 in company with seven other escorts. Sir ships departed on the 18th for Hudson Straits. On the 20th she dropped one embarrassing charge on a doubtful contact thought to have resulted from water currents and temperature conditions. On the 21st she screened the entrance to Skovfjord as the convoy entered and then departed for Kungnat Bay. On the 24th she departed Kungnat Bay for St. John's escorting convoy GS-27 and arrived there on the 30th. She departed for Boston on the same day, arriving there on September 1st for a 20 day availability. On the 23rd she stood out for Casco Bay and then departed for St. John's mooring there an September 28, 1943.

DEPTH CHARGES SUB CONTACTS
The Mohawk departed St. John's on October 1, 1943, escorting the SG-31, in company with the Mojave. She moored at Gronne Dal on the 5th. On the 7th she departed with the Mojave as escort commander for convoy GS-33, consisting of six vessels. At 1525 she dropped two embarrassing charges and at 2020 two more on a radar contact that was then lost. On the 8th a pattern of seven charges was dropped on a sound contact with no apparent results. On the 11th two of the convoy detached for Botwood, N.F. and the Mojave detached for St. John's. The Mohawk continued to Argentia, An embarrassing charge was dropped on a contact en route. She moored on the 13th.

CONVOY TO GREENLAND AND RETURN
On the 17th of October, 1943 the Mohawk departed Argentia for Narsarssuak, Greenland, and moored there on the 21st. On the 22nd she escorted the SS Nevada and Alcoa Guard to Kungnat Bay and departed for St. John's on the 25th in company with 7 other vessels as escorts to convoy GS-34, which consisted of 15 vessels. On the 28th she detached from the convoy as escort of three vessels for Botwood. En route she obtained a sound contact at 4000 yards and dropped nine depth charges. A second bank of eight projectiles followed the first after which the contact was lost from concussion. She moored at Argentia on the 31st. On November 1st she departed Argentia for Boston with seven other vessels ss escorts for 12 vessels. Arriving at Boston on the 5th the Mohawk had a three day availability.

TO GREENLAND AND RETURN
On November 9th, 1943, the Mohawk in company with the Mojave and Tampa, began escorting convoy HX-82 to Halifax. Arrived in Argentia on the 13th she departed the same day, with the Mojave and Modoc and moored at Gronne Dal on the 17th. On the 19th she proceeded out of Arsuk Fjord as escort of convoy GS-36 to St. John's, with five ether escorts and five convoyed vessels. They arrived at St. John's on November 24th, and the Mohawk with three other escorts continued to escort the convoy to Boston. Arriving at Boston on December 1, 1943, she underwent availability for repairs and on the 26th departed for Casco Bay, Maine, for training exercises.

1944

GREENLAND CONVOY ESCORT
0n January 8, 1944, the Mohawk in company with the CGC Laurel was en route Argentia. The Laurel proceeded independently on the 9th and the Mohawk arrived at Halifax on the 10th. Underway on the 12th she rendezvoused with convoy HX-91 and the same day detached as an escort of the USS Laramie to Stephenville, N.F. On the 19th she returned to Argentia with the Laramie, and sailed same day for Greenland, stopping over at St. John's on the 20th for repairs. She entered Skov Fjord on the 24th, proceeding to Narsarssuak next day. On the 28th she began escorting convoy GS-41 in company with the CGC Storis to Argentia and moored there on February 2, 1944.

ASSISTS HMT STRATHELLA
On February 5, 1944, she set forth again for Greenland, escorting convoy SG-38, in company with the Tampa and Modoc. On the 9th she stood by in ice at the entrance to Skovfjord and remained there until the 11th, when she proceeded to Gronne Dal and Narsarssuak. On the 13th she got underway on rescue patrol and next day located, in company with the Modoc, HMT Strathella, who was in distress. The Mohawk took the Strathella in tow next day and moored with her at Narsarssuak on the 18th. Then she broke ice and patrolled Skov Fjord until the 24th. She returned to Gronne Dal on the 26th. On the 24th she began escorting convoy GS-42, with the Tampa and Modoc to Argentia, where aha arrived on March 3, 1944. Getting underway for Boston on the 6th she arrived there on the 9th and underwent repairs until the 24th.

DEPTH CHARGES SUB CONTACTS
The Mohawk got underway out of Boston on March 25, 1944 an route Argentia in company with the USS Laramie, CGC Tahoma and USS Saucy. On the 28th she fired a six charge pattern of depth charges at a contact, later assessed as doubtful and moored at Argentia on the 29th. Next day she was underway, with the Tahoma, escorting convoy SG-40 to Greenland. On April 3, 1944, she dropped two standard patterns of nine charges on sound contacts that were believed to be good. There was no positive evidence of sinking, however, and the Mohawk resumed her station with the convoy. She arrived at Gronne Dal with the convoy on the 7th and on the 11th escorted the Laraamie to Narsarssuak. On the 22nd she stood out escorting convoy GS-43 to argentia, with the Comanche, arriving there on April 30, 1944.

WEATHER PATROL
The Mohawk remained at Argentia until May 6, 1944, when she stood out in company with the Tampa, Saucy and Tenacity escorting the five vessel convoy SG-41 te Greenland. She detached with the SS Rocha for Brede Fjord on the 11th arriving at Narsarssuak next day. On the 16th she stood out to escort the Rocha to Gronne Dal. Returning to Narsarssuak on the 18th, she departed for weather Station "CHARLIE" on May 22nd and patrolled this station until relieved by the Tenacity on the 30th. Mooring at Gronne Dal until jane 2, 1944, she relieved weather Station "CHARLIE" again on the 4th. She patrolled the weather station until the 7th and returned to Gronne Dal on the 12th. Again on the 17th she patrolled weather station "CHARLIE" for three days. Based at Gronne Dal, she patrolled weather station "CHARLIE" from July 8th to 12th, from July 15th to 20th, and from July 28th to 31st. When relieved on August 1, 1944, she proceeded to Reykjavik, Iceland, but departed for weather station "CHARLIE" again on August 8, 1944, and after a three day patrol moored at Narsarssuak. She was again on weather station from the 21st

--77--


COAST GUARD CUTTER MOHAWK
COAST GUARD CUTTER MOHAWK

SURROUNDED BY VAST FIELDS OF FLOATING ICE THE COAST GUARD COMBAT CUTTER <i>MOJAVE</i> FEELS ITS WAY TOWARD AN OBjECTIVE IN THE FAR NORTH
SURROUNDED BY VAST FIELDS OF FLOATING ICE THE COAST GUARD COMBAT CUTTER MOJAVE FEELS ITS WAY TOWARD AN OBjECTIVE IN THE FAR NORTH

--78--


to the 26th of August, 1944.

RETURN TO BOSTON
Arriving at Narsarssuak on September 4, 1944, the Mohawk departed on the 8th, taking HMT Strathella in tow for St. John's, N.F. She arrived there on the 12th and on the 14th stood out of St. John's escorting SS Biscaya. She moored at Atlantic Works, East Boston on the 19th to undergo repairs. On October 20th she departed for Portland, Maine, where she underwent drills and practice at Casco Bay, departing for Argentia on the 27th.

ICE BREAKING--GREENLAND
The Mohawk moored at Argentia until November 2, 1944, and then got underway for St. John's. En route she boarded the Spanish fishing vessel Cierzo. Arriving at St. John's on the 4th, she departed for Narsarssuak on the 5th, escorting the SS Garnes and SS Linda. Reaching her destination on the 13th, she broke ice on the 15th and 16th and proceeded to Frederieksdal on the 19th. Returning to Narsarssuak, she was underway on the 25th, escorting the SS Fairfax through the ice. She moored at Reykjavik, Iceland, on the 29th.

WEATHER PATROL--SUB CONTACT--STRIKES GROWLER
On December 1, 1944, the Mohawk proceeded to Weather Station No. 7 and patrolled it until December 8th when she was relieved by USS Saucy and proceeded to Reykjavik. En route she had a sound contact at a range of 2500 yards. She dropped an eight charge pattern and regaining contact, proceeded on attack course. Then she lost contact but continued the search. The contact was classified.non-sub. She proceeded out of Reykjavik for Gronne Dal on the 14th, mooring there on the 18th. On the same day she proceeded to the assistance of the Evergreen. Assistance proved unnecessary next day. On December 20, 1944, the Mohawk struck a large growler, which hit the ship 5 feet below the waterline on the port side, centered at No. 1 and No. 2 magazines. The ship took about 100 gallons of water per hour in the magazines, which, however, could be controlled. About 18 plates were damaged and port frames from Nos. 16 and 22 were buckled. The Mohawk remained moored at Gronne Dal where temporary repairs were made.

1945

RETURN TO BOSTON
The Mohawk departed Gronne Dal in company with the Algonquin and Evergreen on January 30, 1945, and arriving at Argentia on February 2nd, was on availability until the 7th when she proceeded to Boston, arriving on February 11th. After an availability there until the 29th she proceeded to the Casco Bay Training Area until March 8, 1945, returning to Boston next day.

TO GREENLAND AND WEATHER PATROL
She left Boston and arrived at Argentia on March 14, 1945, escorting a convoy from there to Gronne Dal, Greenland, where she arrived March 20th. Shortly afterward 3he departed Gronne Dal to patrol an area in which a submarine was suspected. She returned to Gronne Dal on the 31st and left the same day as escort to convoy GS-65, detaching to patrol Weather Station No. 6 until April 8, 1945, when she returned to Gronne Dal. She was again patrolling Weather Station No. 6 from April 21st to 26th. Between June 3rd and 14th she patrolled Weather Station No. 1. On July 21st she was at Narsarssuak, at Kungnat Bay on the 28th and Gronne Dal on August 4th . From August 18th to 23rd she was on Air-Sea Rescue Station off Skov Fjord, returning to Narsarssuak to remain until her departure for Argentia late in September, 1945.

1946

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The Mohawk arrived at Argentia on October 4, 1945, at Boston on October 7th, and at Curtis Bay on October 9th for availability until November, 1945. She was stationed at Cape Cay, N.J. from November 25th until January 5th, 1946, when she proceeded to New York on special duty. She returned to Cape May on February 19, 1946, for salvage work on an 83 footer beached at Atlantic City, and then proceeded to Berkeley, Virginia, on March 7th. On April 4th she arrived at Cape May from Norfolk with a fishing vessel in tow, and on April 6th, 1946, was ordered to be placed in reserve in commission, with a skeleton force, at Cape May, New Jersey. She was still in this status on May 15, 1947.


CGC MOJAVE (WPG-47)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Mojave was built at Oakland, California, in 1921, and on July 1, 1941, her permanent station was Miami, Florida. She is 240 feet long with 39 foot beam and drew 16 feet, 6 inches of water. With a gross tonnage C.H. of 1330 she displaces 1780 tons, has a steel hull and does 16 knots. Powered with a 2600 HP turbine electric motor she burns oil. She was a sister ship of the Haida, Modoc and Tampa.

ESCORT DUTY
On May 9, 1942, the Mojave departed Casco Bay, Maine, escorting the SS Brush and SS Biscaya to Greenland. On the 10th she made a sound contact and released one depth charge from the rack and fired two charges from "K" guns. Several minutes later she released another charge and fired three more from "K" guns. The results were negative. Picking up another vessel at Argentia, the SS Bencas on the 14th, she proceeded to her destination through heavy fog through which she held the convoy together with difficulty. She reached Ivigtut, Greenland on the 19th, however, without incident. Here she relieved the Comanche of defense of the cryolite mine until the 10th of June, 1942. Departing Kungnat Bay on June 13, 1942, in company with the Modoc, she escorted a three vessel convoy westward being relieved of the escort at 47°10'N, 58°30'W, and then proceeding to Argentia. On June 18, 1942, she departed Argentia with the Modoc and USS Hobson escorting two Army transports to Greenland, with air escort most of the way. Course was changed on the 18th because of a submarine reported sighted 70 miles eastward. On the 20th heavy ice and dense fog were encountered as she neared the Greenland coast. Finding Brede Fjord too hazardous in the fog she cruised off the entrance until daylight before entering.

PLANE BEACON
On June 21, 1942, the Mojave proceeded to Bluie West One in Skov Fjord to act as radio and visual beacon, and relay station when necessary, in connection with a BOLERO movement of ferry planes passing over on their way to Europe. She maintained this station until the 25th when she was relieved by the Comanche. She then proceeded seaward at 0104 to point her searchlights toward the ship

--79--


and assist a plane reported lost to locate itself, but nothing was heard or seen because of the thick fog. On entering Brede Fjord 6 hours later, however, she learned that survivors of the lost plane had been picked up by the Bear. On July 2, 1942, she again assumed the defense of the cryolite mine at Ivigtut maintaining full watches until July 6th when she anchored in Kungnat Bay.

ESCORT DUTY
Underway out of Kungnat Bay on July 9, 1942, in company with the Algonquin, she escorted a two ship convoy to Sydney, N.S. via Belle Isle Straits and the St. Lawrence. On the 11th while proceeding through the Gulf of St. Lawrence a mine sweeper signalled that a submarine periscope had been sighted an hour before in that vicinity, but the convoy arrived safely in Sydney the same day. On July 22, 1942, while escorting convoy SG-2 a five vessel convoy, in company with the Algonquin to Greenland via Belle Isle Straits, she made a sound contact at 2045 at 1500 yards. She made two attacks with "K" guns, with six charges in the first barrage and four in the second, one charge failing to explode. The results were negative and the contact doubtful. The Algonquin dropped one charge and after the Mojave had searched the area for 30 minutes she rejoined the convoy. Later two of the convoy, the SS Ann Skakel and the SS Iris went aground on the shoals at Bluie West One due to inadequate charts. Both got off, the Skakel under her own power and. the Iris being towed by the Algonquin. The convoy finally arrived at Bluie West One on the 22nd.

MORE ESCORT DUTY
On July 26, 1942, the Mojave left Kungnat Bay with the Algonquin for Sydney, N.S., escorting two vessels, one of which was lost to sight on the 27th. The Mojave lost contact with the convoy on the 29th for five hours because of the heavy fog but arrived at Sydney on the 31st without further incident, escorting only the one vessel, the other arriving next day. On August 5, 1942, the Mojave departed Sydney with six other escorts and four vessels for Greenland with the flag in the Mojave. On the 8th she delivered the USS Munargo along the Labrador coast to contact the Bear which continued with the Mojave to escort the vessel to 60° 01'N, 60°05'W while the rest of the convoy proceeded to Greenland. Proceeding northward, contact with the Munargo was lost in a heavy fog. At 0903 on the 8th a sound contact was established and a barrage of seven charges fired, followed by a second barrage of four. The contact was not reestablished. The Munargo continuing toward destination during the attack and the Mojave proceeding to Greenland moored at Base One on the 10th.

CHATHAM TORPEDOED
The Mojave began escorting a five vessel convoy to Sydney on August 15, 1942, as senior escort along with the Algonquin and Mohawk running down the center of the East Greenland current in the ice and fog area oh the first leg of the course, where mines had been most often found, but arriving at Sydney on the 21st without incident. On August 27, 1942, she was underway out of Sydney in company with the Algonquin and Mohawk and six convoyed vessels, the Mojave escorting the Chatham. On August 27, 1942, the Chatham was torpedoed at 0846 in position 51°50'15" N, 55°45'30" W and sank 25 minutes later. The Mojave could make no underwater sound contact, though she circled the starboard side of the Chatham at full speed and commenced searching on spiral courses. She searched the whole area between Cape Norman, Belle Isle, and the Labrador coast with no results and at 1115 began picking up survivors of the Chatham, assisted by the corvette K-174. The corvette made a contact at 1508 and the Mojave joined in the search but made no contact. She picked up the last survivors at 1430 and continued searching until 1700. Seven boats and five rafts containing 293 survivors wars picked up by the Mojave and one boat and six rafts by the K-174. Two boats and one motor launch were landed on the Labrador coast but not located. The Mojave arrived at Sydney on August 29; 1942 and departed same day for Belle Isle Straits to search for and pick up additional survivors of the Chatham as wall as those of the SS Arlyn and Laramie reported ashore there. No survivors were found there but on arriving at Henley Harbor at 0922, 140 survivors of the 3 vessels were picked up from the SS Harjurand, anchored in Temple Bay, and while proceeding to Battle Harbor for more she was ordered back to Sydney.

ATTACK ON AMAROK
On September 2, 1942, the Mojave was underway out of Sydney escorting the USS Amarok to Greenland by way of Hamilton Inlet, both vessels pursuing a zigzag course because of reported submarines. At daylight on the 5th the Amarok was sighted several miles astern and at 0520 began calling for assistance, firing her "K" guns at 0525. The Mojave proceeded to her assistance while she continued to fire 5 depth charges, her 20mm machine guns and signal flares. Swinging in behind her, the Mojave could make no underwater contact. The Amarok reported sighting a submarine in position 50°15'N, 57°31'W. She was detached on the 5th off the entrance of Hamilton Inlet to continue to destination unescorted while the Mojave proceeded to Greenland, arriving on September 7, 1942. Here she remained moored at Onoto with the exception of short and uneventful trips until September 24, 1942.

ATTACKS CONTACT
On September 25, 1942, in company with the Algonquin, the Mojave departed Kungnat Bay en route Sydney, escorting the SS Pegasus. An underwater sound, at 0912 on October 1, 1942, developed to be negative. At 1355 she sighted an oil slick and while investigating made an underwater sound contact. She made a depth charge attack dropping a pattern of six charges in position 46°37'N, 50°30'W and having then searched the area for a hour, without making further contact, rejoined the convoy. She arrived at Sydney, N.S. the same night at 2106.

ESCORT DUTY
Departing Sydney on October 6, 1942, she stood out for practice with the Algonquin, Comanche and Tahoma returning at 1730. Then on the 7th she departed escorting 3G-10, a nine vessel convoy, with six escorts, proceeding toward Greenland with air escort. A contact on the 10th proved negative. On the 14th two escorts detached with four vessels for Onoto while the rest continued toward Kungnat Bay. Two convoyed vessels failed to continue with the convoy but turned NW to Base 8. The Mojave le ft convoy near Umanak Island and proceeded on October 15, 1942 to try to overtake them but arrived at the limit of the assigned escort area at 0418 without sighting them and returned to Kungnat Bay. She departed same day with three vessels and 2 CGC's as escort, for Hudson Strait, returning on 16th. On the 18th she departed Kungnat Bay escorting convoy GS-11, consisting of 4 merchant vessels and 3 Coast Guard cutters en route St. John's. On the 21st she depth charged a contact at 50°23'N, 53°19'W, as a ship in the convoy signalled sighting a submarine at 2048. The Mojave discovered that the Oneida had suffered engine room casualties because of depth charge explosions and, believing herself attacked, bad given the alarm.

--80--


She entered St. John's on October 22, 1942, and proceeded to Argentia and thence to Boston, escorting USS Mattole, arriving on the 2bth and remaining for overhaul until November 22, 1942.

ESCORT DUTY
Departing Boston November 22, 1942, she proceeded to St. John's via Argentia, and on November 30, 1942 began escorting two merchant vessels to Greenland. Air escort was had on December 1st and 2nd amid snow squalls and low visibility. En route she lost sight of the Biscaya intermittently and arrived at Base One on the 5th, the Biscaya arriving 4 hours later. On the 8th she escorted the SS Alcoa Scout to join a convoy from Kungnat Bay. En route she had a doubtful contact and on the 9th joined the 7 vessel convoy with two other escorts. Lost sight of the convoy at various intervals. On the 12th two convoy vessels departed for Botwood and the rest arrived off St. John's on the 13th. The Mojave arrived off St. John's on the 13th. The cutter arrived at Argentia same day. On the 22nd she proceeded to St. John's to join the one vessel convoy SG-16 with two other escorts, losing sight of convoy at intervals in the fog but arriving at Base One on the 27th without incident. On the 29th she proceeded to Base Seven arriving at Kungnat Bay at 2330. On the 30th she stood out with the Algonquin and Mohawk escorting convoy GS-17, consisting of the Norlago for St. Johns, losing sight of the vessels intermittently because of poor visibility and on arriving at St. John's on January 5, 1943 finding the Mohawk already there, the Norlago arriving in the evening.

1943

ESCORT DUTY
On January 6, 1943, the Mojave departed for Argentia where she remained moored for repairs to her radar until the 13th, when she was ordered to go to the assistance of the YMS-25 in distress at 40°45'N, 54°20'W. The Mojave arrived at the position at 0400 on the 14th and fired one star shell without sighting the vessel which was already proceeding toward Argentia. On the 15th she began escorting with the Mohawk the USS Sapelo to St. John's, losing visual contact with the convoy but keeping contact by radar and arriving at St. John's on the 16th. On the 18th she departed St. John's escorting the 4 ship convoy GS-18, with the Mohawk to Greenland. On the 19th the SS Pillory dropped behind because of loss of steam and after rejoining momentarily was again lost to sight. She was not sighted on the 20th amid gale winds and snow squalls, the convoy detouring a suspected sub concentration area on the 21st. "Storis" ice in narrow fields was encountered 20 to 35 miles off the Greenland coast on the 24th, the Mojave arriving at Base One at 1530 and departing for Base Seven with the SS Rocha on the 25th. As she departed she sighted the Pillory standing up Base One Fjord. The Mohawk joined and many scattered growlers were encountered between Base One Fjord and Cape Thorvaldson. They arrived at Kungnat Bay on the 26th.

MORE ESCORT DUTY
On January 28, 1943, the Mojave departed to join a 5 vessel convoy GS-19, with the Mohawk, the Storis joining at 2350. Several vessels were lost sight of on the 29th and 30th and did not rejoin until the 31st. On February 1, 1943, she encountered an intensive ice area and arrived at St. John's on the 2nd, continuing to Argentia with the Storis, where various practice exercises were held until the 9th. On that day she proceeded to St. John's with the Storis and next day began escorting SG-20, SS Julius Thomsen, with Modoc and Storis, for Greenland. Encountered ice on the 11th and intermittent snow squalls on 13th and 14th. While proceeding toward Julianehaab on the 15th at slow speed, because of strong winds and heavy seas, she heaved to at 1740. Lost contact with convoy on 16th, because of radar failure and later joined the others entering Julianehaab Fjord. She departed on the 17th for Base One with the Modoc. On the 19th she was en route Kungnat Bay with Modoc and USS Sandpiper, escorting Nevada and Pillory. The Sandpiper and Pillory returned to Base One because of Pillory's engine trouble. The Mojave arrived on the 20th and on the 21st Sandpiper and Pillory arrived and continued to Base Seven, the Mojave patrolling entrance to Arsuk Fjord on the 22nd.

CONTINUES ESCORT DUTY
On February 20, 1943, the Mojave stood cut of Arsuk Fjord and joined the eleven vessel convoy GS-20 with four other escorts proceeding to St. John's. Encountering snow and low visibility each day until the 27th, the convoy was forced to heave to and change to a southwest course. It was impossible to keep track of all vessels in the convoy and on the 28th two convoy vessels and five escorts were missing. One joined at 0745 and the Modoc detached to locate the others. The Mojave departed off St. John's and proceeded toward Argentia, thence, escorting the USS Pontiac to Boston where she arrived on March 4, 1943, for overhaul until March 13, 1943. After seven days of practice at Casco Bay, she was underway for St. John's with the Modoc and Storis. On April 3, 1943, she began escorting the SS Fairfax with the Storis, Escanaba and Modoc to Greenland entering Base One Fjord on the 9th. On the 14th escorted Fairfax to Kungnat Bay with 3 other Coast Guard cutters in company. On April 16, 1943, the four vessel convoy GS-22 departed Kungnat Bay with the Mojave and 4 other escorts, arriving St. John's on the 21st. Stopping at Argentia she proceeded on the 24th with the Tampa for Portland, Maine, arriving on the 27th. On the 29th began escorting, with Tampa and Comanche, two tugs towing two sections of floating drydock YF-25 to Argentia arriving on May 3, 1943. On the 5th she began escorting the SS Yarmouth, with Modoc and Tampa in company, to Greenland. The Tampa dropped two charges on an underwater contact en route and they entered Brede Fjord on the 11th, proceeding to Kungnat Bay with the same convoy on the 17th. On the 19th the same group was en route Argentia anchoring there an the 23rd. Dropping the Modoc and Yarmouth at Halifax on the 26th she returned to St. John's with the Tampa and on May 29, 1943, was underway escorting the Fairfax to Greenland along with the Algonquin. They anchored in Kungnat Bay on June 2, 1943, because of heavy "storis" ice, arriving at Base One on the 4th. On June 11th the Army reported that a dock sentry had sighted a periscope south of the main dock.

ESCANABA TORPEDOED
The Mojave in company with the Tampa and Escanaba, and escorting the Laramie, Fairfax and Raritan got underway for St. John's on June 11, 1943 at 2145. At 0510 on June 13, 1943, the Escanaba was torpedoed and sank at 0513. The Raritan picked up two survivors and one body while the Storis searched the area for the submarine with negative results. The convoy proceeded direct to Argentia arriving on the 17th and on the 20th arrived at Halifax. Arrived at Boston on the 21st undergoing repairs and alterations until July 3, 1947.

ESCORT DUTY
Standing out of Boston on July 3, 1943, the Mojave with two Canadian escorts accompanied the 32 vessel convoy HX-61 to Halifax and then joined convoy HJ-60 to St. John's arriving on the 10th. On the 15th began escorting convoy SG-28 to Base Seven, Greenland, with six other escorts, proceeding to Kungnat

--81--


Bay on the 20th. Next day joined 5 vessel convoy GS-26 to St. John's with six other escorts, three vessels and four escorts detaching on the 24th for Fort Chino, Canadian Arctic. On the 27th another vessel detached for Botwood arriving on the 28th and Argentia on the 29th.

TO GREENLAND AND RETURN
The Mojave proceeded to St. John's on August 5, 1943, and on the 12th joined other escorts of convoy SG-29 part of which was bound for Hudson Bay and part for Greenland, dividing into the two groups on the 18th at point "N". The Mojave continued to escort the Greenland group to Kungnat Bay, arriving on the 21st. On the 24th she proceeded to St. John's as part of convoy GS-27 arriving on the 29th and going on to Boston via Argentia, mooring there on September 2, 1942.

ATTACKS SUBMARINE
Standing out of Boston on September 3, 1943, to escort convoy Green #27, the Mojave had a sound contact at 1543 on the 4th at 600 yards, on which she made an attack run and dropped a regular pattern of depth charges. Seven minutes later 3he made a second attack after regaining contact and dropped a second pattern, the explosion of which caused failure of her steering engine and Q.C. equipment. At 1640 wooden boxes, a life jacket and miscellaneous debris were floating in the depth charged area. The Mojave moored at Argentia on the 7th.

ESCORT DUTY
On the 13th she began escorting a vessel to rendezvous with convoy ON-2 and then picked up another escorting her to Argentia, arriving on the 14th. She departed for St. John's on the 28th and on October 1, 1943, departed there escorting three vessels in company with the Mohawk for Base Seven, Greenland. The Mojave detached en route for Kungnat Bay, proceeding to Gronne Dal on the 6th. On the 7th she departed to join convoy GS-33 for Botwood and St. John's. A sound contact was attacked with 7 charges on the 9th, but lost after second contact. On the 12th arrived St. John's . On 13th began escorting convoy SG-31, mooring at Base One, Greenland on the 16th, continued with Greenland Convoy 17 to Base Eight on 17th, mooring on the 20th, returning with same convoy to Base One same day. Dropped one charge on a doubtful contact on the 22nd. On the 25th began escorting a 16 ship convoy GS-34 for Argentia with seven other escorts, mooring there on the 31st. On November 2, 1943, began escorting convoy "Argentia 3" to Boston, dropping one depth charge on a doubtful contact on the 3rd and mooring at Boston on the 5th. Departed Boston on the 9th escorting convoy HX-82 which arrived at Halifax on the 11th, joining another one vessel convoy with two other escorts, to Argentia arriving on the 13th. On same day departed with two other escorts for Greenland entering Arsuk Fjord and mooring at Gronne Dal on the 17th. On the 19th began escorting convoy GS-36 to St. John's arriving on the 24th and on the 27th proceeded to Boston escorting a special convoy mooring on December 1st for 30 days availability.

1944

BACK TO ESCORTING AFTER OVERHAUL
The Mojave proceeded to Curtis Bay, Maryland, on January 1, 1944, and remained there undergoing repairs until March 3, 1944. She proceeded to Boston and to Casco Bay, Maine, returning to Boston on the 13th. She was underway same day for Argentia escorting two vessels arriving on the 17th. On the 20th she returned to Boston escorting three vessels, departing for Casco Bay, Maine on the 25th for exercises until April 2, 1944. Proceeding to Argentia she returned to Boston on April 8, 1944, and departed for Greenland on the 10th. Heaving to in the icefields on the 17th she proceeded slowly to Gronne Dal on the 18th. On the 23rd she joined a convoy for Argentia arriving there May 1, 1944, and on the 3rd departed with two other escorts, and a 4 ship convoy for Boston, mooring on the 7th. Here she underwent repairs until June 10th when she departed as escort to Argentia for two vessel convoy BG-10 with two other escorts. She left Argentia on the 15th for Base One, Greenland, escorting same convoy arriving on the 7th and proceeding to Base Seven on the 24th to remain there until July 8, 1944. On that day she proceeded to Base One with three vessels but had to be towed in because of generator trouble. She remained at Gronne Dal until August 24, 1944, when she departed for Argentia, escorting convoy GS-51, proceeding to Boston where she arrived September 1, 1944. Here she remained in repair status until September 29, 1944, and after a week at training exercises in Casco Bay returned to Boston October 6, 1944.

WEATHER PATROL
She departed Boston October 9, 1944, in company with two other escorts for Greenland arriving at Base One on October 16, 1944. On the 19th she departed for weather patrol, station "ABLE" for six days. On the 27th she was underway westward with convoy GS-55, arriving at Boston November 4, 1944. On the 9th she left Boston for Gronne Dal, arriving there on the 15th. On the 24th she began escorting convoy GS-60 for Boston, arriving December 2, 1944. On the 4th she began escorting a vessel to St. John's arriving on the 9th and getting under way same day for Greenland. Arriving on December 13, 1944, she began escorting convoy GS-61 for St. John's same day, arriving on the 18th. She arrived on December 23, 1944, and remained there until the 31st, when she departed for Greenland escorting convoy Blue-77.

1945

ESCORT DUTY
On January 2, 1S45, the Mojave detached from the convoy and proceeded independently for Gronne Dal, Greenland, where she remained until the 10th. On the 11th she departed with convoy GS-62 for Charlestown where she moored on the 18th and remained on availability until February 23, 1945. She then proceeded to Casco Bay for training exercises until March 9, 1945, when she returned to Boston. On March 10, 1945, she was underway to Greenland, via Argentia and St. John's and in company with four other escorts from St. John's. She moored at Base One, Greenland, on March 25, 1945, and on the 31st got underway for Argentia, with three other escorts with convoy GS-65, arriving April 7, 1945. Next day she proceeded to Boston with four other escorts, dropping two depth charges on a contact while answering a distress call en route. Reaching Boston on April 11th, she remained there on availability until the 17th and on the 23rd departed for Casco Bay but returned at slow speed to make repairs. On April 26, 1944, she again departed for Casco Bay and after anchoring briefly in Cape Cod Bay on the 27th proceeded to Argentia on the 26th. She returned to Boston on May 6th. Departing for Argentia same day she fired all "K" guns on a contact that was then lost and reached Argentia on the 10th. She returned to Boston on the 13th and departed for Argentia on the 19th, arriving on the 23rd.

ICE PATROL
On May 25, 1945, the Mojave was released from Task Group 24.6 and assigned to Task Group 24.7 (Ice Patrol). She was still on this assignment when the war ended on August 14, 1945.

--82--


CGC NEMESIS (WPC-111)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The U.S. CGC Nemesis was launched at point Pleasant, Virginia on July 7, 1934. She was placed in commission October 10, 1934, and arrived at her permanent station St. Petersburg, Florida, November 4, 1934. She was 165 feet long, steel hull, 337 tons displacement with a speed of 16 knots, having a 1340 HP diesel motor with twin screw propulsion.

SUB ATTACK
Ordered to depart her permanent station at St. Petersburg, Florida, for duty with the North Atlantic coastal frontier on January 24, 1942, the Nemesis attacked a submarine off Atlantic City on 24 February with unknown results. She was then serving with the Eastern Sea Frontier. On March 23, 1942, while searching for a reported enemy sub in the vicinity of St. Lucie Inlet, Florida, a message was received from planes that they had sighted and were attacking a sub at 28°18'N, 80°08'W. When the cutter arrived, oil was sighted and echo searching was started. A positive sound contact was made and three charges were dropped. The contact was reestablished, with the sub leaving a definite trail of oil. An hour later another sound contact indicated that the sub apparently was not moving. Three more depth charges were released and white smoke or gas came to the surface. A delayed action charge, released directly over the contact, produced a decided increase in the flow of oil to the surface. Two more charges produced no tangible wreckage. Grappling operations on the 26th produced no results and operations were abandoned. An analysis of the oil samples taken showed it to be fuel oil and not diesel oil and it is possible that the charges had been dropped on the wreck of the Pan Massachusetts.

BOARDS VESSEL
On July 5, 1942, the cutter proceeded to 21°50'N, 85°20'W where an enemy sub had been contacted by planes and believed crippled. Arriving on the afternoon of the 6th she began patrolling and sighted 3 flares near midnight. A few minutes later a dim light was sighted which proved to be a lantern on the schooner Viriato from Havana, Cuba. A sound contact was made about 300 yards astern of the schooner, with range and bearing changing rapidly. Eight depth charges were dropped in three runs until no further echo contact could be made. The schooner was boarded at daybreak but no evidence was found. The cutter remained until July 7th and then left for rendezvous with the Dahlgren off Cape San Antonio, Cuba.

BRINGS UP OIL
Next day while patrolling off Cape San Antonio, she received a message to proceed to 22°51'N, 84°42'W to search for a reported sub and she arrived at an oil slick at that position 5½ hours later. She ran it down but there was no wreckage or evidence of a torpedoed ship. A contact was picked up at the apex of the slick and, after dropping three charges, the cutter began to circle the spot and soon large quantities of oil appeared on the surface but no further contacts could be made. Next day the search was discontinued with the oil still coming to the surface in good quantities.

ATTACKS SUB
During the rest of 1942 and half of 1943 the Nemesis operated as an escort between Galveston, Texas and Key West, Florida under the Gulf Sea Frontier. On August 3, 1942, the Nemesis dropped seven depth charges, in three runs on an oil slick, to which she had been attracted by Coast Guard Plane V-214 which was screening the convoy the cutter was escorting. A tremendous amount of mud, oil, and a number of air bubbles rose to the surface, but there were no signs of wreckage or debris. German records uncovered after the war indicated that the U-166 had been sunk by Coast Guard plane 202 near this position at 28°37'N, 90°45'W, on August 1, 1942.

ANOTHER ATTACK
While escorting a convoy in the Gulf on August 17, 1942, at 28°39'N, 90°47'W, on August 17, 1942, the Nemesis obtained an echo contact. The submarine appeared to be moving to intercept the convoy. The bearing of the sub changed 30° and the range from 1500 to 1000 yards, the speed being estimated at about four knots toward the convoy. The convoy was given an emergency 45° turn to port and a run begun on the submarine, which now changed course rapidly and attempted to evade the attack by turning in a tight circle. A pattern of 4 charges was fired. The result was not determined, although one very large air bubble was observed some distance from the attack. The sub may have escaped in the wake of the convoy which passed close aboard.

BRINGS IN SURVIVORS
The cutter was sent on many missions in search of survivors. On May 21, 1942, she left Key West with a Navy doctor and two pharmacist's mates aboard to assist persons rescued from the torpedoed Mexican vessel Faja de Oro. She picked up 28 survivors in two lifeboats, and the doctor and his assistant rendered first aid. No signs among the wreckage were found of nine men believed killed instantly by the explosion. One man died of burns, concussion and broken limbs on the way to Key West, where the rest were put ashore on the 23rd.

MORE SURVIVORS
While on convoy duty en route to Key West on June 7, 1942, a Navy plane gave the cutter the position of survivors in a lifeboat ahead and departing the convoy, the Nemesis picked up 27 survivors from two rafts. They were members of the crew of the American freighter SS Suwied, which had been torpedoed the previous day en route to Mobile, Alabama, from British Guiana. Six of the crew had been killed instantly by the explosion. The submarine had surfaced and picked up wreckage but had not machine-gunned the survivors.

ESCORT DUTY
On 25 February, 1943, the Nemesis was transferred to the Eastern Sea Frontier and put on escort duty between Key West and New York, making occasional stops at Guantanamo, Cuba. On one trip she stopped at Yucatan, Mexico. On 22 December, 1943, she attacked a sound contact, but the results were negative.

AIR-SEA RESCUE
On 21 June, 1945, the cutter reported to COM 1 for Air-Sea Rescue duty, Eastern Sea Frontier and remained on this duty until the end of the war.


CGC NIKE (WPC-112)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Nike (WPC-112) was built at Point Pleasant, Virginia in 1934 and on July 1, 1941, her permanent station was at St. Petersburg, Florida. She was 165 feet long,

--83--


25 foot 3 inch beam, and drew 9 feet 6 inches of water, with a displacement of 337 tons. She had a steel hull and did 16 knots, being driven by 1340 HP diesel twin screw engines.

RESCUES CREW OF CHINA ARROW
On February 6, 1942, the Nike was notified by Commander, Inshore Patrol Force, that survivors of a torpedoed ship had been sighted off Virginia at 39°12'N, 73°45'W and proceeded to the area beginning search. A red flare was sighted on reaching the locality and three lifeboats of the torpedoed tanker China Arrow were located containing 38 persons, all of whom were in fair condition.

ATTACKS SUB ON SURFACE
At 0124 on Bay 5, 1942, th Nike's sound operator reported propeller noises two points off starboard bow in position 27°23'N, 80°18'W and checking the bearing revealed the outline of a submarine close to St. Lucie Shoal buoy. Altered course toward submarine which had meantime speeded up and headed on course 0650°T. Gave chase attacking with gunfire, expending three rounds of 3"/23 calibre ammunition, but was quickly outdistanced by submarine and lost contact. Patrolled area but was unable to regain contact. On May 9, 1942, the Nike received report of a submarine damaged and headed north just north of Miami. Shortly after observing the Vigilant dropping charges at 26°35.5'N, 79°58.5'W, a sound contact was obtained at 5000 yards. The Vigilant radioed she had lost contact. The Nike dropped a pattern of five charges and the contact was regained, propeller noises were heard and two charges were dropped well ahead of the contact. Two further charges were dropped set to go off on the bottom, where it was believed the damaged sub had been forced to settle.

RESCUES NINE FROM TANKER POTRERO DEL LLANO
On May lit, 1942, while patrolling the Florida Straits at 0118, the Nike sighted a large flame and changing course identified it as a burning tanker at 25°38'N, 79°56'W. Searched area for submarine, then closed burning tanker Portrero del Llano and picked up eight men clinging to a spar. Continuing search took aboard an injured man from a small boat and after searching until daylight, took nine survivors to Miami. Learned that 13 of the remaining 28 crew members had been picked up by a PC boat. An injured man died in the hospital the following day.

CHASES SURFACED SUB
On May 16, 1942, the Nike heard an unidentified signal on Q.C. equipment and picked up propellers moving at relatively high speed. Picked up a vessel on the surface and challenged. Fired Very pistol dud flare, identified submarine and called all hands to general quarters. The submarine dived close aboard along the port side in opposite direction of the ship's heading. The Nike attacked with a five pattern depth charge and picked up a heavy narrow oil slick. Commenced chasing at full emergency speed, the Q.C. picking up occasional sounds, possibly ahead at various distances but could not maintain contact. The submarine started zig-zagging as evidenced by the varied direction of the oil wake. Commenced firing 3"/23 calibre gun in attempt to drive enemy under. Expended 11 shrapnel shells and 750 rounds of 50 calibre tracer and ball ammunition. The enemy straightened out to a southerly course and opened interval with oil wake beginning to widen and difficulty was experienced in holding the contact. The starboard engine suffered a casualty which reduced maximum speed to 8 knots and contact was not made thereafter.

CONVOY DUTY
On July 27, 1942, the Nike was detached from duty with Inshore Patrol and placed under direct operation of COM EIGHT on convoy escort duty between Mississippi Passes and Galveston. Coast Guard planes provided air coverage. On August 24, 1942, the Boutwell and Nike departed Galveston as escort for a convoy. On August 27, 1942, the two cutters were escorting a convoy from Southwest Pass to Galveston. On October 3rd the Nike arrived at Burrwood. On the 4th she departed Southwest Pass as escort to a convoy arriving at Key West on the 6th. On the 15th she departed South Pass for Key West as escort arriving with convoy on the 18th. On the 27th she arrived South Pass with convoy proceeding to New Orleans where she remained until the 30th. On 30 October, 1942, the Nike arrived at Burrwood, Louisiana, departing on the 31st as escort in convoy en route Key West, Florida, During November she operated out of Key West under Commander, Gulf Sea Frontier. On December 17, 1942, the Nike arrived at Key West, Florida with a convoy. (The above constitutes the entire available record of the escort duty performed by the Nike in World War II).


CGC NORTH STAR (WPG-53)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC North Star (WPG-53) was built for the Department of the Interior at Seattle, Washington in 1932. On May 15, 1941, she was commissioned as a Coast Guard cutter and placed on duty with the Navy. On July 1, 1941, she became part of the Northeast Greenland Patrol, organized at Boston with Commander Ed. H. Smith in command and consisting in addition, of the CGC Northland and the USS Bear. On October 25, 1941, this patrol became part of the South Greenland Patrol along with the CGC Modoc, CGC Comanche, CGC Raritan and USS Bowdoin. Built of wood the North Star was 225 feet long, 41 foot molded beam, and had a displacement of 2200 tons and speed of 11 knots. She was an oil burner powered with a 1500 HP diesel engine.

SEIZURE OF BUSKOE
On September 12, 1941, the day following the President's warning to the Axis nations to stay out of American waters or take the consequences, Commander Smith, still commanding the Northeast Greenland Patrol off Eastern Greenland noticed an apparently innocent fishing vessel. The North Star had been informed earlier by some members of the Greenland Sledge Patrol that they had seen a strange steamer entering Young Sound. The North Star radioed this information to Commander Smith and proceeded to Young Sound and Tyroler Fjord in search of the reported vessel. On September 12th they discovered supplies of German origin freshly landed at Rudis Bugt. Commander Smith in the Northland, on the same day, stopped the fishing vessel and sent out a boarding party, who took her into a small bay, called McKenzie Bay, to look her over. On the 13th crew members of the North Star discovered in Young Sound a Norwegian named Antonsen previously landed from the vessel and took him into custody. At first the 27 persons aboard, mostly "Danish hunters and Norwegian trappers," claimed to be a fishing and hunting party. The leader of the expedition was a scientist. After questioning, they admitted landing two sets of "hunters" one with radio equipment about 5 miles north. The ship was identified a s the Norwegian trawler Buskoe, controlled by German interests and servicing a radio station in Greenland. A prize crew from the North Star was ordered aboard her and

--84--


she was found equipped with a 50 watt main transmitter and a 40 watt portable transmitter. She was believed to be engaged in sending weather reports to Axis controlled territory, so as to supply German U-boats with weather information and also information on allied ships due to pass. The North Star towed her from Cape Humboldt to Scoresby Sound and turned her over to the Bear for towing to Boston. The following night men from the Northland captured the men who had been landed five miles away and with them confidential instructions which were plans for German radio stations in the Far North. The seizure of the Buskoe was the first naval capture of World War II.

AERIAL SURVEY TUNUNGDLIARFIK
The North Star returned to Boston and on March 15, 1942, arrived at Casco Bay, Maine, for exercises, departing there on the 21st with the Northland and escorting the SS Azra to Greenland. She anchored off the Army Base at Bluie West One on April 3, 1942, but was placed in quarantine because of a case of measles on board. On the 4th she began an aerial survey of Tunungdliarfik Fjord and adjacent regions. On the 7th she stood down the Fjord and anchored off Hollaender Island boating water all day and transferring supplies for Gamatron. With the ice pack moving in on the 9th, and the survey party ashore, she stood out of Hollaender Havn and continued the survey on the 10th and 11th but was then forced by the ice to get underway, postponing the completion of the survey in that locality, but moving up to Mathoeus Havn where lt was continued. On the 13th she delivered parts to the Northland's plane at Julienehaab and hoisted it aboard for overhaul, while Lt. Pritchard and crew took custody of the North Star's plane until the Northland's plane was repaired. Meanwhile the survey work was continued at Mathoeus Havn. On the 19th she anchored off Simiutak Island and from the 21st to 25th continued local surveys at Eleanors Havn, proceeding to Bluie West One on the 29th.

DAMAGED BY ICE
The North Star was damaged as she broke ice in Sandre Stromfjord on May 6, 1942. On the 7th an inspection revealed that the vessel was making water and after transferring depth charges to the Northland and Mohawk, an inspection of the bow showed about 75 square feet of sheathing torn off just below the waterline. Temporary repairs were completed on May 10th and she proceeded to Godthaab. Added pressure due to being underway, however, increased the size of the small remaining leak and she stood back up the fjord and resumed repairs by placing a concrete patch in the lower chain locker. On the 11th survey flights were resumed and next day the measles quarantine was lifted. The balance of May was spent making local surveys and conducting survey flights, also making communication tests with the Army Base at Bluie West One, in preparation for an actual flight of some 200 planes which were to pass over Greenland en route Europe beginning June 8, 1942.

SEARCHES FOR LOST ARMY BOMBER
After escorting the SS Dorchester into the fjord on June 5th, 1942, the North Star proceeded to search for a lost Army bomber, sending a searching party in a launch on the 7th as far as Sukkertoppen. On the 6th her crew learned from natives that the missing plane was farther south but weather conditions postponed search. On the 9th reports indicated that the plane was down at Harrak where the plane was found undamaged but needing gas and oil, which the North Star provided. On the 11th the Army bomber, a B-17, took off.

RETURN TO U.S.
The cutter joined a three ship convoy off Ivigtut on the 15th escorted by two destroyers and bound for Boston. She lost the convoy in dense fog on the 20th and entered Boston channel. She remained dry-docked at the Boston Navy Yard until July 11th, 1942, receiving major installations and underwater sound equipment. On her way to Casco Bay for training exercises on the 12th of June, 1942, she made a sound contact which however was later lost without making an attack. On the 16th she was underway in convoy, with two Navy and two Coast Guard escorts standing into Sydney, N.S., harbor on July 19, 1942, She departed in a convoy consisting in addition of the Mohawk and Nanok for Bluie West One, Greenland arriving on the 27th. On the 29th she met and escorted an incoming convoy.

TO EAST COAST OF GREENLAND
The North Star remained on plane guard radio watch at Bluie West One and vicinity until August 12, 1942, when she proceeded to Julianehaab and returned with a convoy from Matheous Havn. On the 13th she joined a convoy composed of CGC Comanche, SS Dorchester and firefighter Alcoa Pilot en route Angmagssalik, East Greenland. She anchored at Bluie West Two, Army Base, in Ikatez Fjord on the 17th unloading supplies and disembarking passengers. On the 20th she continued to Scoresby Sound, entering the ice field on the 21st, off the entrance to Scoresby Sound and started maneuvering through it. At 1800 she reversed course and stood out of the ice field, when inspection of steering gear revealed the rudder stock bent, twisting the rudder 12° to port, with the cast iron support collar also cracked. Six feet of stern plating had also been torn off by the ice. On the 22nd she anchored off the village of Scoresby Sound, sending cargo ashore as her airplane surveyed ice conditions. She changed anchorage later to Amdrupa Harbor. On the 23rd she sent supplies ashore for Gurreholm Radio Station, Scoresby Sound, departing on the 25th for Eskimonaes. On August 31, 1942, she was still trying to get through the ice fields off Eskimonaes, unable to advance very far. She anchored off the village on September 1st, transferring supplies and personnel to the Northland, and departed for Mackenzie Bay on the 2nd. She took on various gear from Myggbogta radio station and took on board also Joharm Johansen, evacuated on SOPA, Greenland, orders getting underway for Musk ox Fjord. She touched at Winthers Hunting Station and reached Videnskabelig Radio Station on Ella Island with supplies, taking on passengers. She headed out to sea and on the 8th was clear of ice, heading south for Scoresby Sound. En route she had an underwater contact which faded on approach. On the 11th she was ordered to Angmagssalik, which she was unable to enter until the 14th because of storms and poor visibility. Here she took on supplies and passengers and headed for Bluie West One. On the 17th she reversed course on SOPA orders and returned to Angmagssalik awaiting the Natsek which joined on the 19th en route the West Coast. She arrived Narsarssuak and moored at Army Dock on September 23, 1942.

RETURN TO BOSTON
Anchoring in Kungnat Bay on October 2, 1942, she awaited arrival of a convoy consisting of the Escanaba, Iris, USS Lapwing, towing the Halma and Armstrong, heading for Sydney, N.S., by way of Straits of Belle Isle. On the 8th the Armstrong broke adrift. Entering Belle Isle after making an underwater contact, supposed to be a whale, the convoy received air coverage and anchored in Sydney on the 14th. On the 15th the North Star was underway with the Lapwing for

--85--


COAST GUARD CUTTER <i>ONONDAGA</i>
COAST GUARD CUTTER ONONDAGA

THIS NAZI TRAWLER WAS FOUND DESERTED ON GREENLAND's EAST COAST
THIS NAZI TRAWLER WAS FOUND DESERTED ON GREENLAND'S EAST COAST. COAST GUARDSMEN SEIZED LARGE PILES OF AMMUNITION AND FOOD SUPPLIES NEAR THE VESSEL WHICH WAS FOUR MILES FROM AN ABANDONED RADIO SHANTY

--86--


Boston arriving on the 17th, undergoing repairs until November 9, 1942.

OPERATIONS IN GREENLAND
The North Star proceeded to Casco Bay for training exercises until the 17th when she contacted a tug and tow to be escorted to Sydney, N.S. Arriving there on the 21st she took on supplies for Greenland and departed on the 24th, entering Skov Fjord on November 30, 1942, with supplies including Quonset huts. December 1942 war diaries for the North Star are missing, but on January 1, 1943 she was underway to Marrak Point, Greenland, with a detachment of Army equipment. She delivered mail at Godthaab on the 6th returning to complete unloading at Harrak until the 8th. Returning to Godthaab on the 10th she brought a passenger to Narsarssuak, stopping at Kungnat Bay for other personnel. Reaching Narsarssuak on the 15th she was quarantined with German measles on board until the 27th.

RESCUE MISSION
Proceeding to the assistance of the SS Omaha on February 1, 1943, she was diverted to Godthaab to take on the Governor of Greenland and the American Consul, as well as a Dane and Norwegian, the latter to assist in rescue operations of personnel of a Navy PBY forced down on the ice cap. Proceeding to Holstenborge she took on 5 dog teams with sled and two dog drivers and proceeded to Ivigtut. On the 5th a man fell overboard and was unconscious when recovered, dying at 1535. She patrolled Kungnat Bay entrance until the 16th while arrangements were being perfected for the ice cap rescue. On the 18th she was underway for Godthaab and Holstenborge with dog teams for rescue operations. On the 23rd delayed by winds of gale force, she proceeded through the ice fields and was stopped by 12 to 15 foot ice covering the area. It was not until the 28th that she was able to anchor off Holstenborge, when mail, dogs, drivers and equipment were put ashore. Proceeding south on March 1st the North Star was requested to maintain lookout for two RAF planes reported lost and she drifted until the 12th southwest of the entrance to Sondre Stromfjord on the lookout for the planes, though low visibility and heavy sea ice along the coast interfered with operations. She proceeded to Narsarssuak on the 15th and on the 17th was underway escorting the CGC Amarok to Boston, where she arrived on March 31, 1943.

ASSISTANCE
Standing out of Boston on April 2, 1943, the North Star proceeded to Curtis Bay. On the 3rd, while off Block Island Light, she changed course to search for a small craft reported in need of assistance. She located the CGC General Greene standing by the fishing craft Columbia but unable to tow her, because of engine trouble, and the North Star took the vessel in tow, transferring her to a small harbor tug two miles south of Breton Reef Lightship on the 5th. Arriving at Curtis Bay on the 8th she underwent repairs and alterations until May 11, 1943.

SEARCH FOR ESCANABA
She proceeded to Boston arriving there May 16, 1943, and after 6 days at Casco Bay on training exercises, from May 21.1943, proceeded escorting the U.S. Navy Tanker YO-65 and CGC Faunce to Argentia. Here after two days she proceeded to Gronne Dal, Greenland in company with the CGC Faunce, Nogak and Aklak and the USS Albatross, the Faunce returning to Argentia because of engine trouble. The others reached Gronne Dal June 9th. The North Star left Gronne Dal on the 12th and on June 13, 1943, was ordered to assist the CGC Escanaba, reported sunk at 60°50'N, 52°00'W. She searched the area with the USS Bluebird and SC-705 but found no trace of survivors or wreckage. She returned to Narsarssuak where she remained until June 30, 1943.

ATTACKED BY GERMAN PLANE
The North Star departed Narsarssuak on July 1, 1943, in company with the Northland, loaded with supplies and equipment for delivery to the northeast coast of Greenland. She was drydocked at Reykjavik, Iceland, until July 20, 1943, for repairs. While proceeding north on July 23, 1943, a German reconnaissance plane was encountered. It stood in from the eastward, north of Jan Mayen Island and was picked up on the radar screen at a distance of 12 miles. As the plane stood in, crossing from starboard to port, it opened fire on the North Star with machine guns, bullets hitting the water 600 to 800 yards from the bow. The plane then reversed and stood down the starboard side, apparently searching for a soft spot in the ship's armament, meeting the fire of the North Star's No, 2 gun as It stood up the starboard side. When the plane was abreast of the pilot house, both the cutter's guns found the range, the bursting projectiles rocking the plane, which started to throw off black smoke and stood off to the northeastward, trailing heavy black exhaust smoke. It speedily dropped to a low altitude and appeared to bounce over the horizon on three occasions as though hitting the water. The plane was thought to have been hit by shrapnel at a range no nearer than 4000 to 6000 yards.

LANDS SUPPLIES
The North Star was stopped by heavy pack ice on July 26, 1943, at 74°22'N, 16°22'W and drifted nearly a month south to a point 20 miles east of Cape Simpson where on the 24th of August she finally broke out of the ice to the eastward into open water. She proceeded northward, stood into Gael Hamkes Bay and arrived at Eskimones on August 31, 1943. While approaching the Bay the rudder stock broke and the Polar Bjorn came out of Young's Sound to assist the North Star into the Bay for emergency repairs. At Eskimones all supplies for the Greenland Sledge Patrol at Dead Man's Bay and Clavering Island were transferred--supplies considered sufficient for one and possibly two years. Materials for a house were laid out on shore so that it could be erected by the Sledge Patrol. A landing party also investigated a German camp on Sabine Island. The cutter departed Eskimones on September 3, 1943, and assisted by the Polar Bjorn broke out of the ice in clear water off Cape Broer Ruys on the 6th and proceeding south, contacted the Northland at 72°16'N, 15°48'W, both vessels arriving at Reykjavik on September 11, 1943.

GERMAN CAMP WELL EQUIPPED
The German camp on Sabine Island had borne every evidence of having been hastily abandoned. It had been well and completely laid out and equipped. Tobacco and candy, as well as machine gun parts, clothing, etc. had been dropped by parachute containers. The food was choice. Salvageable material was used on the spot or stocked in Danish huts, including several hundred gallons of gasoline and kerosene, which were particularly welcome. The camp had evidently been evacuated by air, probably in two trips shortly after an air attack on May 25, 1943, by Colonel Balchen of the U.S. Amy Air Corps. It is possible that a small group may have gone north to the Dove Bay region by dog sled, this being a region which the expedition did not and could not search because of the ice and late season. A German plane which had come over the Northland on August 22, 1943, off Shannon Island was apparently conducting a general

--87--


reconnaissance of ice conditions with a view to sending in another expedition either by boat or air. While only one prisoner was taken the joint landing, forces from the North Star and Northland had covered considerable territory in any part of which active opposition might reasonably be expected. The naval personnel involved were specially trained and acted in conjunction with a similar army force. The physical hazards of weather, ice and terrain were abnormal and the naval personnel were recommended for the Navy Marine Expeditionary Medal.

RETURN TO NARSARSSUAK
After being in drydock at Hvalfjord, Iceland, from September 17 to 20, 1943, the North Star returned to Reykjavik and on the 22nd stood out with the CGC Alatok and SS Nyco (Norwegian) for Narsarssuak, arriving on the 28th, less the Alatok which had dropped behind. She remained moored for the rest of September at Narsarssuak.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
On October 5th the North Star departed Narsarssuak as escort of MS Izarra (Canadian) bound for St. John's, N.F., and arriving there on the 12th continuing alone. She docked at Argentia on the 13th and on the 14th departed Argentia for Boston, where she moored on the 18th. Here she remained on availability undergoing extensive repairs until November 21, 1943.

DECOMMISSIONED
The North Star was decommissioned January 13, 1941|.


CGC ONONDAGA (WPG-79)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

DESCRIPTION
The CGC Onondaga was built at Bay City, Michigan, in 1934, and her permanent station thereafter until 1941 was Astoria, Oregon. She is a geared turbine oil burner of 1500 horsepower with steel hull, 165 feet long overall, with a 36 ft. molded beam and main mum draft of 13 ft. 7 in. Her displacement is 1005 tons and her gross tonnage 718 CH ["Custom House tonnage"].

EARLY SERVICE
From her commissioning in 1934 to 1941, the Onondaga was stationed at Astoria, Oregon, where she performed important law enforcement duties and rendered much assistance to vessels in distress. Every year she was assigned to patrol the pelagic seals on their annual migration to the Pribilof Islands and to prevent halibut fishing out of season.

ESCORT DUTY
Assigned to general escort duty in the area of Women's Bay and Kodiak, she was later assigned to escort duty between Cape Spencer and Dutch Harbor and anti-aircraft and escort patrol off Dutch Harbor. On January 16, 1942, she assisted in rescuing 48 men from the SS Mapele in distress off Cape Divine. She resumed escort duty between Dutch Harbor and Juneau. On March 14, 1942, she conducted a sound sweep with the CGC Atalanta.

PEARL HARBOR
Soon after Pearl Harbor, the Onondaga was assigned to Dutch Harbor, Alaska. When the first reports of the Hawaii attack reached Alaska, Major General Simon R. Buckner, head of the Alaska Defense Command, ordered a constant alert and a total blackout was effected. Vigilant naval patrols were continually maintained in southern Alaska and the Alaskan peninsula, where by June, 1942, two important secret air fields had already been established. Navy PBY's had been patrolling the Aleutian waters for about two months prior to Pearl Harbor and early in December, 1941, began patrols under full combat operation.

DUTCH HARBOR ATTACK
Early on the morning of 3 June, 1942, a handful of Japanese fighter and bomber planes appeared out of the Aleutian fog. Late on the day before, one of our, patrol planes had sighted an unidentified surface force 400 miles south of Kiska, proceeding eastward. At the same time that the Japanese task force was approaching Midway another force had been sent out to the Aleutians. Japanese submarines had been reported in the vicinity of Umnak and Unalaska. Just before dawn on the morning of the 3rd a squadron of possible Japanese planes was reported cruising low over Dutch Harbor. They were, soon definitely identified as Japanese by their wing marking and shore and ship batteries opened fire a few minutes before the first bomb fell. The attack was of short duration; a few barracks and warehouses were set on fire and a Navy patrol plane strafed. Only two PBY's were lost, while several enemy aircraft were shot down. Fewer than 40 enemy planes were estimated to have engaged in the attack, which seemed designed primarily for reconnaissance purposes, to survey the strength of the base before the main attack was launched. This strength was not great. The base, still under construction, was garrisoned by a couple of regiments of troops and a few marines. The Onondaga was in the harbor, together with three destroyers, a minesweeper, an Army transport, and an old station ship, the Northwestern. The Onondaga was moored at the south buoy in the harbor and sighted the enemy at 051(0 before the air station was attacked. General quarters was sounded, battle stations manned, and all batteries put in action within a few seconds. During the brief period the Japanese planes were within range, the Onondaga fired 115 rounds of 3"/23 caliber, 1400 rounds of .50 caliber, and 500 rounds of .30 caliber ammunition, without suffering any casualties. The personnel responded to the call of duty in a most commendable manner. At 1045 she made a sound contact at 1800 yards on her port bow. She verified the contact which was however not in motion but dropped two charges at 100 and 150 feet. At 1052 she regained contact and dropped two charges at 200 feet. The contact was at 54°13'10" N, 165°43'4.3" W, bearing 005° from Ukatan Harbor Light.

SECOND ATTACK
A second attack came next evening on the 4th of June, 1942, when the main assault on Dutch Harbor and nearby Fort Maars occurred. 18 bombers and 16 fighter planes approached the harbor from two directions in fleets of three planes each. The bombers dropped heavy explosives and incendiaries while the fighters strafed the streets from an elevation of about 500 feet. A warehouse, a few oil tanks, and an empty aircraft hangar were hit and the old Northwestern bombed and destroyed by fire. Suddenly in the midst of the attack our Army fighters and medium bombers appeared out of the fog in the rear of the Japanese planes. The enemy were taken completely by surprise since they had no knowledge of our two secret army field at Cold Bay and Umnak. In stunned confusion they wheeled to attempt escape only to find themselves flying directly over the secret fields. The pursuing Warhawks downed at least two Zeros and perhaps two or three dive bombers before the rest disappeared in the enveloping fog. Meanwhile, the invading surface fleet had been located and attacked, several direct bits being scored by our planes before it scattered. The enemy was forced to

--88--


withdraw with the loss of one cruiser and a few crippled vessels. The force was estimated to consist of two small carriers, two seaplane tenders, four to six transports and a full support of cruisers and destroyers. Apparently Dutch Harbor had been their immediate objective, after which they might have seized the Pribilofs to the north or made a mass landing on the Seward Peninsula, eventually occupying the coastal harbors and penetrating into the very heart of Alaska. The attack undoubtedly represented a major attempt at a surprise blow against the North American continent. When they found Opposition at Dutch Harbor, and after a tremendous loss of air strength, the expedition chose the landing spot of far-off Kiska followed by Agattu and Attu Islands In the westernmost Aleutians as an alternative. Here they remained until we drove them out in the attack on Attu on 11 May, 1943. Meanwhile the Onondaga performed important convoy duty and assistance work in the Aleutians until the end of 1943. In July, 1942, while patrolling past Dutch Harbor in search of a reported submarine, she made contacts and dropped charges with negative results. From July 17, 1942, she was assigned to Massacre Bay Patrol. On November 8, 1942, she arrived at Kodiak with a convoy.

ON PATROL
Departing Women's Bay, Kodiak, on the 16th of December, the CGC Onondaga proceeded to Pleasant Island, icy Strait, changing course to return to Women's Bay on the 17th. On the 19th she departed for St. Paul Harbor and moored alongside SS David W. Branch. Informed by the Master of that vessel that it would be necessary for her to proceed to Women's Bay for fuel prior to sailing eastward, the Onondaga returned to Women's Bay on the same date.

ESCORTING VESSELS
On December 207 1942, she departed Women's Bay escorting the USS Tippecanoe dropping convoy at 2010 and proceeding to Juneau, arriving December 23, 1942. Departing Juneau, Alaska, on 27 December, 1942, the CGC Onondaga picked up west-bound convoy of two merchant vessels in vicinity of Pleasant Island and escorted them toward Yakutat. One vessel was convoyed to Women's Bay, Kodiak, where they arrived on 29 December. The Onondaga remained at N.O.B., Women's Bay for the rest of the week.

1943

DEPARTS DUTCH HARBOR AS ESCORT
The Onondaga continued to remain at Women's Bay. On 6 January, she tried to conduct anti-submarine patrol off Kodiak entrance but severe weather precluded carrying out this order. On the 9th the Onondaga departed for Dutch Harbor as escort for the USS St. Mihiel.

TRANSFERS ANCHOR TO DRIFTING BOAT
The Onondaga and St. Mihiel reached Dutch Harbor on 11 January. On the 12th the former vessel proceeded to Broad Bay, anchoring near the SS Richard March Hoe, preparatory to escorting that vessel to Kodiak. This escort duty began on the 13th. At 1455 the Onondaga stopped alongside MTB-24, drifting in Unimak Pass, and upon request, transferred a small boat anchor to the MTB. At 1505 the convoy was directed to proceed independently, while the Onondaga proceeded on toward Kodiak.

SEARCHES FOR SURVIVORS OF GROUNDED SHIP
On the 15th at 0543, the Onondaga intercepted an SOS from SS Mapele, who was aground at Cape Devine and needed immediate assistance. The Onondaga changed course, arrived in the Mapele's vicinity at 1237, and hove to, finding that the USS Discoverer and USS Berle were also hove to nearby. By contacting the Discoverer, the Onondaga learned that the master and chief engineer were still on the Mapele, that a motor boat was proceeding to take them off, and that the rest of the crew was believed to be somewhere on the beach. As existing sea conditions did not permit a close search of the rocks and small beaches, the Onondaga proceeded around Cape Devine and anchored in the cove south of Korovin Island, but at 1324 she was able to dispatch a rescue party to the beach and the Discoverer also dispatched a boatload of searchers. At 1650 the Discoverer departed for Sand Point after rescuing 48 out of 51 persons from the Mapele. The three missing crew members were believed to be dead and somewhere on the beach. The boat from the Onondaga with an additional rescue party was dispatched, but at 1913 all boats and members of the rescue parties bad returned without having found any signs of living or dead persons. On the 16th the Onondaga's personnel took note of the Mapele's condition (she was listing about 20 degrees to port, her after deck was completely awash, with seas breaking over it heavily, all deck cargo was missing, and her forward deck cargo was washing overboard), and as it appeared that nothing further could be accomplished until the weather and sea conditions moderated, the Coast Guard vessel proceeded toward Kodiak. But at 1633, following instructions, the Onondaga reversed course to take charge of the salvage of the wreck. She anchored at 2124 south of Korovin Island, Shumagin Islands, to await daylight.

ASSIGNED TO SALVAGING SS MAPELE
The Onondaga's inspection of the wrecked Mapele on January 17 revealed that both vessel and cargo were a total loss. During the afternoon at low tide two 20mm guns were salvaged minus their stands, but no other equipment could be saved. The Coast Guard vessel departed the next day, stopped for water at Sand Point, and left there on the morning of the 19th for Kodiak, but bad weather caused her to reverse course and to stand into lee of Korovin Island, and later into lee of Sand Point. Departed Sand Point on the 20th and arrived at NOB, Women's Bay, Kodiak at 1613 on 21 January, remaining there for the balance of the week.

AT KODIAK
The only time the Onondaga left her mooring at Women's Bay Kodiak, during the week was on the 27th when she conducted anti-submarine patrol off Kodiak entrance from 0842 to 1840.

STILL AT KODIAK
The Onondaga stood out into Chiniak Bay on 31 January, 1943, to check magnetic steering compass; conducted anti-submarine patrol off Kodiak entrance from 1203 to 1824 on 3 February; and on the 5th again stood out to check magnetic steering compass. Patrol, also scheduled for that day, was not conducted because of adverse weather. At all other times during the week the vessel was at NOB, Kodiak.

LOSES CONTACT WITH CONVOY
On 7 February, the Onondaga departed Women's Bay, Kodiak, as escort for the SS Columbia en route to Cross Sound. At 0220 on the 9th a strong gale, heavy snow, poor visibility and rough seas caused the Coast. Guard vessel to lose contact with the convoy, which was not thereafter contacted. That afternoon she stood into Cross Sound and learned from the Routing Officer on the Swiftsure that the Columbia bad passed North Indian Head Light one hour later than the Onondaga. The Onondaga then proceeded and moored to Army Dock, Excursion Inlet, departing there on

--89--


the 10th for conference at Pleasant Island. There she found that sailing of convoy was postponed due to adverse weather, so the rest of the 10th was spent breaking ice at the head of Excursion Inlet to free piles needed for operations on U.S. Army project. After completing this duty, the Onondaga returned to Army Dock, Excursion Inlet, mooring at 1647. The sailing of the convoy was again postponed on the 11th pending arrival of the SS Toloa. On the 12th, the Onondaga stood out to Pleasant Island anchorage to assemble convoy consisting of the SS Baranof, SS Yukon, SS Toloa, SS Denali, SS Otsego and SS Taku. The convoy assembled at 1400 and departed to the westward. On the 13th, the Otsego and Taku departed convoy for Yakutsk and the Denali, when in vicinity of Cape Hinchinbrook departed for Cordova.

LOCATES AND TOWS BARGE
The Onondaga continued escorting the Toloa, Yukon and Baranof. These last two vessels departed from the convoy at 0430 on the 14th and proceeded toward Seward while the Onondaga and Toloa continued on to Kodiak, arriving there at 1858. The Coast Guard vessel departed on the 16th to locate PSB&D Barge No. 10, and sighted her the next day. With the help of YP-92 she got the barge into deeper water, finally secured two manila hawsers to the barge, and departed towing it. The Onondaga was hove to with the tow off Cape Igvak in an easterly gale on 18 February, but was able to proceed the next day into the lee of Portage Bay. Moved on the 20th to smoother water at the western end of Wide Bay, where the Onondaga began pumping out barge with two portable gasoline pumps.

DISCONTINUES PUMPING
The Onondaga discontinued pumping out barge No. 10 on the 21st when it became evident that pumping was not effective for so large a leak. Bad weather kept the Onondaga anchored until the 25th. On that day she returned to the eastern end of Wide Bay to salvage towing wire previously buoyed while assisting the barge. After salvaging about 100 fathoms of the wire cable, the remainder, badly fouled, was cut away and the vessel departed for Kodiak, where she arrived on the 27th and released the barge to a tug for further disposition.

REFLOATS GROUNDED VESSEL
The Onondaga remained at Kodiak until 3 March, 1943, when she proceeded toward the grounded SS American Star off Woody Island, Kodiak. At 2250 on the 3rd strong flood current swept the Onondaga and USS YT-323 together, causing minor damage to the Coast Guard ship. Early on the 4th the USS American Star was refloated and anchored during a dense fog. The Onondaga returned to NOB, Women's Bay, and after undergoing repairs, she departed that same day towing the Ex-Algonquin to Seattle via Cross Sound and Ketchikan, and was still underway as the week ended.

OVERHAUL AT SEATTLE
From 14 to 31 March, 1943, the Onondaga was undergoing overhaul and conversion at the Seattle plant of Todd Drydocks, inc.

OVERHAUL AND CONVERSION
April began with the Onondaga still undergoing overhaul and conversion. On the 25th she left Todd Drydocks, inc., for a brief trial run and then moored at Pier 41, Seattle. Between then and the 30th, overhaul was completed, fuel and supplies were taken on and trial runs were made. The Onondaga departed Pier 41 on 30 April with Kodiak as her destination. At 1850 she anchored in Port Angeles Harbor, Washington, to await departure of SS Toloa, whom she was to escort.

CONVOY DUTY
On 1 May, 1943, the CGC Onondaga departed Port Angeles as escort of SS Toloa en route to Kodiak, Alaska. Arrived Kodiak on the 5th and on the 7th departed Women's Bay escorting SS Toloa to Dutch Harbor. On the 11th departed Dutch Harbor and met SS Henderson Leulling at 54°18'N, 16°20'W and escorted her to Dutch Harbor. On 13th departed Dutch Harbor escorting USAT North Coast to a point 50 miles through Unimak Pass returning to Dutch Harbor on the 14th. On the 15th departed Dutch Harbor escorting SS Yukon to Adak, arriving Kuluk Bay on 17th and on same day proceeded to Sweeper Cove, relieving CGC Atalanta on Dog Patrol outside between Head Rock and Oglala Point, Kuluk Bay. On 18th discontinued patrol and anchored in Kuluk Bay, departing same day to rendezvous USS Platte. On 19th contacted USS Platte at 50°15'N, 17°20'W and escorted her to Adak via Amukta Pass, arriving Kuluk Bay on 20th. On 21st assumed Dog Patrol 2 between Head Rock and Black Point, Kuluk Bay maintaining it through the 24th. On that day departed for Dutch Harbor in convoy with SS Toloa, SS Chief Washakie and USAT Chirikof arriving on 26th. On 27th formed convoy in company with USS Herald of four vessels en route Kuluk Bay, arriving on 29th. On 30th formed convoy of two vessels in company with USS PC-6OO en route Amchitka, arriving on 31st. On same day began escorting SS Sam Jackson from Amchitka to Adak.

CONVOY DUTY
Arriving with the SS Sam Jackson at Kuluk Bay on the 1st of June, the Onondaga departed on the 4th en route Dutch Harbor escorting the SS Chirikof, arriving on the 6th, On the 8th she was underway en route to rendezvous with USAT Otsego at Chernofski Harbor, arriving same day. On the 9th she stood into Dutch Harbor with the Otsego and on the 10th stood out to rendezvous with USS Ramapo on the 11th in 54°12'N, 164°00'W and began escorting her to Dutch Harbor, arriving on 12th. On the 13th stood out of Dutch Harbor to rendezvous on the 14th with USS Brazos at 5°06'N, 152°21'W, and began escorting her to Dutch Harbor via Unimak Pass arriving same day. On 18th stood out of Dutch Harbor with convoy of two vessels en route Adak, arriving on 20th. On 23rd departed Adak escorting SS Toloa en route Atka arriving same day. On the 23rd took aboard 54 men and two officers for transportation to Kanaja Island but returned to Adak on orders. On 25th departed Kuluk for Dutch Harbor for Nazan Bay, Atka, arriving on 30th.

ESCORT DUTY
On July 1st escorted SS Morlem to Dutch Harbor. On 4th rendezvoused with USS Tippecanoe escorting her to Dutch Harbor. On 8th rendezvoused with USS Ramapo and escorted her to Dutch Harbor. On 10th escorted USS Ramapo and SS Wm. T. Sherman to Adak via Chernofski arriving on 13th. On 14th escorted Ramapo and Mary D to Dutch Harbor. On 17th transported salvage gear to Attu. On 21st proceeded to Sheraya Island and assumed patrol. On 24th escorted C&G.S. Explorer to Buldir Island to survey uncharted waters until 31st.

ESCORTS TRANSPORTS
While engaged in guarding the C&G.S. Explorer, who was running survey lines in the uncharted waters in the vicinity of Buldir Island, Alaska, the CGC Onondaga was ordered to Massacre Bay, Attu. On August 4th she escorted a tug and an LST craft to Otkriti Bay,

--90--


Agattu, where the vessels discharged cargo and then returned to Massacre Bay. After meeting an incoming convoy on the 6th, she returned to Buldir Island with the Restorer, who continued her survey work until the 11th, returning to Massacre Bay. On the 16th the Onondaga met the USS S-28 and escorted her to Massacre Bay. On the 18th she escorted the S-40 into the Bay, relieving the USS Charleston of patrol. On the 22nd she towed the USA Tug Commodore to Adak and from there escorted a convoy to Dutch Harbor, where she moored until the 31st.

ESCORT TO ATTU
Remaining at Dutch Harbor until September 8th, the CGC Onondaga underwent miscellaneous repair and maintainance work. On the 8th freight was loaded aboard for transportation to Submarine Facility, Attu. Stood out of Dutch Harbor at 1806 and formed convoy consisting of the SS American Star and the SS Sam Jackson who were en route Adak Island. Arrived with convoy and anchored in Kuluk Bay, Adak Island on 30th. Moored on 14th for electrical installation work and remained until 17th when she departed escorting SS Thomas Condon to Massacre Bay, Attu Island. Arriving on 19th she moored at Navy Dock at 1500 and unloaded freight. Departed Attu on 21st with convoy consisting of SS Samuel D. Ingham and SS Jos. L. Meek with USS PC-1080 as additional escort en route Kuluk Bay. Arrived Kuluk Bay on 23rd and departed same date en route Tanaga Island escorting SS William L. Garrison. Was relieved of convoy on 24th near Tanaga Island by USS ORACLE and returned to Kuluk Bay where she remained until 30th.

ESCORT DUTY
On the 1st of October, 1943, the CGC Onondaga stood out of Kuluk Bay escorting the SS Chief Washakie to Amchitka, arriving on the 2nd. On the 3rd she departed for Kiska Harbor remaining there until the 7th. On that day she departed Kiska for Adak escorting the SS Carl Shurz, SS J. B. Floyd and the USAT James S. Clarke with the USS Austin as additional escort. On the 12th escorted the SS William L. Garrison out of Kuluk Bay and returned. On the 17th proceeded to Sitkin Island and escorted SS Lymann Beecher to Amchitka, mooring or. the 18th. On the 19th escorted Beecher to Kiska, returning to Amchitka on the 21st, and escorting SS Cummings to Kiska, SC-997 as additional escort. On 22nd escorted SS Beecher to Kuluk Bay, Adak Island. On 26th proceeded to search for a drifting LCT returning to Kuluk Bay same day. On 30th escorted SS Texada to Kiska.

CGC ONONDAGA ON CONVOY ESCORT
On 1st November, 1943, the CGC Onondaga was escorting the SS Texada from Kuluk Bay, Adak Island, to Kiska Island. Arrived in Kiska Harbor at 455 and moored. On the 5th began escorting SS Jack London to Adak, anchoring on 7th. On the 17th stood out of Kuluk Bay, Adak, with convoy SS Columbia en route Kiska Island, anchoring on 18th. On 21st stood out of Kiska Harbor escorting SS American Star, and SS Columbia en route Adak, mooring on 23rd. On 24th began escorting SS Restorer into Asuksak Pass, standing into Shelter Cove, Igitkin Island at 1105. On 25th engaged in cable laying operations to Korovin Bay, Atka Island. On 29th stood out of Korovin Bay escorting Restorer and anchored in Nazan Bay, Atka Island at 1834. On 30th began escorting Restorer to Dutch Harbor.

SCREENING AND ESCORT DUTY
The Onondaga, escorting USAT Restorer to Dutch Harbor, Alaska, reached that point on 1 December and left again on the 3rd to escort the same vessel to Attu, where they arrived on the 6th. For the next several days the Restorer was engaged in cable repairs off Shemya, Alaska, and the Onondaga screened her during these operations, mooring at Attu when not screening. At 2115 on the 12th, the Onondaga departed Shemya, arrived at Adak on the 14th, departed from there with the Restorer on the 15th, and arrived at Dutch Harbor two days later. The Onondaga remained moored at Dutch Harbor until 23 December, when she left for Adak with SS Henry Failing, arriving at destination on the 25th. On the 28th the Coast Guard vessel departed with convoy consisting of SS Thompson for Kiska, where they arrived on the 30th. The Onondaga was still moored there as the month ended. (The above is the entire available record on the Onondaga during World War II.)


CGC PERSEUS (WPC-114)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Perseus (WPC-114) was built at Bath, Maine, in 1932, her permanent station on July 1, 1941, being San Diego, California. She was 165 feet long, 25 feet 3 inches beam and drew 9 feet 6 inches of water. Her displacement was 334; tons. She had a steel hull and made 16 knots. She was powered with 1340 HP diesel oil burning twin screw engine.

ESCORT DUTY ALASKA
On December 16, 1941, the Perseus relieved the Bonham off Point Adolphus, Alaska, and spent the balance of that week guarding the entrance to Icy Strait, escorting vessels toward North Indian Pass, patrolling North Passage and Cross Sound identifying vessels and planes. She remained on this duty until she was detached for duty with the Eastern Sea Frontier.

STRIKES OIL
At 1150 on March 23, 1942, the Perseus contacted a suspicious submerged object with her echo ranging at 33°21'N, 77°57'W off the coast of South Carolina and stood out developing the contact. At 520 yards a distinct screw noise was heard and she dropped one charge set at 100 feet which failed to explode. Circling to the left and still maintaining contact she dropped two more charges two minutes later, one set at 100 feet and one at 150 feet both charges exploding simultaneously. Black bubbles were observed and what appeared to be oil came to the surface. Fifteen minutes later she circled back and picked up the contact but passed over it five minutes later before it was possible to drop charges accurately. She ran the bearing down to 180 yards and started to change to the left, then put rudder hard left and dropped two more charges set to explode at 75 to 150 feet. Blackened water came to the surface and no more contact or screw noises were heard as had been heard on all three attacks. At 0705 she sighted oil slick about one-eighth mile wide. (The above constitutes all available material on the Perseus during World War II.)


CGC RUSH (WSC-151)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Rush (WSC-151) was built at Camden, New Jersey, in 1927. On July 1, 1941, her permanent station was Norfolk, Virginia. She was 125 feet, long with a 23 foot 6 inch beam and a 9 foot draft, displacing 220 tons. She had a steel hull, did 11 knots and had a 350 HP diesel oil driven twin screw engine.

ESCORT DUTY
On June 20, 1942, the Rush in company with the Legare, Jackson and Colfax were

--91--


ordered to proceed to Charleston from Norfolk. En route the Legare proceeded to assist the Dione in an anti-sub action while the Rush and the other two cutters patrolled a small sector east of Hatteras Minefield. They reached Charleston on the 23rd and on the 25th were ordered to report to Commander Caribbean Sea Frontier. The Rush with the others, less Colfax, detached to escort a tanker, moored at Key West on i June 29, 1942. On the 30th the three began escorting the SS Alcoa Patriot to Curaçao and then proceed to Trinidad. On July 3rd the Legare sighted a periscope but could not get the echo range. The Rush made contact and dropped two depth charges set to explode at 200 feet. A large geyser of oil and air appeared. Arriving at Curaçao on the 6th the unit departed next day escorting 4 vessels to join convoy W.A.T. at rendezvous which was reached on the 8th. On the 10th while proceeding toward Trinidad, depth charges were dropped by an escort at 2145. On the 11th the convoy dispersed the unit escorting two vessels of the convoy to Trinidad. (The above is all that Is available on the activities of the Rush in World War II.)


USS SEA CLOUD (IX-99)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

WEATHER PATROL
The USS Sea Cloud (IX-99), Coast Guard manned, on April 4, 1942, was on Weather Patrol under Task Force 24, Atlantic Fleet and was proceeding to Weather Station No. 2 at the beginning of February 1944. Here she relieved the CGC Conifer on the 5th of February and patrolled the hundred square miles; at 54°N, 44°30'W until February 26th sending daily weather reports as per schedule to the District Coast Guard Officer, First Naval District. She was relieved of this duty on 27 February and proceeded to Boston arriving on 4 March, 1944. After overhauling at Atlantic lard, East Boston, she proceeded to Weather Station No. 1 on the 11th of March, patrolling the 100 square miles at 34°N and 55°W from the 14th of March until the 4th of April, 1944. On the 23rd of March all Atlantic Weather Patrol vessels were placed under Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet, with Commander, Task Force 24, having control of operations and Commander, Destroyers, Atlantic Fleet having charge of Administration. On 31 March, C.T.F. 24 issued orders to the Sea Cloud to continue to base at Boston, Mass., and adhere to existing patrol schedule of DCGO, 1ND. Relieved on the 4th of April, 1944, by the Sorrel, the Sea Cloud set course for Boston. On the 5th at 2141 she had a radar contact on a small surface target at Lat. 39°27'N, Long. 62°30'W, bearing 350°T, range 3000 yards. General Quarters was sounded; all battle stations were manned and ready. The vessel lost the contact ten minutes later. The target was plotted on course 015° at 10 knots and evaluated and reported as a submarine. After carrying out standard anti-submarine warfare plan to regain contact, without success, the Sea Cloud continued towards Boston arriving on the 7th of April.

EN ROUTE ARGENTIA
From the 7th to 20th of April, 1944, she underwent minor repairs and prepared for sea, receiving a new schedule of weather observations as well as orders to base at Argentia, Newfoundland, except for the 30 day overhaul period when she was to Base at Boston. On the 20th of April she departed for Weather Station No. 2 relieving the USS Zircon on the 25th and patroled the station until the 16th of May when the Sorrel relieved her. She set course for Argentia and moored there on the 20th of Bay, where she received a new schedule.

WEATHER PATROL
On 30 May 1944, she departed for weather Station No. 3 and relieved the USS Zircon on the 2nd of June patrolling the 100 miles square at 43°N, 37°W until 11 June, 1944, when a U.S. Navy TBF Avenger was sighted and recognition signals exchanged. The Sea Cloud received orders from the plane to steer course 035°T. She changed course and proceeded at full speed. At 1655 the aircraft carrier USS Croatan and five escort vessels under command of C.T.G. 22.5 were sighted. At 1748 the Sea Cloud was ordered to report to the Croatan and at 1752 to take position astern of that vessel. At 2001 the Sea Cloud was ordered to proceed to 40°12'W to investigate a reported life raft. She arrived at that point at 0318 on the 12th of June and began search for the raft but abandoned search at 0919 on the 13th and resumed patrol of Weather Station No. 3. She was relieved by the USS Sorrel on the 21st of June and arrived at Argentia on the 24th. On the 8th of July, 1944, after undergoing voyage repairs, the Sea Cloud, departed and relieved the Zircon on Weather Station No. 4 patrolling the 100 miles square at 55°N, 44°30'W until 2 August, 1944, when she was relieved. Following a search on that date for survivors of an aircraft reported lost in the area 52°00'N, 143°40'W, the Sea Cloud set course at 1940 for Boston and remained at the Atlantic Ship Yard undergoing repairs and conversion for the rest of the month. The Coast Guard crew was removed on 4 November, 1944.


CGC SOUTHWIND (WAG-280)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The commissioning of the Southwind (WAG-280) took place on July 15, 1944, at San Pedro, California, when Commander Richard M. Hoyle, USCG, assumed command. An availability of 26 days was then granted to complete the vessel and outfit her at the builder's yard, Western Pipe and Steel Company, San Pedro. On August 10, 1944, two days of shakedown was followed by 72 hours of post shakedown availability and five days of anti-submarine warfare training at San Diego. On August 22, 191th, , she left San Diego for New York, via the Canal Zone.

DESCRIPTION
The Southwind is a heavily armed icebreaker,5 269 feet long, 63 feet 6 inches maximum beam, with a normal draft of 25 feet 9 inches and a maximum draft of 29 feet 1 inch. She has a normal displacement of 5300 tons and a maximum displacement of 6515 tons, and carried a complement of 145, attaining a speed of 16 knots. She is propelled by diesel electric machinery, her forward engines having 333 normal horsepower and her after engines 6664 or 10,000 horsepower, depending on whether her bow propeller is in use or not. She has a cruising radius of 10,800 miles. The capacity of her trimming tanks, used for shifting the water ballast used in the ice-breaking operations, is 717 tons. The ice belt plating of her hull is 1-5/8". She is a sister ship of the Eastwind, Westwind and the two Northwinds. The first Northwind, the Westwind and in March 1945 the Southwind were all turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend Lease.

TO NORTHEAST GREENLAND
The Southwind reached New York on September 9, 19U4, and on the 12th departed for training exercises at Casco Bay, Maine. Departing the training area same

--92--


day to patrol special area DOG the winds reached hurricane force of 65 knots. At the height of the storm a fire broke out in the upper handling room of the 5"/38 turret but was extinguished before any damage was done. After training exercises, extending over five days, the Southwind proceeded to New York for alterations and loading of cargo, reporting for duty to Commander Task Force 24 on September 26, 1944. She sailed next day for Northeast Greenland.

RENDEZVOUS WITH EASTWIND
No enemy contacts were made during the trip north and on October 6, 1944, the vessel reported for duty to Commander, Northeast Greenland Patrol. Next day she was instructed to meet the Eastwind ten miles east of Cape Philip Broke. On the 8th she encountered an extensive ice field and hove to until daylight when she proceeded through broken ice and sighted the Eastwind at 1040. After transferring fuel and stores on the 9th she proceeded to Hockstetter's Bay and the cruised northward in the ice. On the 10th, latitude 77°N was reached at longitude 15°30'W. Here the ice was about 10 feet thick. "Storis" ice extended to 75°40'N after which the sea was frozen solid with winter ice. No sign of the enemy was found. On the 11th she scouted to the south and westward Investigating a lead through the ice at 76°05'N. Next day she made a plane search north to 77°30'N and westward to the Coast, then a coastal search to the Sledge Patrol Station on Morkefjord, to the southern tip of Great Koldewey Island and back to point of origin, but no unusual condition was observed.

ENEMY SHIP REPORTED
At 1935 on October 15, 1944, the Southwind was notified that the Eastwind's plane had sighted a large ship in the ice 15 miles east of Cape Borgen. The Southwind, at that time, was less than three miles from that position and had sighted nothing before dark. She was ordered to search from 5 to 10 miles east of Cape Borgen. Because of the thick ice the Southwind progressed slowly and could not hold straight courses, but the general course to the west was maintained in the latitude of Cape Borgen. At 2312 star shells were sighted so the Southwind challenged the vessel firing them and received a friendly reply, turning to course 180° to avoid fouling the firing line. No target was visible. As firing ceased the Southwind changed course once more to 270° .

"WE HAVE SUNK TARGET"
At 2340 on October 15, 1944, the Southwind received the visual message from the Eastwind "We have target" and firing from the latter vessel commenced once more. A flashing light was sighted ahead of the Eastwind bearing and orders were given to fire, but a visual message was then received "We have sunk target." Before a salvo could be fired by the Southwind a "cease firing" order was given supposedly because the survivors on the ice were not to be fired upon. The target and the Eastwind were about 6 miles away. The Eastwind stuck in the ice with a damaged propeller, asked the Southwind for assistance, so the latter continued her course toward the Eastwind, progressing slowly through the ice. It required more than seven hours to reach the damaged vessel and she had to ram some places six or seven times before breaking through, making only 400 or 500 yards some hours, the greatest distance being two miles in one hour. In the last half mile the ice was somewhat lighter. On the 16th, with only one half a blade on her port screw, she stopped near the Eastwind and the captured Externsteine, who obviously had not been sunk as reported, but had surrendered with 20 prisoners. The Southwind was ordered to proceed southeastward where she soon reached much open water and stopped to await the Eastwind. On the 17th, ordered to rendezvous at Cape Philip Broke, she proceeded through heavy ice to a lead and then through fairly light ice and open water to Hochstetter's Bay, mooring portside to the Eastwind's starboard side with the German prize tied to that cutter's port. Later that day the Southwind's plane searched south to Cape Wynn, then seaward for 50 miles and then north to 76°47'N, then to the coast and along the coast to the starting point.

TOWARD ICELAND
On October 18, 1944, the Southwind followed the Eastwind through the ice toward open water, with the Externsteine in her wake, taking the German vessel in tow when she was unable to follow through the ice. The tow line broke several times and the Externsteine bumped the Southwind's stem damaging both depth charge racks. At 1745 the prize proceeded under her own power after 6 hours towing. The vessels stopped overnight proceeding again next morning and reaching open water in position 73°34'N, 14°16'W. The Eastwind departed at 1421 and the Southwind lay to making emergency repairs to the depth charge racks, the German vessel remaining within visual signalling distance. On the 20th she proceeded south escorting the German vessel to Reykjavik, Iceland. She was to have been relieved by HNMS Honningsvaag, but was notified on the 21st that that vessel could not relieve her and that the Externsteine was to proceed alone from latitude 70°N. The Southwind accordingly departed at 1230 to the north to assume station patrol from 75°00'N to 75°30'N outside the ice. She maintained this patrol until October 31, 1944, meeting the Eastwind on the 29th to determine ice conditions as far south as Scoresby Sound. Ice conditions at 75°N had been such as to allow only a heavy ice breaker to reach shore. On the 31st both ships departed for Reykjavik.

ESCORTS PRIZE TO GREENLAND
Arriving at Reykjavik on November 2, 1944, the Southwind's commander assumed acting C.T.U. 24.8.5 on the 4th and departed with the Eastwind to escort the German prize ship, along with the Faunce and Travis to Narsarssuak, Greenland. They entered Skovfjord on November 16, 1944, after an uneventful trip, during which excellent air coverage had been furnished. Here T.U. 24.8.5 was disbanded on November 18, 1944.

TO BOSTON
On November 19, 1944, the Southwind and Eastwind were ordered to escort the Faunce, Travis, Frederick Lee and Externsteine to Argentia, Newfoundland and the Julius Thomsen and Bloomfield Park to a point of detachment for St. John's, Newfoundland. The ships departed Greenland on November 22, 1944, detached the two for St. John's on the 26th and arrived at Argentia on the 27th, leaving on the 29th for Boston. On the 30th the Travis reported having been in collision and the Eastwind and Externsteine were ordered to stand by to assist. Later it was learned that the Travis and Externsteine had collided, but the latter had not been damaged. The Travis had a hole extending below the water line. The lazarette was completely flooded and she was unable to steer. The German vessel towed the Travis to Halifax, N.S. with the Eastwind escorting and the other three vessels continued to Boston which was reached December 3, 194lt. The Southwind was granted 30 days availability for repairs.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA ON LEND LEASE
The Southwind remained at the U.S. Naval Drydock, South Boston

--93--


Massachusetts, until February 9, 1945, undergoing conversion for transfer under Lend Lease to Russia. On March 12, 1945, she arrived at San Pedro, California via the Panama Canal, where she was granted a 7 day availability undergoing repairs. On February 9, 1945, she departed Wilmington, California for Tacoma, Washington for decommissioning. On March 20, 1945, she was decommissioned.


CGC STORIS (WAGL-38)

COMMISSIONING
The CGC Storis (WAGL-38) was built at Toledo, Ohio, and after commissioning on 30 September 1942, was at Cleveland between October 20 and 28, 1942. She reached Boston and from April 24 until May 6, 1943, was moored at Atlantic Ship Yard, there undergoing repairs.

1943

ESCORT DUTY
After undergoing anti-submarine exercises at Casco Bay, Maine, until May 19, 1943, she began escorting the USS Sagamore, one section of drydock, and the USS Wandank to Argentia, with three other escorts. En route, the Sagamore reported steering engine failure and the convoy proceeded for Casco Bay. Four hour later, the trouble was repaired and the course changed for Argentia where it arrived on the 24th. On May 25, 1943, the Storis and two other escorts were en route St. John's escorting the USS Belle Isle, arriving on the 26th, and departing next day with the two vessel convoy SG-24, with two other escorts for Greenland. On the 29th, the Active, an escort, reported engine trouble and returned to Argentia. On the 30th, 6 to 10 submarines were reported from a plane, 120 miles west of the noon position. On the 31st, a depth charge attack was made on a sound contact, three charges being dropped with no visible results. The convoy anchored in Jungnat Bay on June 2, 1943, and on the 6th the Storis escorted the convoy to Narsarssuak. On the 11th she searched for suspected submarines without results and then proceeded to sea to observe ice and weather conditions.

LOSS OF ESCANABA
On June 12, 1943, the Storis joined convoy GS-24 en route St. John's. On June 13, 1943, at 0510, a terrific explosion occurred on the Escanaba and she sank almost immediately. Proceeding to the point where the Escanaba went down, the Storis screened the Raritan, who was undertaking rescue operations. Three survivors and only a few life jackets and scattered pieces of cork were all that was sighted after very thorough search. The Storis rejoined the convoy at 0825. The Raritan reported three survivors, one of whom died during the day. On the 17th, the Raritan released 7 depth charges but failed to regain contact. Convoy arrived at Argentia on June 18, 1943. On the 20th the Storis escorted the Belle Isle to St. John's with 8 other escorts.

ESCORT DUTY
On June 22, 1943, the Storis was en route Greenland, escorting with seven other cutters the eight ship convoy SC-26. Seven charges were dropped on a contact on the 24th and on the 26th the Amarok dropped two charges on a sighted periscope, the Mohawk going to her assistance. The convoy moored at Narsarssuak on the 28th, proceeding to Gronne Dal on the 30th.

TO CANADIAN ARCTIC
The month of July was taken up almost entirely with local escort duty, the Storis assisting convoys into Arsuk Fjord and escorting them from Bluie West One to Bluie West Seven. On July 22, 1943, she began escorting a convoy of five vessels with seven other escorts to the Canadian Arctic. She left the convoy on the 24th and returned to Gronne Dal on the 26th. Again on August 8, 1943, the Storis was underway as senior escort of a convoy to the Canadian Arctic with destination at Frobisher Bay. She entered the bay on the 11th and rendezvoused with the Fairfax, Bear and Aivik and began escorting them to Greenland, arriving off Arsuk Fjord on the 14th. On the 15th she stood out of the Fjord to investigate a submarine which had been sighted and to assist a convoy to Narsarssuak. On the 17th she stood out of Kungnat Bay escorting the Fairfax to Frobisher Bay which she reached on the 19th, turning over the convoyed Fairfax to the Arluk and returning to Gronne Dal on the 22nd.

ESCORT DUTY
On September 1, 1943, she stood out of Narsarssuak as escort to convoy GS-28 (USAT Yarmouth) to St. John's, Newfoundland, in company with the Algonquin and Modoc. On the 2nd they rendezvoused with the Fairfax, which was escorted by the Tampa. The convoy reached St. John's on September 5, 12943, when the Storis detached and proceeded to Boston, where she arrived on the 8th, for a 30-day availability.

ESCORT DUTY
On October 28, 1943, the Storis departed for exercises at Casco Bay, Maine, and on November 7, 1943, was underway for Argentia with the Algonquin, preceeding to St. John's with her on the 9th. On November 13, 1943, she departed St. John's with convoy SG-34 (Primo (Nor.)) and Algonquin for Narsarssuak. On the 17th the Albatross took over escort of the Primo off Kerkertai Island and the Storis and Algonquin were joined by the Tahoma and reached Kungnat Bay on the 18th. On the 19th a four vessels convoy, GS-36, departed Kungnat Bay for St. John's with the Storis and five other escorts, arriving on the 24th. On the 26th the convoy reformed as YD#1 and proceeded to Boston, vias Halifax, N.S., arriving December 12, 1943. On the 4th the Storis and Tahoma stood out of Boston for St. John's, Newfoundland, being instructed en route to proceed direct to Argentia. On the 6th the Tahoma dropped three charges on a doubtful contact. Arriving at Argentia on the 8th, the Storis proceeded to St. John's, were on the 10th, with two other escorts, she began escorting convoy CG-36 (USS Kaweah) to Greenland.

SINKING OF USAT NEVADA
On base course she awaited the Mui Hock (Nor.) and USAT Nevada, as additional vessels, and on the 112th proceeded toward St. John's to pick them up. Later the two ships were reported to have left St. John's the previous day and to be proceeding to destination unescorted. The Storis was ordered to search for the missing vessels in order to effect a rendezvous, but she reached Narsak Reach, Greenland on the 15th without locating them. Detaching 10 miles from Narsarssuak, the Storis set course for the Nevada's last reported position. At 23142 on the 16th, the Comanche and the Nevada were picked upon the radar in a position 60 miles distant, and on the 18th the Storis was underway in the vicinity of the USAT Nevada, now abandoned and sinking after being torpedoed. The Storis awaited daybreak to continue search for survivors. On the 18th at 0018, the Nevada sand in position 555°27'N, 47°12'W with no one on board. Search for the survivors continued. At 1300 the Storis rendezvoused with the Modoc and Tampa, breaking ice for the convoy returning to Narsarssuak.

--94--


1944

ESCORT DUTY
During most of January, 1944, the Storis broke ice in the Greenland fjords and transported supplies to various Greenland stations. On the 28th she stood down Arsuk Fjord escorting convoy CG-41 (Mui Hock (Nor.)) in company with the Mohawk to St. John's Arriving February 1, 1944, she proceeded to Argentia and on the 3rd proceeded to Boston, escorting convoy Argentia No. 6, where she arrived on February 8, 1944, for an availability that extended until March 6, 1944, proceeding independently to Argentia on the 7th. Arriving there on the 10th, she was underway in company with 4 other escorts for Greenland on the 14th, arriving at Narsarssuak on March 19, 1944.

OPERATIONS--NORTHEAST GREENLAND
Throughout the rest of March and up until July 7, 1944, the Storis was engaged in icebreaking in the fjords of West Greenland, and in transporting material for aids to navigation construction and maintenance there. On July 7, 1944, she was underway for Eskimones, Clavering Island, Northeast Greenland via Reykjavik, in company with the Northland. Here she was engaged in landing supplies at Shannon Island and the Young Sound area, observing ice conditions by ship's plane, reprovisioning the hunting huts being used by the Northeast Greenland Patrol and other related activities. On August 29, 1944 at 73°53'N, 16°44'W a suspected enemy plane was sighted about 10 miles distant. The plane circled the Storis at 14,000 yards and then disappeared in the direction of Shannon Island. On September 1, 1944, the Storis received word from the Northland that the latter vessel had sighted a suspected enemy vessel identified as a large trawler at 75°45'N, 14°45'W,, had pursued her and opened fire on her, the enemy vessel being scuttled by her crew of 28, including 8 officers, who took to lifeboats and were made prisoner. Next day the Northland's plane sighted an enemy submarine at 75°45'N, 16°00'W. The Storis proceeded to the position but made no visual contact, the sub being lost to view in the extremely heavy ice pack. On September 12, 1944, she contacted the Eastwind and relieved the evergreen on the station at the entrance to Pendulum and Clavering Straits. On September 29, 1944, she jointed as screen the Eastwind who was assisting the Northland, steering with a jury rig after damaging her rudder in the ice. On September 30, 1944, she was en route Iceland with the Evergreen, who was towing the Northland, in company with the Eastwind. On October 8, 1944, she left Iceland, returning to the Hochstetter's Bay area of Northeast Greenland where she took aboard captured German weather station equipment and prisoners captured on Little Koldewey Island.6 Returning to Iceland on October 17, 1944, she began screening the Evergreen who, with the Northland in tow was proceeding to Bluie West One, West Greenland. After some difficulty due to the tow line parting on several occasions, the vessels reached Bluie West One on October 31, 1944.

TO BOSTON
On November 6, 1944, the Storis left Narsarssuak for Boston, escorting convoy GS-56, consisting of the Northland in tow of the Curb, in company with the Tahoma. En route the convoy was diverted to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, where it anchored November 16, 1944. After a trip to Boston to discharge captured German equipment, the Storis returned to Portsmouth for availability during the rest of 1944.

1945

ESCORT DUTY
After a period of availability, followed by training exercises at Casco Bay, Maine, the Storis returned to Boston and on February 2, 1945, was underway for Gronne Dal, Greenland, where she arrived February 10, 1945. She remained in Greenland until March 4, 1945, delivering mail and cargo, breaking ice, and in stand-by status during foehn wind of hurricane force on March 2, 1945. Then she departed for Argentia with the Comanche. On the 6th, en route, she dropped six charges on a sound contact. She arrived at Argentia on March 9, 1945, and on the 11th was underway, with the Comanche, for Boston, arriving March 14, 1945. She was undergoing availability at Portsmouth Navy Yard from March 16, 1945 through April 20, 1945. On May 2, 1945, after exercises at Casco Bay, Maine, she was underway for Argentia, and on the 11th began escorting convoy SG-55 to Narsarssuak, arriving May 23, 1945.

TO NORTHEAST GREENLAND
On July 1, 1945, the Storis was en route Reykjavik, escorting the USAT Belle Isle, arriving on the 9th. On the 26th she stood out of Reykjavik for Scoresby Sound, Northeast Greenland, escorting the Belle Isle. Arriving on July 29, 1945, the Belle Isle began unloading cargo for the U.S. Army Weather Station. On August 13, 1945, the two vessels departed for Kangerd-Iugssuak on Mike's Fjord, where cargo was put ashore for a new U.S. Army Weather Outpost.

PEACETIME
Returning to the United States after this duty, the Storis began her peacetime duties of icebreaking and servicing aids to navigation.


CGC TAHOMA
(WPG-80)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The CGC Tahoma was built at Bay City, Michigan in 1934. On July 1, 1941, her permanent station was Cleveland, Ohio. She was 165 feet long, 35 foot beam, drew 13 feet 7 inches with a displacement of 1005 tons and a gross tonnage CH of 718. With a steel hull, she did 13 knots and was powered by a 1500 HP geared turbine, oil burning engine.

1942

ESCORT DUTY
On July 31, 1942, the Tahoma left Casco Bay escorting 4 trawlers for Sydney, arriving August 4, 1942. On August 5, 1942, she got underway escorting the 7 vessel convoy SG-4 from Sydney [Nova Scotia] to Greenland with 4 other escorts. The convoy arrived at Bluie West One on August 10th and at Ivigtut on the 13th. On September 5, 1942, the Tahoma stood out of Skov Fjord entrance awaiting a convoy from Bluie West One to Sydney. The convoy arrived at Sydney on September 12, 1942. On September 14, 1942, the Tahoma, as part of Task Unit 24.8.2 was at Sydney, N.S., as commander D.C. McNeil, USCG, too over command of the Task Unit. On the 17th, she departed, escorting a five vessel convoy, SG-8, with the USS Rapidan. On the 19th, she lost contact with the convoy and was out of contact on the 20th. She rejoined on the 21st with Mojave and Comanche joining off Arsuk Fjord, later departing with two vessels for a position off the coast at 66°00'N, 49°48'W. On September 29, 1942, she began escorting a convoy to Sydney, arriving October 3rd. On October 8, 1942, she began escorting a 9 vessel convoy, SG-10, to Greenland.

--95--


On October 15, 1942, what remained of convoy SG-10 from Sydney, after being badly split due to faulty instructions, was taken by the Tahoma into Kungnat Bay from Arsuk Fjord entrance. On the 16th she stood out of Kungnat Bay escorting two vessels to join others forming a 3 vessel convoy to Hudson Straits arriving on the 19th. She returned to Kungnat Bay October 23rd. On October 31st, 1942, the Tahoma and 4 other escorts began escorting convoy GS-12 for St, John's and Argentia, arriving November 7, 1942. On November 14, 1942, she departed for St. John's and on 17th was en route Kungnat Bay escorting SG-13 arriving on the 23rd. She departed for Argentia on November 25th escorting convoy GS-14 arriving on the 30th. On December 8th she left Argentia escorting a vessel to St. John's and on the 12th departed escorting the five vessel convoy . SG-15 with 3 other escorts for Greenland arriving Kungnat Bay on December 19, 1942. On December .21, 1942 she began escorting the 5 vessel convoy GS-16 for St. John's arriving December 26th and at Argentia on the 27th for repairs.

1943

SEARCHES FOR SUB
On March 1, 1943, the Tahoma reported for duty with Task Unit 24.8.2 and on the 5th while at gun practice with Storis, Modoc and Algonquin in the bay, received report of a submarine in the area from a patrol plane, which commenced directing the unit to the position. The unit searched the area for the remainder of the day with negative results, continuing until daylight of the 6th, when it stood for St. John's. On the 8th, the unit, plus three escorts departed St. John's as escorts for the 4 vessel convoy SG-21. On the 14th the Modoc and Tahoma escorted two of the ships to Kungnat Bay, while the remainder continued to Narsarssuak.

ESCORT DUTY
On March 18, 1943, the Tahoma and four other escorts departed Greenland with the two ship convoy SG-21, the Storis and Modoc splitting off on the 19th to go to the assistance of the SS Svend Foyne which had collided with an ice berg at 58° 05'N, 43°50'W. Later the Storis returned to the convoy as the Algonquin, Aivik and Frederick Lee departed for the disabled vessel. The Tahoma continued to Argentia. On April 20, 1943, she began escorting convoy XSG-23 to Greenland, entering the ice field on the 21st to break ice for the convoy. Ordered to escort the SS Eagle for Greenland, the Tahoma received air coverage but lost contact with the Eagle due to low visibility regaining it on the 24th. On the 28th proceeding through increasing heavy ice, she hove to until daylight and moored at Narsarssuak on April 29, 1943. On May 20, 1943, the Tahoma was underway with the Northland and four other escorts en route St. John's as escort to convoy GS-23, arriving there on the 26th and continuing on to Boston, via Argentia where she arrived June 2, 1943. She departed Boston on the 10th escorting the USS Pontiac with the Modoc and SC-704 arriving Argentia on the 14th. Arriving St. John's on the 22nd, she departed same day escorting convoy SG-26 to Gronne Dal where she arrived on June 29, 1943. On July 1, 1943, she departed Gronne Dal with four other escorts of convoy GS-25 arriving St. John's on the 5th and Argentia on the 6th. Leaving Argentia on the 9th, with four other escorts, she arrived St. John's on the 10th and departed on the 15th for Gronne Dal with six other escorts and convoy SG-28, standing into Kungnat Bay on the 20th to assist the USAT Fairfax which was aground. The Fairfax was floated by the Mohawk and Tahoma. On the 22nd, the Tahoma with six escorts began escorting convoy GS-26 for Hudson Straits and Argentia, three escorts and two vessels departing for Hudson Straits on the 24th and one vessel proceeding to Botwood independently on the 27th. The rest of the convoy arrived at Argentia on July 31, 1943.

ESCORT DUTY
On August 1, 1943, the Tahoma with the Mohawk was en route Sydney, N.S., and St. John's arriving on the 5th. On the 12th she departed St. John's escorting convoy SG-29 with seven other escorts. On the 18th six ships departed for Hudson Straits and the Tahoma with 3 other escorts and the rest of the convoy moored in Kungnat Bay on the 21st. On the 24th she departed escorting convoy GS-27 with 3 other escorts for St. John's where she moored on the 30th. On September 9, 1943, she began escorting the 15 vessel convoy SG-30 with 4 other escorts to Greenland. On the 11th the Algonquin dropped a full pattern of 11 charges on a contact. The convoy split into two groups on the 13th, the Tahoma and two escorts taking the Greenland section to Gronne Dal on the 14th. On September 16, 1943, the Tahoma departed with the Modoc escorting a two vessel convoy to St. John's, proceeding with the Modoc to Argentia on the 27th. On November 19, 1943, the Tahoma left Gronne Dal escorting the 3 vessel convoy GS-36 with two other escorts to St. John's, arriving on November 24, 1943. On the 26th the 7 vessel convoy YD-#1 departed St. John's for Boston. Two vessels detached and proceeded independently for Halifax on the 30th and the balance reached Boston December 1, 1943. On December 10, 1943, the one vessel convoy CG-36 with the Tahoma and two other escorts, left Boston, the Nevada and Mui Hock (Nor.) to join on base course. On arrival St. John's, learned that the two vessels had apparently left and were proceeding to destination unescorted. The convoy entered Narsak Reach, Greenland, on December 15, 1943. The Storis departed to search for the missing Nevada. On December 25, 1943, the Tahoma departed Gronne Dal for St. John's with 3 other escorts escorting convoy GS-39.

1944

ESCORT DUTY
The Tahoma arrived at St. John's on January 1, 1944, and on the 3rd departed for Boston with convoy YD-#2, arriving on the 8th. There she remained until February 7, 1944, when she departed for Casco Bay, Maine. She departed on the 16th with Algonquin en route Argentia, where she moored on the 19th remaining through March 2, 1944. On that date she rendezvoused with convoy GS-42 en route Boston, relieving the Mohawk, encountering a force 10 to 11 NW gale en route and reducing speed, she arrived at Boston without the convoy on March 7, 1944, for availability until the 25th. On that day she departed with three other escorts for Argentia, arriving on the 29th. On the 30th she began escorting convoy SG-40 to Greenland with six other escorts, mooring at Bluie West Seven on April 7, 1944. On the 12th she anchored at Bluie West One, returning to Bluie West Seven on the 13th. She proceeded to Navy 26 on the 28th and to Gronne Dal on April 30, 1944.

ICE AND WEATHER PATROL
For the rest of World War II the Tahoma was on ice and weather patrol. She alternated with the Algonquin, Mohawk and Frederick Lee in patrolling Station "CHARLIE" reporting on ice and weather conditions and acting as plane guard on this station midway between Greenland and Iceland. Due to a major casualty to her main engine on October 3, 1944, she returned to Gronne Dal. On November 6, 1944, she

--96--


COAST GUARD CUTTER Tahoma
COAST GUARD CUTTER Tahoma

COAST GUARD CUTTER Tampa
COAST GUARD CUTTER Tampa

--97--


escorted convoy GS-56 which consisted of the CGC Northland, towed by the USS Curb and additionally escorted by the Storis as far as Argentia and proceeded to Boston independently, on November 14th, 1944, for 30 days availability. After several weeks at Casco Bay she returned to Boston on January 9, 1945.

1945

WEATHER PATROL
Departing Boston escorting the USS Laramie, with three other escorts on January 15, 1945, the Tahoma reached St. John's on the 20th, when she detached and began escorting convoy SG-58 to Julianehaab, Greenland, detaching and proceeding to Gronne Dal on the 25th. She continued to patrol weather station #6, being relieved by the Comanche and Northland periodically until April 28, 1945. On May 12, 1945, she began escorting convoy GS-67, consisting of SS Julius Thomsen, arriving Boston on the 25th, for 30 days availability. After 10 days training at Casco Bay she proceeded to Reykjavik, Iceland, via Argentia and St. John's. On August 8, 1945, she proceeded to air-sea rescue patrol station at 62°45'N, 29°00'W, returning to Reykjavik on August 15, 1945, for 5 days availability. At the end of August, 1945, she, was at Reykjavik awaiting orders to carry out her post-war peacetime duties.


CGC TALLAPOOSA (WPG-52)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The Coast Guard cutter Tallapoosa was built by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company at Newport News, Virginia. She was launched in 1915 at Newport News, Va., and after acceptance and being placed in commission on August 12, 1915, proceeded to her station at Port Eads, La., with headquarters at Mobile, Alabama. The Tallapoosa was 165 feet 10 inches in length overall with a 32 ft. molded beam, and a maximum draft of 11 feet. She had a displacement of 964 tons and a gross tonnage of 692. Her hull was of steel and she had a speed of 12 knots. Her oil burning steam engine developed 1000 HP.

ESCORT DUTY
In 1937 the Tallapoosa replaced the Yamacraw at Savannah, Ga., and remained in the 6th Naval District throughout World War II. Here she engaged in convoy and anti-submarine work. On May 30, June 10, June 21, and 22, 1942 she searched various areas where submarines had been sighted, but with negative results. On November 4 and 5, 1942, she was reported searching for a reported submarine, and during the next two days escorting a British steamer en route to Lookout Bight. On the 9th she resumed search for the submarine in the vicinity of Sapelo Island Buoy. On the 13th and 14th of November, she escorted another British vessel to Lookout Bight. Standing out from Charleston on November 23, 1942, the Tallapoosa searched in the area southeast of Charleston Whistle Buoy 2-C for about 15 miles, continuing her search next day before returning to Charleston. At 1800 on the same day she stood out again to search 10 miles N.E. of the wreck of the lighted bell buoy en route to Southport, N.C. On the 25th of November she rendezvoused off Southport, N.C. entrance buoy with the SS Cornelius Barnett and escorted her to Lookout Bight, thence returning to Southport, N.C. On the 26th she patrolled off Frying Pan Shoals and next day escorted the SS Henry Bacon from Southport to Lookout Bight.

CONVOY DUTY
On December 10, 1942, while on convoy duty, the Tallapoosa made an apparent sound contact at 33°49'N, 77°11'30"W and dropped 11 MX VI depth charges and a marker buoy. The charges raised a quantity of oil, but it was decided that the target was a wreck and the cutter continued on convoy duty. On the 12th while still on convoy duty, a CAP plane dropped two smoke bombs in close proximity to the convoy. The cutter was unable to establish communications with the plane, which departed immediately, and so proceeded with the convoy. On December 19, 1942, what appeared to be a submarine was heard on the cutter's sound equipment, estimated 3 or 4 miles from the ship. The cutter notified NAO-4 but the submarine was not heard or seen again. The Tallapoosa began a grid search westward from a position 30 miles due east of the reported sub's position at 0900 on December 19, 1942, with negative results. At 0410 on the 20th, a dispatch was received reporting a sub sighted 3 or 4 miles distant on bearing 015 from Savannah Lightship No. 94, and the Tallapoosa again carried out a grid search with negative results.

PATROL DUTY
The principal occupation of the Tallapoosa from January 1943 when she was attached to the Southern Ship Lane Patrol of the 6th Naval District was an observing vessel for tests in connection with shore blackouts. From January 4th to 15th, 1943, she operated from the section base at Mayport, Florida, under direction of the Base Commander and Lt. Comdr, Fintel, USNRF, attached to the Eastern Sea Frontier. The cutter made nightly trips to a position south of St. John's Light vessel, sometimes accompanied by the USS Umpqua, who acted as target vessel. Various arrangements of shore lighting in the vicinity of Jacksonville Beach were made by the U.S. Army Engineer Corps. These lights varied in intensity and were measured on board the cutter from seaward by civilian experts using photometers to determine the amount of light constituting a hazard to a merchant vessel passing between a submarine and a shore light. On one occasion the visibility of various navigational aids was tested. Proceeding to Jacksonville after these tests the cutter underwent repairs until February 28, 1943, when she returned to her duties on the Southern Ship Lane Patrol. The Tallapoosa remained in the 6th Naval District until the fall of 1945, when she was sent to Curtis Bay, Maryland for decommissioning.


CGC TAMPA (WPG-48)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Tampa (WPG-48) was built at Oakland, California, in 1921. On July 1, 1941, her permanent station was Mobile, Alabama. She was 240 feet long, 39 foot beam, and drew 16 feet 6 inches of water, with a displacement of 1780 tons. She had a gross tonnage C.H. of 1330, a steel hull, and made 16 knots. She was an oil burner with a 2600 H.P. turbine electric engine.

ESCORT DUTY
On May 3, 1942, she departed Bluie West One for Ivigtut, and on the 8th began escorting the SS Chatham to Cape Cod Canal, via St. John's where she stopped on the 12th. Losing contact with the Chatham in the dense fog on the 16th, she regained it near the eastern entrance to the Canal, where she left the vessel and proceeded to Boston. En route she searched for a submarine reported in the vicinity of Stellwagon Banks reaching Boston on the 17th, where

--98--


she remained for repairs and alterations until the 28th. On May 30, 1942, she attacked a sound contact as she began escorting the SS Montrose to Argentia. The Montrose ran aground on Moratties Reef on June 3, 1942, and the Tampa floated her with the assistance of two Navy vessels. Escort continued to Greenland where both vessels anchored at Bluie West Eight on June 10, 1942. After guarding Sondre Strom Fjord entrance until the 14th, the Tampa proceeded to Ivigtut, boarding four Portuguese fishing vessels en route. Arriving at Ivigtut on the 16th, she remained through the 26th guarding the cryolite mine. Returning to Kungnat Bay, she began escorting a three vessel convoy, in company with the Modoc, to Sydney, N.S. On July 1, 1942, convoy was lost to sight in a dense fog. reassembling next day as they entered Sydney Harbor. On July 6, 1942, the Tampa, with the Modoc, began escorting three vessels to Greenland where she detached for Bluie West One on the 11th. Proceeding to Kungnat Bay on the 15th, on the 16th she was en route to Sydney escorting two vessels with the Modoc, arriving on the 21st. She departed Sydney on the 26th with convoy SG-3. En route she rendezvoused with HMCS N. V. McLean to proceed to Niger Sound, Labrador, and thence to Resolution Island on July 30, 1942. Proceeding to Kungnat Bay she remained there until August 5, 1942, when, with 3 other escorts, she proceeded with a convoy to Sydney, arriving on the 10th, when Commander Charles W. Dean, USCG, was relieved by Lt. Comdr. H. W. Stinchcomb, USCG, as commanding officer. On August 15, 1942, a five vessel convoy was escorted, with the Modoc, to 60°02'N, 60°45'W, known as "Point X" where the escorts left the convoy and stood for Kungnat Bay. On August 25, 1942, she proceeded to Sydney with three vessels, in company with the Modoc, one vessel proceeding independently to St. John's on the 30th. Arriving Sydney on September 1, 1942, the Tampa began escorting a three vessel convoy to Point X on September 4, 1942, arriving on September 12 and proceeding to Tunugdliarfik Fjord where she remained anchored until the 16th. On September 18, 1942, with the Modoc she began escorting 4 vessels for Sydney, the Mohawk joining next day, and a Navy escort on the 21st. Arriving on the 24th, she stood out on the 27th with two other escorts of a vessel convoy arriving in Greenland on October 1, 1942. Departing on the 7th she joined the Modoc in escorting the SS Lake Traverse to form convoy GS-10 for Sydney, arriving there on the 14th. Leaving Sydney on the 19th she escorted a seven vessel convoy, with two other escorts to Greenland. On the 28th she proceeded to Julianehaab with 3 vessels by inland water route, returning to Kungnat Bay with one vessel on the 30th. On the 31st the Tampa was escorting the 4 vessel convoy GS-12 to St. John's with three other escorts. On delivering the convoy the Tampa rejoined the other escorts remaining with them until November 7, 1942, when they detached from GS-12 and intercepted convoy HX-214 to escort the Laramie and Pontiac to Argentia arriving there on the 8th. Here Tampa detached and proceeded to Boston for overhaul. On December 12, 1942, the Tampa, having arrived St. John's began escorting a five ship convoy to Greenland, detaching for Onoto with one vessel on the 18th. On the 21st she departed Kungnat Bay for St. John's with convoy GS-16 reaching Argentia on the 29th, 1943

DORCHESTER TORPEDOED
Leaving Argentia with the Tahoma on January 1, 1943, for St. John's, where she moored until the 6th, the Tampa with two other escorts continued accompanying 3 vessels to Greenland. The Tahoma and her convoy detached on the 11th as the Escanaba went in search of another convoyed vessel lost in the fog. The Tampa moored at Base One with the third vessel on the 11th, escorting 6 other vessels to Kungnat Bay on the 12th. On January 14, 1943, she departed with the Tahoma and Escanaba to escort the six vessel convoy GS-18 to Newfoundland, 4 vessels detaching for Argentia, and the escorts picked up a new convoy group at St. John's and arrived at Argentia with them on t,he 20th. The Tampa escorted the USS Pontiac to join convoy ON-161 on the 27th returning to St. John's next day. On the 29th she was underway escorting convoy SG-19, consisting of the SS Dorchester, Biscaya and Lutz, and in company with the Comanche and Escanaba to Greenland. On February 3, 1943, she observed the Dorchester at 0056 veering hard to port and showing numerous small lights. Three minutes later the Biscaya fired two green rockets and executed an emergency turn to starboard. The Dorchester had apparently been torpedoed at 0100. The position was 59°23'N, 48°42'W. The Escanaba reported that the vessel was sinking fast and rescue operations were carried out as the Tampa departed to escort the rest of the convoy into Skov Fjord arriving there at 1414 and then returning to the scene of the torpedoing. An army bomber reported attacking a submarine 30 miles south. The Tampa searched for survivors on the 4th, sighting numerous bodies, two swamped lifeboats containing bodies and seven empty life rafts but no signs of life. She returned to Narsarssuak on February 6, 1943.

ESCORT DUTY
Engaged in local escort duty until February 22, 1943, the Tampa got underway with 5 other escorts and the 11 vessel convoy GS-20, detaching on the 27th and proceeding alone to St. John's for emergency repairs. Proceeding to Argentia on the 28th she remained there until March 5, 1943, when she searched for a sub sighted by a plane and then proceeded to St. John's on March 7, 1943, departing next day with four other escorts and convoy SG-21 for Kungnat Bay and Narsarssuak, arriving at the latter place on March 15, 1945. On the 18th she departed on escort duty for Argentia arriving there on the 24th and left as escort for Boston arriving on the 29th. She remained at Boston until April 8, 1943, and after 10 days at Casco Bay arrived at Argentia on April 19, 1943. On the 24th she accompanied the Mojave to Casco Bay to pick up a convoy of two tugs each with a tow and with the Comanche escorted them to Argentia, arriving May 4, 1943. On the 5th, with two other escorts, she took one vessel to Bluie West One, dropping depth charges on a contact en route and mooring on the 12th. On the 17th she began escorting another convoy to Argentia and proceeded to St. John's on the 24th. On May 29, 1943, the Tampa with two other escorts, accompanied the Fairfax to Bluie West One, arriving June 4, 1943. On June 12, 1943, she departed with four other escorts and a 3 vessel convoy.

SINKING OF ESCANABA
At 0508 on June 13, 1943, a yellowish white smoke was observed and the Escanaba was reported on fire. Two minutes later she was seen to sink. The Storis and Raritan departed for rescue operations and later reported three survivors (one of whom died). No sound of an explosion had been heard on the Tampa's QC equipment. A radar search had negative results. The position of the sinking was 60°48'N, 37°56'W. The Tampa moored at Argentia on June 17, 1943. She left there on June 18, 1943, escorting three vessels with the Algonquin and Mojave. At Halifax, the Tampa detached to return to Argentia with the Algonquin, mooring there until the 26th when, with the Modoc, they began escorting the Yarmouth to Kungnat Bay arriving on June 30, 1943. After fueling at Gronne Dal, the Tampa, with the Modoc left for Argentia on the 30th arriving there July 4, 1943. Departing on the 9th she arrived St. John's on the 15th and was underway same day escorting a 16 vessel convoy with 6 other escorts to Gronne Dal, arriving on the 20th. On the same day she began escorting the Yarmouth with two

--99--


other escorts to Argentia, arriving on the 24th and proceeding to Boston, arriving on July 27, 1943.

ESCORT DUTY
Undergoing repairs at Boston until August 18, 1943, the Tampa, with two other escorts, began accompanying the USS Pontiac to Gronne Dal, arriving August 28, 1943. She proceeded to Frobisher Bay, Canada, next day and anchored there on August 31, 1943. Escorting the Fairfax she left Frobisher Bay on September 1, 1943, and joined convoy GS-28 on the 2nd arriving at St. John's on the 5th. On September 9, 1943, she departed St. John's as one of five escorts for a 15 ship convoy. The Tampa continued escorting the convoy as the Greenland section detached on the 13th and did not reach Greenland until the 16th, with the rest of the convoy continuing northward. On September 30th the Tampa, with two other escorts, accompanied a 4 vessel convoy to St. John's, dropping 7 depth charges on a contact en route. She arrived October 5, 1943, and proceeding to Argentia moored there the same day. After undergoing repairs, the Tampa left Argentia on October 12, 1943, escorting convoy SG-31 with two other escorts, joined by another on the 13th. The convoy moored at Bluie West One on October 16, 1943. Next day the Tampa departed with another escort but was detached and returned to Gronne Dal. Moving to Kungnat Bay on the 20th, she departed on the 25th escorting the 16 vessel convoy GS-34 with 4 other escorts and three escort trawlers. On the 28th three vessels and two escorts detached for Botwood. On the 31st, the rest of the convoy arrived at Argentia. On November 1, 1943, she departed Argentia with eight other escorts and 10 convoyed vessels for Boston, arriving November 5, 1943.

SEARCH FOR NEVADA SURVIVORS
Departing Boston on November 9, 1943, the Tampa escorted the USS Pontiac to Argentia and then departed with two other escorts for Gronne Dal, arriving on the 17th. On the 19th she departed escorting the 5 ship convoy GS-36 with five other escorts, arriving at St. John's on the 24th. Next day the Tampa was escorting the SS Laramie, with the Algonquin, to Gronne Dal, arriving on the 30th. Departing Gronne Dal on December 7, 1943, she entered the ice and lay to. Next morning she stood through the ice and began escorting the one vessel convoy GS-38, with the Northland to St. John's, which was reached December 12, 1943. On the 13th, with the Modoc and Comanche, she began escorting the SS Fairfax to Greenland in convoy SG-39, arriving on the 16th. On December 17, 1943, she left with the Modoc to search for survivors of the USAT Nevada reported abandoned and sinking. On the 18th the Storis joined in the search and on the same date the Comanche picked up 29 Nevada survivors and reported that the Nevada had sunk at 0118. The search continued without success and except for the 29 survivors, all who had been on the Nevada were believed lost. The vessel returned to Skov Fjord on the 21st. On the 24th the Tampa began escorting convoy GS-ltO (Fairfax) for St. John's and continuing from there entered Boston on December 31st, 1943.

1944

SEARCH FOR FLIERS
The Tampa remained at Boston during January, 1944, undergoing refitting and repairs. On February 1, 1944, repairs having been completed, she stood out of Boston Harbor escorting the USAT Fairfax to Argentia, in company with the Modoc and Comanche, on convoy GS-38. Continuing on to Greenland the Tampa, on the 7th, detached and set course for the estimated position of two members of the RCAF reported adrift in a rubber lifeboat 160 miles off the coast of Labrador. The Tampa searched the reported position until February 17, 1944, when she was ordered to Gronne Dal, arriving on the 14th. From the 22nd she stood by the USAT Fairfax, drifting in the ice into Tunugdliarfik Fjord for three days before being able to escort her to Gronne Dal where she arrived on the 26th. The Tampa departed Gronne Dal February 28, 1944, escorting convoy GS-42 to Boston. En route the Mohawk was relieved as one of the escorts by the Tahoma, and the convoy moored at Boston on March 6, 1944, where the Tampa underwent repairs until the 31st. On that date the Tampa and Modoc began escorting the USS Kaweah to Argentia, where on April 5, 1944, she picked up the USS YO-65 and USS Tingle for St. John's. Leaving St. John's on the 7th, the Tingle, on the 8th, was unable to continue because of heavy weather and the convoy put into Trepassey Bay, reaching Argentia on the 9th. On the 18th, the Tampa proceeded to St. John's, and on the 19th began escorting SS Scull Bar to Boston, Mass., where she moored on the 22nd and remained until the 30th. On that date convoy BG-8 was formed, consisting of five merchant vessels and two naval oilers, with three corvettes as additional escort, and reached Argentia on May 4, 1944. Here the Tampa joined convoy *******SG-I*1******* as escort to Greenland, reaching Narsarssuak on the 13th. On May 18, 1944, she was escorting the two vessel convoy GS-t*6 with another escort to Argentia, getting underway from there on the 24th for Boston.

ESCORT DUTY
On June 2, 194lt, the Tampa began escorting the USAT Fairfax as convoy BG-9 with two other escorts to St. John's, returning to Boston via Halifax, with the Fairfax on the 12th. On the 20th, the Tampa, again escorted the Fairfax as BG-11, with three other escorts to St. John's. On the 27th she was escorting the Fairfax as convoy SG-48 to Ivigtut, Greenland, with two other escorts, being diverted en route to Bluie West Eight. On July 2, 1944, she proceeded with the Fairfax to Gronne Dal, damaging her propeller in the heavy ice in Arsuk Fjord before mooring there on the 5th. On the 9th she began escorting convoy GS-48 to Argentia arriving on July 14, 1944. On the same day she departed escorting two vessels with another escort in convoy SG-46 for Boston, arriving on July 18, 1944, for 5 days availability. On the 25th she departed, two other escorts accompanying the 5 vessel convoy B-12-A to Argentia with her.

TO HUDSON BAY
On August 6th she began escorting convoy B-13 for Hudson and Frobisher Bays, the convoy receiving intermittent air coverage until the 11th. A rendezvous was effected at 61°18'N, 62°55'W, 60 miles east of Acadia Bay, Resolution Island, with C.T.U. 24.18.19 in CGC Laurel to whom B-13 was transferred, the Tampa returning to Bluie West Seven on the 14th. On August 16, 1944, the two vessel convoy GS-50 got underway for Boston with the Tampa and another escort. The other escort detached at Argentia and the Tampa reached Boston on the 25th. Departing Boston on September 6, 1944, the Tampa began escorting convoy B-15 (Fairfax) to St. John's. Two other escorts joined en route and a PBY gave air coverage on the 8th and 9th. Reaching St. John's on the 10th, the Tampa next day set out for Greenland escorting convoy SG-53 (Fairfax) with two other escorts and moored at Bluie West One on the 14th. She remained there until the 26th when she proceeded to Bluie West Seven arriving on the 30th.

SOUND CONTACT
On October 1, 1944, the Tampa stood up Gronne Dal harbor with the 8 vessel convoy GS-54 accompanied by three other escorts. On October

--100--


2nd, the Tenacity joined as escort. On the 3rd, 9 depth charges were dropped on a sound contact. St. John's was reached on the 6th. On the 8th the Tampa with two other escorts began escorting a two vessel convoy to Boston arriving on the 11th, where she remained on availability until November 11, 1944, departing for Casco Bay for training until the 20th. On that date, receiving report of an enemy submarine sighted eight miles from Stratmouth Harbor entrance light, she commenced a search of the area, with Navy blimp and planes joining. Two Navy DD's also joined. Search continued until November 21st without result, and the Tampa returned to Boston. On November 29, 1944, she took the USS Laramie under escort with another escort to point "HOW" (60°00'N--46°51'W). This was reached on December 7, 1944, the Tampa mooring at Bluie West One. On the 10th she escorted the Laramie to Bluie West Seven. On December 13, 1944, she began escorting a three vessel convoy GS-61 for St. John's. En route the Polarbjorn lagged and the Tampa detached, contacted her and brought her into St. John's on the 18th. On December 22, 1944, the Tampa and another escort took on convoy SG-57 (USAT Belle Isle), and moored at Bluie West One on December 31, 1944.

1945

AVAILABILITY
The Tampa departed Gronne Dal on January 11, 1945, and arrived at Boston on the 18th where she underwent availability until January 27, 1945. Departing Boston on January 30th, she arrived at Argentia on February 4, 1945. She returned to Boston February 10, 1945, and left on the 17th for Argentia. She arrived in Greenland on March 3, 1945, and returned to Argentia on March 16, 1945. Departing for Casco Bay on March 26, 1945, she remained there until April 10, 1945, and then proceeded to Argentia arriving on the 18th. Returning to Boston on the 22nd, she proceeded on May 3, 1945, to Coast Guard Yard for 30 days availability. She departed Coast Guard Yard on June 11, 1945, and departed Boston for Argentia on the 16th, arriving on the 19th.

ICE PATROL
On June 21, 1945, the Tampa departed Argentia for ice patrol on the Grand Banks and continued on this duty, being relieved by the Modoc and Mojave periodically, until September 6, 1945, when she departed Argentia. She departed Gronne Dal for Boston September 14, 1945, via Argentia, arriving on the 21st. On September 30, 1945, she departed Boston for Argentia and on October 14, 1945, again arrived at Boston for 4 days availability. She arrived again at Argentia October 22, 1945, and at Boston on November 16, 1945, when she was given 30 days availability at Coast Guard Yard.

1946-47

ICE PATROL
Departing Coast Guard Yard January 12, 1946, for Boston, the Tampa proceeded to Argentia. Here she was placed on ice patrol duty until August 8, 1946, when she proceeded to New Orleans, Key West, Miami and Mayport, Florida, finally ending up at the Coast Guard Yard on January 18, 1947. She was sold to Charles M. Barnett, Jr., by the U.S. Maritime Commission on September 22, 1947.


CGC TRAVIS (WSC-153)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Travis (WSC-153) was built at Camden, New Jersey in 1927, and on July 1, 1941, was on duty with the Navy, her permanent station being Rockland, Maine. She is 125 ft. long, 23 ft. 6 in. beam and draws 9 ft. with a displacement of 220 tons. She has a steel hull and does 11 knots, being powered by a 400 HP, diesel, twin screw engine.

ATTACKS SUB
At about 1110 on February 8, 1942, while on listening patrol off the outer harbor entrance to Placentia Bay (Argentia) Newfoundland, a sound contact was made by the Travis. The QC operator pronounced the sound contact distinctly metallic and in all probability a submarine. Changes in ship's heading checked his bearing reports and localized the bearing of the submarine. The Travis maneuvered for an attack position and dropped one depth charge. The listening device was rendered inoperative and the contact lost. The mechanism was adjusted and the sound contact again picked up and second and third charges dropped. In the meantime an alarm was sent to SOPA at Argentia who dispatched destroyers and planes. A sound contact was again made and at the same time, a rip, such as might be made by an underwater moving object was apparent on the surface, approximately at reported bearing and distance. A fourth charge was dropped. No further contact was had other than a muffled echo from a disturbed wall of water. An oil film appeared on the surface in the locality of the last attack. Samples were taken and pronounced fuel oil by appearance. No bubbles or wreckage was sighted. Destroyers and planes appeared and D-158 apparently made contact about two miles to the southward, dropping ten to fourteen depth charges from the rack and Y gun. At 1500 the oil film was still present with a fresh breeze blowing when the Travis departed to board an incoming vessel.

RELIEVED OF TOW
On December 20, 1942, at 2200, the Mohawk while en route St. John's from Argentia, sighted the Travis assisting the SS Maltran. A strong northwest gale was blowing both ships toward a rocky, poorly charted lee shore with no navigational aids. Icing conditions were severe. The Travis requested help, visual signal devices being so iced as to make communications difficult. The Mohawk assumed charge of assistance operations and prepared to take the Maltran in tow, the Travis having parted her hawser and the Maltran drifting rapidly toward shore. The Travis was assigned to anti-submarine sound screen during the assistance operations. After three unsuccessful attempts, the Mohawk placed a 10 inch manila hawser aboard the Maltran and commenced towing at 0315 on December 21, 1942. The vessels were in dangerous waters due to numerous uncharted reefs and rocks within one mile of a rocky lee shore. The steering was difficult due to the hawser being led through stem chucks because of numerous depth charges on the quarter deck. By 0527 the Mohawk, having towed the Maltran well clear of all immediate dangers and about 5 miles from the lee shore, slowed to place a chafing gear on the hawser. The hawser had to be cut during the operation to save the arm of a chief boatswain's mate which had become jammed in it. The Maltran was ordered to take the hawser aboard, but cut it instead, fearing it would foul her wheel. The USS Junalaska attempted to take the Maltran in tow and, with the weather moderating, succeeded in doing so, with the Maltran using her engines while the Junalaska steered. The Mohawk and Travis maintained an anti-submarine screen until the Maltran was safely within the swept channel of Argentia. (The above constitutes all the material on the Travis contained in War Diaries).


--101--


CGC TRITON (WPC-116)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Triton (WPC-116) was built at Point Pleasant, West Virginia, in 1934. On July 1, 1941, she was on duty with the Navy her permanent station being Gulfport, Mississippi. She was 165 ft. long, 25 ft. 3 in. beam and drew 9 ft. 6 in. of water with a displacement of 337 tons. Her hull was steel and she made 16 knots, being powered by a 1340 HP diesel oil burning twin screw engine.

MAKES CONTACT
On February 21, 1942, at 0802, contact was made by the Triton at 500 yards ahead, while on anti-submarine patrol in the 7th Naval District. The contact was lost but was regained at 1830 at 460 yards. An attack was made with two depth charges, both set for 50 feet but they failed to explode in 72 feet of water. At 0910 the contact was made at 250 yards and another attack was made with two charges set for fifty feet which failed to explode in 78 feet of water. On the 23rd another depth charge set at 50 feet was dropped with negative results. On the 26th two distinct echoes were heard over the sound equipment and at 1008, five charges were dropped, propeller charges being heard momentarily at 1035. Again on February 28, 1942, contact was made but lost again. PC-445 and USS Hamilton joined in the search. At 1420 the Hamilton made contact and dropped four charges. At 1502, a positive contact was established by the Triton who dropped five charges with negative results. At 1512, the contact was renewed and six charges dropped. (This is all the material available on the Triton's activities in World War II).


CGC UNALGA (WAK-185)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The Revenue Cutter Unalga was built by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry-dock Company under a contract signed June, 1911, for $250,000.00. She was launched at Newport News, Virginia, on February 10, 1912, Miss Elizabeth Hilles being the sponsor. She was 190 feet long, 32 foot 6 inch beam molded, with a draft of 14 feet 1 inch and a displacement of 1181 tons. Her gross tonnage was 808 tons. She had a steel hull and was steam powered. She was commissioned at Arundel Cove on May 23, 1912. On September 26, 1912, she left Norfolk, Virginia to report to the Commanding Officer, Northern Division, Pacific Coast, travelling via Gibraltar. She arrived at Port Townsend on March 22, 1913, and was assigned to the Bering Sea Fleet March 27th.

AT SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO
During World War II the Unalga was stationed at San Juan, Puerto Rico, San Juan being the headquarters of the 10th Naval District, was assigned more ships and craft than any other single port in the District, with a view that these vessels would be best located at the main port of the District, for its adequate defense in times of emergency in this way these same units, being extremely mobile, could be assigned temporarily from time to time to threatened areas, or to areas in which submarines were extremely active, returning to San Juan, when the condition had ceased to exist. Further, they could be made available at any time for special patrols in the vicinity of Puerto Rico proper, or in outlying areas within the boundaries of the District, without undue detriment to the overall defense of the nerve centers of the District's military organizations. To San Juan, therefore, were allocated the Coast Guard cutters Unalga, Marion, Crawford, Lotus and Spruce, all being sizeable cutters with fairly adequate armament and anti-submarine fighting facilities. Twenty six other craft, ranging in size from 12 to 83 feet in length, were assigned to San Juan and operated from there during the entire time they were attached to the District.


CGC VIGILANT (WSC-154)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Vigilant (WSC-154) was built at Camden, New Jersey in 1927. She was fitted to service aids to navigation and her permanent station on July 1, 1941, was Fort Pierce, Florida. She was 125 ft. long, with 23 ft. 6 in. beam and drew 9 feet of water, displacing 220 tons. Her hull was steel and she made 13 knots, powered by a 350 HP diesel, twin screw engine.

ATTACKS SUB
At 1350 on February 19, 1942, a radio message was intercepted from the SS Elizabeth Masset that a ship had been torpedoed at 28°06'N, 80°00'W. The Vigilant was dispatched at 1400 to assist survivors. At 1742 the Masset radioed that she had 19 survivors of the SS Pan Massachusetts and no further assistance was necessary. The Vigilant continued and at 0555 on February 22, 1942, sighted a flare off shore east of Melbourne, Florida. At 0800 discovered an overturned lifeboat alongside the burning tanker with one man on the bottom. Maneuvered the Vigilant to within 50 feet of the man when the ship exploded, enveloping the man in flames and spraying the Vigilant with oil. Continued search and picked up two survivors very close to the flames, who were transferred to the Biddle (DD). Continuing the search she picked up six bodies and transferred them to the Biddle. She was relieved of the search at 1700 by the Biddle. On May 9, 1942, the Vigilant was observed by the Nike dropping depth charges on a submerged object at 26°35.5'N, 79°58.5'W, thought to be a submarine reported to have been damaged and was headed in a northerly direction off the Florida coast just north of Miami. The Nike obtained a sound contact at 5000 yards south of this position, and shortly thereafter the Vigilant radioed she had lost contact. A pattern of five charges was dropped in the wake of the Vigilant's depth charge attack. Contact was again regained south of the first contact, propeller noises were heard and a pattern of two charges dropped well ahead of the contact. No further noises were heard and two more charges were dropped set to go off on the bottom where it was believed the damaged submarine had settled. (The above is all that is available in War Diaries and other reports on the activities of the Vigilant in World War II).


CGC WOODBURY (WSC-155

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The CGC Woodbury (WSC-155) was built at Camden, New Jersey, and fitted for aids to navigation. On July 1, 1941, her permanent station was Galveston, Texas. She was 125 feet long, 23 feet 6 inch beam, and drew 9 feet of water with a displacement of 220 tons. She had a steel hull and made 13 knots, powered with a 600 HP diesel twin screw engine.

RESCUES 40 SURVIVORS OF TANKER E. H. BLUM
While performing patrol duty at the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay in a dense fog, at

--102--


2145; on February 16, 1942, a vessel passed the Woodbury headed east and blowing whistles indicating that it was underway. Shortly afterward at 2145, an explosion was heard and then a second explosion. The radioman picked up the distress signals from the sinking vessel, which had either struck a mine or had been torpedoed. The Woodbury got underway at 2215, and at 36°57'N, 75°52'W, three miles away, picked up eleven survivors of the U.S. Tanker E. H. Blum. The Blum had been out two days and was bound for Houston, Texas. Informed that 3 other lifeboats were adrift, the Woodbury picked them up and by 2245 had rescued the entire crew of forty men.

UNDER COMEIGHT CONVOY ESCORT
Shortly after this the Woodbury was transferred to Inshore Patrol Duty in the 8th ND and went into drydock there for overhaul and rearmament. On July 27, 1942, the Woodbury was detached from the Inshore Patrol and placed under direct operation of COMEIGHT on convoy escort duty between Mississippi Passes and Galveston. On August 8, 1942, after searching for two days, the Woodbury, at 1815 obtained a sound contact about 30 miles south of the Mississippi Delta at 28°27'N, 8?°21'W and attacked it. A large oil slick was noted but the contact was lost and although the results of the attack were unknown, it was believed that a submarine in the vicinity had been seriously damaged. Next day, as the Woodbury resumed patrol in the area, it was covered with diesel and lube oil and granulated cork for two miles. Patches of cork were about 3 feet square. No submarine was reported as lost at this time or in this position when enemy records were made available after the conclusion of World War II. On August 24, 1942, the Coast Guard cutters Woodbury and Nemesis departed Southwest Pass on convoy escort duty to Galveston, leaving Galveston for Southwest Pass on return escort duty on the 27th. On October 25, 1942, the Woodbury arrived at Corpus Christi, Texas, with a convoy of six merchant vessels. She arrived at Galveston on the 28th to remain 8 days.

SEARCHES FOR SUB
On September 1, 1942, the Woodbury was ordered to position 28°50'N, 90°50'W to search for and attack a reported submarine. No contact was made, however, at the reported position. On September 24, 1942, the Woodbury departed Port Arthur for Southwest Pass on convoy escort duty. On September 24, 1942, she arrived at Mobile and on October 3, 1943, the CGC 466 and Woodbury escorted a convoy of 12 vessels which joined the eastbound convoy off Southwest pass. On October 16, 1942, the Woodbury was ordered to provide escort duty for a special convoy of six merchant vessels departing Southwest Pass for Port Arthur. She arrived off Sabine on the 17th and proceeded toward Galveston but was relieved as escort in transit and returned to Sabine Section Base. On the 16th, she departed Port Arthur as an escort for a convoy to Southwest Pass. On the 20th, the Woodbury arrived Burrwood and on the 22nd escorted vessels joining a convoy off Southwest Pass and proceeded with it to Galveston and Corpus Christi. She arrived at Corpus Christi on the 25th and left on the 27th for Galveston where she arrived on the 28th and remained 8 days. On November 12, 1942, the cutter escorted tugs and barges to Port St. Joe, Florida, and returned to Burrwood, Louisiana on the 13th.

ATTACKS SUB
On November 13, 1942, while escorting a convoy, the Woodbury made a sound contact with an enemy submarine at about 840 yards. On dropping a depth charge the sub seemed to attempt to evade the attack by crossing courses, passing through the ship's wake. After searching 25 minutes, two CAP planes were observed. The Woodbury was in frontal position sweeping with echo ranging apparatus the area to outboard and in front of the convoy. The sub crossed over at about 6 knots. The cutter regained contact at 600 yards and dropped a charge at 60 feet after the range failed to operate. When it had been repaired, no further contact could be established. As the Woodbury was the only escort she had to rejoin the convoy to protect it from possible attack, so the search had to be abandoned. The Woodbury left New Orleans on November 16, 1942, for 72 hours availability, returning on the 20th. On December 18, 1942, she escorted the western cable repair ship to the Gulf. The Woodbury arrived in Galveston December 24, 1942, after being on special duty with the cable repair ship in the Gulf, with another week of the duty in prospect. She completed the duty December 31, 1942, and returned to Galveston. (The above constitutes the entire record of the Woodbury in World War II which is available).


NAVY VESSELS

 

USS ACTION (WPG-86)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

9 ROUND TRIPS TO CUBA
(Available Records begin March 26, 1944).
The USS Action (WPG-86) was, one of the Coast Guard manned Canadian corvettes. She was commissioned November 22, 1942. Her commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Herbert Feldman, USCGR. On March 26, 1944, she arrived In New York after some months of escort duty, Coast Guard manned, between New York and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Between March 26, 1944, and January 6, 1945, she made nine round trips, escorting convoys between New York and Guantanamo Bay, including two to Key West, Florida.

PATROL DUTY--DECOMMISSIONING
Between January 14, 1945, and June 24, 1945, she was engaged on patrol duty in the New York District, usually 10 days patrol and 10 days layover. She Left New York June 20, 1945, for Charleston, S.C. where on September 8, 1945, she was decommissioned.

Each of these eight Coast Guard manned Canadian Corvettes was 208 feet long, with a 33 foot beam, and a maximum speed of 17 knots. They had a total cruising range of about 7300 miles at an economical cruising speed of about 12 knots. They each carried two 3"/50 caliber HA fire guns, four 20mm Oerlikon rapid-fire guns, and three Browning 30 caliber machine guns. For anti-submarine warfare they carried four D/C projectors with roller sacks, each projector with four charges. Astern were two dual racks carrying a total of 40 charges and two storage racks carrying 18 charges. The A/S projector (Hedgehog) had a capacity of 24 charges and the D/C a capacity of 74 Mark VI depth charges.


USS ALACRITY (WPG-87)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COAST GUARD MANS CANADIAN CORVETTE
The USS Alacrity (WPC-87), one of the eight Canadian corvettes which the Coast Guard manned during World War II, was commissioned December 10, 1942. On June 17, 1943, Lt. Comdr. R. F. Rea, USCG, and a Coast Guard crew relieved the ship's company on the Alacrity at South Boston, Massachusetts. Succeeding commanding officers were Lt. Thomas A. Cosgrove, USCG, and Lt. R. A. McCordie, USCG. Until July 22, 1943, was spent in deperming and making other preparations during

--103--


which the Alacrity remained at various anchorages in Boston and vicinity. On July 22, 1943, the Alacrity proceeded to Bermuda where she engaged in exercises until August 14, 1943, when she departed for Staten Island, New York, to undergo repairs.

ON ESCORT DUTY
On August 30, 1943, the Alacrity proceeded on convoy station en route from New York to Cuba. On September 1st she was ordered to depart from convoy, and for three days searched for an enemy submarine, arriving at Norfolk September 4th for engine repairs. On the 12th, she was underway for Staten Island and from there escorted a British tanker to Boston, returned to Staten Island on the 18th. After repairs at Brooklyn Navy Yard the Alacrity was underway on September 29, 1943, in convoy en route Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where she arrived October 6, 1943. On October 10, 1943, she was one of a four ship escort of six vessels which departed for New York, being joined on the 11th by a convoy of 27 more ships whose escorts they relieved. Arriving at Staten Island on October 18, 1943, she again departed for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, with a convoy of merchant ships as one of five escorts. (Record between October 30, 1943 and March 30, 1944 not available). '

14 MONTHS OF ESCORT DUTY--DECOMMISSIONING
From March 30, 1944, when she arrived at New York until May 18, 1945, the Alacrity made twelve round trips between Guantanamo Bay (including one to Key West) and return, escorting coastwise convoys under the Eastern Sea Frontier. Departing New York for Boston on June 11, 1945, she left there on July 10, 1945, for Charleston, South Carolina, arriving August 13, 1945, one day before VJ-day. Here she was decommissioned October 4, 1945.


USS BRISK (WPG-89)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COAST GUARD MANNED
The USS Brisk (WPG-89) was one of the Coast Guard manned Canadian Corvettes. She was commissioned December 6, 1942. On June 23, 1943, a Coast Guard officer assumed command as she was moored at Staten Island, New York. Other commanding officers were Lt. Comdr. Glenn L. Rollins, USCG; Lt. Comdr. Joseph H. Hantmann, USCG and Lt. B. G. Weeks, USCGR.

ESCORT DUTY--CHARGES SUB
The Brisk got underway July 1, 1943, escorting a convoy to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. On July 7, 1943, she separated from the main convoy to take three merchant vessels to the same destination, affording protection to the disabled SS Wilcox. She departed Guantanamo July 13, 1943, escorting Convoy GN-71 which arrived at New York on the 20th. Departing again on July 26, she escorted, as one of five escorts, another 27 vessel convoy for Guantanamo, NG-376. On August 1, 1946, she made a radar contact at 4000 yards at 2350 and while developing it made a sound contact at 2800 yards. The radar contact was temporarily lost at 1100 yards and the Brisk reduced speed, assuming the target had submerged. At 800 yards radar indications were again received and the corvette increased speed to 15 knots intending to ram. Immediately, thereafter a great swirl of white water was sighted dead ahead. There was no time for a deliberate attack with ahead throwing weapons, but an 8 charge depth charge pattern was dropped at 0010, August 2, 1943, followed by a hedgehog attack. Then the Brisk was forced to turn away to avoid the convoy. A light explosion was heard 33 seconds after firing the hedgehog followed by another 3 minutes later. A six hour search was then conducted without regaining contact. No record of an enemy submarine destroyed in that position on that date, however, was noted in enemy records uncovered after the war. Although the U-boat escaped, the attack by the Brisk probably frustrated an attack on the convoy.

ESCORT DUTY--ATTACKS SUB
The Brisk was underway again on August 7, 1943, escorting 28 ships in convoy GN-76 to New York. On August 20, 1943, she departed New York with the Intensity, PC-484 and PC-553 escorting convoy NG-381 consisting of 14 ships to Guantanamo. On the morning of August 27, 1943, she dropped depth charges and made a hedgehog attack on a contact and then searched the area but without results. Again on August 31, 1943, she was enroute to New York escorting the 24 ship convoy GN-81, arriving on September 8, 1943. She departed on the 19th with the 30 ship convoy NG-387 for Guantanamo, four LCI's joining on the 20th. On October 1, 1943, she began escorting the 22 ship convoy GN-87 to New York, arriving on the 9th. On the 15th she was again underway with 4 other vessels escorting convoy NG-392 to Cuba, merging with another convoy on October 21st and arriving same date. She returned to New York October 26, 1943, escorting convoy GN-72 to New York. (Records between November 1, 1943, and March 17, 1944, are not available).

15 ROUND TRIPS TO CUBA--DECOMMISSIONING
Between March 17, 1944, when she arrived in New York from convoy escort duty to June 11, 1945, when she left New York for Charleston, via Norfolk, for decommissioning, the Brisk made 15 round trips between New York and Guantanamo, Cuba, escorting convoys under the Eastern Sea Frontier. She was decommissioned at Charleston October 9, 1945.


USS HASTE (WPG-92)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING
The USS Haste (WPG-92) one of the Canadian Corvettes turned over to the Navy and manned by the Coast Guard, was commissioned on April 6, 1943. at Quebec, Canada. Her commanding officer on March 30, 1944, was Lt. James S. Ramsey, Jr., USCGR. The corvette remained at Quebec until May 5, 1943, and then got underway for Boston, patrolling a station in a convoy en route. She arrived at Boston on May 11, 1943, and remained there during May 1943. (Reports from June 1, 1943, to March 30, 1944, are not available).

8 ROUND TRIPS ON ESCORT DUTY
The Haste made eight round trip voyages escorting convoys from April 6, 1944, to November 14, 1944, 6 to Guantanamo Bay and return, one to Key West and return and one to St. John's, Newfoundland and return.

PATROL DUTY--EASTERN SEA FRONTIER
On November 18, 1944, she was assigned to patrol duty, Eastern Sea Frontier, and in this capacity was absent on patrol duty for 10 day periods in the New York area, returning for several days in port at New York, until May 22, 1945, when she made two round trips to St. John's on convoy escort duty.

DECOMMISSIONING
Departing New York on July 2, 1945, she arrived at Charleston on July 5, 1945, where she was decommissioned on October 3, 1945.


--104--


THE COAST GUARD MANNED CORVETTE INTENSITY SLIDES THROUGH THE SEA WITH ITS CREW READY FOR A FIGHT
The Coast Guard manned Corvette Intensity slides through the sea with its crew ready for a fight.

THE BUSY COAST GUARD PATROL GUNBOAT MIGHT SPEEDY AND PACKING PLENTY OF PUNCH RESTS IN AN ATLANTIC COASTAL HARBOR
The busy Coast Guard Patrol Gunboat Might,
speedy and packing plenty of punch, rests in an Atlantic coastal harbor.

--105--


USS INTENSITY (WPG-93)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING
The USS Intensity (WPG-93), one of the Canadian Corvettes turned over to the Navy and Coast Guard manned, was commissioned at Quebec, Canada, on March 31, 1943 Her commanding officer who assumed command June 17, 1943, was Lt. Harold F. Morrison, USCG.

ESCORT DUTY
She remained at Quebec until May 5, 1943, when she departed for Boston, with the USS Haste and USS Alacrity escorting the SS Essex Lance. The Intensity lost contact with the convoy and put into George Bay, Nova Scotia, next night. The other vessels stood in on the following day. Departing May 9, 1943, she stopped at Halifax and proceeded to South Boston arriving May 11, 1943. After various tests she proceeded to Bermuda with the Haste for shakedown exercises, arriving July 12, 1943. Returning to Staten Island, New York, on August 5, 1943, she began screening a convoy for Guantanamo Bay on August 20, 1943, arriving there on the 20th. On the 31st she began a return trip on escort duty with another convoy, arriving at New York, September 8, 1943. On September 19, 1943, she began screening the 29 ship convoy NG-387 with 4 other escorts for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, returning with Convoy GN-87 on October 1, 1943, dropping some vessels at Baltimore and Philadelphia, and arriving at New York with the rest October 9, 19ii3. She departed New York October 15, 1943, with convoy NG-392 for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, transferring some of the convoyed vessels to convoy GAT-94 on October 21, 1943, and proceeding to Guantanamo with the rest. On October 26, 1943, she began screening the 6 ship convoy GN-92, relieving escort of convoy TAG-92 same day, while en route for New York. (Records of movements of the USS Intensity between October 31, 1943, and March 17, 1944, are not available)

14 ROUND TRIPS TO CUBA
Between March 17, 1944, and May 22, 1945, the Intensity made 14 round trips to Guantanamo, Cuba from New York, escorting convoys. This duty was interspersed with five weeks of patrol duty in the New York area for Eastern Sea Frontier between November 5, 1944, and December 14, 1944.

DECOMMISSIONING
On June 26, 1945, the Intensity left New York for Charleston, S.C. arriving there on the 29th. She was decommissioned there on October 3, 1945.


USS MIGHT (WPG-94)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING
The USS Might (WPG-96), one of the Canadian Corvettes turned over to the Navy and manned by the Coast Guard, was commissioned December 22, 1942. Her first Coast Guard commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Joseph P. Martin, USCG, who was followed by Lt. Comdr. Paul A. Artman, USCG. He in turn was followed by Lt. George V. Stepanoff on July 7, 1944, Lt. Marion M. Mitchell on May 15, 1945, and Lt. Gordon P. Hammond on June 22, 1945. The Might was at South Boston on February 1, 1943, being fitted out, loading ammunition and making trial runs, deperming and conducting other activities. On March 7, 1943, she departed for Staten Island.

ESCORT DUTY
On March 19, 1943, the Might departed Staten Island on the first of a long series of round trips from New York to Guantanamo Bay. These trips extended until December 30, 1944, each round trip occupying about a month. During this period of approximately 22½ months, the Might, with other escorts brought hundreds of merchant vessels safely to Guantanamo, on the southbound and New York on the northbound trips.

PATROL DUTY
On January 5, 1945, the Might departed New York on the first of a series of patrols under the Eastern Sea Frontier, each extending for about 10 days at sea followed by 10 days in port.

DECOMMISSIONING
On June 24, 1945, the Might left New York for Charleston, S.C. where she was decommissioned on October 9, 1945.


USS PERT (WPG-95)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING
The USS Pert (WPG-95) one of the eight Coast Guard manned Canadian Corvettes was commissioned July 23, 1943, at Quebec, Canada. Remaining at Quebec, the Pert took aboard ammunition on August 9, 1943, in readiness for the Quebec Conference.

TO BOSTON--A CONTACT
On September 7, 1943, the Pert, with the USS Prudent, departed Quebec for Halifax, N.S. On the 9th a sound contact was made off Gaspe Peninsula. The Pert tried to run down the contact but couldn't hold it due to poor contact and water conditions. She abandoned search as the radar was inoperative and her inexperienced sound men were afraid of running down the Prudent in the fog. The Pert and Prudent reached Halifax on September 11, 1943, and on the 16th departed for Boston. Two sound contacts on route turned out to be whales. A third contact was lost but believed to be a wreck or a shoal. She reached Boston September 18, 1943, and remained there undergoing refitting and repairs until October 24, 1943, when she departed on her shakedown cruise at Bermuda. Her commanding officers were Lt. Comdr. Geo. E. Stephanson, USCGR, who was succeeded by Lt. William P. Clark.

ESCORT DUTY
Returning to New York on November 20, 1943, the Pert was underway on the 28th as escort to convoy NG-401, for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

SHIP TORPEDOED--CONTACTS ATTACKED
On November 30, 1943, one of the ships of the convoy, SS Gypsum King (Br.), was torpedoed at 0957. The Pert received a sound contact and expended 24 hedgehogs with no result. On December 1, 1943, she investigated another sound contact which was lost and not regained. At 1106 another contact was heard and at 1126 the Pert dropped 8 charges with negative results. She boxed in the area but did not regain contact. At 1208, a third contact was heard and she dropped 8 charges with no results. On the 4th, she reached Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

ESCORT DUTY--EASTERN SEA FRONTIER
From November 26, 1943, to November 6, 1944, the Pert was on continuous escort duty with the Eastern Sea

--106--


Frontier, escorting coastwise convoys between New York, Guantanamo Ray and Key West. Many contacts were attacked.

PATROL DUTY
Departing New York on November 12, 1944, the Pert entered upon patrol duty in the New York area and remained in that area on 10 patrols, with the exception of three trips to Boston, until June 11, 1945. On that day she departed for Boston and then for Charleston, S.C.

DECOMMISSIONING
She was decommissioned at Charleston. S.C. October 4, 1945.


USS PRUDENT (WPG-96)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING
The USS Prudent (WPG-96) one of the Coast Guard manned Canadian Corvettes, was commissioned at Quebec August 14, 1943. On September 7, 1943, she departed for Halifax and Boston, arrived at the latter place on September 18, 1943. Her commanding officers were Lt. Olaf L. Laveson, USCG, succeeded by Lt. Robert L. Overman, USCGR.

ESCORT DUTY
The Prudent was on escort duty with coastwise convoy under the Eastern Sea Frontier from November, 1943, until December 21, 1944, escorting convoys to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and return to New York.

PATROL DUTY
She departed New York January 3, 1945, for a period of patrol duty in the New York area, that took her to sea for 10 day intervals until May 7, 1945. Only one escort trip was made during this time when she left New York, February 20, 1945, for San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, returning to New York on March 15, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONING
On June 23, 1945, she left New York for Charleston, S.C. where she was decommissioned October 11, 1945.


USS POOLE (DE-151)
ESCORT DIVISION 22

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned destroyer escort USS Poole (DE-151) was commissioned at Orange, Texas, on 29 September, 1943. Built by the Consolidated Steel Corporation at Orange, Texas, she was named for Minor Butler Poole, gunner's mate first class, U.S. Navy, killed in action aboard the USS Boise at the Battle of Cape Esperance, October 11--12, 1942, and later awarded the Navy Cross, posthumously, for extraordinary heroism. After being outfitted at Galveston and New Orleans, the Poole was designated flagship of Escort Division 22, and the Division Commander, Comdr. W. W. Kenner, USCG, reported aboard. Under command of Lt. Comdr. R. D. Dean she arrived at Bermuda on October 24, 1943, for shakedown, including gunnery, A.S.W. exercises, ship handling, fueling at sea, towing, damage control drills, and numerous other tasks. At the end of four weeks the Poole departed for Charleston for post shakedown availability in the Navy Yard effecting minor repairs and routine check up.

SEARCHES FOR SUBMARINE
The Poole departed for New York on November 27, 1943, arriving on the 30th. Two days later she was escorting a convoy to Hampton Roads, Va. Mooring at Naval Operating Base, Norfolk on December 3rd, she was attached to COTCLANT for training of destroyer escort crews. On December 14th she was ordered to sea to search for a submarine reported sighted off the Virginia coast, in company with USS Harveson (DE-316). That night, in a blinding snow and rain with rough seas and high winds, the Harveson reported being rammed, by the Liberty Ship SS William T. Barry with her #1 and #2 engine rooms flooded. The Poole stood by to give assistance, but the Harveson was able to proceed under her own power, using only one screw, and arrived safely in Norfolk the next afternoon. After a fruitless all night search the Poole was ordered back to Norfolk, encountering the William T. Barry on her way back and escorting her into the swept channel.

1944

ESCORTS CONVOY TO GIBRALTAR
The Poole left Norfolk on December 19th, 1943, escorting the USS Tarazed (AF-13) to New York. On the 22nd she was again underway for Norfolk with the New York section of African bound convoy UGS-28. Anchoring off Norfolk on December 23rd, the convoy picked up more merchant ships, and by Christmas Eve was well out to sea, with the USS Poole (DE-151), USS Kirkpatrick (DE-316) and USS Leopold (DE-319) forming Escort Division 22, of Task Force 61. The convoy Consisted of 64 ships in 13 columns. The trip was without incident and on January 10, 1944, the American escort group was relieved in the Strait of Gibraltar by a British escort group and the Poole with her sister escorts proceeded to Casablanca, arriving there on January 11th, 1944.

HITS GALE RETURNING TO U.S.
Getting underway again on January 13, 1944, Task Force 61 formed a scouting line and swept through the Straits of Gibraltar until past Europa Point, and then the area west of Tarifa Light. They continued scouting throughout the night as enemy submarine activity had been reported in this area, and it was believed that one or more submarines were attempting passage of the Strait into the Mediterranean. On the morning of the 14th, Escort Division 22, plus USS Barber, continued the patrol which was later shifted to a small area along the north coast of the strait and continued throughout the night. Escort Division 22, with Escort Division 5, relieved British vessels of the escort of convoy GUS-27 on January 16th and the 50 ship convoy passed out of the Straits and headed for the United States. On the 19th an enemy sub was reported to be in the immediate area and another 200 miles southward. The Mission Bay (CVE) and four escorts joined the Task Force on the 20th and departed next day in search of a reported submarine. Intercepted MF/DF signals were identified as coming from the Brest radio. On February 1st, a northwesterly gale caused the convoy to straggle and the Poole left the screen to round up stragglers, the majority rejoining by the afternoon of the 2nd. Next day the Poole detached with Escort Division 22 and 16 merchant ships of the Delaware Section and on the 4th, the Poole proceeded to Gravesend, New York, moving to the Navy Yard next day for ten days availability.

USS LEOPOLD IS TORPEDOED
On completion of availability, the Poole proceeded to Casco Bay, Maine,

--107--


for training exercises, and on the 27th was again in New York. Here all the ships of Escort Division 22 were assembled together for the first time. They included the Poole (DE-151), Peterson (DE-152), Harveson (PE-316), Joyce (DE-317), Kirkpatrick (DE-318) and Leopold (DE-319). The six vessels, forming Task Group 21.5, on March 1st took screening station on the 27 ship convoy CU-16. On the 2nd the Peterson was detached to search astern for a member of the armed guard of the SS Santa Cecilia, who had been lost overboard, but returned without success. On the 8th the Leopold reported an HF/DF intercept which indicated an enemy submarine with 100 miles of the convoy and close to its route, which was consequently altered. On the 9th, at 1950, the Leopold reported a radar contact at 8000 yards, which placed it about 7 miles south of the convoy, and assisted by the Joyce proceeded to intercept. Ten minutes later the Leopold was torpedoed, breaking in half and sinking during the night. After the torpedoing, the Joyce remained in the vicinity to search for the submarine and rescue survivors. The Joyce picked up twenty eight survivors. Three torpedoes were fired at her during the rescue operations. The submarine was thought to be a unit in the patrol line reported running north and south of the vicinity in which the Leopold was torpedoed at 58°44'N, 25°50'W. On the 10th the convoy was in good formation, and four tankers were dispatched to proceed to Barry Roads at full speed. The convoy arrived off the north coast of Ireland on March 11, 1944, and the escort vessels, relieved by British vessels anchored in Lough Foyle off Moville. The Joyce, who had rejoined during the afternoon was ordered to Londonderry so that two of the Leopold survivors could be hospitalized. The Poole proceeded to Lisahally, North Ireland, on March 12th, together with the four remaining destroyer escorts of Escort Division 22. The USS Burrows (DE-105) reported, on the 14th for temporary duty with the division.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The Poole, along with the other five vessels of Escort Division 22, departed Lisahally on March 16, 1944, and reported at Moville, leaving next day to rendezvous with convoy UC-16, west of Oversay. A British escort group was sweeping 6 miles ahead. A message was received on the 22nd that an enemy submarine might cross the convoy track on that date. The heaving pounding of the escorts made sonar gear useless, but at 1800 a message from a British escort reported sighting a submarine and a torpedo. The message was believed to come from convoy ONS-31, 70 miles to the north, and no further developments occurred. Two vessels were detached on the 26th, one for Aruba and one for Halifax. Two vessels were detached for Philadelphia on the 28th and the rest of the convoy entered Ambrose Channel, New York the same day. The Poole and the other escorts remained in New York Navy Yard the rest of March on availability.

THREE ESCORTS SINK A SUBMARINE
Leaving New York Navy Yard on April 8th, 1944, the Poole engaged in exercises in the New London area and then repaired to the Section Base, Staten Island, where the USS Gandy (DE-764) reported for duty with Escort Division 22, which left on the 15th to rendezvous with the 28 ship convoy CU-21. Two vessels in the convoy collided in a heavy fog and had to return. On the 16th the SS Pan Pennsylvania was hit by a torpedo on the port side, and the Gandy, Joyce and Peterson were ordered to sound sweep the vicinity. The Pan Pennsylvania's crew abandoned the vessel as fire broke out in the engine room. At 0948 the Joyce reported a sound contact and dropped depth charges nine minutes later. Six minutes later the submarine surfaced and the Gandy rammed and sunk it The Joyce picked up 31 survivors from the Pan Pennsylvania and 12 German submarine crew members, who were made prisoners of war. The Peterson picked up 25 survivors from the torpedoed vessel, which was abandoned, burning and adrift. The three escorts rejoined the convoy. At first it was thought that the Gandy would have to return to port because of the damage sustained in ramming the submarine, but she repaired the damage and continued with the Task Group. On the 24th, the Harveson and Kirkpatrick were detached to hunt for a submarine which had been attacked by aircraft. On the 26th vessels were detached for Clyde, Lough Ewe and Avonmouth, and the convoy arrived off Oversay and proceeded down North Channel, while the Poole and other vessels of Escort Division 22 proceeded to Lisahally, to remain there until the end of April.

ICEBERG SIGHTED ON RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The Poole left Lisahally on May 2, 1944, with Task Group Commander of Tas Group 21.5 (Escort Division 22) on board, together with destroyer escorts Gandy, Kirkpatrick, Joyce, Harveson and Peterson, and rendezvoused with convoy UC-21, which consisted of 27 vessels. Because of the unfavorable submarine situation, the British Escort Group One consisting of five escort vessels took station 8 miles ahead of the convoy. An iceberg was sighted 15 miles south of the convoy on the 8th. On the 9th there was a dense fog and plane coverage was furnished for 16 hours, one of the planes picking up a radar contact 50 miles astern of the convoy. The Harveson, Peterson and Joyce were sent to sweep astern and three British escorts were later ordered to aid in the search. The group returned to the search on the 10th. After detaching vessels for Aruba, Hampton Roads, Philadelphia and Wilmington, the convoy arrived in New York on the 12th, the six vessels of the Task Group remaining on availability through the 22nd. Lt. Comdr. Louis M. Thayer relieved Lt. Comdr. R. D. Dean on May lath, 1944, as commanding officer of the Poole.

CONVOY TO IRELAND
After five days of training and exercises in the New London area, the Poole, with Escort Division 22, returned to New York on May 27, 1944, to prepare for convoy duty. On the 30th they met the 35 ship convoy CU-26 off Sandy Hook. The aircraft carrier HMS Ruler guarded the stern of the convoy. On June 8th the Kirkpatrick and Joyce were assigned to sweep on the right fLank of the convoy. On the 10th the Task Group was relieved of escort duty and proceeded to Lisahally. They moored at Londonderry until the 16th of June.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The Poole, with the rest of the Task Group, left Londonderry on June 16, 1944, to rendezvous with the 46 ship convoy UC-26. On the 17th the Poole had a possible sound contact which she closed, while the Harveson and Kirkpatrick passed through the convoy to assist her a s she regained contact astern of the convoy. The Poole dropped one depth charge pattern and the Kirkpatrick two patterns, but the results of all operations were negative. On the 21st the convoy was diverted because of a submarine in the vicinity of the track, and the Joyce and Harveson were stationed ahead to conduct a sweep. On the 25th vessels were detached for Trinidad, Aruba, and Baton Rouge. On the 26th two vessels detached for Hampton Roads escorted by the Peterson. On the 27th five vessels proceeded independently to Philadelphia. The rest of the convoy arrived at Ambrose Lightship the same day and the escorts were granted availability through the 30th. On July 5th, Commander Russell J. Roberts

--108--


relieved Captain W. W. Kenner as division and escort commander.

CONVOY TO IRELAND
Availability for Escort Division 22 continued until July 6, 1944, when they engaged in firing exercises 20 miles south of Montauk Point for two days, returning to Brooklyn until the 10th. On that day they proceeded to the swept channel to meet the 35 ship convoy CU-31 and then proceeded across the Atlantic without special event, arriving at Lisahally on the 21st.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The Escort Division rendezvoused with two sections totalling 31 ships of convoy UC-31 on July 26, 1944, the two sections joining into seven columns on the 27th. On August 3rd, two vessels were detached to proceed independently to Halifax and next day five mere were detached to proceed independently to Boston and other destinations. As another was detached on the 5th, the convoy was proceeding to New York through the swept channel, the entire Escort Division being granted availability through the 13th of August.

SS JACKSONVILLE IS TORPEDOED--TWO SURVIVORS PICKED UP
The Poole, with the rest of the Escort Division, departed for New London training area on August 14, 1944, and after two days of exercises returned to Brooklyn. The USS Oswald (DE-767) reported for duty with the Division on the 18th as relief for the Gandy which was detached. On the 19th the Division rendezvoused with the 31 ship convoy CU-36. On the 28th the Poole dropped an urgent pattern on sound contact. Four additional runs were made on good echoes, but lack of doppler and attack speed range rate made these runs doubtful. On the 30th five vessels were detached for Loch Ewe, with the Joyce and Harveson as escorts. At 1549 on August 30, 19hh, the gasoline tanker SS Jacksonville of the Loch Ewe section, had an explosion from an undetermined source, as she was breaking off from the port side and about 3000 yards from the main body of the convoy. A spray of water from the port side of the vessel was immediately followed by two tremendous detonations and in about five seconds the entire ship was enveloped in flames and very quickly broke in two. The Poole proceeded to the area and dropped life rafts for possible survivors. Later she picked up the only two survivors. They had swum underwater through the flames to safety. Both were badly burned, one having a leg broken. The attempt to sink the stern section of the Jacksonville by laying depth charges from K guns under it was without success. The Poole, Peterson, Kirkpatrick and Oswald formed a scouting line and searched the area, proceeding to Londonderry on the 31st.

HOMEWARD BOUND CONVOY SCATTERED BY HURRICANE
The Poole, with Escort Division 22, departed Londonderry for Belfast on September 3, 1944, and on the 4th stood out of Belfast to rendezvous with the 30 ship convoy UC-36. Early on the 11th, the Joyce and Peterson intercepted a transmission which placed a sub about 19 miles from the convoy and the Harveson took a position 6 miles from the convoy, which took an evasive course. On the 14th, a storm of hurricane force had been forecast and the convoy was reduced to four columns. By afternoon the wind, now E by S, had increased to 40 knots with the barometer down. Visibility was less than 200 yards with heavy rains and mist whipped up from the seas. By 1900 the wind had increased to 70 knots and some vessels had steering difficulties and broke out of line. Four hours later the storm was so intense that all semblance of formation was lost. Heavy weather and poor traffic control made it difficult to get a message through on the plight of the vessels. By 2000 the barometer had dropped to 28.62. Two hours later it started rising and the wind decreased to 30 knots. By 0400 on the 15th, seven ship's were still in the Poole's vicinity, and these, together with three each in the vicinity of the Harveson and Kirkpatrick were ordered to proceed to a rendezvous point, before entering the New York swept channel. Others were ordered to proceed independently to destinations. From the 16th to the 26th all ships of the escort division had availability at the Navy Yard, New York. Exercises in the New London area began on the 26th and continued through October 3, 1944.

CONVOY TO FRANCE
On October 6, 1944, Task Group 21.5 consisting of USS Doran (DD-634), the destroyer escorts Poole, Kirkpatrick, Joyce, Harveson, Peterson, Oswald, Ebert, Burrows and Slater stood out of New York harbor to rendezvous with the 31 ship convoy CU-42, three more ships joining later from Boston. On the 9th, hedgehog attacks were made on a sonar contact with negative results. On the 15th, eight ships with five escorts were detached for South England and French ports, one being detached for Plymouth with 3 escorts on the 16th. On the 17th the Poole proceeded with two ships for Cherbourg, and Peterson with one for Solent. The other four proceeded to Southend escorted by H.M.S. Vimy. The Poole returned to Plymouth the same evening.

LORAN AVERTS COLLISION
On October 24, 1944, thePoole moved to Portsmouth, taking over the escort of a merchant vessel, and proceeded with her to rendezvous with the remainder of convoy UC-42B. The Peterson joined from Plymouth, and on the 26th they proceeded on course, and on the same day joined the Irish Sea section of eight ships escorted by the Joyce and Harveson. On October 27th the convoy altered course after receiving bearings on a possible submarine, 14 miles on the starboard beam. Returning to the track on November 1st, a radar contact was picked up on the 2nd, which apparently originated from pickets of eastbound convoy CU-45. Loran checks at 0445 indicated that the Escort Division was about 5 miles south of its line and after the radar contacts the course was changed. This still made the passing close as the CU-45 was about 12 miles north of its line. Sights had been unavailable for two days and had it not been for the use of Loran, the escort division's position would have been doubtful. A thick fog began setting in on the 4th, and convoy speed was decreased as it formed a double column to enter the New York swept channel.

CONVOY TO FRANCE
After 10 day availability and five days in the training area, the Poole proceeded to New York and on November 23, 1944, departed to rendezvous with the 27 ship convoy CU-46, as a unit of Task Group 21.5. From the 26th to the 29th there was some straggling because of heavy seas. On December 2nd the convoy reduced speed to rearrange for breakoff. On the 4th, one vessel, with escort, detached for Plymouth, another, with escort for Cherbourg, and three were in the Thames section, with an escort. The other escorts proceeded with Southampton and Solent ships later returning to Plymouth. The Poole and Peterson remained at Plymouth, with the Harveson and Joyce at Greenock, Scotland, through December 10th.

--109--


RETURN TO UNITED STATES
On December 4th, 1944, the Poole, Peterson and Ramsden proceeded to Milford Haven, South Wales, to rendezvous with the Milford section of convoy UC-48B. While the Ramsden escorted a ship from Swansea to the rendezvous point, the Poole and Peterson proceeded with two ships and rendezvoused with four Irish Sea section ships escorted by the Joyce and Harveson. On the 13th, the Joyce fired two hedgehog patterns on a contact and the Poole an urgent pattern but was unable to regain contact. From the 16th the vessels were affected by rough seas, the wind reaching gale force on the 20th, with one of the convoy vessels pounding badly. Loran fixes placed the convoy 30 miles north of its line. The wind and sea moderated on the 21st. Vessels detached for Halifax and Norfolk and on the 23rd the convoy altered course to clear another convoy standing into the swept channel of New York. The Task Unit proceeded to the Navy Yard and were on availability for the balance of December.

1945

CONVOY MISSES TORPEDO EN ROUTE ENGLAND
All vessels of Escort Division 22, except the Kirkpatrick, which left for Casco Bay, Maine, on January 1, 1945, remained on availability until the 4th, when the Poole, Peterson, Joyce and Harveson departed for drills and exercises in the New London areas. On the 6th the Poole departed for Boston and all the others returned to New York. On the lOth the Poole, with three other destroyer escorts, left the Boston section of convoy CU-54, contacting the main convoy on the 11th. On the 12th a transport dropped out of formation due to shifting cargo and the Joyce was assigned to screen her. Next day the Harveson screened two stragglers with engine trouble. On the 17th, the Somers had a contact which turned out to be a floating wreck. On the 18th, the English Channel section of 25 ships detached, escorted by the Poole, Joyce, Harveson, Kirkpatrick and Ebert. On the 19th, noises of torpedoes being launched were heard by the sound gear of the Poole, which ordered an emergency turn of the convoy. Similar sounds were heard on the Harveson which dropped astern to lay an urgent pattern of depth charges but was unable to develop a sound contact and returned to the convoy. On the 21st the Kirkpatrick and Harveson detached to escort three ships to Cherbourg and the Le Havre section detached with 7 British escorts. The Joyce and Ebert assisted HMS Vimy with 5 ships for the Thames and the Poole escorted one to St. Helen's Roads.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
After six days at Plymouth and Portsmouth, the Poole, Harveson and Kirkpatrick sailed on January 28, 1945, with 12 ships of convoy UC-54A and on the 30th joined the other escorts with 16 ships of the Irish Sea section. The crossing was uneventful, and on February 9th the convoy entered the New York swept channel, and the escorts went on availability at the Navy Yard until February 20th.

COLLISION IN CONVOY TO ENGLAND
Concluding exercises in the New London area through February 25th, Escort Division 22 departed New York on the 27th, as escort to convoy CU-60. On March 1st one of the vessels in the convoy lost control due to a steering gear casualty and collided with another. The Slater and Burrows were assigned to assist the damaged ships. On the 2nd another vessel reported a man overboard and the Ebert located and picked the man up in a very short time. On the 10th, the Irish Sea section of 11 vessels with the Poole, Harveson and three Navy escorts, detached, and proceeded to Liverpool where they remained until March 14th.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The Poole stood out of Liverpool on March 15, 1945, to rendezvous with the Irish Sea section of convoy UC-60A. On the 16th the Bristol Channel section of seven ships, escorted by the Harveson and Slater joined, and later contacted the English Channel section. Returning to Liverpool on the 17th they met the Mersey section of convoy UC-60B on the 18th and joined the rest of the convoy on the 19th. On the 27th the Poole had a sound contact and dropped a depth charge pattern on it but was unable to regain it, so the results were negative. On the 29th the convoy stood up the New York swept channel and the escorts went on availability at the Navy Yard until April 10th.

CONVOY TO ENGLAND
On April 10, 1945, Commander J. L. Steinmetz, USCG, reported aboard the Poole, relieving Commander R. J. Roberts, USCG, as commanding officer of Escort Division 22. The Poole, Peterson and Harveson proceeded to Casco Bay, Maine, for training exercises. Departing for Boston on the 14th, Commander Steinmetz transferred his flag to the Peterson, and on the 16th the Peterson, Poole, Harveson and Joyce got underway escorting the Boston section of convoy CU-66 which, on meeting the New York section on the 17th, became a convoy of 42 ships and 10 escorts. The Halifax section of two ships joined on the 18th. Five other vessels joined the convoy en route. On the 26th the Irish Sea section consisting of 20 ships detached. On the 27th, 9 ships of the Bristol section left the convoy and later the Mersey section of 9 vessels departed. The Poole, Peterson and Harveson moored at Greenock, Scotland, on the 28th.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
On her return to the United States, Commander Thayer returned to Escort Division 22 on May 31, 1945, as division commander, relieving Captain Steinmetz and shifted his pennant back to the Poole. After her twenty second Atlantic crossing the Poole put into the Brooklyn Navy Yard for overhaul and repair and the installation of new and additional armament. Hostilities had ceased on the Atlantic and Escort Division 22 was one of the divisions picked for action in the Pacific.

TO PEARL HARBOR
On June 4th, 1945, Escort Division 22 left New York for Culebra Island, West Indies. Here, having completed shore bombardment on the 8th, the Division set sail for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for a 9 day training period. On the 20th the Division set sail for the Panama Canal and traversing it on the 23rd headed for San Diego, arriving on July 1st. On the 8th, the Poole departed for Pearl Harbor and arrived there on July 18th. The Poole remained at Pearl Harbor until September 4th, carrying out training exercises, acting as school snip for gunnery students and as target ship for the training of our submarines. The sudden end of the war on August 14, 1945, necessitated a change of plans for ships en route to the combat zone. During the last week in August, the ships of Escort Division 22 began to separate as individual ships received separate assignments. Prior to the Poole's departure for occupational duty in Japan, Lieutenant Commander V. E. Bakanas relieved Commander

--110--


L. M. Thayer as division commander and shifted his pennant to the Kirkpatrick.

TO JAPAN
The Poole, in company with PC-1185, departed Pearl Harbor on September 4, 1945, escorting a flotilla of LSM's to Saipan, arriving there September 17th after an uneventful trip. At Saipan the LSM's were to team up with a flotilla of LST's and proceed to Wakayama, Honshu, Japan, for occupational duty. The Poole and the LSM's sailed for Japan on the 20th, joining the LST flotilla on the 23rd. The trip was without incident, even though all hands experienced a feeling of tenseness on passing through the Japanese mine fields on the 26th. The convoy arrived at Wakayama on the morning of the 27th and the occupation came off without incident.

RETURN FOR DECOMMISSIONING
After a month of patrol duty off Wakayama, the Poole got underway on October 29, 1945, for San Diego, via Pearl Harbor. She arrived at San Diego on November 15th and then proceeded to San Pedro, where she engaged in special tests with the Peterson. On November 27th, 1945, both vessels proceeded to Charleston, S.C. where they arrived on December 10th. She proceeded to Jacksonville on January 15, 1946, and then to Green Cove Springs, Florida, for decommissioning. The Coast Guard crew was removed on May 1, 1946.


USS PETERSON (DE-152)
ESCORT DIVISION 22

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Peterson (DE-152) was named for Oscar Verner Peterson of Wisconsin, Chief Water Tender, U.S. Navy, who died of multiple burns during an aerial attack on May 13, 1942, while closing the bulkhead stop valves on board the USS Neosho. He received the Congressional Medal of Honor, posthumously. The Peterson was built by the Consolidated Shipbuilding Corporation at Orange, Texas, and commissioned on September 29, 1943. Lieutenant Commander R. F. Rea, USCG, was the first commanding officer. Proceeding to Galveston on October 6th, the Peterson went into drydock for latest additions to equipment to make her ready for wartime duties. On the 13th, in company with the Poole she departed for Bermuda, via New Orleans, for her shakedown exercises. Leaving Bermuda on November 22nd, she proceeded to Charleston and on the 28th left for New York.

FIRST CONVOY DUTY
The Peterson departed for Norfolk on December 2, 1943, with three other escort vessels and 23 merchant ships, and there 10 more escorts and 55 merchant ships joined to form convoy UGS-26 for Casablanca. The trip over was uneventful but on the return voyage the slow convoy was tossed and smashed by howling gales and high seas. Some days the convoy failed to make any headway. Many merchant ships ran out of food during that three week's crossing.

FORMATION OF ESCORT DIVISION 22
After a ten day availability in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, the Peterson started out on January 2d, 1944, for a month's training session at Casco Bay, Maine. It was here that the Peterson joined with the other destroyer escorts that made up Escort Division 22, the ships that were to serve with her until the end of the war. These were USS Poole (DE-151), USS Harveson(DE-316), USS Joyce (DE-317), USS Kirkpatrick (DE-318) and USS Leopold (DE-319). Captain W. W. Kenner, USCG, was the first division commander and his flagship was the Poole.

SINKING OF USS LEOPOLD
On March 1, 1944, Escort Division 22 began its first combat operation as a unit, screening convoy CU-16, a fast oil convoy, to Londonderry, North Ireland. The convoy was diverted several times by British authorities from its original course. Finally on the evening of March 9th, 1944, the convoy was just south of Iceland, only two days from its destination, when the Leopold reported a surface contact behind the convoy, four miles distant. It was ominously dark and bitter cold as a freezing wind kicked up choppy seas. The Peterson was on the port side of the convoy, just opposite the Leopold on the starboard quarter, when the Leopold surprised a submarine on the surface. Flashes of the Leopold's gunfire were easily visible from the Peterson. The escort commander was faced with a dilemma; he had sent the Joyce back to assist the Leopold, leaving only four escorts with the now sharply maneuvering convoy. If it was a lone submarine, another escort could be spared; however, if a wolfpack were preparing to attack the convoy, all remaining escorts would be vitally needed on their stations. The Commander decided in favor of the wolfpack. As it turned out the submarine was alone. As the Joyce approached the Leopold no contact with her could he made and it became obvious that she had been hit, as she was very low in the water. The Joyce came up to the sinking Leopold for a sound sweep but made no contact. Then the Leopold broke in two and the icy waters were filled with survivors and the Joyce began maneuvering to pick them up. Lines had been slung over the sides and some men were clinging to cargo nets on what remained of the Leopold. Then the Joyce got the sound of an approaching torpedo on her sonar gear. A sudden surge to flank speed and a hard over rudder and many nearly rescued men were lost, some caught in the churning screws of the Joyce. Again the Joyce came back for survivors, and again had to get underway as another torpedo was fired at her. Further sweeps failed to locate the submarine. The water, unendurably cold, was fatal to many Coast-guardsmen. The Leopold finally sank. The Joyce, struggling against seas and torpedoes, could rescue only 28 men of the crew of 199. No officers were saved.

GERMAN SUB U-550 IS SUNK AS PAN PENNSYLVANIA IS TORPEDOED
The remainder of the trip to Londonderry and back to New York was uneventful and on April 15, 1944, the Peterson, and the rest of Escort Division 22, with the Navy manned USS Gandy (DE-764) replacing the Leopold, stood down Ambrose Channel with convoy CU-21, again bound for Londonderry. Lt. Comdr. Sidney M. May, USCGR, formerly executive officer, had relieved Lt. Comdr. Rea, as commanding officer. Early next evening two merchant ships of the convoy collided in the fog and the Peterson was detailed to escort them back to New York. She left them with a PC off the swept channel and started to rejoin the convoy at 0100 on April 16th. At 0800, when but 15 miles astern of the convoy, word was received that the tanker Pan Pennsylvania had been torpedoed. The Peterson, together with the Gandy and Joyce, was directed to seek out the submarine and destroy it. The three escorts joined, all hands tense and alert, as the area was closely screened, every echo and every pip being methodically worked over and charges dropped. The huge tanker, the world's largest at that time, was slowly settling as its crew abandoned ship. While the Gandy screened, Peterson and Joyce went in to pick up survivors from life rafts and from the water, many sick from the fumes of octane gas with which the tanker was

--111--


loaded, unable to help themselves. Two of the Peterson's crew distinguished themselves--Stuart B. Goodwin, CEM, going over the side to help survivors aboard, ignoring the fact that the other escorts might drop depth charges at any moment--and David J. Stephenson MoM3/c, assisting him. Just ss they were putting lines around the last of the tanker's survivors, the Joyce who had stood in to determine the extent of the tanker's damage and the possibility of salvage, had a "hot" underwater contact and signalled the Peterson to join in the attack. The two men scrambled aboard and the Peterson veered off sharply, all engines ahead at flank speed. Soon after this the Joyce dropped charges, the tremendous explosion shaking the Peterson. Then the submarine came to the surface. Captain May Immediately gave the order "Stand by to ram", but the Gandy was better situated for this tactic and the Peterson sheered off. The Gandy struck the sub a glancing blow and the Peterson closed in, her guns going into action. As the sub passed close abeam, her conning tower was laid open by the withering fire from the escorts, and as a parting gesture two shallow set charges were fired from the Peterson's K-guns. The German crew began to abandon ship shortly afterward and the U-550 began to settle by the stern and finally slid to the bottom. A great cheer surged through the men of the Peterson. With 12 survivors of the sub aboard, the Joyce, the escorts, one Navy and two Coast Guard rejoined the convoy. The hulk of the Pan Pennsylvania being a menace to navigation in the ship lanes off Nantucket, was later sunk by the Navy. Lt. Comdr. May, received a letter of commendation and the USSR Order of Fatherland War, Second Class, and Goodwin and Stephenson received letters of commendation.

TWO ROUND TRIPS TO IRELAND
The Peterson returned to New York on May 12, 1944, and after a ten day availability, was again underway escorting convoy CU-26 to Ireland as part of Escort Division 22. This convoy was taken across and returned to New York without undue incident, though no radar or sound contacts were overlooked. Early in July, Commander R. J. Roberts, USCG, relieved Captain Kenner as division commander and Escort Division 22 was off to Ireland again, this time escorting Convoy CU-31, which was brought back to New York on August 5, 1944, without incident. The quietness of these crossings was deceptive, however. The Battle of the Atlantic was far from won.

SINKING OF THE JACKSONVILLE
The next crossing of the Peterson, with Escort Division 22, turned out to be an eventful one. Departing New York on August 19, 1944, with convoy CU-36, nothing unusual happened until the escorts, having arrived off Loch Foyle, the entrance to Londonderry, were taking their customary departure of the convoy on August 30th. From here the convoyed ships went on alone for these confined waters were considered by the British to be free of submarines. Vessels bound for various ports on the Irish Sea were joined here by British escorts. As the trans-oceanic escorts were leaving, and four merchant ships were also being detached to be escorted northward to Loch Ewe in Scotland, suddenly the last of the four, the tanker Jacksonville, carrying a full load of aviation gasoline, went up in a roaring, fiery hell of flames and exploding fuel. Only two of her crew were ultimately saved from the holocaust. On the horizon was a huge convoy of slow merchant ships and also the Queen Mary, the prize the Germans were seeking. The British Commander-in-Chief, Western Approaches, got into action. The Queen Mary and the distant convoy were diverted. Convoy CU-36 dashed on, maneuvering at top speed; and escorts began to pour out of British ports. Plane coverage arrived. By evening nearly thirty escorts were searching the area for the audacious invader who had dared to penetrate to the very back door of the British Isles. Escort Division 22 was sent into port next morning but for several days the hunt went on, with another cargo ship and a British escort being sunk. The submarine was thought to be one of the first German "schnorkel" subs in operation, fitted with a device that enabled it to remain submerged while recharging its batteries. One great Allied advantage over the enemy's subs had thus been eliminated--the fact that they could only remain submerged for a comparatively short time.

BATTERED BY HURRICANE
On the return voyage with convoy UC-36, the Escort Division struck the full fury of the 100 knot hurricane that was raging up the East Coast of the United States. Headway between the mountainous battering seas was impossible as the screeching wind enveloped the Peterson in a blinding sheet of water. Conversation with other ships over TBS grew fainter and finally died away altogether. The worst of the storm struck about 2000. The Peterson's radar ceased to operate. All that night men of all the ships fought to stay afloat, to remain together for mutual protection, but gradually the great convoy began to scatter. When morning and calm arrived not a ship was to be seen. The next day the Peterson limped into New York. One by one other ships began to arrive until all were accounted for. There had been no serious casualties.

FIVE ROUND TRIPS TO CHANNEL PORTS
On October 6, 1944, Escort Division was made a unit of a larger group consisting of the USS Doran (DD-634) and four Navy manned destroyer escorts--the Burrows, Slater, Oswald and Ebert. Five more round trips were made during the next seven and a half months, most of them to English Channel ports. Solent, Plymouth, Cherbourg, Milford Haven, Le Havre and Southampton, together with Liverpool and Greenoch (Scotland), were the ports visited. On April 15th while the Peterson was in Boston, a new division commander, Captain John L. Steinmetz, USCG, relieved Commander Roberts. VE-day found the Peterson sailing back to the United States with her last Atlantic convoy. Eleven convoys had been escorted over and back in nineteen months with hundreds of ships carrying thousands of troops and vital material of war.

ON TO THE PACIFIC
After a long availability at the Bayonne, New Jersey Navy Yard, where much new armament was added and other improvements made, a new division commander, Commander Louis M. Thayer, USCG, reported and selected the Poole as his flagship, and on June 4th, 1945, Escort Division 22 left New York, bound for the "shooting war" that was still raging in the Pacific. From June 10 to June 20, 1945, the Peterson underwent the most intensive of drills, inspections, underway maneuvers and gunnery, at Culebra Island, just off Puerto Rico. Then through the Panama Canal on June 23rd and up the Mexican Coast to San Diego. Escort Division was now a unit of the Pacific Fleet. On July 10th the Peterson set out for Pearl Harbor, arriving on the 16th. She remained in Pearl Harbor six weeks. VJ-day came and went and finally on August 31, 1945, the Peterson departed, escorting a large group of LST's bound for Saipan. It was a long haul, and a far cry from the fast convoys of earlier days, for the LST's were slow and lumbering ships. Saipan was reached on the 16th and three days later the Peterson departed on the final leg of her journey, bound for Japan. She was joined by the Poole and together they arrived at Wakayama, Japan on September 24, 1944. The first waves of occupation troops

--112--


had just gone ashore. The vast harbor was overflowing with vessels of all types, from huge battleships to LCT's. Other ships of Escort Division 22 were on similar missions in other Far Eastern ports. The Peterson was in Japanese waters for a little over a month, patrolling the entrances to the Inland Sea, stopping suspicious craft and, in general, protecting our ships anchored at Wakayama. On October 29, 1945, in company with the USS Kearny (DD-432), the Peterson and the Poole began the trip back home. Arriving at Pearl Harbor on November 7, 1945, the Peterson was delayed for repairs and went on to San Pedro alone, where she again joined the Poole. On the way up the East Coast a Navy mariner plane landed near her out of gas, off New Smyrna Beach and the Peterson towed her in.

DECOMMISSIONING
After Christmas leaves at Charleston, South Carolina, the Peterson reported to the Sixteenth (Inactive) Fleet, completing tender availability on January 29, 1946, and then went down the St. John's River to Green Cove Springs, Florida, for decommissioning and preservation for any future emergency. The last of her Coast Guard crew left on March 1, 1946. The Peterson had spent 10,162 hours underway since commissioning and travelled 146,875 miles.


USS MARCH AND (DE-249)
ESCORT DIVISION 20

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS March and (DE-249) was commissioned on September 6, 1943, at the Brown Shipbuilding Yards, Houston, Texas, where she was built. Her first commanding officer was Lieutenant Commander G. I. Lynch, USCG, and she became part of Escort Division 20, under Division Commander, Commander John Rountree, USCG, who made her his flagship. Until November 25, 1943, the March and was outfitted, underwent a month of shakedown and training at Bermuda. After a post shakedown availability at Charleston, South Carolina, she served as a target vessel for U.S. torpedo bomber squadrons in Cape Cod Bay and Block Island Sound.

CONVOY ESCORT TO CASABLANCA AND RETURN
On December 14, 1943, the March and put to sea on her first escort mission as flagship of Task Force 66 escorting UGS-27 from Norfolk to Casablanca. Upon her return to the United States, she was assigned to what was to be the first long series of escort mission with fast convoys to the United Kingdom.

RESCUES SURVIVORS FROM COLLISION
Three days out of New York on this escort mission, on February 25, 1944, fire broke out in the convoy as a result of a collision between two vessels of the convoy, the SS El Coston and the tanker Murfreesboro. Both vessels caught fire. The Murfreesboro was abandoned. While maneuvering to assist the stricken vessels, the March and was struck and severely damaged on her starboard side by El Coston. The March and's lifeboat was shattered and her speed limited to 12 knots. The El Coston succeeded in extinguishing her fire and proceeded away from the convoy at slow speed with the March and as escort. On the 27th the March and was designated to escort the El Coston to Bermuda, the latter's damage being a large opening in her stern about 20 feet in diameter, with the forward bulkhead of No. 1 hold partially broken through. The March and took aboard the survivors from the Murfreesboro and they proceeded uneventfully the remainder of the 27th, the El Coston apparently having some trouble steering, sometimes veering as much as 60°from bass course. The wind was picking up and the seas were increasing from the northwest. The March and was in communication with the Coston at all times, and at 2300 a message from the Coston said "We are shipping water rapidly and do not think we can keep afloat at this speed. Will have to cut speed until weather moderates." To this message the March and replied "Make your safest speed." At 0019 cn the 28th the Coston signalled "We are having difficulty in steering and do not know how long we can stay afloat. Will you please let us know how far away from us you are?" The March and replied "We are as near as possible and will always be ready in case of trouble." At 0045 the Coston sent her last message "We are preparing to abandon ship. Please stand by to rescue us." The March and immediately proceeded to the Coston and found her hove to with starboard beam to the wind. The March and illuminated her and saw that she was badly down by the head. The Coston's first boat cleared the port side at about 0120 and as it approached the March and, her second boat was seen being lowered with great difficulty from the starboard side, with seas breaking over the bow. Shortly after her liferaft left the port side, the Coston began to settle by the head. A number of red lights were now seen on the stern of the Coston and lights were seen going over the side, indicating that the last group had had to jump overboard. The Coston sank at 0142. The survivors of the last boat and life raft were hoisted without mishap aboard the March and at 0150 and she began maneuvering to pick the survivors out of the water. They were widely separated. The seas were too high to risk using the heavy lifeboats of the Coston and they were cast loose. The March and's boat was smashed in the davits and it was necessary to maneuver alongside each man. As she drifted down on the survivors, the March and's men went over the side on a line and passed a second line under the arms of the man in the water so that he could be hoisted aboard. There were various volunteers for this duty, although the rolling of the March and meant working under water half the time. At 0153 a terrific underwater explosion was felt. At first it was thought that the March and had been hit by a torpedo, but it was finally determined that the explosion was on the submerged Coston. Rescue operations continued until all men had been taken from the water by 0308. 50 survivors were picked up including the first mate who had been acting master of the Coston since the master had disappeared in the collision. As a result of the rescue, Commander Gilbert I. Lynch was awarded a letter of commendation and Seaman 1/c Milton O. West was awarded the Navy-Marine Corps Medal.

ELEVEN ROUND TRIPS
After thirty days under repair at Brooklyn Navy Yard, the March and rejoined Escort Division 20 in time to make the next trip to the United Kingdom in April, 1944. From then until the end of the war in Europe, the March and operated continuously in escort duty across the Atlantic making eleven round trips before the European war's end.

TO KWAJALEIN
The 4th of June, 1945, found the Marchand departing England with her last convoy, when orders were received to disband the convoy and proceed to New York where further orders were awaiting her to proceed to the Pacific. She joined the Pacific Fleet on July 6, 1945, and was ordered to Pearl Harbor where she remained until August 27, 1945. Then she departed for the Marshall Islands and was

--113--


assigned to an air sea rescue station at Kwajalein. She was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed May 1, 1946.


USS HURST (DE-250)
ESCORT DIVISION 20

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Hurst (DE-250) was commissioned August 30, 1943, with Lt. Comdr. Frank B. Marker, USCGR, as her first commanding officer. He was succeeded on October 26, 1944, by Lt. Edward B. Winslow, USCG. She became part of Escort Division 20. After being outfitted and undergoing shakedown and training at Bermuda, she was on post shakedown availability at Charleston, South Carolina.

CASABLANCA AND RETURN
Putting to sea on her first escort mission on December 14, 1943, the Hurst, as part of Escort Division 20, and Task Force 66, escorted convoy UGS-27 from Norfolk to Casablanca. Returning to New York she proceeded to Casco Bay, Maine, on February 4, 1944, and after training exercises there returned to New York February 18, 1944.

17 MONTHS OF ESCORT DUTY TO ENGLAND
Departing New York on February 22, 1944, the Hurst began a 17 month period of trans-Atlantic escort duty to the United Kingdom as part of Escort Division 20. This involved 11 round trips across the Atlantic, on the very first of which she picked up survivors of the SS El Coston which on February 25, 1944, had been rammed by the SS Murfreesboro. Periods of availability ranging from 0 days to 16 days were spent mostly at the New York Navy Yard, after which she spent some ten days at exercises usually in the New London area, but once in March, 1945, at Casco Bay, Maine. Altogether there were eight such periods of availability and exercises. She returned to New York on her last of such missions on June 11, 1945.

TO THE PACIFIC
Departing New York June 19, 1945, for the Pacific via Guantanamo, Canal Zone, San Diego and Pearl Harbor, she reached Eniwetok September 3, 1945, and Majuro September 10, 1945. VJ-day had come during the layover in Pearl Harbor and the need for escort duty for Pacific transport no longer existed. Arriving at Guadalcanal September 19, 1945, she reached Pearl Harbor November 8th, and then departing for New York, via San Diego and the Canal Zone, arriving there December 10, 1945. Here she had been placed on inactive status by January 21, 1946, and arrived at Green Cove Springs, Florida, in the St. John's River on January 24, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONING
The Hurst was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed May 1, 1946.


USS CAMP (DE-251)
ESCORT DIVISION 20

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Camp (DE-251) was commissioned on 16 September, 1943, at the Brown Shipbuilding Company, Houston, Texas. Lieutenant Commander P. B. Mayor, USCG, was the first commanding officer. After trial runs out of Galveston, the Camp departed for New Orleans and Bermuda where she remained during October and November, 1943, engaged in her shakedown cruise. December 1943, found the Camp operating under COTCLANT and engaged in afloat training of Destroyer Escort crews from the Naval Training Station, Norfolk, Virginia.

1944

CONVOY TO CASABLANCA AND RETURN
On December 9, 1943, the Camp, in company with the USS Hurst left Norfolk for New York. Two days later she was escorting the New York section of convoy UGS-27 to Norfolk, and on December 16th was helping to assemble the main convoy which was dispersed because of heavy weather. After an uneventful crossing, Escort Division 20, consisting, with the Camp, of DE's Marchand, Hurst, Pettit, Crow and Ricketts was relieved by British escorts, after passing through the Straits of Gibraltar on January 2, 1944, and headed for Casablanca. On January 8th the Division joined convoy GUS-26 for escort to the west. The convoy entered New York Harbor on January 24th and the Camp proceeded to the Navy Yard for availability until February 4, 1944.

COLLISION IN CONVOY
After four days training exercises in the Montauk-Block Island area, the Camp stood for Casco Bay, Maine, where she underwent further training exercises until February 17, 1944. Returning to New York, she took station as escort for convoy CU-15 on February 23rd. On the 25th the El Coston and Murfreesboro, two merchant ships of the convoy were in collision, both ships being badly damaged from the collision and resulting fire. The DE's Ricketts and Marchand remained on the scene of the collision and the Camp and the three remaining escorts of the division continued with the convoy. On the 29th the Ricketts rejoined, carrying Escort Commander, who assumed command of escorts and convoy. On March 5th the division was relieved and anchored at Lisahally, Northern Ireland. The Camp with the rest of the escort division stood out of Lough Foyle and joined UC-15 proceeding westward. The convoy arrived at New York Harbor on March 22nd and the Camp proceeded on ten days availability at Navy Yard Annex, Bayonne, New Jersey, until April 2nd.

TO IRELAND AND RETURN
On April 6, 1944, the Camp was escorting convoy CU-20 eastward and, after being relieved by British escorts on the 17th, anchored off Moville, Northern Ireland. Proceeding next day to Lisahally with other escorts of the division, she stood out of Lough Foyle on the 24th and joined west bound convoy UC-20. The convoy entered New York Harbor on May 3rd and the Camp proceeded to Brooklyn Navy Yard for ten days availability.

ESCORTS USS MARBLEHEAD TO BOSTON
After training exercises, the Camp joined convoy CU-25 on May 21, 1944, as escort to the United Kingdom with the rest of the division. The trip was without incident and the Camp moored at Londonderry on the 31st. On June 6th she rendezvoused with convoy UCT-25 and after an uneventful trip detached from the convoy, with other ships of the Escort Division on June 16th to escort the USS Marblehead to Boston. Next day she detached from duty with the Marblehead for ten day's availability at the Navy Yard, South Boston Annex. Commander Mayor was relieved as commanding officer by Lt. Comdr. R. R. Waesche, Jr., USCG. Commander Mayor assumed the duties of Commander, Escort Division 20, and, on the 28th, the Camp, in company with the Marchand and Hurst departed for Casco Bay for a three day training period.

--114--


ROUND TRIP TO IRELAND
Returning to Boston on July 1st, 1944, the Camp departed two days Liter with the Boston section of convoy TCU-30 and rendezvoused with the New York section at sea on July 4th. The convoy continued eastward without incident and the Camp moored at Lisahally on the 12th. After making rendezvous on the with convoy UCT-30, the Camp entered New York Harbor on the 27th and proceeded to Navy Yard, Brooklyn for 8 days availability.

TWO MORE ROUND TRIPS
During August, September and October, 1944, the Camp made two more round trips to England--one escorting, with Escort Division 20, convoy TCU-35 to Lisahally, returning with convoy UCT-35, and one escorting with the rest of the Division convoy CU-40 to Solent, England, returning with convoy UC-40B.

IN COLLISION
On November 7, 1944, the Camp made rendezvous with convoy CU-46 bound for England. Making a landfall on the South Ireland coast on November 17th the convoy was split into two sections, with Escort Division 20 escorting one group northward. Later that day the Camp broke off from the rest of the division to escort 17 ships to [Scar...] weather Lightship. Early on the 18th of November, 1944, as the Camp was detaching from this convoy she collided with SS Santa Cecilla. The bow of the Camp was sheered off at frame 23 and one man--Albert Hoerth, SOM 2/c--lost his life. A British mine sweeper took the Camp in tow and nine hours later she moored at Swansea, Wales. Oo the 25th she was towed to Cardiff where she was drydocked for the fitting of a stub bow. She was again drydocked on the 29th for the fitting of a false bow for return to the United States. While in drydock during December 1944 and January 1945, the officers and men underwent various courses of training. The repair work was completed on January 25th, 1944, and the sea trials successfully completed on January 31, 1945.

1945

DROPS OUT OF CONVOY
On February 2, 1945, the Camp was underway proceeding out of Cardiff locks to rendezvous with convoy UV-55A. During the crossing the convoy encountered several bad storms, causing severe pounding and subjecting the ship to excessive stress and strains. The Camp stayed with the convoy at first, to minimize the danger from the large number of submarines reported on the southwest approaches to England, but finally had to drop out, when the main and first platform decks started to buckle at frame 125. The mast whipped so badly that chips from strained insulations in the standing rigging started flicking about the deck. The stub bow parted and buckled badly and progressive shoring was built up throughout the trip to strengthen it. After dropping out of the convoy the USS Wingfield (DE-194) escorted the Camp the rest of the way to Boston, where she entered dry dock on February 3, 1945, for the fitting of a new bow.

SEARCHES FOR SUB
An extensive training program for all officers and men was begun in March, with the Camp in drydock, and continued through April. Successful sea trials and structural tests were completed by April 25th and on the 27th the Camp departed for training exercises at Casco Bay where she remained for the next fifteen days. On May 12th she escorted the U.S. submarine S-20 to Casco Bay and next day departed to assist in the search for a possible enemy submarine reported in the Gulf of Maine. She made a retiring search for the submarine for the next two days but the results were unsuccessful. Before returning to Boston, five more days were spent holding drills in Casco Bay.

ROUND TRIP TO WALES
The Camp departed Eoston in company with the Marchand on May 20, 1945, escorting three ships of the Boston section of convoy CU-17. On the 29th the main convoy split into two sections and the Camp proceeded to Cardiff, Wales. On June 4th she made contact with convoy UC-71 and, escorting the convoy westward, docked in Brooklyn on the 19th. She departed same day for the Chesapeake Bay for shore bombardment exercises.

TO THE PACIFIC
On June 21, 1945, having completed the exercises, the Camp departed for Guantanamo, Cuba, for ten days extensive training. Returning to Charleston for gun repairs, she proceeded to San Diego in July, 1945, via the Panama Canal, and, having spent a week at San Diego, sailed for Pearl Harbor to join the Pacific Fleet, Arriving at Pearl Harbor early in August, Lt. Comdr. R. R. Waesche, Jr., USCG, was relieved on August 17, 1945, as commanding officer by Lt. Comdr. J. J. Shingler, USCG. After serving as a training ship for a short period, she set sail for Eniwetok. She arrived at Eniwetok on September 2, 1945, and was next based at Majuro Atoll and then at Mili. At Mili, where there was a Japanese garrison of about 200 men, the Camp was assigned the task of disposing of Japanese ammunition, procuring a muster roil, in English, of the entire garrison and assembling all equipment at the dock area. Many Japanese were questioned in connection with atrocities to American flyers. Several prisoners were taken, among them the Japanese Commanding Officer, Navy Captain Shiga, who later took his own life. The entire Japanese garrison was evacuated on the Japanese Hospital Ship Hikawa Maru on September 26th for transportation to Japan. Ordered to Kwajalein on October 14, 1945, the Camp relieved the Marchand as flagship of the division and was in standby air sea rescue duty until November 4, 1945, when she was ordered to return to the United States. She was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed May 1, 1946.


USS HOWARD D. CROW (DE-252)
ESCORT DIVISION 20

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Howard D. Crow (DE-252) was commissioned at the Brown Shipyards, Houston, Texas, on September 27, 1943. Lt. Comdr. D. T. Adams, USCG, was her first commanding officer. After various drills and exercises in Galveston Bay she took on supplies at New Orleans, and left there on October 17, 1943, for Bermuda and shakedown exercises.

JOINS ESCORT DIVISION 20
Leaving Bermuda on November 18, 1943, the Crow, in company with the USS Poole, (DE-151) proceeded to Charleston, South Carolina, where she was drydocked for ten days, departing for Norfolk on the 30th. Here the Crow reported to Commander, Escort Division 20, who was Captain John Rountree, USCG. The other Coast Guard manned destroyer escorts in the Division were the Marchand (flagship), Hurst, Camp, Pettit and Ricketts.

--115--


1944

TO CASABLANCA AND RETURN
On December IS, 1943, the Crow put to sea as part of Task Force 66, escorting convoy UGS-27. After an uneventful trip the convoy was turned over to British escorts on January 2, 1944, and the escort division proceeded to Casablanca. Upon entering the Casablanca swept channel the Crow, along with the Pettit and Ricketts, was ordered to proceed to 33°57'N, 08°19'W where HMS Malcolm had contacted a submarine. Arriving at that point about 0200 on the 3rd, no other escorts were found, but there was a radar contact about 15 minutes later, which was ordered illuminated by a starshell. The shell exploded right in the rigging of a Portuguese fishing vessel. After four days in Casablanca, the division was underway again escorting convoy GUS-26 to New York, arriving on the 24th. On February 4th, 1944, Commander Adams was relieved as commanding officer by Lt. Comdr. R. E. Bacchus, Jr., USCGR.

A YEAR OF ESCORT DUTY
The next ten months saw Escort Division 20 make six complete round trips to Londonderry, Ireland, from New York, escorting convoys both ways. Outside the heavy weather encountered in the North Atlantic, and the collision on February 25, 1944, between two merchant vessels, El Coston and Murfreesboro, both of which were lost, the journeys were uneventful. On one occasion two members of the Crow's crew lost their lives when the motor whale boat swamped in a heavy sea, while returning from the Marchand, to which a member of the crew had been taken for treatment by the division doctor. Horace L. Thomas, CEM, sacrificed his life trying to save the life of Seaman, First Class, Felici, and was posthumously awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal. On the 18th of November the port of destination was changed to Greenock, Scotland, and on the following four trips the Crow put into Liverpool once and Southhampton three times, the convoys now being routed to Cherbourg and Le Havre. Frequent periods for exercises and inspection were allocated on each return of the division to the United States.

LAST TRANS-ATLANTIC CONVOY ESCORTED
In February, 1945, Lt. Comdr. Bacchus was relieved of command by Lt. John M. Nixon. In the spring of 1945, as the war in Europe was being brought to a close, the Nazis stepped up their U-boat campaign and as many as twelve submarines at one time were reported patrolling the entrance to the English Channel. On VE-day the Crow was in New York. During this availability the heavy anti-aircraft machine gun armament was increased and two directors added, a good indication that the Crow was to see Pacific duty very shortly. The last convoy which the Crow or Escort Division 20 escorted to England, left New York on May 20, 1945. On the 4th of June, the convoy they were escorting to the United States dispersed, just as they cleared the English Channel, and the escorts were ordered to return to the United States.

TO THE PACIFIC
On June 19, 1945, Escort Division 20, with the Crow, was on its way to the Pacific. After a day's shore bombardment practice in the Chesapeake Bay area, the division headed for Guantanamo, Cuba, where two weeks of gunnery, damage control and tactical exercises were run off. Anti-aircraft firing was practiced daily. The Crow reached the Panama Canal on July 6th, and, with the rest of the division, proceeded to San Diego and thence to Pearl Harbor. It was while the Crow was at Pearl Harbor that the news of Japan's surrender was flashed around the world. However instead of returning to the United States, Escort Division 20 departed for the Marshall and Gilbert Islands. After anchoring at Eniwetok for a month, the Crow received orders to report to the Commander of the South Solomons Area at Guadalcanal, where she served as ready duty ship for another month. On October 2, 1945, Lt. Frederick T.Carney, USCGR, relieved Lt. Nixon of command. On November 9, 1945, the Crow was back at Pearl Harbor. From 22 November to 19 December, 1945, the Crow was on weather patrol in the North Pacific. She reached Long Beach, California or December 27th and remained there until January 7, 1946. From Long Beach she returned to New York, via Panama Canal for an availability period at the Navy Yard prior to reporting to the Commander, Sixteenth Fleet, Florida Group. She arrived at Jacksonville on 22 February, 1946. Lt. Carney was relieved of command on March 27, 1946, by Lt. B. H. Kelraer, USCG. By May 22, 1946, all the Coast Guard crew had been removed.


USS PETTIT (DE-253)
ESCORT DIVISION 20

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Pettit (DE-253) was commissioned September 23, 1943, at Brown Shipbuilding Company, Houston, Texas. Between that date and October 15th, 1943, she was conducting test firing at Galveston or undergoing necessary repairs at New Orleans. Departing for Bermuda she underwent a shakedown period at the Naval Operating Base there until November 15th. En route to Naval Operating Base, Norfolk, she put into the Charleston Navy Yard en route for maintenance and necessary repairs, arriving at Norfolk on 1 December. At Norfolk she was attached to Escort Division 20 and for 9 days conducted training exercises in the Chesapeake Bay for the purpose of training Destroyer Escort nucleus crews. She then proceeded to New York.

1944

FIRST ESCORT DUTY
On December 12, 1943, the Pettit was underway with Escort Division 20, in Task Force 66, escorting convoy UGS-27 to various African and Mediterranean ports. Turning the convoy over to British escorts on January 3, 1944, she moored at Casablanca until the 7th and on that date began escorting, with the division, convoy GUS-26 bound for Hampton Roads, Va., and New York. She remained moored at New York Navy Yard, after arrival on the 24th, until February 4th. After four days in the exercise area off Montauk Point, Long Island, she proceeded to Casco Bay, Maine, for exercises and training, returning to New York with the escort division on the 18th, where she remained moored at the Navy Yard Annex, Brooklyn, until the 22nd.

ELEVEN ROUND TRIPS OF CONVOY ESCORT DUTY
During the next 16 months, from February 22, 1944, until June 19, 1945, the Pettit was engaged in convoy escort duty. During this period she escorted eleven convoys on round trips from the United States to various ports in the British Isles and Northern France and back again to the United States. These convoy numbers which were

--116--


prefixed by "CU" on the eastbound trip and "UC" on the westbound trips were 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 46, 52, 58, 64 and 71. On the last of these trips the Task Group Commander shifted his flag to the Pettit. When in the United States she moored either at New York, N.Y., or Bayonne, N.J., and when in the European theater either at Londonderry, North Ireland; Plymouth, Liverpool or Southampton, England. In addition to the customary "In port" period of availability for maintenance and repair at the United States ports; there were a number of training and exercise periods, both at Casco, Maine, and off Montauk Point, Long Island, New York. By 4 June, 1945, the Pettit had escorted twenty four Atlantic convoy operations. On that date, with the war in Europe over, all escort of convoys in the Atlantic ceased and the Task Group to which the Pettit was attached, was detached from the convoy to proceed back to the United States independently. During this whole period of convoy escort operations, the Pettit had no positive contact with the enemy, no casualties, and only two convoy losses, those of the Murfreesboro and El Coston, which were in collision on February 25, 1944. On June 19, 1945, the Pettit, together with the rest of Escort Division 20, left Navy Yard Annex, Brooklyn for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where she underwent training until July 3, 1945. The division then got underway for San Diego, via the Panama Canal. They arrived at San Diego on July 18, 1945, and at Pearl Harbor on July 25th, where the Pettit underwent training and engaged in buoy upkeep until August 27, 1945. With the war in the Pacific over on August 14th, the Pettit departed for Eniwetok on August 27th arriving on September 3rd. She arrived at Majuro Atoll on the 11th and patrolled the air strip on Dalap Island until the 14th. Returning to Majuro she proceeded to Guadalcanal and then to Tutuila, Samoan Islands. Up to this time she had been underway 459 days and covered 127,549 nautical miles. On return to the United States, her Coast Guard crew was removed on May 6, 1946.


USS RICKETTS (DE-254)
ESCORT DIVISION 20

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Ricketts (DE-254) was commissioned at Houston, Texas, on October 5, 1943. She proceeded to New Orleans on the 20th and then to Bermuda in company with the Harveson (DE-316). Shakedown maneuvers occupied the period from 1 to 25 November when the Ricketts proceeded to escort the SS Braga to Chesapeake Bay. Then she returned to Charleston Navy Yard for post shakedown availability until December 8th.

1944

ESCORTS CONVOY TO CASABLANCA AND RETURN
The Ricketts departed for New York on December 11, 1943, and on the 12th with three other DE's began escorting the New York section of convoy UGS-27 to Hampton Roads. On the 14th she was preparing for a voyage to North African waters as escort to UGS-27, when her departure, and that of the Crow, was delayed so as to provide escort for two vessels still loading at Newport News, Virginia. The two escorts began escorting the two vessels on the 15th and joined the main convoy on the 20th. After passing through the Straits of Gibraltar on January 2nd the Ricketts was relieved and stood for Casablanca. Two hours after her arrival there she proceeded along with the Crow and Pettit to assist HMS Malcolm who had contacted an enemy submarine. The results of the mission were negative and on the 3rd she returned to Casablanca. The return voyage with Escort Division 20, escorting convoy CUS-26 to New York, was uneventful and she arrived on the 24th.

RESCUES 33 SURVIVORS OF COLLISION
After availability at Brooklyn Navy Yard, and practice exercises in the Montauk-Block Island area and at Casco Bay, Maine, the Ricketts returned to Brooklyn on February 18th, 1944. On February 22nd she departed as a unit of Escort Division 20, escorting convoy CU-15. The mission continued without special event until February 25, 1944, when at 2035, a ship in the convoy burst into flames. The Ricketts stood by for submarine attack and to pick up survivors. After detaching temporarily, she continued to pick up survivors the next day, when it was learned that the SS El Coston had rammed the SS Murfreesboro and that both were badly damaged and burning. Thirty-three survivors of these two vessels were rescued by the Ricketts. The Marchand, also damaged in a collision with the El Coston, had departed with her for Bermuda, while the Commander, Escort Division 20 and his staff had transferred from the Marchand to the Ricketts on the 29th. On March 5th the escorts were relieved and stood into Lough Foyle, Northern Ireland, and the Ricketts moored at Lisahally on the 6th, remaining there until the 11th when she moved to Moville, Ireland. On that date the Navy manned USS Fechteler (DE-157) joined Escort Division 20 and the division began escorting convoy UC-15 to the United States, the Ricketts standing into New York Harbor on the 22nd and mooring at the Navy Yard Annex, Bayonne, New Jersey, for a ten day availability period.

14 MONTHS OF ESCORT DUTY
The following is a brief record of the escort missions performed by the Ricketts f rom April 6, 1944, to June 11, 1944, with Escort Division 20:

CONVOY LEFT NEW YORK ARRIVED BRITISH ISLES
CU-20 April 6, 1944 April 16, 1944
CU-25 May 21, 1944 May 31, 1944
CU-30 August 11, 1944 August 22, 1944
CU-40 September 20, 1944 October 1, 1944
CU-46 November 7, 1944 November 17, 1944
CU-52 December 26, 1944 January 9, 1944
CU-58 February 11, 1945 February 22, 1945
CU-6I1 March 31, 1945 April 12, 1945
CU-71 May 20, 1945 May 30, 1945
CONVOY LEFT BRITISH ISLES ARRIVED NEW YORK
UC-20 April 24, 1944 May 3, 1944
UC-25 June 6, 1944 June 17, 1944*
UC-30 July 17, 1944 July 27, 1944
UC-35 August 27, 1944 September 5, 1944
UC-40A October 6, 1944 October 16, 1944
UC-46b November 27, 1944 December 7, 1944
UC-52B January 12, 1945 January 23, 1945
UC-58B March 2, 1945 March 12, 1945
UC-6I1B April 19, 1945 April 30, 1945
UC-71 June 4, 1945 June 11, 1945
  * Ricketts to Boston

OCCUPATIONAL DUTY AT KUSAIE, MARSHALL ISLANDS
The Ricketts, together with Escort Division 20, was on its way to the Pacific by June 19, 1944, stopping at Guantanamo Bay for two weeks of exercises and drill. Passing through the Panama Canal on July 7th4 she proceeded to San Diego and then to Pearl Harbor. While she was at Pearl Harbor the

--117--


Japanese surrendered on August 14, 1945. The Ricketts was assigned to assist in taking over the Island of Kusaie, one of the Marshall Group. About four thousand Japanese, one of the largest uncaptured Japanese forces on any island in that area, laid down their arms and watched the stars and stripes unfurled where the flag of the rising sun had flown since the islands were mandated to Japan from Germany after the first world war. The occupational duties included the delicate problem of unarming and controlling vastly superior numbers of a belligerent and treacherous enemy who had been by-passed on the march to Japan. It included maintenance of order and discipline, of arranging for and assisting the return of Koreans and other slave laborers to their homeland, and of initiating the native Kusaiens into the ways of democracy until the island could be turned over to the military government officials, who had been specially trained for their tasks.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
Leaving Eniwetok on November 3, 1945, the Ricketts, under command of Lt. Urial H. Leach, Jr., USCG, arrived at Pearl Harbor on the 9th. She left Pearl Harbor on November 24th and arrived at San Diego on the 30th. By December 16, 1945, she had arrived in New York, via Panama Canal, and on 23 January, 1946, was at Jacksonville, where she was decommissioned and the Coast Guard crew removed, on 17 April, 1946.


USS SELLSTROM (DE-255)
ESCORT DIVISION 23

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Sellstrom (DE-255) built by the Brown Shipbuilding Corporation of Houston, Texas was named for Ensign Sellstrom, USNR, a Navy flier killed during the early part of the war in the Pacific, and was commissioned at Houston, Texas, on October 12, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. William L. Maloney, USCG. Somewhat later at Galveston the flag of Escort Division 23 was raised as Commander Fred P. Vetterick, USCG, reported on board and she departed for shakedown exercises at Bermuda.

CONVOY DUTY
On January 13, 1944, the Sellstrom departed Norfolk for Gibraltar with a large convoy on her first escort duty. From that date to the summer of 1945 she saw duty in the Atlantic and Mediterranean, calling at Casablanca, Bizerte, Londonderry, Belfast Liverpool, Southampton, Plymouth, Birkenhead, Le Havre and East Coast ports of the United States. A few U-boat scares in the Atlantic and one aircraft attack in the Mediterranean were experienced. In May 1944, Lt. Comdr. William L. Morrison, USCG, became her commanding officer. In January, 1945, Commander John H. Forney, USCG, became commander of Escort Division 23.

AIR ATTACK
Previous operations in the Mediterranean convinced the Sellstroms's personnel that action with the Luftwaffe was inevitable as they passed Gibraltar with convoy UGS-36 on 29 March, 1944. German observation planes confirmed this shortly after they cleared the Rock. The attack came at 0400, 1 April, 1944. There were two flights of German two-motored bombers and torpedo planes. Flares and anti-aircraft fire from over one hundred merchantmen and escorts illuminated the Mediterranean for miles around. After the smoke and flames had cleared, it was found that one merchantman had been torpedoed and was burning. She had to be beached but three quarters of her cargo was salvaged. Three German bombers were reported to have been downed by escorts and British night fighters. German aircraft, life rafts and German fliers in the water were evidence.

SAVES EIGHTEEN MEN
The most serious disaster encountered in the Atlantic was the collision between two high speed tankers in a convoy the Sellstrom was escorting. These were the San Mihiel and the Nashbulk. The San Mihiel was hopelessly aflame and was abandoned with a loss of 35 men. The Sellstrom pulled 18 men and two bodies from the icy waters under unfavorable sea conditions.

NORTHERN PACIFIC DUTY
Atlantic operations were followed by a 25 day availability in the New York Navy Yard and assignment to the Pacific Fleet when the Armistice was signed in Europe. After a pre-Pacific training period and a trip through the Canal, the Sellstrom reported to Commander, Western Sea Frontier at San Francisco for further assignment in the Pacific. A boiler casualty had delayed her departure from the Atlantic and she was now operating alone and without the flag of Escort Division 23. While in San Francisco, Lt. Carlton J. Schmidt, USCGR, relieved Lt. Comdr. Morrison as commanding officer. Departing San Francisco, the Sellstrom arrived at Adak on 19 July, 1945, for duty under Commander, Northern Pacific Forces. Operations consisted of routine patrols and acting as guardship for flights over the Northern Japanese Kurile Chain. Pilot escort of a Russian convoy was one of her few interesting assignments. After VJ-day she acted as station vessel for the record non-stop flight of three B-29's from Tokyo to Washington, D.C. Returning to the Atlantic coast she was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed 13 June, 1946.


USS HARVESON (DE-316)
ESCORT DIVISION 22

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Harveson (DE-316) was commissioned at Orange, Texas, on October 12, 1943. She was named for Lt. (jg) Harold Aloysius Harveson, USN, who was killed at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, while serving aboard the USS Utah. After a checking and fitting out process at Galveston, she departed for Bermuda on October 24th, stopping en route at New Orleans. For one month, from October 29th to November 29th, 1943, ship, officers and men underwent the gruelling tasks called for in a shakedown. Her first skipper was Lt. Comdr. P. L. Stinson, USCG. Her first assignment came during her training period when she was ordered to contact a tanker that had become separated from a convoy some 400 miles from Bermuda. She escorted the tanker to Bermuda.

IN COLLISION
On November 25th while on patrol duty as part of her training program, a target appeared on her radar scope. A small unidentified schooner was contacted visually, who failed to answer challenges and was ordered to come alongside. In attempting to do so, the schooner suddenly veered to port and collided with the Harveson, who sustained minor damages, but the stem of the schooner--the OK Service VII out of Halifax--was broken and her bow opened up. The master of the schooner ordered his men to abandon ship and they were taken aboard the Harveson. Blame was placed by a Court of Inquiry on the master of the schooner. Minor repairs to the Harveson were made at Charleston where she

--118--


USS JOYCE (DE-317)
USS Joyce DE-1317

PANICKY NAZI SEAMEN POUR OUT OF THE CONNING TOWER TO THE DECK OF A SUBMARINE
Panicky Nazi seamen pour out of the conning tower to the deck of a submarine blasted to the surface
by depth charges accurately planted by Coast Guard and Navy Destroyer Escorts Petersen, Joyce and Gandy.

--119--


arrived on December 1st for post-shakedown availability. Arriving at Norfolk on the 8th she was engaged in training DE crews until the 14th.

ANOTHER COLLISION
On December 14, 1943, she was ordered to sea, in company with the Poole, to search for a submarine reported sighted just off the coast of Virginia. Weather and visibility were poor. About 2100 the radar reported a contact and, while its course and speed were being determined, a ship appeared within visual range. In the subsequent collision with the SS William T. Barry, a fully loaded 7000 ton merchant vessel, a huge hole was ripped in the Harveson's starboard side, flooding #1 and #2 engine rooms. There were no casualties and, after emergency repairs, the Harveson was able to proceed toward Norfolk where a tug met her at the entrance to the swept channel and towed her to port.

1944

UNDER REPAIR
The Harveson spent the following nine weeks undergoing repairs at Norfolk Navy Yard. Her whole starboard side required realigning and strengthening and two of her engines had to be replaced. On February 2nd Comdr., G. W. Nelson, USCG, became her second commanding officer. Sea trials were made on February 22nd and on the 27th she departed for New York to report to Escort Division 22.

LEOPOLD TORPEDOED
On March 1, 1944, in company with Escort Division 22, the Harveson departed New York as part of the screen of convoy CU-16. On the 19th at 1950, the Leopold, assisted by the Joyce, departed the convoy to investigate a radar contact 7 miles south and 45 minutes later the Joyce reported that the Leopold had been torpedoed. The Harveson continued on with the convoy, which arrived safely at Londonderry on the 11th. The return trip begun on the 17th, was terminated without incident on the 28th at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

SUBMARINE IS SUNK
On her second trip, begun on April 15, 1944, the SS Pan Pennsylvania was torpedoed a day out of New York. The Harveson was ordered to continue with the convoy while the Gandy, Joyce and Peterson brought the enemy submarine to the surface and took 12 German crew members as prisoners of war. On the 24th the Harveson and Kirkpatrick were ordered to search for an enemy submarine but the search produced negative results. On the return trip to the United States, the Harveson, Peterson and Joyce were sent, on the 9th of May, to search for a submarine which one of the planes, covering the convoy, had picked up by radar 50 miles astern. The search continued on the 10th, with the help of three British escorts, without results. On her arrival in New York, Lt. Comdr. J. A. Norton, USCG, became the Harveson's third commanding officer on May 20th.

SS JACKSONVILLE TORPEDOED
The third and fourth round trips of the Harveson, made during June and July were without incident. On the fifth trip, begun August 19th another sinking of a convoyed vessel occurred when the SS Jacksonville was torpedoed off the coast of Ireland. The Harveson searched in vain for the enemy submarine.

1945

DAMAGES SUB
The Harveson's sixth trip, during October 1944, was uneventful and as she sailed out of New York on November 23, 1944, on her seventh, Lt. J. F. Thompson was her fourth commanding officer. On her ninth trip begun February 27, 1945, the Harveson inflicted damage on an enemy submarine, sufficient to force it to surface some time during the night. This was believed to be the same submarine which was sunk the following day by a patrolling British aircraft, about 50 miles from the scene of the attack.

PACIFIC DUTY
The last and tenth round trip of the Harveson to Europe, began on April 17, 1945, terminated on May 13, 1945, at Brooklyn Navy Yard. The ending of hostilities in Europe dispensed with the need of convoying ships to Europe and the escort vessels and combat ships previously employed in the Atlantic were prepared for duty in the Pacific. By June 4th all ships of Escort Division 22 had been overhauled and, on that day, they departed New York en route the Pacific. The Escort Division Commander was L. M. Thayer, USCG. On June 6th shore bombardment exercises were conducted off the coast of Culebra Island in the West Indies. Arriving at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on June 10th, the Harveson, and the other ships of the division, were put through a most comprehensive and gruelling ten day training program. Night and day she took part in anti-submarine warfare, gunnery, towing, fueling, radar and ship handling exercises, in preparation for a different type of war in the Pacific. She arrived at San Diego, via the Panama Canal on July 1st and three days later departed for Pearl Harbor. She remained in Pearl Harbor until September 3, 1945, carrying out advanced training exercises. The sudden ending of the war against Japan on August 14, 1945, necessitated a change in plans for many ships en route to combat zones. On September 3rd she left Pearl Harbor, escorting 18 LST's in LST Group 14, bound for Sasebo, Kyushu, Japan. The long trip ended 21 days later, when the Harveson and the LST Group dropped anchor off Sasebo on September 24th, She then received orders to escort the USS Mt. McKinley (AGC-7) to Wakayama, Japan, and arrived there on the 29th. En route Wakayama the Harveson sighted and exploded a drifting Japanese mine. Departing on October 4th she next escorted the Mt. McKinley to Hiro Wan, Honshu, and took part in the first landings in the immediate area. She left for Yokohama on October 31, 1945, as the escort of the USS Mt. McKinley and USS Calvert (APA-32). She departed November 3rd, 1945, for Pearl Harbor and leaving Pearl Harbor on November 15, 1945, and San Diego ten days later, passed through the Panama Canal on December 3rd and arrived at Charleston on December 8, 1945, ready for de-commissioning. The Coast Guard crew was removed on May 1, 1946.


USS JOYCE (DE-317)
ESCORT DIVISION 22

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Joyce (DE-317) was built by the Consolidated Shipbuilding Corporation, Orange, Texas, and commissioned September 30, 1943. She was named for Ensign Philip Michael Joyce, USNR, who died in the loss of the USS Peary by enemy action at Port Darwin, Australia, on February 19, 1942. After brief calls at Galveston and New Orleans, for fitting out, the Joyce, in October, 1943, underwent four weeks of shakedown and training exercises at Bermuda.

--120--


FIRST CONVOY DUTY
On December 2, 1943, the Joyce sailed from Norfolk as part of the escort of a convoy bound for the Mediterranean. The crossing was made without incident. The escorts screened the troop and cargo ships through the Straits of Gibraltar, transferred them to a British escort group and put in at Casablanca. On the westward trip to New York the Joyce encountered the worst and most prolonged storm of her career.

1944

SINKING OF LEOPOLD
Following intensive training at Casco Bay, Maine, in late February 1944, Escort Division 22 assembled consisting of the Flagship USS Poole, with the Peterson, Harveson, Joyce, Kirkpatrick and Leopold. These were to help guard fast convoys between the United States and United Kingdom. On the night of March 9, 1944, 400 miles south of Iceland, the Leopold, while investigating a radar target, was torpedoed amidships, and later broke in two and sank. The Joyce, four miles distant at the time, was designated rescue ship. Twice, while dead in the water picking up the twenty-eight survivors, the Joyce got underway precipitately to evade torpedoes, the screws of which were detected by sonar. Eleven of the crew received the Navy and Marine Corps Medal, and the commanding officer, Lt. Comdr. Robert Wilcox, USCG, and two men received commendation from the Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet, for their outstanding performance of duty on this occasion.

SINKS SUB
An opportunity to retaliate for the loss of the Leopold was afforded the Division on the next outward voyage. On the morning of April 16, 1944, while taking her station in the convoy, the SS Pan Pennsylvania, one of the world's largest gasoline tankers, was torpedoed and set aflame. After picking up thirty-one survivors, including the master, the Joyce located the submarine by sonar and brought lt to the surface with one pattern of eleven depth charges. With the aid of the Peterson and the USS Gandy (DE-764), the submarine's guns were quickly subdued. Her crew thereupon abandoned and scuttled her. Twelve of the submarine's company were picked up by the Joyce, including the commanding officer. Lt. Comdr. Wilcox received the Legion of Merit and the USSR Order of the Fatherland War, 1st Class, and Lt. John L. Bender, USCGR, Nelson W. Allen, SOM 2/c, USCGR, and Winston T. Coburn, SOM 2/c, USCGR, received the Bronze Star Medal.

1945

ELEVEN TRIPS ACROSS ATLANTIC
The Joyce made eleven round trips across the Atlantic, celebrating VE Day in mid-ocean on her last return voyage. Her ports of call were Casablanca (12/22/43), Londonderry (3/11/44, 4/26/44, 6/10/44, 7/21/44), Loch Ewe, Scotland and Londonderry (8/31/44), Liverpool (10/1744), Glasgow, Scotland (12/4/44), Falmouth, England (1/21/45), Portsmouth (1/25/45) Le Havre, France (3/11/45), Southampton (3/12/45), and Birkenhead, England (4/26/45).

AN ACT OF HEROISM
While the ship was fitting out at Bayonne, New Jersey, on May 19, 1945, Walter G. Ruding, F 1/c, USCGR, of the Joyce, with considerable risk, rescued a yard worker from drowning. He was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal.

IN THE PACIFIC
The Joyce, with Escort Division 22, departed New York on June 4, 1945, for the Pacific Area, undergoing training en route at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. VJ-day found the Joyce still at Pearl Harbor. Her first Pacific mission was the escorting of troop carriers for the initial occupation landing at Sasebo, Japan, on September 22, 1945. While engaged in her second Pacific mission, the escort of troops from Manila to Wakayama, Japan, the Joyce was ordered home and sailed from Leyte Gulf on November 4, 1945, for New York, where she arrived on December 10. Her last voyage was to Green Cove Springs, Florida, where she arrived January 24, 1946, to join the Inactive Reserve Fleet. Here her Coast Guard crew was removed May 1, 1946.

PACIFIC PORTS VISITED
Her ports of call after leaving New York on her Pacific mission were Guantanamo, Cuba (6/10/45), Coco Solo, Canal-Zone (6/22/45), San Diego, California (7/1/45), Pearl Harbor, T.H. (7/11/45), Saipan, Marshall Islands (9/11/45), Sasebo, Japan (9/22/45), Leyte, P.I. (10/2/45), Manila, P.I. (10/2445), Leyte, P.I. (11/2/45), Pearl Harbor, T.H. (11/15/45), San Diego, California (11/23/45), Coco Solo, Canal Zone (12/3/45), New York (12/10/45) and Green Cove Springs, Florida (1/24/46).

COMMANDING OFFICERS
The following officers have commanded the Joyce:

Lt. Comdr. Robert Wilcox, USCG, 9/30/43--10/5/44
Lt. Comdr. Benjamin P. Clark, USCG, 10/5/44--8/14/45
Lt. Comdr. Hubert G. Ball, USCGR, 8/14/45--12/18/45
Lt. Comdr. John F. Thompson, Jr., USCG, 12/18/45-1/3/46
Lt. Charles W. Scharff, USCG, 1/3/46--3/26/46
Lt. Comdr. Emmett P. O'Hara, USCG, 3/26/46--5/1/46


USS KIRKPATRICK (DE-318)
ESCORT DIVISION 22

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Kirkpatrick (DE-318) was commissioned at Orange, Texas, on October 23, 1943. Her only commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Victor E. Bakanas, USCG. Moving to Sabine, Texas, she proceeded to Galveston for drydocking during the balance of October. On November 3rd she departed for New Orleans and on the 6th proceeded to Bermuda, where shakedown exercises were held until December 9, 1943. She arrived at Charleston for a 5 day post shakedown availability on December 11, 1943, and on the 17th departed for New York where she reported to Escort Division 22 on December 19, 1943.

FIRST ESCORT DUTY
The Kirkpatrick departed New York for Norfolk December 22, 1943, escorting the New York section of convoy UGS-28 consisting of 12 merchant ships escorted in addition by the USS Poole, USS Sellstrom, two Navy Destroyer Escorts and 3 PC's. Arriving at Norfolk the Kirkpatrick reported for duty to Commander Task Force 61 and then departed for point XS to conduct a sound sweep 25 miles wide and 50 miles ahead of the convoy's projected course. She was in company with USS Poole, USS Leopold and USS Straus. She took position in van of the 64 ship convoy UGS-28 on December 25. The trip was uneventful and on January 10, 1944, the American escort group was relieved by a British escort group in the Straits of Gibraltar, the Kirkpatrick putting in at Casablanca. The return trip in Task

--121--


Force 61, escorting the 50 ship convoy GUS-27 with Escort Divisions 22 and 5, was highlighted by a sub contact in the immediate area and another 200 miles southward. On February 1st a NW gale caused the convoy to straggle but most returned on the 2nd. Next day the Kirkpatrick detached with Escort Division 22 and 16 merchant vessels of the Delaware Section and reached New York on the 4th for ten days availability.

LEOPOLD TORPEDOED
The Kirkpatrick proceeded to Casco Bay, Maine, for training exercises and was back in New York by February 27, 1944, where all the ships of Escort Division 22 assembled. On March 1, 1944, they took screening positions on the 27 ship convoy CU-16. On the 9th the Leopold reported a radar contact at 8000 yards, 7 miles south of the convoy and assisted by the Joyce proceeded to intercept. Ten minutes later the Leopold had been torpedoed, breaking in half and sinking during the night. The Joyce rescued 28 survivors but all of the Leopold's officers and 158 out of 186 enlisted men were lost. The convoy arrived off the north coast of Ireland on March 11, 1944, the escort vessels proceeding to Lisahally, North Ireland. They reported at Moville, March 16, 1944, and next day rendezvoused with the convoy UC-16 west of Oversay. The convoy arrived at New York March 28, 1944, where the Kirkpatrick went on availability until April 15, 1944.

NINE VOYAGES TO ENGLAND
Between April 15, 1944, and May 15, 1945, the Kirkpatrick as part of Escort Division 22 made nine round trips to England escorting convoys of merchant vessels. On April 16, 1944, the SS Pan Pennsylvania was torpedoed and the Gandy rammed and sank the submarine involved. On April 24, on the first of these, the Harveson and Kirkpatrick were detached to hunt for a submarine attacked by aircraft. On August 30, 1944, the SS Jacksonville was torpedoed off Loch Ewe, Scotland, caught fire and broke in two. Only two survivors were picked up by the Poole sent to the rescue.

TO THE PACIFIC
On June 4, 1945, the Kirkpatrick left New York for Pearl Harbor, via Canal Zone and San Diego, arriving on July 11, 1945. While there the Japanese surrendered on August 14, 1945. The ship was sent to the forward area arriving at Lingayen Bay, Luzon, October 6, 1945, and Sasebo, Japan, October 18, 1945. She returned to Charleston December 8, 1945, via Pearl Harbor, San Diego and the Canal Zone and on December 13, 1945, reached Jacksonville, Florida.

DECOMMISSIONED
On May 1, 1946, the Kirkpatrick was decommissioned at Jacksonville, Florida, and her Coast Guard crew removed.


USS LEOPOLD (DE-319)
ESCORT DIVISION 22

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Commissioning ceremonies were held on board the Coast Guard manned USS Leopold (DE-319) on October 18, 1943, at Orange, Texas, and the ship was delivered to the commanding officer Lt. Comdr. Kenneth C. Phillips, USCG. After structural firing tests at Galveston she departed for New Orleans. On the 7th of November she proceeded to Great Sound, Bermuda, where shakedown exercises were begun. On December 9th she left for Charleston and eleven days of post-shakedown availability.

FIRST CONVOY
After four days of training exercises for officers and nucleus crow of new destroyer escorts in the Chesapeake Bay area, she stood out of Thimble Shoal Channel on December 24, 1943, as part of Task Force 61, escorting convoy USG-68 to the Mediterranean. On the 30th the Leopold was directed to go to the rear of the convoy and search for a seaman reported lost overboard from one of the convoy ships. It was very dark and fairly rough, so, unless the seaman had on a life jacket with a light, the chances of finding him were slight. After US minutes she discontinued the search. The convoy reached the Straits of Gibraltar on January 10th and was turned over to British escorts. The Leopold moored at Casablanca on the 11th. On the 13th she commenced patrolling as anti-submarine screen across the Atlantic side of the Straits of Gibraltar, the Task Force forming a line to prevent U-boats from entering the Mediterranean. On the 15th she moored at Gibraltar and on the 16th proceeded out of the inner harbor to close up the stragglers on west bound convoy GUS-27. On February 1st a northwesterly gale caused the convoy to scatter and much time was consumed rounding up stragglers. The Leopold arrived at New York on the 4th for ten days availability at the Navy Yard. From the 14th to the 27th of February the Leopold, with other escorts of Escort Division 22, underwent training exercises at Casco Bay, Maine.

SUB IS SPOTTED
On March 1st, 1944, the Leopold took her screening station, as part of Escort Division 22, with the 27 ship convoy CU-16. On the 8th she reported an HF/DF intercept which indicated an enemy submarine on the route of the convoy. The route was consequently altered. On the 9th while south of Iceland she reported a radar contact at 1950 at 8000 yards, which placed it 7 miles south of the convoy. Assisted by the Joyce, the Leopold was ordered to intercept. General Quarters was sounded and orders were issued to "fire on sight." A flare was released and gun crews strained to sight the submarine in the lighted a rea. The U-boat was almost submerged when spotted and the gun crews had to work blind.

FIRST HAND ACCOUNTS
"We hadn't fired" more than a few rounds" said Cleveland Parker, Chief Commissary Steward, the highest ranking man rescued, "when another sub, lying in wait off our port quarter, threw a torpedo into us." Troy S. Gowers, Seaman 1/c, was at his gun station when the torpedo struck. "When the fish exploded" he said "I was blown right out of my shoes and into a life net a dozen feet away. I crawled back to my station and since the electric power was off, i tried to work the gun manually, but she was jammed. Then came the order to abandon ship. I helped release a life raft on the starboard side and jumped into the water. The water was almost freezing and the wind felt even colder. When I pulled myself aboard the raft there were 18 or 19 of us. When we were finally picked up there were only three or four." A storm was blowing and the waves started to break over the small life raft. Gowers and Joseph M. Ranyss, Seaman 1/c crawled around to the men sitting still, trying to keep them awake. "But those that were freezing knew it" Gowers said. "One Boy said 'I'm dying, i cant hold out any longer' and in a minute he was gone". Finally the Coast Guardsmen left on the raft saw a ship, the USS Joyce--which had dropped behind for rescue work. The Joyce saw them but couldn't stop to pick them up at that moment because a U-boat was firing torpedoes at her. The men on the raft watched in despair as the ship slowly pulled out of sight.

--122--


LEOPOLD BREAKS IN HALF
Meanwhile another survivor, W. G. O'Brien, Seaman 1/c, was still aboard the Leopold. He watched the fore part of the ship break away about 3/4 of an hour after the explosion and then had walked to the stern of the vessel where 40 of the ship's crew and officers had congregated. There he heard about one man who had been pinned under a heavy galley range by the explosion. The man had pleaded with an officer to shoot him and, when the officer refused, he begged him to leave a gun by his side so that he could shoot himself. But they freed him from the wreckage and lowered him to a boat. He died before they picked him up.

ROLLS OVER AND FINALLY SINKS
O'Brien helped pull three men out of the water. One was the commanding officer, Commander Kenneth Phillips, who had been blown off the ship by the explosion. The stern of the Leopold was now setting deeper and deeper into the water. The storm was getting stronger. An officer went below deck and came back with medical whisky and blankets. Then they saw the Joyce and signalled it with a flashlight. "She came within 50 yards of us," O'Brien said "and her skipper hollered through a megaphone 'We're dodging torpedoes. God bless you. We'll be back.' And then they went away. In a little while the stern of the Leopold rolled straight over to the port side and a lot of the men were thrown off. The Captain was one of them and I didn't see him again. The ship stayed like that for about one hour and a half, all the time getting lower in the water. The waves were about 50 feet high and one by one, the men were washed off. I'd see a big wave coming and close my eyes and hold my breath until the stern raised out of it. In one of these the water didn't go down, and I realized that the stem had finally gone under for good. So I let go and my life jacket carried me to the surface. After a while I saw a life raft and struck out for it."

ONLY 28 SURVIVORS
All of the Leopold's 13 officers and 158 of her complement of 186 enlisted men were lost. There were only 28 survivors, all enlisted men.


USS MENGES (DE-320)
ESCORT DIVISION 46

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USSMenges (DE-320) was built at the Consolidated Steel Company Shipyard at Orange, Texas, and launched on June 15, 1943. She was commissioned on October 26, 1943. Her only commanding officer has been Lt. Comdr. Frank M. McCabe, USCG. She proceeded to Galveston where she remained until November 7, 1943, for sea trials and then to New Orleans. On November 14th she proceeded to Bermuda where she underwent shakedown until December 16, 1943, and then to Charleston for post-shakedown availability until January 3, 1944. From January 6-28, 1944, was spent training nucleus Destroyer Escort crews in Chesapeake Bay and in training the ship's crew at sea, being based at Naval Operating Base, Norfolk, Virginia.

FIRST CONVOY TO GIBRALTAR AND RETURN
Escort Division 46 included USS Menges (DE-320), USS Mosley (DE-321), USS Newell (DE-322), USS Pride (DE-323), USS Falgout (DE-324) and USS Lowe (DE-325) On January 28, 1944, these vessels except the Lowe and Falgout, had completed shakedown and training of shakedown crews in Norfolk, Virginia, and started first operations as a division. On that date, with the Commander of Escort Division 46 on the Menges, she departed Norfolk with the Mosley, Pride and Newell for New York, to escort the New York section of UGS-32 to Hampton Roads, Virginia. They returned on February 2nd with the 23 ship convoy section they were escorting and on that date began operating under Commander, Task Force 65, which consisted of Escort Divisions 6 and 46 and the destroyer Eberle. From 3 to 19 February this task force escorted convoy UGS-32 to the Straits of Gibraltar and then moored at Casablanca from 20 to 25 February, They began escorting convoy GUS-31 from the Straits of Gibraltar to the United States on 26 February, arriving at New York on 16 March without incident. From 19th to 28th of March the division had an availability period at the New York Navy Yard, and then conducted exercises in the practice area off Montauk Point until the 31st.

GERMAN AIR ATTACK
The Menges, along with the Newell, Pride and Lowe arrived at Norfolk from the practice area on April 1, 1944, and on the 3rd, together with the Mosley and Falgout, began escorting convoy UGS-38 from Hampton Roads to Bizerte, North Africa. The Task Force (66) consisted of Escort Division 46, two vessels of Escort Division 9, four vessels of Escort Division 21 and the Coast Guard Cutter Taney. The escort mission was carried out without special event until the early morning of April 20, 1944, when a HF/DF bearing on an enemy transmission was obtained, indicating a submarine within 30 miles of the convoy's rear. About 2100 on April 20th the convoy was heavily attacked with torpedoes from some 20 or 30 German aircraft, at 36°59'N, 03°54'E, just north of Algiers in the Mediterranean. During the engagement, five ships were torpedoed, three of them being sunk. One of these, the USS Lansdale (DD-426) was sunk in about four minutes. The Menges picked up 113 survivors of the Lansdale using bowlines from the ship's sides and the ship's motor whaleboat for men that couldn't reach the ship. The Newell picked up the remainder of the Lansdale's survivors, which numbered 119. The Paul Hamilton, an ammunition freighter, was struck first and exploded, killing the entire personnel of 600 men, including 498 who were part of an especially trained demolition squad on its way to the Anzio beachhead. The Menges shot down one of the attacking Nazi planes and rescued two of the crew. The SS Samite, torpedoed in the bow, was towed to Algiers. The SS Stephen F. Austin, also torpedoed in the bow, managed to reach Algiers. The SS Royal Star, torpedoed aft, was abandoned by her crew, who took to life rafts and were taken aboard the Chase. A tug began to tow her to Algiers but had to beach her as she was sinking slowly. The Menges and Newell discontinued search for survivors at 0330 on the 21st and proceeded to Algiers to disembark survivors. They rejoined the convoy at 1930, and arrived with it at Bizerte on the 23rd, remaining there for the rest of April.

MENGES IS TORPEDOED
The Menges with the rest of Escort Division 46, six other DE's, USS Steady, a British AA cruiser, and the CGC Taney, departed Bizerte on May 1, 1944, escorting convoy GUS-38, relieving British escorts. The convoy consisted of about 70 merchant vessels and proceeded in a broad front formation, with the Menges maintaining a position about two miles behind the convoy. There was a smooth sea, light westerly airs and good visibility from the bright moonlight for most of the night. While enemy, air attacks were more or less routine in this area, the heavy air attack on the east-bound convoy in April was still fresh in the memory of escort

--123--


personnel. There was, however, only a general possibility of a submarine attack in the Mediterranean. At 2334 on 2 May the Pride investigated a flashing white light off the port quarter of the convoy and reported it by TBS to the Task Force Commander as "some kind of a carbide light which is submerged and emits a bright light intermittently." The Menges had intercepted this message and had also sighted a flashing white light. At 0037 on May 3rd, a small radar surface target appeared on the scope about six miles from the Menges, who reversed course to investigate. A few minutes later a plane appeared on the radar scale at a range of about 7000 yards and passed directly over the Menges at about 200 feet in the direction of the convoy. Visual identification by the Menges' gun crews indicated that it was a Junkers 88. When neither the surface target nor the Menges was molested by the plane, a large air operation against the convoy was expected, with the strange lights evaluated as decoys to lure escorts from the convoy and the surface target some type of radio beacon to guide enemy planes. At 0112 the surface target disappeared from the radar screen. Up to this time it had not been positively identified as a submarine. To prevent its escape the Menges started an erratic approach towards the point of submergence. Five minutes later the Menges had a sound contact on the port beam at 1500 yards and at 0118 a torpedo hit her stem when in position 37°08'N, 05°19'E. The explosion was followed two minutes later by several heavy explosions shaking the ship. The torpedo was not heard by the sound man and was probably a new, circling, turbine-propelled type of acoustic torpedo. The force of the explosion demolished the stern of the ship aft of number 3 gun. Many casualties were caused by the depth charge racks, depth charges and other objects being blown from the stern high in the air forward, one man being killed by a washing machine which had been secured below decks aft. One depth charge rack, with 12 charges, landed on the 40mm gun, bending the barrels almost double and ripping the gun from its foundations. Depth charges crushed the officer and men on the torpedo tubes but did not explode. Torpedoes were jarred partially out of their tubes and at least one had a hot run. Total casualties were two officers and 29 men killed or missing, and 13 men requiring hospitalization.

USS PRIDE SINKS THE SUBMARINE
The first vessel to arrive on the scene was the Pride. At 0247 the Pride located the underwater enemy by sound gear at 1800 yards down moon from the Menges and evidently at periscope length. She made a good hedgehog approach which was, however, ruined by the failure of the hedgehog electrical circuit. The Pride had approached the Menges in the up moon position correctly assuming that this would be the most probable location of the submarine, which, at periscope depth and in down moon position, could sight up moon an escort proceeding directly from the convoy. This probably saved the Pride from being torpedoed, as the sub could not turn fast enough, at periscope depth, to aim at the Pride approaching her beam. The J. E. Campbell (DE-70), with Commander, Escort Division 21 on board, arrived shortly after this and these two were joined by a French and British destroyer, a French Destroyer Escort and a U.S. mine sweeper in attacking the submarine. After 26 hours of coordinated depth charge attacks and hold down tactics by these vessels, the submarine was finally scuttled by its crew, but not until it had torpedoed the French DE. To scuttle the sub, the crew put it in motion, heading for water deep enough to prevent salvage and all hands apparently abandoned it successfully. 46 were taken prisoner and probably four escaped by swimming ashore.

AWARDS
The following personnel of the Menges were presented with awards for outstanding achievements on 20 April and 3 May, 1944:

Lt. Comdr. F. M. McCabe, USCG Legion of Merit
Lt. LeRoy Van Nostrand, USCG Bronze Star
Lt. (jg) James A MacKay, USCG Bronze Star
Harold Levy, C.Ph.M., USCGR Legion of Merit
W. A. Riskedahl, MoMM 1/c, USCGR Navy and Marine Corps Medal
V. B. Mathis MoMM 1/c, USCGR Bronze Star
J. D. Lawless, WT 2/c, USCGR Navy and Marine Corps Medal
S. D. Putzke, RM 2/c, USCGR Navy and Marine Corps Medal
James Lee, Sea 1/c, USCGR Navy and Marine Corps Medal
G. E. Doak, F 1/c, USCGR Navy and Marine Corps Medal
C. O. Sandas BM 2/c, USCGR Navy and Marine Corps Medal (Posthumously)

MENGES REPAIRED
By dawn on May 3, 1944, a tug arrived on the scene and towed the disabled Menges to Bougie, Algeria, where the dead and wounded were landed. From there she was towed to Algiers for minor repairs and then to Oran, where the damaged part of the ship was cut off, leaving two-thirds of the original ship. She was then towed in a convoy toward the United States, but because of continual breaking of the towing chain, the tow put in to Horta, Azores, where a more suitable towing rig was procured. She was then towed to Bermuda and from there to New York. At the New York Navy Yard, 95 feet of the stern of the USS Holder (DE-401), who had been torpedoed amidships by an aerial torpedo, was welded onto the remainder of the Menges. This was the first known case of a large section of a battle damaged ship being welded to another battle damaged ship to make a complete ship. A new crew was put aboard, except for the commanding officer, and a few of the original officers and men, and the new Menges departed from the Navy Yard on September 16, 1944.

NEW MENGES HELPS SINK SUBS
After a four week shakedown at Casco Bay, Maine, the Menges resumed escort duty, taking a North Atlantic convoy to French and English ports and then returning to the United States to Mediterranean runs. On February 11, 1945, the Menges, along with the Pride, Mosley and Lowe, was assigned as an independent Killer Group in the North Atlantic, commanded by Commander R. H. French, USCGR. This was the only Killer Group completely manned by Coast Guard personnel. On the 18th of March, 1945, the Menges and Lowe succeeded in destroying a German submarine, the first target assigned to this Killer Group. The following awards were made as a result of this action;

Lt. Comdr. F. M. McCabe, USCGR Bronze Star Medal
Lt. (jg) H. W. Tyas, Jr., USCGR Commendation Ribbon
Thomas H. Watkins, SOM 2/c, USCGR Commendation Ribbon

The Killer Group operations were continued in the North Atlantic and later this Killer Group was joined with two carriers and other Killer Groups. This combination succeeded in sinking three other German submarines. One DE was sunk.

--124--


TRAINING VESSEL
On May 14, 1945, Germany having surrendered, the Killer Group was dissolved. The next assignment for the Menges was to escort the last trans-Atlantic convoy to England, along with the pride and the Davis (DD-325) The escorts put into Liverpool and returned without a convoy. The Menges was then assigned as one of the training vessels for the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. The Menges and the CGC Cobb made two one month cruises to the West Indies, carrying separate groups of cadets. Upon being detached from this duty the Menges was assigned as a training vessel at New London Submarine Base. After being inspected at Fall River, Mass., on Navy Day, October 27, 1945, the Menges proceeded to Green Cove Springs, Florida, in the St. John's River for preservation and decommissioning in the Inactive Fleet. She was decommissioned and the Coast Guard crew removed April 12, 1946.


USS MOSLEY (DE-321)
ESCORT DIVISION 46

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Mosley (DE-321) was commissioned at Orange, Texas, on October 30, 1943. Outfitted in Galveston on November 19th she departed for Bermuda for her shakedown training. On Christmas Eve, 1943, she departed Bermuda for Charleston, where she underwent a seven day post shakedown availability.

FIRST CONVOY
Her first escort duty was from Norfolk to various Gulf ports, returning with a convoy for Port Arthur, Texas, to Norfolk. Here she joined the Menges, Newell, Pride, Falgout and Lowe, and these destroyer escorts, operating together for the first time as Escort Division 46, sailed from New York as escort with convoy UGS-32, on January 28, 1944. The trip to Casablanca was uneventful except for a couple of attacks on possible submarines, but during the return trip to the United States with convoy GUS-31, the Mosley encountered some very rough weather. She arrived at New York on March 18th, 1944.

CONVOY IS ATTACKED
The Mosley's next assignment was as escort to convoy UGS-38 from Norfolk to Bizerte. It was while on this duty, on the night of April 20, 1944, that the convoy was attacked off the coast of Algiers, by twenty one JU-38's and HE-111's. In the ensuing action, the USS Lansdale and the USS Paul Hamilton, a troopship, were sunk and three other merchant ships torpedoed before the attackers were repulsed. The Mosley knocked down one German plane and hit two others.

MENGES HIT AND USS FECHTELER SUNK
One day out of Bizerte, Tunisia, on the return trip, the USS Menges (DE-320), stationed astern of the convoy was torpedoed on May 3, 1944, by a German submarine, while investigating a sound contact. Three escorts from the convoy later sunk this U-boat. Two days later, a ship in the outer screen sighted a submarine in the path of the convoy at 0310. Half an hour later, after two emergency turns to starboard had been made, the USS Fechteler, stationed ahead of the Mosley, was torpedoed and later sank. After dropping an embarrassing pattern of depth charges between the supposed location of the U-boat and the convoy, the Mosley proceeded to the Fechteler and dropped three life rafts and two floater nets to the survivors. The Mosley and two others searched for the submarine until noon, when she was relieved by two U.S. destroyers stationed in the Mediterranean.

OTHER TRIPS
After this trip the Mosley escorted two more convoys to Bizerte, Tunisia, and two to Oran, Algeria, After each round trip, Escort Division 46, had a ten day availability at the New York Navy Yard and a short period of training and inspections at Casco Bay, Maine.

IN KILLER GROUP
On February 22, 1945, the Menges, Mosley, Pride and Lowe were formed into Task Group 22.14, a "Killer" Group. After a week's training under Commander, Submarine Squadron One, New London, Conn., the group was sent out after its first submarine. In less than two weeks the group had found and sunk the submarine. For her next mission the Mosley, with Task Group 22.14 joined another successful "Killer" Group, with an aircraft carrier, and went in search of submarines in the area between Newfoundland and Greenland. To curb Germany's final desperate U-boat drive, this new Task Force, combined with another task group of the same size--ten destroyer escorts and an aircraft carrier--set up a barrier at 30 degrees west longitude. This group fought it out with the German underseas fleet and so routed the few subs to escape alive, that the Nazi drive was a complete disaster. For two weeks after the European War was over, the Mosley and her group remained at sea, while the U-boats were surrendering.

DECOMMISSIONING
After a short stay in New York, the Mosley went to Port Everglades, Florida, for experimental and training work with Commander, Anti-Submarine Development, Atlantic Fleet. After three months of this duty and a month at the Charleston Navy Yard, the Mosley arrived at St. John's River Group Anchorage, Reserve Fleet, Green Cove Springs, Florida, on November 3, 1945, for decommissioning. The Coast Guard crew was removed March 15, 1946.


USS NEWELL (DE-322)
ESCORT DIVISION 46

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Newell (DE-322) was built by the Consolidated Steel Company, Shipbuilding Division, at Orange, Texas, and was commissioned on October 30, 1943. Lt. Comdr. Russell J. Roberts, USCGR, was her first commanding officer. The Newell was named after Lt. Comdr. Byron Bruce Newell, USN, who lost his life as a flyer attached t o the USS Hornet in 1942. After being fitter out at Galveston, Texas, she finally sailed on November 17, 1943, for Bermuda where she arrived on Thanksgiving Day, 1943, for shakedown. On Christmas Day, 1943, she sailed for Charleston, S.C. and a short availability. She then proceeded to Norfolk for the training of pre-commissioning crews. In about two weeks Escort Division 46 was formed consisting of the Menges, Mosley, Newell, Pride, Falgout and Lowe.

FIRST CONVOY
The first convoy escort trip was to Casablanca and was uneventful. The Newell, as part of Escort Division 46, helped screen convoy UGS-32 to the Straits of Gibraltar from February 3rd to 19th, 1944. She remained at Casablanca from February 20 to 25, during which time many of the men had their first glimpse of a foreign port. On February 26th, the Newell began escorting convoy GUS-31 from Gibraltar to the United States arriving at New York on

--125--


AS SHE FLOATS TODAY THE USS <i>Menges</i> (DE) IS A HYBRID SHIP CONTAINING THE BOW 0? THE ORIGINAL COAST GUARD MANNED USS <i>Menges</i> AND THE STERN 0? THE USS <i>Holder</i>, BOTH TOMFEDOED IN <i>Action</i> AND APPARENTLY DOOMED
As she floats today, the USS Menges (DE) is a hybrid ship containing the bow of
the original Coast Guard manned USS Menges and the stern of the USS Holder,
both torpedoed in action and apparently doomed.

THE COAST GUARD-MANNED DESTROYER ESCORT USS <i>Ramsden</i>
The Coast Guard-manned Destroyer Escort USS Ramsden

--126--


March 16th, 1944. After ten days availability at New York she engaged in exercises off Montauk Point until the 31st.

RESCUES SURVIVORS FROM USS LANSDALE
On April 3, 1944, the Mosley, with Escort Division 46 began escorting convoy UGS-3U from Hampton Roads to Bizerte, Tunisia. At this time harassing attacks upon allied convoys were still being made in the Mediterranean by Nazi aircraft. About two days past Gibraltar, and barely past Algiers, the convoy had settled into its usual watchful attitude during the evenings. At this time all ships went to General Quarters at least an hour prior to sunset, and until half an hour afterward. On the night of April 20, 1944, about 2045, Nazi aircraft began to come in on the convoy in what was considered the heaviest attack yet encountered. During the attack, the Newell's gunners brought down a Nazi plane, survivors of which were later rescued. A torpedo from one of the enemy planes caught the USS Landsdale, a destroyer, not 200 yards from the Newell. After the attack the Newell and the Menges were directed to rescue survivors. Between the hours of 2115 and 0330, April 21st, more than 120 survivors were brought aboard, the Newell, many of them through the individual efforts of members of the crew. Every section of the ship had its job. Many of the survivors were injured and the pharmacist's mates brought considerable credit to themselves by their courageous work. Every man was examined for shock, and those that were wounded were carefully treated. These men, who carried on their work without supervision of a doctor, were later given the Legion of Merit. They were Rudolph T. Schlesinger, CPhm and Joseph Yaccarino, Jr., Ph U 2/c, The damage control parties worked tirelessly to bring men aboard. Many individual members went over the side, in cold water, to bring aboard survivors too weak to swim to the ship. Letters of commendation were later awarded for their "skill, initiative and cool resourcefulness" to Jeston V. Woodson, COM, Raymond L. Williams, Jr., CEM and Fred F. Wisniowski, S 1/c. The Newell proceeded with their survivors, in company with the Menges, and other DE's towing disabled merchant ships to Algiers, where the survivors were landed and the escorts rapidly caught up to the convoy which had proceeded on ahead to Bizerte.

MENGES HIT
After ten days at Bizerte the Newell, with the rest of Escort Division 46, left on May 1, 1944. On the second night underway, the USS Menges was torpedoed while tracking down a target and the next night, the USS Fechteler received a torpedo amidship and sank. The Menges was towed to port and thence across the Atlantic where the stern of the USS Holden (DE-401) was joined to her bow.

SPECIAL DUTY
The convoy returned to New York and the escorts were armed with four additional 40 mm guns, in preparation for her next convoy. At this time her skipper was relieved and given command of a division of destroyer escorts. Lt. Comdr. P. E. Burhorst, USCGR, assumed command. The Newell made two more uneventful trips to Bizerte, and two more trips to Oran. In February, 1945, after the last of her six round trips with the convoys, and a short availability in New York, the Newell reported to Norfolk for special duty under COTCLANT. A number of miscellaneous duties were performed there, including testing sono-buoys, determining the minimum speed possible for DE's while dropping various types of depth charges, a short convoy of a carrier, and training newly commissioned officers of the Navy. On April 6, 1945, she was ordered to Florida to act as escort and plane guard for a carrier which was training pilots. She remained on this duty, in the course of which she rescued six pilots who had crashed in the water, until June 3rd when she proceeded to New York.

DECOMMISSIONING
Meanwhile, with the surrender of Germany, large sections of the Atlantic fleet were being sent to the Pacific. However, the Newell was assigned to remain in the Atlantic. She sailed for Panama on June 18, 1945, for special duty at Balboa, where she trained submarines, remaining there about 4½ months, throughout the summer and after the surrender of Japan on August 14, 1945. During this time she made a good will visit to Costa Rica. On 15 September, 1945, Lt. Gabriel E. Pehaim, USCGR, relieved Lt. Comdr. Burhorst as commanding officer. On October 20th she was ordered into Inactive Fleet status, sailing for Florida on December 13th. On May 1st, 1946, her Coast Guard crew was removed.


USS PRIDE (DE-323)
ESCORT DIVISION 46

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Pride (DE-323) was commissioned at Orange, Texas, on November 13, 1943. Under command of Commander R. R. Curry, USCGR, she proceeded to Bermuda for her shakedown cruise. After six weeks of intensive training there, she was ready for convoy duty.

FIRST TRIP
For the next twelve months the Pride escorted convoys of badly needed men and materials to the fighting fronts in the Mediterranean area. During this period six convoys, of from 60 to 115 ships, were escorted safely into the area. The first trip was entirely uneventful except for a period of rough weather which lasted 23 days on the return trip.

GERMAN AIR ATTACK
It was on the second trip that the Pride won her spurs as a fighting ship. Off Algiers, German planes attacked the convoy at dusk and gave the crew their first taste of actual warfare. Five ships were hit and three sank, including the transport Paul Hamilton and the USS Landsdale. On April 20, 1944, the Pride, in position 37°04'N, 03°49'E, was stationed in the outer screen of the convoy and expecting an air attack. At 1900 an aircraft was reported approaching dead ahead about 5 miles. This was followed immediately by a report from another source that planes were passing low overhead and were heading for the convoy. Gunfire was observed but no planes were sighted. By this time much gunfire was sighted in the direction of the convoy and one large explosion was observed. At 1907 it was reported that two torpedo tracks were headed toward the Pride. The vessel went to flank speed and dropped two depth charges set at 100 feet, at intervals of 10 seconds. A man stationed at the depth charge rack reported that one torpedo was passing close astern but this was not observed by bridge lookouts. At 1916 more planes were reported coming in and heading for the convoy. Shortly after this, one plane was seen astern heading 090° true. It passed up the Pride's portside and started to circle ahead of her, turning to the right. The Pride opened fire and continued firing for about 20 seconds, during which time the plane turned away, disappeared and was not seen again. On April 22,

--127--


the convoy reached Bizerte and the Pride remained there for the balance of April.

SUB DESTROYED
As May, 1944 began, the Pride was acting as one of the escorts for convoy GUS-38 en route from North Africa to the United States. Shortly after the Menges reported early on May 3rd, the Pride received orders to join the Menges, in company with USS J. E. Campbell (DE-70). These two were joined by the Senegelese (French DE), Alycon (French Destroyer), Blankley (British Destroyer) and Sustain (U.S. mine sweeper). After 26 hours of coordinated depth charge attacks and hold down tactics by these vessels, the submarine was finally settled by its crew, but during the attack the enemy put a torpedo into the stem of the Senegelese. The crew put the sub in motion to scuttle it heading for water deep enough to prevent salvage. All hands apparently abandoned the sub successfully. Forty six were taken prisoner and probably four escaped by swimming ashore. The young captured commander boasted of being the leading German ace and of having 26 ships to his credit during over a year in the Mediterranean. The Menges was towed to Algiers for repairs and salvage. Here on May 4th, Commander, Escort Division 46, transferred to the Pride and, along with the J. E. Campbell, she left Algiers that same day to rejoin the convoy. On May 5th it was concluded from intercepts that Fechteler (DE) of Task Force 66 had been torpedoed and sunk near the Spanish Isla Del Alboran and that the sub was being hunted. The Pride and J. E. Campbell secured permission and altered course, joining the hunt in the shoal water around the island, but the search was negative and they rejoined the convoy before dark. The Pride anchored in New York Harbor on May 22nd. For this action Commander R. R. Curry, USCGR, received a gold star in lieu of a second Legion of Merit. Lt. (jg) Donald E. Shively, USCGR, Samuel Abbott, SOM 3/c, Morton M. Fink and Daniel J. Hollern received commendations from the Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet.

ANOTHER SUB SUNK
In March, 1945, the Pride was assigned killer group work with the Menges, Mosley and Lowe of Escort Division 46. The first assignment for this group resulted in the destruction of the U-866 at 43°18'N, 61°08'W on March 18, 1945. This took place off Halifax before she had opportunity to sink any allied shipping. For his part in this action, the commanding officer, Lt. Comdr. Winslow H. Buxton, USCGR, received a commendation from the Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet.

BARRIER GROUP
The killer group was then assigned to the barrier group in the North Atlantic which consisted of four Escort Carriers and eighty Destroyer Escorts. The job assigned was to intercept and destroy enemy U-boats before they could reach the vital shipping lanes. Five out of six submarines known to be in that area were destroyed and the sixth one surrendered shortly after VE-day.

TRAINING DUTY
The coming of VJ-day found the Pride helping to train submarines in the war against Japan, under command of Lt. L. A. Cheney, USCGR, who relieved Lt. Comdr. Buxton on September 1, 1945. Later she was transferred to the Inactive Fleet. Her Coast Guard crew was removed on May 6, 1946.


USS FALGOUT (DE-324)
ESCORT DIVISION 46

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN--PICKS UP 11 SURVIVORS
The Coast Guard manned USS Falgout (DE-324) was built by the Consolidated Steel Corporation at Orange, Texas, and commissioned on November 15, 1943. She was named after George Irvin Falgout, Seaman 2/c, USNR, who was killed in action aboard the USS San Francisco on November 12, 1942. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. H. A. Meyer, USCGR. Proceeding to Galveston on November 20, 1943, for fitting and drydocking, she departed December 2, 1943, for Bermuda. While en route in the Gulf of Mexico the Falgout was ordered to conduct a search for the survivors of the torpedoed tanker USS Touchet, reported adrift in a lifeboat. The lifeboat was picked up on December 4, 1943, with 11 survivors aboard. The Falgout then proceeded to Key West, Florida, where the survivors were put ashore in charge of the naval authorities at that base on December 6, 1943. The Falgout reported at 3ermuda on December 11th and after 4 weeks of intensive training arrived at Charleston on January 9, 1944, for an availability period extending to January 22, 1944. From that date until February 2nd she was on temporary duty, training crews for Destroyer Escorts at Hampton Roads, Virginia.

FIRST ESCORT DUTY
On February 2, 1944, th Falgout was attached to Task Force 65, Escort Division 46, for escort duty with convoy UGS-32 which sailed for the Mediterranean next day. The escorts were detached at Gibraltar and proceeded to Casablanca to await the returning convoy. On the 25th the Falgout, in company with other escorts of the task force departed Casablanca and joined convoy GUS-31 for the trip back to the United States. After a rough voyage she arrived in New York on March 17, 1944.

GERMAN AIR ATTACK
The Falgout reported again to Naval Operating Base, Norfolk, Virginia, on April 1, 1943, for escort duty with Escort Division 46, under Commander Task Force 66 and on the 3rd escorted convoy UGS-36 out of Hampton Roads, Virginia, to the Mediterranean. The trip across the Atlantic was uneventful, but after passing through the Straits of Gibraltar into the Mediterranean, the screen was reenforced and preparations were being made for probable enemy action. On the evening of April 20, 1944, just after dusk, the air alert was sounded and shortly afterwards the Falgout received her first taste of action when several waves of German bombers and torpedo planes attacked from the north after first dropping flares around the convoy. Several heavy explosions were felt, and after a hectic few minutes the attack ended. It was discovered that several convoy ships were hit and one ammunition ship blown up. The destroyer Landsdale was also sunk. Some enemy planes were claimed by escorts but no official count is known. Survivors were picked up and damaged ships escorted to the nearest port, which was Algiers, while the convoy continued on its way. Relieved by British escorts off Bizerte, the Falgout put into port for a layover and upkeep period until joining the next home-bound convoy.

MENGES HIT--FECHTELER SUNK
The Falgout, with other escorts of Escort Division 46, Task Force 66, departed Bizerte on May I, 1944, to escort convoy GUS-38 back to the States. A continued alert was maintained for further air attack. This

--128--


time, however, it was enemy submarines that struck. Two days out of Bizerte, the USS Menges (DE-320) while investigating a radar contact astern of the convoy, received a torpedo hit on the stern. Although badly crippled, she remained afloat and was towed into Algiers for repairs. Two escorts, the Pride and J. E. Campbell, were detached to hunt down the submarine, which they later destroyed. Two nights later, while not far from Oran, the USS Fechteler (DE-157) was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine which submerged ahead of the convoy. The convoy continued on its way with no further incident and arrived at New York May 21, 1944.

PICKS UP GERMAN AVIATORS
The Falgout continued escorting convoy runs to the Mediterranean, escorting UGS and GUS convoy. Two more trips were made to Bizerte without experiencing enemy action. However, while escorting GUS-45 in the Mediterranean en route the United States in July, 1944, the Falgout picked up four German aviators who had been shot down on a raid against another convoy the previous night. The Falgout put into Oran and turned the prisoners over to naval authorities in that port.

TRAINING DUTY
After October, 1944, three trips were made to Oran with UGS convoys, enemy resistance in the Mediterranean being negligible at this time, and the U-boat menace in the Atlantic being also well under control, with no more enemy action being experienced. On the Falgout's last trip to Oran in May, 1945, just before reaching port, the news of Germany's surrender to the Allies was received, and the Falgout joined in the celebration of VE-day in the port of Oran. On June 2, 1945, the Falgout again arrived at New York, and after a 17 day upkeep period was ordered to duty under Commander, Submarines, Atlantic Fleet. Departing New York on June 20, 1945, she proceeded to Balboa, Panama Canal Zone for duty under Commander, Submarine Operational Training Group, training submarines en route to the Pacific. The Falgout remained on this duty until VJ-day. She continued with submarine training operations, making good will and recreational trips to Costa Rica and Nicaragua. On July 22, 1945, Lt. Comd.r Henry C. Keene, Jr., USCGR, became her commanding officer, relieving Comdr. Meyer. Later she joined the Inactive Reserve Fleet at Green Cove Springs, Florida, and her Coast Guard crew was removed March 24, 1946.


USS LOWE (DE-325)
ESCORT DIVISION 46

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Lowe (DE-325) was built by the Consolidated Ship Building Corporation, Ltd., in Orange, Texas. She was named after Harry J. Lowe, Jr., Gunner's Mate, Third Class, USNR, who was killed in action aboard the USS San Francisco, November 12, 1942. She was commissioned November 22, 1943. Three Coast Guard officers have commanded the Lowe. Her first commanding officer was Commander R. H. French, USCGR. He was followed by Comdr. James A. Alger, USCGR, on May 22, 1944. Lt. Comdr. Herbert Feldman, USCGR, assumed command on October 14, 1944. After a brief shakedown and training period the Lowe began escort duty.

ESCORT DUTY
She was attached to Escort Division 46, which on April 20, 1944, was escorting convoy UGS-38 in the Mediterranean when it was attacked by German torpedo bombers which sank the SS Paul Hamilton and the USS Landsdale. On the return homeward bound trip, the USS Menges, a sister escort vessel of Escort Division 46, was hit by a torpedo from a German submarine, and another escort the USS Fechteler (DE-157), was sunk. The Lowe made two more uneventful trips to Bizerte and two more to Oran, in company with Escort Division 46.

KILLER GROUP SINKS SUB
On February 22, 1945, the Lowe, along with the Menges, Mosley and Pride, became a member of Task Group 22.14, the first Coast Guard Killer Group organized by the Navy for duty in the North Atlantic. The first assignment given this group resulted in the destruction of the German submarine U-866 on March 18, 1945, off Halifax. The following officers and men of the Lowe were awarded decorations for this accomplishment:

Lt. Comdr. Herbert Feldman, USCGR--Legion of Merit
Lt. Comdr. David B. Enbody, USCGR--Bronze Star Medal
Lt. James B. Luse, USCGR--Bronze Star Medal
Robert A. Stephenson, Soundman 3/c, USCGR--Letter of Commendation and Commendation Ribbon
Leonard Harsfeld, Soundman 2/c, USCGR-- Letter of Commendation and Commendation Ribbon

TRAINING VESSEL
Following the surrender of Germany and the end of hostilities in the Atlantic, the Lowe operated as a training vessel for U.S. Navy officers at Norfolk. She was placed in the Inactive Reserve Fleet at Green Cove Springs, Florida, and her Coast Guard crew removed May 1, 1946.


USS RAMSDEN (DE-382)
ESCORT DIVISION 23

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Ramsden (DE-382) was built by the Brown Shipbuilding Corporation of Houston and named for Marvin Lee Ramsden, Coxswain, USN, who was killed in action aboard the USS Lexington in the Battle of the Coral Sea on May 8, 1942. She was commissioned on October 19, 1943, and after a month's intensive shakedown off the Coast of Bermuda, she reported to Destroyer's Atlantic Fleet, to operate as an escort vessel. Prior to making trans-Atlantic crossings, the Ramsden escorted a convoy of heavily laden troopships to Panama.

AIR ATTACK ON CONVOY
In January, 1944, the Ramsden, attached to Escort Division 23, left New York escorting a tanker and LST convoy bound for Casablanca. She returned to New York in February. On April 1, 1944, a convoy escorted by the Ramsden to Bizerte, North Africa, was attacked at night by a flight of German Dornier bombers. In the ensuing engagement the Ramsden shot down one of the attackers. The one merchantman struck was not sunk. The final score of the encounter was four Nazi planes destroyed, one allied merchantman damaged.

FOURTEEN MORE CROSSINGS
During the following thirteen months which were to complete her career in the Atlantic, the Ramsden made

--129--


the crossing an additional fourteen times, putting into Cardiff, Londonderry, Glasgow, Plymouth, Portsmouth, Le Havre and Cherbourg. Her career in the Atlantic was an interesting, dangerous and, at times, an uncomfortable one. On many occasions submarine contacts were established and the Ramsden and her sister escorts dropped depth charge patterns in order to destroy or divert the submarines from making torpedo attacks.

NORTHERN PACIFIC DUTY
With the defeat of Germany, the Ramsden, overhauled, her armament increased, was dispatched to the Pacific to aid in the knockout of Japan, departing New York on May 29, 1945; as a unit of Escort Division 23. She arrived at San Francisco late in June and was ordered to proceed to Adak in the Aleutian Islands to report for duty with Commander, North Pacific Forces. En route the Ramsden sighted and destroyed by shellfire a floating mine. Upon arriving at Adak the Ramsden was dispatched to Attu, Aleutian Islands and was assigned to operate with Fleet Air Wing Four, as a plane guard vessel, assisting Army and Navy planes on bombing and reconnaissance missions over the Japanese held Kurile Islands. While on this duty the Ramsden crossed the International Date Line eight times.

IN JAPAN
At sea when hostilities ceased, the Ramsden returned to Adak and departed on August 29, 1945, escorting a service force unit of the occupation fleet. After passing through the heavily mined Tsugaru Straits she dropped anchor in Ominato Naval Anchorage on September 9th. She returned to Adak on September 25th. In her two years of service her four commanding officers were Commander J. E. Madacey, USCGR, Lt. Comdr. S. T. Eaketel, USCGR, Lt. Froctor Winter, USCGR, and Lt. R. H. Welton, USCGR. She was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed at Green Cove Springs, Florida, 13 June, 1946.


USS MILLS (DE-303)
ESCORT DIVISION 23

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Mills (DE-383) was built by the Brown Shipbuilding Company at Houston, Texas, and commissioned there on October 12, 1943. Lt. Comdr. J. S. Muzzy, USCGR, was the first skipper, with a crew of 186 Coast Guardsmen and 9 other Coast Guard officers. Leaving Galveston on October 2oth, she arrived at New Orleans and on November 2nd, in company with the SELLSTROM, departed for her shakedown in Bermuda. She left Bermuda on December 3rd for Charleston Navy Yard for repairs and maintenance until the 15th when she departed for Norfolk where she remained until January b, 1944, training nucleus crews for future PFs and DEs.

FIRST CONVOY ESCORT
On January 6, 1944, the Mills departed Norfolk for New York in company with the Sellstrom (DE-255), Ramsden (DE-382), Savage (DE-366). The four escorts of Escort Division 23, later to be augmented by the Rhodes (DE-364) and the Ritchey (DE-345), returned to Norfolk with the New York section of convoy UGS-30 and on the 13th of January, together for the first time with all the ships of Escort Division 23, plus Escort Division 7, departed Norfolk for North Africa. Leaving the convoy at Gibraltar, the Mills with four other escorts, proceeded to Casablanca arriving there on February 1st. On the 4th the Mills departed Casablanca and, after picking up convoy GUS-29 at Gibraltar, proceeded for the United States. En route the Mills left the convoy to take an appendectomy case to Bermuda. Rejoining the convoy she arrived at New York on 21 February.

TWO COAST GUARD MANNED DESTROYER ESCORTS TRAIL IN THE FROTHY WAKE OF A THIRD SOMEWHERE IN THE ATLANTIC
Two Coast Guard-manned Destroyer Escorts trail in the froth wake of a third, somewhere in the Atlantic

--130--


GERMAN AIR ATTACK--LIBERTY SHIP FIRE EXTINGUISHED
On March 13, 1944, after a Navy Yard availability at Brooklyn and a period of refresher training off Montauk, L. I., the Mills, in company with Escort Division 23 and Destroyer Division 57, departed Norfolk as escorts of convoy UGS-36 bound for the Mediterranean. On April 1st the convoy was attacked by a group of low flying German torpedo bombers. At least two were shot down by other convoy escorts. At daybreak the Mills was ordered to the assistance of the SS Jarred Ingersoll, a liberty ship which had been torpedoed, and although in a sinking condition, was also afire. After picking up the survivors who had abandoned ship, the Mills put its own party aboard the Ingersoll. By courageous and heroic efforts this party extinguished tho fires, after the Ingersoll had been twice abandoned by her crew, and in spite of the fact that the compartment adjacent to the burning hold was a magazine containing ammunition. After bringing the fire under control, the Mills assisted in towing the ship to Algiers where it was beached. Lt. Comdr. Muzzy was awarded the Legion of Merit and Lt. (j.g.) Waldron and 13 fire fighting crew members received commendations. On April 3rd, the Mills rejoined the convoy just before the escorts broke off and proceeded with then into Bizerte. An uneventful return voyage with convoy GUS-36 brought the Mills back to New York on May 2nd. On May 4th Lt. Comdr. V. Pfeiffer, USCGR, became the MILL's commanding officer.

ATLANTIC CONVOYS
The movements of the Mills< during the remainder of her duty escorting trans-Atlantic convoys are as follows:

CONVOY DEPARTED ARRIVED
UGS-43 Norfolk 5/22/44 Bizerte 6/12/44
TCU-35 New York 8/13/44 Londonderry 6/23/44
CU-41 New York 9/29/44 Milford Haven 10/9/44
CU-47 New York 11/15/44 Liverpool 11/26/44
CU-53 New York 1/3/45 Plymouth 1/15/45
CU-59 New York 2/19/45 Southampton 3/2/45
CU-65 New York 4/8/45 Southampton 4/20/45
 
GUS-43 6/19/44 Bizerte 7/11/44 Norfolk
UCT-35 8/27/44 Londonderry 9/5/44 New York
UC-41A 10/13/44 Milford Haven 10/29/44 New York
UC-47B 12/3/44 Liverpool 12/17/44 New York
UC-53A 1/18/45 Plymouth 2/3/45 New York
UC-59A 3/5/45 Southampton 3/17/45 New York
UC-65B 4/26/45 Southampton 55/7/45 New York

A U.S. COAST GUARD CONVOY CUTTER AND A DESTROYER MEET IN A RENDEZVOUS HELD SOMEWHERE AT SEA

--131--


NORTHERN PACIFIC DUTY
On May 30, 1945, the Mills departed New York in company with other ships of Escort Division 23 for Culebra Island, one of the Virgin Group, arriving there on June 3 where all ships engaged in shore bombardment exercises. After a period of intensive training at Guantanamo Bay she departed on June 15th for the Canal Zone, and San Francisco, where she arrived on June 27th. On June 30th she departed for Adak, Aleutian Islands arriving there on July 6th and then setting out, in company with the Savage, for Dutch Harbor. She arrived at Attu on July 20th and on the 24th departed on weather patrol and plane guard station between Paramashiro and Attu until the 31st. She was again on the same station between August 5th and 11th. VJ-day was celebrated on August 14th, and on the 15th Lt. Henry E. Ringling, USCGR, became commanding officer. The Mills was again on weather station between August 17th and 23rd. On the 25th she proceeded to Adak. In company with the Ramsden, as escorts for the USS Exanthus, she departed Adak for Japan on August 29th to participate in the occupation. The Ritchie with the USS Tippecanoe joined en route and on September 6th, rendezvous was made with the fleet of NOR PAC FORCE. On September 9th the Mills entered Mutsu Bay and anchored off Ominato Naval Base. Returning to Adak on the 25th of September, the Mills finally returned to the Atlantic Coast where she joined the Inactive Reserve Fleet at Green Cove Springs, Florida, and her Coast Guard crew was removed on June 13, 1946.


USS RHODES (DE-384)
ESCORT DIVISION 23

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Rhodes (DE-384) was built at the Brown Shipbuilding Company, Houston, Texas, and commissioned there on October 25, 1943. After completing her post-commissioning fitting out period in Galveston she departed on her first voyage to Bermuda on November 13, 1942, for a six week's shakedown and training period. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. E. A. Coffin, Jr., USCGR. After a brief Navy Yard availability and Christmas holiday in Charleston, South Carolina, she cruised to Norfolk, Virginia, for orders, then to New York for her first duty assignment.

FIRST CONVOY DUTY
That duty began New Year's Day, 1944, when the Rhodes rounded Sandy Hook as an escort for the New York section of convoy UGS-30, bound for North Africa, via Norfolk. She remained in Norfolk as a training ship for prospective destroyer escort crews until January 13, 1944. On that date she departed Hampton Roads as an escort for convoy UGS-30, bound for North African ports. No positive enemy activity was encountered during the voyage, although the Rhodes attacked four possible submarine sonar contacts during the voyage. The convoy was transferred to a British escort at the Straits of Gibraltar and the vessel's first European-African Theatre. Liberty was granted in Casablanca, French Morocco. By February 23rd the Rhodes was back in the United States after escorting convoy GUS-29 returning from the Mediterranean area.

DESTROYER ESCORTS GUARDIANS OF ALLIED CONVOYS
Destroyer Escorts: Guardians of Allied Convoys

--132--


AIR ATTACK
Following a Navy Yard availability in New York, and a brief refresher training period off Montauk Point, the Rhodes returned to Norfolk, departing as escort to another North African convoy, UGS-36, on March 13, 1944. While en route to Gibraltar the escort commander received orders to remain with this convoy as far as Bizerte, Tunisia, instead of transferring it to British escorts at the entrance of the Mediterranean, as had been the procedure in the war thus far. Consequently on March 30, 1944, the Rhodes became part of the first United States ocean escort to enter the Mediterranean Sea. Early on the morning of April 1, 1944, while on station, screening the starboard bow of the convoy, the Rhodes intercepted a voice radio signal, indicating that enemy planes were overhead. At the same time, armed guard crews in the convoy opened up with vigorous anti-aircraft fire. Immediately closing to her anti-aircraft screening station, the Rhodes joined the battle, and for the next 20 minutes helped engage some eighteen JU-80 and DO-217 enemy planes. Twice her mast was nearly destroyed by low-diving German attackers, but each time her stubborn fire turned the enemy away. When the planes departed, they left one of their number as tribute to the marksmanship of the USS Ramsden. One merchant vessel was foundering badly, a gaping torpedo hole in her bow. However, a boarding party from the USS Mills extinguished the fires aboard the stricken ship, and the Mills then towed her to port where all of her vital cargo was saved. On April 3, 1944, the Rhodes anchored in Bizerte, Tunisia. Leaving Bizerte on April 11, 1944, the Rhodes arrived in New York May 2nd with convoy GUS-36.

RESCUES SIX
After availability at New York and a training period at Casco Bay, Maine, the Rhodes proceeded to Bizerte with convoy UGS-43 on May 22, 1944, returning with convoy GUS-43 on July 11, 1944. Upon her return she was assigned availability in Boston followed by a two week training period at Casco Bay, after which, as part of Escort Division 23, she joined a task group escorting convoys from the United States to the United Kingdom. She continued this North Atlantic escort duty from August 11, 1944, until May 4, 1945, seeing service in the Irish Sea and English Channel areas during the height of the submarine threat to these vital shipping lanes. While engaged in this duty, the Rhodes, on April 9, 1945, rescued six survivors from the SS Saint Mihiel and SS Nash Bulk, tankers which collided while in a United Kingdom bound convoy. For his performance of duty that night, Lt. A. C. Wagner, USCGR, the commanding officer who had relieved Commander Coffin on the 29th of December, 1944, received a letter of commendation from the Commander Destroyers, U.S. Atlantic Fleet.

NORTHERN PACIFIC SERVICE
With the arrival of VE-day, the Rhodes was ordered to join the Pacific Fleet and after a refresher period in the Caribbean Sea, passed through the Panama Canal in the Pacific on June 18, 1945. She arrived at Adak, Aleutian Islands on July 8, 1945, and began serving under the Commander Alaskan Sea Frontier as an escort and air-sea rescue vessel, occasionally being assigned to duty under Commander, Northern Pacific Forces and Commander, Task Force 92. She served under the latter command between July 15 and July 21, 1945, escorting the service group of Task Group 92 during one of its strikes at shipping in the Sea of Okhotsk and the bombardment of the Kurile Islands. On August 20, 1945, Lt. Wagner was relieved of command by Lt. Comdr. W.K. Earle, USCGR, and the Rhodes was assigned to Commander, Fleet Air Wing Four for duty as guard and rescue ship. She was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed at Green Cove Springs, Florida, on June 13, 1946.


USS RICHEY (DE-385)
ESCORT DIVISION 23

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Richey (DE-385), a Coast Guard manned destroyer escort, was commissioned October 30, 1943, at the Brown Shipbuilding Company, Houston, Texas. She was named in honor of Ensign Joseph Lee Richey, USNR, who died on the USS California in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. After a shakedown cruise in Bermuda she reported as a member of Escort Division 23.

ATLANTIC CONVOY DUTY
The Richey made her first trip as escort to convoy UGS-30 from Norfolk to Casablanca on 14 January, 1944, and returned to New York on 22 February, 1944, with convoy GUS-29. On March 16, 1944, the Richey acted as escort to convoy UGS-36 from Norfolk to Oran, Algeria and then proceeded on 2 April, 1944, with convoy GUS-36 from Oran to Bizerte, Tunisia, and then to New York. The Richey left Norfolk, Virginia, May 23, 1944, as escort to convoy UGS-43 bound for Bizerte and returned to New York on July 10th escorting GUS-43. On August 11th, 1944, she joined convoy TCU-35 as escort from New York to Londonderry and departed there on the 27th escorting convoy UCT-35 to New York. Again on 29 September, 1944, she departed New York escorting convoy CU-41 for Belfast and returned to New York on October 25, 1944, with convoy UC-41. From January, 1945, the Richey escorted convoys to England and France until May 29, 1945.

OUTSTANDING INCIDENTS
Each of these convoy trips had its individual surprises and calls upon the officers and men for alertness and expert seamanship. On one run to Africa, a merchant ship in the convoy persisted in showing a light which threatened the security of the entire convoy. After sending warning by bullhorn, the Richey took decisive action by firing 10 rounds of .30 caliber rifle ammunition over the bow of the offending ships. The merchant skipper quickly extinguished the light. A trip from Plymouth, England, was memorable when one ship of the convoy, the SS STONY CREEK, found it necessary to fall behind and leave the safety of the convoy behind because of flooded tanks. The Richey was detailed to escort the limping ship and stayed with her three days and nights until the merchant vessel regained control and again took her place in the convoy.

PICKS UP 32 SURVIVORS
Early in April, 1945, the SS Nash Bulk and St. Mihiel, tankers carrying high octane gasoline, collided in mid-ocean, causing a tremendous fire in which scores perished. Thirty two men, more than half of the total of survivors, were picked up by the Richey from the fire swept seas. John F. Collins, MoMM 1/c particularly distinguished himself by plunging into the fire covered sea and personally bringing in three men who would have perished, dazed and weighted with oil as they were. He was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for this action.

IN THE NORTH PACIFIC
The Richey made 16 safe crossings of the submarine infested waters of the

--133--


Mediterranean and the Atlantic. She had just returned to New York from France when the final surrender of Germany was announced. The ship underwent extensive overhaul and was immediately ordered to the Pacific Theatre of War. Before reaching the Aleutian Islands, stopovers were made at such places as Cuba and the Canal Zone. The first week of July, 1945, she reported to the Northern Pacific Fleet at Adak, Alaska. She there operated from the Aleutian area as part of the Ninth Fleet, which constantly harassed the Kurile Islands by bombarding their shores.

TO OKINAWA AND CHINA
When capitulation of Japan came, the Richey was then assigned to the Fourth Fleet, which on September b, 1945, occupied the Japanese Naval Rase at Ominato, Japan. Returning to Adak on September 20th, the Richey celebrated Navy Day, 1945, at Valdez, Alaska. After returning to Adak, the Richey left for Okinawa on November 14, 1945. After a few days spent anchored in Buckner Bay, Okinawa, the Richey sailed for Taku, China, where she was in ready duty status until her return to the United States. She was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed at Green Cove Springs, Florida, on June 13, 1946.

COMMANDING OFFICERS
The Richey had three commanding officers during

the war. Her first was Commander Petros D. Mills, USCGR, who was captain until July, 1944, when command was turned over to Commander John H. Fomey, USCGR. In December, 1944, Commander Forney became commander of Escort Division 23 and the command of the Richey went to Lt. Comdr. Roger J. Auge, USCGR.


USS SAVAGE (DE-336)
ESCORT DIVISION 23

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Savage (DE-366) was built by the Brown Shipbuilding Company of Houston, Texas, and placed in commission on 29 October, 1943. She was named in honor of Ensign Walter S. Savage, (SC), USNR, who gave his life on December 7, 1941, aboard the USS Arizona during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. After final fitting out at Galveston, she proceeded to Bermuda for combat training and shakedown. After completing her training on Christmas Day 1943, ship and crew reported to Norfolk as members of the Atlantic Fleet.

FIRST CONVOY
In January, 1944, the Savage was assigned as one of the six ships composing Escort Division 23 of Task Force 63. This task force was engaged in escorting convoys of from 60 to bO merchant ships to the Mediterranean Theatre. During these operations, lasting approximately seven weeks for each convoy, the Savage and her sister ships safely escorted hundreds of ships loaded with vital war materials safely past the heavy enemy submarine and air concentrations in the Atlantic and Mediterranean.

AIR ATTACK
On April 1, 1944, convoy UGS-36, whose escort included the Savage, was attacked by some 30 enemy aircraft North of Algiers, Africa. So intense was the gunfire of the escorting DE's and Destroyers that the attack was repelled with only one merchant ship being hit. This vessel was later taken into port and beached.

EIGHTEEN CROSSINGS OF THE ATLANTIC
During the latter half of 1944 and the first six months of 1945 the Savage escorted high speed troop convoys between New York and the British Isles to support the final assault on Germany. During 18 crossings of the Atlantic the Savage and her sister ships safely brought through over 1000 loaded troop and supply ships without a single loss.

NORTHERN PACIFIC DUTY
Following the defeat of Germany, Escort Division 23 went into the New York Navy Yard for overhaul and the addition of more anti-aircraft guns. An intensive period of operational and gunnery training followed in the Caribbean and in June, 1945, the Savage and her sister ships, passed through the Canal and into the Pacific. Sailing north to the Aleutians, they reported to the Commander, North Pacific Fleet, for escort duty. The end of hostilities in the Pacific found the Savage supporting a strike against the Kuriles. The Savage had had four commanding officers: Commander Oscar C. Rohnke, Lt. Comdr. Randolph Ridgely III, Lt. Comdr. James A. Norton and Lt. John M. Waters, Jr. Returning to the United States the Savage was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed on June 13, 1946.


USS VANCE (DE-367)
ESCORT DIVISION 45

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Vance (DE-387) was commissioned on November 1, 1943, at the Brown Shipbuilding Company, Houston, Texas. All during August and September, 1943, the nucleus crew of the Vance had studied and trained in all phases of destroyer escort operation at the Submarine Chaser Training Center, Miami, Florida. This nucleus crew consisted of the first commanding officer, Lt. Comdr. E. A. Anderson, USCGR, and about forty key officers and men, most of whom had had previous duty on Coast Guard cutters, chasing subs and convoying in the North Atlantic and Caribbean. Early in October they left for Houston, where they were joined by 30 other Coast Guardsmen assigned to the Vance, mainly technicians and specialists from Navy Service Schools. After loading ammunition at San Jacinto, Texas, the Vance left for Galveston for her first sea and gunnery trials. By mid-November the Vance was en route Bermuda for her shakedown cruise, which extended through most of December, 1943. On December 19, 1943, Commander E. J. Roland, Commander, Escort Division 45, reported on board and his burgee command pennant was hoisted. The Vance thus became flagship for a division which included USS Lansing (DE-300), USS Durant (DE-369), USS Calcaterra (DE-390), USS Chambers (DE-391), and USS Merrill (DE-392). Four days before Christmas, 1943, the Vance departed for Charleston for post shakedown repairs.

FIRST CONVOY DUTY
From Charleston the Vance went to Norfolk for her first assignment convoying a group of oil tankers to Port Arthur, Texas, and back to Norfolk. On the return trip the Vance had her first sonar contact in the Florida Straits, which was investigated and proved to be non-submarine. Arriving at Norfolk she was used as a training Ship for future DE crews, while awaiting the arrival of the remainder of Escort Division 45.

--134--


ESCORTS CONVOYS TO GIBRALTAR
On February 6, 1944, the Vance departed Norfolk escorting an aircraft carrier to New York. On February 10, 1944, with the rest of Escort Division US, she was assigned her first UGS convoy, departing with the New York section of UGS-33. This was the beginning of a long tour of convoy duty from the United States to the Mediterranean. Off Norfolk the remainder of the convoy plus another DE division and the US CGC Bibb (flagship of Task Force 66) joined. Rough weather accompanied the Vance during the entire trip. She finally arrived at Gibraltar where the convoy was taken over by a British task force and she put in at Casablanca awaiting the return convoy to the United States. She departed Casablanca March 7, 1944, joining convoy GUS-32 and arrived at New York on March 23rd for a ten day availability.

RAMS DUMMY PERISCOPE
The Vance sailed again with a large Mediterranean convoy on April 13, 1944. This was convoy UGS-39 and consisted of 102 merchant ships, escorted by Escort Division 45, and another division of six Navy manned destroyer escorts, bound for Bizerte, Tunisia. The trip through the Mediterranean was one of constant vigil as German planes and subs were operating and regularly attacking convoys. All went well, however, and the Vance arrived at Bizerte on May 3rd, 1944. She left Bizerte on May 11th as escort of convoy GUS-39 bound for the United States. Early in the morning of May 14, 1944, off Oran, Algeria, an enemy submarine penetrated the escort screen and succeeded in torpedoing, but not sinking, two merchant vessels. As soon as the submarine was detected in the convoy, the Vance came up from her position astern of the convoy. As the two ships were torpedoed, one in each column, a periscope was sighted and the Vance rammed it, following with a depth charge attack and gunfire. The periscope proved to be a dummy, used by the sub for deception. The Vance remained in the vicinity of the submerged German sub for ten hours, making several depth charge and hedge hog attacks. Finally she was relieved by five American destroyers coming out from Oran, and rejoined the convoy. These destroyers remained in the vicinity of the sub and finally after five days it surfaced and was sunk by gunfire.

ENEMY AIR ATTACK
The Vance made a total of eight round trips to the Mediterranean Theatre, each time followed by several days availability at the New York or Boston Navy Yards. Four times she engaged in training exercises between trips at Casco Bay, Maine. She escorted some 2000 merchant ships through mine and submarine infested waters, without loss of life or a single ship due to enemy action. She attacked submarines on several occasions. An enemy air attack on the morning of July 14, 1944, off Oran was repulsed with an effective smoke screen and heavy anti-aircraft fire from the escorts and merchant ships. Her station during most of her convoy work was the "whip" astern of the convoy. Many gruelling hours were spent rounding up and shepherding stragglers. Carrying the division doctor, she was responsible for the lives of the men on both the merchant ships and escort vessels, and countless times sick and injured were transferred to her via breeches buoy for emergency medical treatment and operations, under all kinds of weather conditions.

GERMAN SUB SURRENDERS
On May 2, 19US, the Vance departed from New York with her last Mediterranean convoy. Off the Azores on the morning of May 4th, a light was sighted up in the convoy. The Vance left her position at full speed and headed up into the convoy to investigate. When within range, the light was illuminated by searchlight. It proved to be a surfaced German submarine. All guns were trained on the target and were ready to commence firing. At first the sub started to run, "but after a few convincing orders in German over the Vance's bull horn, the sub heaved to and prepared to surrender. The Vance came alongside and placed a prize crew on board. The German U-boat was number 873. She had been out for fifty days and had torpedoed several ships off Newfoundland. The sub was escorted back to Portsmouth, N.H., without incident.

PACIFIC DUTY
The Vance proceeded to Boston Navy Yard for 40 days availability, during which many changes and alterations were made in the ship's anti-aircraft armament. On July 2, 1945, she departed Boston for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for an intensive two weeks period of refresher training. The Germans had been defeated and the Vance was now destined for the Pacific. In mid-July, the Vance departed Guantanamo Bay for the Pacific, stopping at Coco-Solo, Canal Zone. Her first stop in the Pacific was at San Diego. From there she sailed for Pearl Harbor, where she again went through another training period of anti-aircraft and surface firing, damage control and anti-submarine warfare exercises. By this time the Japanese had been beaten and had sued for peace and the Vance returned to New York, via San Pedro and the Panama Canal. By mid-October, 1945, she had completed her availability at the New York Navy Yard and headed south to Florida to be placed in the Inactive Fleet on the St. John's River, south of Jacksonville, at Green Cove Springs. Her Coast Guard crew was removed February 27, 1946.


USS LANSING (DE-388)
ESCORT DIVISION 45

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Lansing (DE-388) was commissioned on November 10, 1943, at the Brown Shipbuilding Company, Houston, Texas. She reported to DE Shakedown Group, Commander, Task Group 23.1 at Bermuda on December 8, 1943, for training under COTCLANT.

CONVOY DUTY
The Lansing made a total of eight round trip across the Atlantic escorting convoys. The numbers of these convoys outbound and homebound were as follows:

Outbound   Homebound
UGS 33   GUS 32
UGS 39   GUS 39
UGS 46   GUS 46
UGS 53   GUS 53
UGS 60   GUS 60
UGS 62    
UGS 66   GUS 68
UGS 78   GUS 80

TWO ENEMY ENCOUNTERS
During this period of trans-Atlantic escort duty the convoys the Lansing was escorting had two encounters with the enemy. On the morning of May 14, 1944, a German submarine attacked convoy GUS-39. On the morning of July 12, 1944, enemy aircraft were encountered while escorting convoy UGS-46. Both of these encounters were in the Mediterranean Sea off Oran. In the first encounter two merchant vessels

--135--


of the convoy were torpedoed but did not sink. The second enemy air attack was thwarted by a smoke screen from the escorts and heavy anti-aircraft from escorts and merchant vessels.

PACIFIC DUTY
At the end of the European phase of the conflict the Lansing underwent a lengthened availability in preparation for service in the Pacific. She reported to CINCPAC/CINCPOA on August 1, 1945. She reached Pearl Harbor after the surrender of Japan and was ordered to return to the East Coast. She reported to CINCLANT for duty September 20, 1945. Upon completion of availability at New York in October, 1945, she reported to Jacksonville, Florida, for transfer to the Inactive Fleet at Green Cove Springs, in the St. John's River. Her Coast Guard crew was removed May 6, 1946.


USS DURANT (DE-389)
ESCORT DIVISION 45

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Durant (DE-389) was commissioned at the Brown Shipbuilding Company, Houston, Texas, on November 16, 1943. She was named for Kenneth W. Durant, U.S. Marine Corps, who gave his life during a marine offensive in the Matanikau River area of Guadalcanal on November 3, 1942. After sea trials off Galveston, she departed early in December, 1943, for the island of Bermuda where she engaged in the many and varied exercises, including tactical maneuvers, anti-submarine warfare, surface, antiaircraft and night firing, etc., that make up the shakedown period. After three weeks, she was assigned to Escort Division 45 in January, 1944, and proceeded to Charleston for post shakedown repairs. After that she headed for Norfolk. Here, while awaiting the entire division to form, the Durant was used as a school ship for crews connected with Destroyer Escort training program. An unexpected order to proceed to Tampa to pick up a vessel and escort her to Norfolk, found many of the Durant's crew on leave, and she had to depart with a limited number of men. However, she accomplished the mission successfully.

FIRST ESCORT DUTY
In February, 1944, the Durant was ordered to New York where she was to start on her long tour of convoy duty. She escorted the New York section of convoy UGS-33 to Norfolk where on February 10, 1944, the remainder of the convoy joined and her first trans-Atlantic duty began. Days of the roughest weather followed. Mountainous waves enveloped the small ship, tossing her about like a match. When nearly to the Azores, the Durant was ordered to turn back and herd a straggling ammunition ship back to the Gibraltar-bound convoy. This meant many extra miles of travel and hours more of weathering the raging seas. The Durant finally found the vessel she was hunting, far off her course. A radar contact led her to the wayward ship, whom she took in escort back to the convoy. At Gibraltar the crew was afforded their first look at foreign soil. Then the Durant was underway to Casablanca and the crew was given their first liberty in weeks. The Durant left Casablanca on March 7, 1944, bound for the States, arriving in New York on March 23rd.

IN COLLISION. SUB ATTACK
After a period of refresher training at Casco Bay, Maine, early in April, 1944, the Durant proceeded to Norfolk to await her next convoy. While anchored out of Norfolk one stormy night, an angry wind whipped across the bay and lashed savagely at the ships. As the storm increased in tempo, the violent wind caused the anchor of the Durant to drag, and the vessel was literally carried to the side of a sister ship. The result was slight material damage. The voyage across with convoy UGS-39 which began on April 13th and ended at Bizerte on May 3, 1944, was uneventful. The 14th of May, 1944, found the Durant on the return trip. At about 4:00 A.M., in the dull grey of the morning, the general alarm was sounded, sending all hands to battle stations. One of the escort vessels had contacted a sub, which was attacking one of the ships of the convoy. Depth charges were dropped, and before the submarine departed she managed to torpedo another vessel. These incidents did not long go unavenged, for several days later the submarine was sunk.

ENEMY AIR ATTACK
The Durant returned to New York and, after another training period, left Norfolk on June 24, 1944, as one of the escorts of UGS-46. Shortly after 1:00 A.M. on July 12, 1944, the Durant received an air raid warning from the Oran radio. She immediately assumed her air defense station, laying a smoke screen in her wake. Ready at general quarters the men awaited the oncoming attack. Nerves were taut and men prayed as they stood at their guns. The morning was heavy and still as death itself. Occasionally the silence was broken by the Public Address System, reporting the distance and bearing of the enemy. Before they reached the convoy, the greater part of the Nazi force had been intercepted by allied planes. The remainder, reaching the convoy, found the smoke screen effective enough to prevent any accurate aim in dropping their destructive missiles. Futilely, however, the huge four engined bombers let loose their torpedo loads. Then the heavens resounded with the rumble of many firing guns, filling the skies with thousands of sparkling tracers. Merchant and war ships alike opened up with their batteries, enveloping the now weakened foe. Flying low, some 1500 yards from the stern of the Durant, an enemy plane found itself in the spray of the ship's withering fire. The bomber headed for the nearby mountains and was not heard from again. The convoy resumed its course without the loss of a single ship.

OTHER CONVOY TRIPS
On September 2, 1944, the Durant was part of Escort Division 45 which accompanied convoy UGS-53 to Bizerte, arriving on the 22nd. Departing Bizerte next day she anchored in Palermo harbor on the 24th and remained there until the 28th when she began escorting GUS-53 to the United States. She arrived in New York in mid-October, and after a refresher training at Casco Bay, went to Staten Island to await her next convoy. This one took her to Mers-el-Kebir, Oran, Algeria, and she returned to New York in December 1944. In January, 1945, she made another trip to Oran. On the return trip, in the bleak cold of February, 1945, while en route to Boston, one of the vessels in escort lost a screw. The Durant was designated to stand by the disabled vessel until a tug arrived. The Durant, took the vessel in tow, despite the merchant vessels great size compared with her own, and towed her until relieved by a tug. The Durant made another trip to Oran in March, 1945, returning early in May.

A SUB SURRENDERS
On the 11th of May, 1945, while again en route Oran all hands were called to their battle stations. It was a black and windy morning. A huge 24 inch searchlight was played over the dark waters. A surfaced Nazi U-boat had been sighted. The light cutting through the inky blackness, finally fell up its target.

--136--


It was a huge German submarine that had surrendered, come to the surface and was awaiting further developments. The U-boat was standing idle in the water, her crew n nervously pacing the decks. The Durant diverted the sub from the path of the convoy, under the train of her watchful guns. Once the convoy had safely passed, a sister ship relieved the Durant, placed a boarding party aboard the sub and escorted the enemy to an American port. The Durant resumed her journey to Oran.

PACIFIC DUTY
On returning to Boston in June, 1945, a large portion of the crew had served aboard the Durant for more than 18 months. Those who desired transfer ashore were granted their request and those wishing to remain aboard were given rehabilitation leave. The greater part of the men chose the latter and returned to the ship. The Durant was now destined for Pacific waters. The battle of the Atlantic had been won. In July, 1945, the ship sailed for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for a period of refresher training before entering the Pacific. Here she learned to fight a different kind of war. Japanese battle tactics were studied and counter measures rehearsed. Then the Durant proceeded to Coco-Solo and from there through the Panama Canal. After a short stay in San Diego she proceeded to Pearl Harbor. Prior to her arrival, there, however, the war had come to its victorious end. For two weeks the Durant lay in Pearl Harbor and was then ordered to return home. She arrived at San Pedro in September and from there sailed for New York via the Panama Canal. In October, 1945, she sailed for Florida where she was placed in inactive status at Green Cove Springs, in the St. John's River. Her Coast Guard crew was removed February 27, 1946.


USS CALCATERRA (DE-390)
ESCORT DIVISION 45

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built by the Brown Shipbuilding Company of Houston, Texas, the Coast Guard manned USS Calcaterra (DE-390) was commissioned there on November 17, 1943, her first commanding officer being Commander H. J. Wuensch, USCGR, She completed shakedown at Bermuda on January 6, 1944, and then took on her first duty of escorting the destroyer tender USS Piedmont from Tampa, Florida to Norfolk.

CONVOY DUTY
From then until the end of the European war she was assigned to escort convoys from the United States to Mediterranean ports, serving as part of Escort Division 45 in task forces 66 and 60 (Task Group 60.4). On April 1, 1944, Commander Wuensch was relieved of command by Lt. Comdr. E. D. Howard, USCGR, who continued, in command of the Calcaterra throughout the war. Altogether she made eight round trips across the Atlantic. Two convoys she was escorting were attacked. On May 14, 1944, two merchant ships of convoy GUS-39 were torpedoed off the North Africa Coast but made port under their own power. On July 12, 1944, an attempt was made to attack convoy UGS-46 from the air, east of Oran. This attack was effectively repulsed, principally by shore based fighters and a very heavy smoke screen. At least two planes broke through and were taken under fire without observed results by the Calcaterra or other ships of the screen and convoy. On the night of March 7-8, 1944, the Calcaterra also participated in a demonstration against U-boat hideouts off the Spanish Moroccan Coast.

PACIFIC DUTY
Upon termination of the Atlantic phase of the war, the Calcaterra made preparations for Pacific duty. She reported to Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet on July 28, 1945. The end of the war came, however, while she was still east of Pearl Harbor. Shortly afterwards she was ordered to the East Coast to be placed in reserve status at Green Cove Springs, St. John's River, Florida. Hew Coast Guard crew was removed May 1, 1946.


USS CHAMBERS (DE-391)
ESCORT DIVISION 45

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Chambers (DE-391) was commissioned at the Brown Shipyards of Houston, Texas, on November 22, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Commander Harry A. Loughlin, USCGR, who was succeeded on October 24, 1944, by Lt. Comdr. W. K. Thompson, USCGR. The Chambers proceeded to Galveston for tests and then departed for Bermuda for a month of shakedown training, after which she had a ten day post shakedown availability at Charleston, S.C. Proceeding to Norfolk she served for several weeks as a training ship.

FIRST ESCORT DUTY
As part of Escort Division 45 the Chambers departed Norfolk February 12, 1944, in company with Task Force 66, accompanying convoy UGS-33 to Gibraltar, where they arrived March 2, 1944. Detaching for Casablanca she awaited rendezvous with homeward bound convoy GUS-32, leaving Casablanca on the 7th to rendezvous with the convoy on the 8th. The Chesapeake section of the convoy to which Escort Division 45 was assigned reached Norfolk March 23, 1944. A ten day availability at New York Navy Yard followed.

SEVEN TRANS-ATLANTIC VOYAGES
Between April 13, 1944, and June 10, 1945, the Chambers, as part of Escort Division 45 made seven round trips, three to Bizerte and four to Oran, escorting trans-Atlantic convoys. Six periods of availability intervened, all spent at New York and followed by short training periods at Casco Bay or the New London area.

TO THE PACIFIC
Leaving New York July 8, 1945, after and 18 day availability, the Chambers proceeded to Pearl Harbor via Guantanamo, Canal Zone and San Diego, arriving August 17, 1945. En route from San Diego the Japanese had surrendered and the war was over. The Chambers did not tarry long at Pearl Harbor. By September 20, 1945, she was back in New York where after an availability for laying up, she proceeded to Jacksonville, Florida, for laying up in reserve status at Green Cove Springs, Florida.

DECOMMISSIONING
The Chambers was decommissioned April 22, 1946, at Jacksonville and her Coast Guard crew removed.


USS MERRILL (DE-392)
ESCORT DIVISION 45

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Merrill (DE-392) was

--137--


commissioned at the Brown Shipyards of Houston, Texas, on November 27, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Irvin J. Stephens, USCGR. Proceeding to San jacinto, Texas, for ammunition and depth charges two days later, she next went to Galveston, Texas, for structural firing tests, speed trials and drydocking. On December 16, 1943, she departed Galveston for Bermuda for a month of shakedown training. On January 14th, 1944, she departed for Charleston, where she arrived two days later for a 10 day post shakedown availability. On the 27th she headed for Norfolk. Here she served until February 12, 1944, as a training ship.

FIRST CONVOY DUTY
Departing Norfolk on February 12, 1944, the Merrill, as part of Escort Division 45, in company with Task Force 66, accompanied convoy UGS-33 to Gibraltar, arriving there March 2, 1944. There the escort force was detached and ordered to Casablanca to await rendezvous with convoy GUS-32, homeward bound. She left Casablanca on March 7, to conduct operations off the Coast of the African International Zone, for the purpose of detecting German submarines, suspected of putting landing parties ashore in that area. No enemy contacts ware made and the Merrill effected rendezvous with the convoy on March 8th. The trip home was uneventful and the Chesapeake Section of the convoy, to which the Merrill was assigned, arrived in Norfolk on March 23, 1944. A ten day availability period at the Navy Yard, New York followed.

TWO VESSELS TORPEDOED
The Merrill arrived in Norfolk on April 11, 1944, following a refresher training course at Casco Bay, Maine, and left next day with Task Force 60 escorting convoy UGS-39 to Bizerte where she arrived May 3, 1944. After a layover of a week, the Merrill resumed duty as escort for GUS-39 leaving Bizerte on May 11th. Early on the morning of May 14th, following report of an underwater sound contact, two merchant ships, the SS Waiden and SS Fort Fidler were torpedoed and forced to put into Oran. Four escorts were detailed to search for the submarine, later being relieved of this duty by destroyers from Oran, who sank the submarine some days later. No further attempts were made to attack the convoy, which arrived at its destination on May 29th, the Merrill escorting the Delaware section. After 10 days availability at New York Navy Yard and 8 days refresher training at Casco Bay, Maine, the Merrill returned to Norfolk on the 23rd.

ENEMY AIR ATTACK
Again as a unit of Task Force 60, the Merrill departed Norfolk June 24, 1944, to escort convoy UGS-46 to Mediterranean ports. Arriving in the Mediterranean, the convoy was one day out of Gibraltar on July 11th when it was alerted by a "red" air raid warning from Algiers. At 8:20 P.M. the Merrill assumed air defense station, patrolling astern of the convoy, coming to general quarters when informed an hour and a half later that enemy aircraft were approaching the convoy. She was secured from general quarters an hour later, but again came to general quarters at 1:11 A.M. on the 12th. Ten minutes later she commenced laying a smoke screen. Convoy ships fired on aircraft over the convoy two hours later. The "all clear" signal was not received until 4:30 A.M. The Merrill sighted no enemy aircraft during the action. The escort duty of the convoy ended July 14th at Bizerte. The return trip to the United States with convoy GUS-46 was uneventful, the Merrill arriving at New York on August 9th for ten days availability. After a 9 day refresher training period at Casco Eay, Maine, the Merrill moored at Norfolk August 31st.

AT PALERMO
The Merrill again departed Norfolk on September 2, 1944, as part of Task Force 60, escorting convoy UGS-53 to the Mediterranean. After being relieved of escort duty on the 22nd, the Task Force sailed for Palermo, Sicily arriving there on the 23rd for a four day stay before departing September 27th to escort GUS-53 to the United States. During this homeward passage the Commander of Task Force 60 shifted his flag from the Bibb to the Merrill on October 13th. Mooring at the New York Navy Yard on the 17th for a 10 day availability, the Merrill then departed for Casco Bay, Maine, for a training period extending until November 7th, 1944.

TO MERS-EL-KEBIR
The next escort duty commenced on November 10, 1944, when the Merrill began escorting UGS-60 to the Mediterranean. Following the dispersal of this convoy at Gibraltar, the Merrill, with Task Force 60, stood into Mers-el-Kebir, Algeria, where she remained until December 3rd, 1944. The return trip to the United States was as escort for convoy GUS-60, the New York section of which arrived on December 21, 1944. A Navy Yard availability until December 31st was followed by two days training in the New London area.

CONVOYS UGS-67 AND GUS-69
On January 7, 1945, the Merrill, as escort commander of the New York section of UGS-67, departed for rendezvous with the Chesapeake Bay section on January 9th. The convoy arrived at Gibraltar on the 25th after an uneventful passage, and the Merrill then moored at Mers-el-Kebir, Algeria, until February 1st, when she began escorting GUS-69 to the United States. She discharged the Chesapeake section on February 19th and after a 10 day availability at the New York Navy Yard spent two days at refresher training in the New London area. On February 24th Commander Stephens was relieved of command by Lt. Sidney K. Broussard, USCGR.

CONVOYS UGS-79 AND GUS-81
The Merrill began escorting the New York section of UGS-79 on March 7, 1944, rendezvousing with the main convoy on the 9th. After dispersal at Gibraltar on the 24th, the Merrill proceeded to Mers-el-Kebir where she remained until April 1st. She began escorting convoy GUS-81 on April 2, 1945, arriving in New York on the 21st for a 5 day upkeep period and then departed for Casco Bay, Maine, where she engaged in refresher training until May 4th.

14 BREECHES BUOY OPERATIONS
News of peace in Europe was being broadcast as the Merrill departed Norfolk as escort for UG3-91 on May 8th, During this passage of 15 days, a total of 14 "breeches buoy operations" were accomplished, medical cases from convoy merchant vessels being so transferred to the Merrill for treatment. Arriving in Mers-el-Kebir on May 23rd, the Merrill remained moored until June 1st when the return trip to the United States was made. The Merrill arrived at New York on June 10th and entered the Navy Yard for a 25 day availability. On July 6th Lt. Comdr. Paul G. Prins, USCGR, relieved Lt. S. K Broussard as commanding officer.

PACIFIC DUTY
Ordered to the Pacific Fleet, the Merrill embarked on a two week training period at Guantanamo Bay on July 13th. Then, with Escort Division 45, she departed for the Pacific

--138--


Coast via the Panama Canal. The Merrill remained at San Diego until August 11th, when, with the USS Chambers (DE-391), and with the Commander of Escort Division 45 aboard, she departed for Pearl Harbor. During the passage the Pacific War came to an end as the Japanese accepted surrender terms on August 14, 1945. The Merrill arrived in Pearl Harbor August 16, and reported to Commander, Destroyers, Pacific Fleet for duty. On September 3, 1945, the Merrill was ordered back to the United States. She arrived at San Pedro on September 9th and departed next day for the East Coast via the Panama Canal. Later she joined the Inactive Fleet at Green Cove Springs, St. John's River, Florida, where her Coast Guard crew was removed May 1, 1946.

--139--


USS TACOMA (PF-3)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING
The CG manned USS Tacoma (PF-3) was commissioned on November 6, 1943, with Lt. Comdr., Adrian F. Werner, USCGR, as her first commanding officer. She remained at San Francisco for completing and fitting out from April 4, 1944, until early in October, 1944.

TO ALASKA
Arriving at Kodiak, Alaska on October 21, 1944, she remained there as part of Escort Division 27 until February 13, 1945, when she returned to San Pedro, California. She arrived at San Francisco on March 1, 1945, and remained there until May 13, 1945, on availability. From the 19th to the 26th of May, 1945, she was at San Francisco on availability. On June 19, 1945, she was transferred from Escort Division 27 to Commander, Alaskan Sea Frontier.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
On July 6, 1945, she was transferred to Soviet Russia and proceeded to Cold Bay and Dutch Harbor, arriving there on August 20, 1945 and from Dutch Harbor, Alaska, she proceeded to Petrapavlousk, Russia, where she arrived August 25, 1945.


USS SAUSALITO (PF-4)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING
The CG manned USS Sausalito (PF-4) was built by the Kaiser Cargo Inc. of Richmond California, and commissioned March 4, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Commander Edward A. Eve, Jr., USCGR. He was succeeded on October 17, 1944 by Lt. Comdr. Paul E. Trumble, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded on May 14, 1945, by Commander Stanley J. Woyciechowsky, USCGR. She arrived at Oakland, California, on April 13, 1944, and departed from Mare Island on September 26, 1944, for Kodiak where she arrived October 5, 1944.

IN ALASKA
She remained at Kodiak until June 5, 1945, as part of Escort Division 27. On June 6, 1945, the frigate was transferred to Commander, Alaska Sea Frontier and proceeded to Seattle.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
Arriving in Seattle June 11, 1945, she was transferred to Soviet Russia, under Lend-Lease on July 6, 1945, and departed for Cold Bay, Alaska, arriving there on August 19, 1945, and at Dutch Harbor on the 20th. She arrived at Petropavlousk, Russia, AUgust 25, 1945.


USS HOQUIAM (PF-5)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING
Built at Kaiser Cargo Yard 4, Richmond, California, the Coast Guard manned USS Hoquiam (PF-5) was commissioned on May 8, 1944, with Lt. Paul E. Trumble, USCGR, as her first commanding officer. He was succeeded October 10, 1944, by Lt. Joseph G. Bastow, Jr., USCGR, who in turn was succeeded on March 8, 1945, by Lt. Comdr. Carlton Skinner, USCGR.

TO ALASKA
She departed Mare Island on June 15, 1944 for Kodiak, via Alameda, San Francisco and Seattle, arriving there on August 27, 1944 to become part of Escort Division 27. She visited Adak on December 2, 1944, and arrived at Attu, Kurile Islands, December 6, 1944, remaining there until January 11, 1945, returning to Adak until June 5, 1945, when she left for Seattle, being transferred to Commander Alaska Sea Frontier.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
On July 6, 1945 she was transferred to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease and proceeded to Dutch Harbor, via Cold Bay, arriving there on August

THE COAST GUARD-MANNED PATROL FRIGATE ALEXANDRIA
The Coast-Guard manned Patrol Frigate Alexandria

--140--


20, 1945. On August 25, 1945, she arrived at Petropavlousk, Russia.


USS PASCO (PF-6)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS Pasco (PF-6) was built by the Kaiser Cargo Inc. of Richmond, California, and was commissioned April 15, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Commander Roy E. Stockstill, USCGR, who was succeeded on April 26, 1945, by Lt. Olaz Laveson, USCGR. She remained on post shakedown availability at San Francisco until October 4, 1944, when she was ordered to Alaska.

IN ALASKA
Arriving at Kodiak on October 15, 1944, she became part of Escort Division 27. She was stationed at Adak from January 12, 1945 to June 5, 1945.On June 6, 1945 she was transferred to Commander, Alaskan Sea Frontier and departed for Seattle arriving there June 11, 1945. On July 6, 1945 she was transferred to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
Proceeding to Dutch Harbor, via Cold Bay, on August 20, 1945, she arrived at Petropavlousk, Russian on August 25, 1955.


USS ALBUQUERQUE (PF-7)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS Albuquerque (PF-7) was commissioned on December 11, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Wayne I. Goff, USCGR, who was succeeded on October 6, 1944, by Lt. R. C. Sweet, USCGR.

IN ALASKA
She proceeded to Seattle April 4, 1944, and thence to Adak on April 20, 1944, as part of Escort Division 27. She proceeded to Attu where she remained until December 27, 1944, returning to Adak on the 29th. On June 5, 1945, she departed Dutch Harbor for Seattle, being transferred next day to Commander, Alaskan Sea Frontier.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
Arriving at Seattle June 10, 1945, she was transferred to Soviet Russia under Lend-Lease July 6, 1945, and arrived at Dutch Harbor, via Cold Bay, on August 20, 1945. She arrived at Petropavlousk, Russia, on August 25, 1945.


USS EVERETT (PF-8)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS Everett (PF-8) was commissioned January 22, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Warren L. David, USCGR, who was succeeded October 24, 1944, by Lt. Eugene I. Brown. Arriving at Mare Island April 4, 1944, she proceeded to Port Townsend on the 13th and arrived at Adak on April 22, 1944.

IN ALASKA
She remained at Adak as part of Escort Division 27 until June 5, 1945, when she departed for Seattle, having been transferred to Commander, Alaskan Sea Frontier. On July 6, 1945, she was transferred to Soviet Russian on Lend-Lease.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
She proceeded to Dutch Harbor, via Cold Bay, arriving there on August 20, 1945. On August 25, 1945, she arrived at Petropavlousk, Russia.


USS POCATELLO (PF-9)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Pocatello (PF-9) was built

at Kaiser Yard #4, Richmond, California, and launched there October 17, 1943. She was commissioned February 18, 1944, with Lt. Comdr. S. G. Guill, USCGR, commanding. She moved to General Engineering and Drydocking Co., Alameda, California for outfitting. On March 30, 1944, she departed San Francisco for San Diego with a complement of 14 officers and 104 men, including Commander Allen Winbeck, Commander, Escort Division #41, the Pocatello having been designated the Division's flagship. He was detached shortly after the first patrol. After shakedown exercises through April 28, 1944, she departed for post-shakedown availability at Alameda. Departing Alameda she proceeded to Seattle, Washington, arriving there May 22, 1944.

ON WEATHER PATROL
On June 22, 1944, she departed Seattle for Weather Station "ABLE" (49°00'N, 148°00'W). Her weather patrol duty consisted of 30 days at sea and 10 days in port (Seattle). By October 7, 1945, she had concluded her eleventh patrol, alternating her duties on this weather station with US CGC Haida. During this period there were two changes of command. On May 7, 1945, Lt. Comdr. H. H. Horrocks, Jr., USCGR, assumed command, succeeding Lt. Comdr. Guill. On September 6, 1945, Lt. Comdr. John D. Winn, succeeded Lt. Comdr. Horrocks. Her Coast Guard crew was removed May 2, 1946.


USS BROWNSVILLE (PF-10)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

WEATHER AND PLANE GUARD DUTY
The USS Brownsville (PF-10) was commissioned at Richmond, California, May 6, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Commander H. M. Warner, USCGR. He was succeeded by Lt. Comdr. Mitland L. Midonick, USCGR. On October 23, 1945, Lt. R. B. Newell, USCGR, became her skipper and was succeeded February 7, 1946, by Lt. R. F. Barnes, USCGR. She arrived at San Diego for shakedown exercises June 21, 1944 and at Oakland July 24, 1944. She was assigned to weather patrol and plane guard duty and proceeded to San Diego September 28th and to San Clemente Island, November 23rd, returning to San Diego December 2, 1944. Proceeding to San Pedro March 1, 1945, she arrived at San Francisco May 28, 1945, and returned to San Diego, January 4, 1946. She was decommissioned August 2, 1946.


USS GRAND FORKS (PF-11)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

WEATHER AND PLANE GUARD DUTY
Commissioned March 18, 1944, the first commanding officer of the USS Grand Forks (PF-11) was Lt. Comdr. C. W. Peterson, USCGR. He was succeeded by Lt. William F. Adams, USCGR, and on August 25, 1945, by Lt. Hugh A. LeRoy, USCGR. Proceeding to San Francisco on April 15, 1944, she departed for San Diego, May 3, 1944. She returned to San Francisco, October 25, 1944, for weather and plane

--141--


guard duty until March 18, 1946. Proceeding to Charleston, S.C. via the Canal Zone, she was decommissioned May 16, 1946.


USS CASPER (PF-12)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

WEATHER AND PLANE GUARD DUTY
The USS Casper (PF-12) was commissioned at Richmond, California, March 31, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. F. J. Scheiber, USCGR, who was followed January 5, 1946, by Lt. Conor. R. F. Lucy, USCGR. Reporting for duty in the San Francisco area, she arrived on weather station "ABLE" October 7, 1944. She arrived in Seattle November 3, 1944 for plane guard and weather ship duty. She returned to San Francisco July 26, 1945. On March 24, 1946, she left San Francisco for Charleston, S.C. via the Canal Zone, and was decommissioned May 16, 1946.


USS PUEBLO (PF-13)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

WEATHER AND PLANE GUARD DUTY
Commissioned at Richmond, California on May 27, 1944, the USS Pueblo (PF-13) had as her first commanding officer Comdr. D. T. Adams, USCGR. He was succeeded on December 6, 1944, by Lt. Comdr. John S. Dickerson, USCGR. Lt. Edward J. Stack, USCGR, took command on August 4, 1945, and Lt. Comdr. E. P. Chester, USCGR, on November 26, 1945. The last commanding officer was Lt. Bernard A. Hyde, who took over on March 12, 1946. The Pueblo reported for weather ship and plane guard duty on October 27, 1944, in the San Francisco area and remained on that duty until March 13, 1946, when she departed for Charleston, S.C. via the Canal Zone. She was decommissioned May 6, 1946.


USS GRAND ISLAND (PF-14)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

WEATHER AND PLANE GUARD DUTY
The USS Grand Island (PF-14) was commissioned May, 1944, at Richmond, California. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. H. L. Morgan, USCGR, who was followed by Lt. A. H. Fiske, Jr., USCGR. On October 1, 1945, Lt. Comdr. R. A. Sarenberg took command from September 12, 1944, she was within the geographical jurisdiction of the 12th District Coast Guard. Officer on weather and plane guard duty. She left San Francisco March 26, 1946, for Charleston, S.C. via Canal Zone and was decommissioned May 22, 1946.


USS ANNAPOLIS (PF-15)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND ESCORT DUTY
Built by the American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain, Ohio, the USS Annapolis (PF-15) was floated down the Mississippi River and completed at the Port Houston Iron Works, Houston, Texas. She was commissioned December 4, 1944, and departed January 16, 1945, for shakedown. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. H. F. Garcia, USCGR, who was succeeded December 14, 1944, by Comdr. M. F. Garfield. She arrived at Norfolk February 17, 1945, for post shakedown availability. She made her first trans-Atlantic trip on escort duty arriving at Oran, Algeria, March 5, 1945, and returning to New York March 30, 1945. After two week's availability she departed on exercises April 13, 1945. She arrived at Oran on her second escort duty on May 9, 1945, returning to Philadelphia June 2, 1945. After two week's availability she departed Philadelphia June 16, 1945, for the West Cos St.

WEATHER PATROL
The Annapolis arrived at San Pedro, via the Panama Canal, on august 5, 1945, and Seattle on August 10, 1945. She arrived at Kodiak, September 10, 1945, and returned to Seattle, September 25, 1945. On January 5, 1946, she arrived at San Francisco and was on Weather Station E until 1 April 5, 1946. She left San Francisco April 16, for Seattle where she was decommissioned May 29, 1946.


USS BANGOR (PF-16)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built in the yards of the American Ship Building Co. Lorain, Ohio, the hull of the Coast Guard manned Bangor (PF-16) was first laid down as PG-124, the designation later being changed to Frigate. She is 304 feet long, 38 feet wide, with a maximum displacement of 2300 tons and a speed of 20 knots. The vessel was fitted out at New Orleans where she was placed in commission on November 22, 1944, with Lt. Comdr. Fred J. Statts, USCGR, assuming command. 12 officers and 199 men reported on board. The vessel was christened by Mrs. Ruth R. Hutchins, wife of the Mayor of Bangor, Maine. Shakedown exercises were conducted off Bermuda. Three 3"/50 caliber guns made up her main battery. Additional armament consisted of two 40 MM twin mounts, nine 20 MM single mounts, two depth charge racks held eight 600 pounds or twelve 300 pound depth charges, eight depth charge projectors and one set of anti-submarine rocket racks.

SHIP TORPEDOED
The Bangor spent the first months of her career operating in the anti-submarine screen of fast convoys between the United States and North African ports. She sailed for her first convoy duty on January 23, 1945, when she took station in the anti-submarine screen of a large convoy bound for Africa. On her second day out, the frigate rescued a boatswain's mate who had fallen overboard from another escort, the USS Ericsson (DD-44O). The convoy went into Mers-el-Kebir, Oran, Algeria on February 8, 1945. The return trip proved more eventful. During the second day out of Oran, one of the ships on the other side of the convoy from the Bangor was torpedoed. The frigate charged in to take part in a coordinated depth charge attack.

ABANDONED LIFEBOAT
On March 26, 1945, while steaming in company with another convoy, an alert lookout shouted from the bridge that a lifeboat was seen. The Bangor investigated but found that the boat contained nothing more than a small compass and other minor items, none of which revealed any clue as to why it happened to be that far out at sea. On April 25, 1945, while in another Oran-bound convoy out of New York, the Bangor's crew prevented a major disaster by acting quickly to extinguish a fire near the galley stove. She reached Mers-el-Kebir on May 9th, 1945, and VE-day was spent at anchor in Oran. On May 17th, the Bangor set out with a return convoy, everyone realizing that an end to her European duty had come and sensing a new assignment in the Pacific theater.

--142--


NORTH PACIFIC AND WEATHER DUTY
After a period of overhaul, the Bangor made a fast trip to the Canal Zone, arriving on June 21, 1945. The next month was spent in training with newly constructed submarines near Saboga Island, thirty miles west of the Canal Zone. The frigate was sent to San Pedro, California in the middle of July, 1945. VJ-day found her undergoing repairs at Smith's Cove, Seattle, Wash. She then proceeded in September in company with the USS Annapolis (PF-15) to Cold Bay, Alaska, returning to Bremerton, Washington, by the end of the month to await further assignment. On May 22, 1946, the Bangor was on weather station duty off Pearl Harbor. Her Coast Guard crew was removed August 16, 1946.


USS KEY WEST (PF-17)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Key West (PF-17) was built by the American Shipbuilding Co., Lorain, Ohio, and brought down the Mississippi River to New Orleans on August 1, 1944. She proceeded to Houston, where further work brought her to completion. She was commissioned November 7, 1944, at Houston. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Bertheld Papanek, USCGR, followed by Lt. William F. Andersen, USCGR, and finally on November 15, 1944, by Comdr. Oscar C. Rohnke, USCGR. She proceeded to Bermuda for a month's shakedown exercises and returned to Norfolk December 24, 1944, for post shakedown availability.

ESCORT DUTY
The Key West arrived at Oran, Algeria, February 2, 1945, on her first trans-Atlantic convoy escort duty, returning to Boston February 26, 1945. After an availability and refresher training period she arrived at New York March 16, 1945, departing two days later for her second tour of escort duty to Oran, where she arrived April 4, 1945. Returning to Boston May 1, 1945, she had another availability period followed by refresher training exercises at Casco Bay, Maine. On May 14th she departed New York for Norfolk and arrived at Oran June 3, 1945 on her third escort duty. She returned to Boston July 6, 1945 and left for the Pacific on the 31st.

PLANE PATROL
The Key West arrived at Pearl Harbor August 23, 1945. After a trip to Guam, she returned to Pearl Harbor, March 1, 1946 and was assigned to Plane Patrol Station No. 1 on April 6, 1946. She was decommissioned at Seattle on June 14, 1946.


USS ALEXANDRIA (PF-18)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Alexandria (PF-18) was built at the American Shipyards, Lorain, Ohio and named for the city of Alexandria, Virginia. Launched January 14, 1944, she was towed down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, Louisiana, for outfitting and was commissioned March 11, 1945 at Avondale Marine Ways, Avondale, Louisiana. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. C. G. Houtsma, USCGR. The Alexandria proceeded at once for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for shakedown, after which she reported at Norfolk. At the end of her availability there, the frigate was sent to Casco Bay, Maine, for additional training. While stationed at Casco Bay, the crew members of the Alexandria got their first taste of combat duty when she received emergency orders to join a killer group hunting for German submarines. She was on this mission on VE-day.

ON WEATHER PATROL
At the completion of this training period in May, 1945, she was ordered back to Charleston, S.C. where she was outfitted for weather patrol work. With her new gear aboard, the ship was then sent to Argentia, Newfoundland on June 14, 1945 to join the fleet of weather vessels. She completed five weather patrols in the North Atlantic, serving a two-fold mission of daily sending valuable weather data to Washington and serving as an air-sea rescue vessel and pLane guard for trans-Atlantic airplanes. Lt. Bache M. Whitlock, USCGR, served as commanding officer from July 28, 1945 to October 20, 1945. He was succeeded by Lt. Aaron T. Leopard, USCGR. Her Coast Guard crew was removed in May, 1946.


USS HURON (PF-19)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Huron (PF-19) was commissioned at New Orleans, September 7, 1944. Her commanding officer throughout her active duty period was Lt. CoMdr. Walter W. Collins, USCGR. On the 17th she proceeded down the Mississippi to Burrwood, Louisiana and thence into the Gulf of Mexico in company with the USS Bath (PF-55) for formation cruising and general drills. On the 23rd she left for Bermuda in company with the USS Poughkeepsie (PF-26) for shakedown training. She continued training until October 27, 1944, when she left for Norfolk, escorting the USS Escalante, a Navy Fleet Tanker. Post shakedown availability at Norfolk continued until November 30, 1944.

RAMMED ON FIRST TRIP
On December 1, 1944, the Huron got underway as one of eight escorts for a convoy to Oran, Africa. On December 8th she was ordered to round up stragglers and stay with them until they resumed station. At 0445 she was rammed at the starboard side abaft the beam by the SS James Fennimore Cooper. All electricity failed and the engine room was abandoned due to flooding conditions. She began sending out distress messages, her position being 36°45'N, 47°01'W. The engine-room bulkhead was holding and the ramming vessel as well as the DE-171 were standing by. The latter began towing the Huron. Depth charges and smoke screen generators were jettisoned as the DE-168 came alongside to render assistance. One officer and 49 men were transferred to the DE-171 by motor whale boat and 14 men to the DE-168 by raft before 12 hours had elapsed. By noon of the 9th, 98 men and much meat and perishables had been transferred to DE-326. On the 10th a large fender was secured over the hole and a collision mat completed and secured over it, after an inspection party from ARS-21 came alongside. Later that day a second collision mat was put in place followed by a third on the 11th. The Huron reached Bermuda on the 15th. Here she was dry-docked on the 16th. On the 24th she proceeded under tow of the Choctaw to Navy Yard, Charleston, with the DE-334 acting as escort. While at Charleston the Huron was converted to a sonar training ship.

SONAR TRAINING
Departing Charleston, S.C. on February 20, 1945, she proceeded to Key West, Fla., for duty as Flagship, Fleet Sonar School Squadron, and remained on that duty as

--143--


an aid in instructing student officers and men in the use of sonar equipment until the end of the war. Her Coast Guard crew was removed in May, 1946.


USS GULFPORT (PF-20)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Gulfport (PF-20) was first placed in service August 29, 1944 at New Orleans, having been built by the American Shipbuilding Co., Cleveland, Ohio. She underwent trials at New Orleans between the 5th and 14th of September, took on stores at the Naval Supply Depot, and left for Gulfport, Mississippi where she was commissioned September 16, 1944, Commander, G. A. Knudsen, USCGR, assuming command. On the 18th she departed for a two day stay at Mobile, Alabama, and then headed for Bermuda for shakedown training. Due to ruptured boiler tubes she moored at Miami on the 23rd and then left for Charleston where she remained until October 7, 1944, undergoing repairs. On the 9th she left for Bermuda. Here she conducted shakedown training exercises until November 9th when she departed for Norfolk. After undergoing repairs there she acted as Destroyer Escort Schoolship until December 14, 1944, when she left for Washington, D.C. to undergo inspections for two days. On the 17th she returned to Norfolk and reported ready for duty to Commander Task Force 64.

CONVOY DUTY
On December 18, 1944, she commenced escort duty with Task Force 64 (Task Group 60.11) escorting convoy UGS-64. from Norfolk, Virginia, to Oran, Algeria. Arriving at Gibraltar on January 4, 1945, the Task Force was relieved of escort duty and the Gulfport moored at Mers-el-Kebir. On January 7th the Task Group began escorting convoy GUS-64 from Oran to Hampton Roads, Virginia. They reached their destination on January 22nd and the Gulfport proceeded to New York. After Navy Yard availability and refresher training in the New London area she moved to Norfolk. Lt. Comdr. H. C. Reeves, USCGR, became commanding officer on February 11, 1945. On February 12, 1945, as a member of Task Group 60.11 she became one of the escorts for convoy UGS-74 from Norfolk to Gibraltar. Arriving there on the 26th, she was relieved of escort duty and proceeded to Oran. She left Oran on March 8, 1945 escorting convoy GUS-76 to Hampton Roads. On the 11th, first the Gulfport, and then the USS Mason (DE-529), conducted urgent depth charge attacks, seven minutes apart, on a contact classified as submarine. The two vessels remained with the contact for two hours before discontinuing search and taking up their screening positions again. On the 23rd the Gulfport broke off from the main convoy to escort the Delaware Bay section, after which she proceeded to New York. On April 18, 1945, after undergoing repairs during Navy Yard availability, she rendezvoused with convoy UGS-67, as a member of Task Group 60.12 escorting the convoy to Western Mediterranean waters. On May 3rd she was relieved of escort duty and proceeded to Mers-el-Kebir, Algeria. On May 12th she began escorting convoy GUS-39 to the United States arriving at Hampton Roads on the 28th.

WEATHER PATROL
On completion of trans-Atlantic escort duty the Gulfport was converted to a weather ship at Staten Island, New York, and ordered to Adak, Alaska, via Pearl Harbor, T.H. She reported at Adak on September 16, 1945, and on the 20th Lt. Comdr. W. J. Dongian, USCGR, relieved Lt. Comdr H. C. Reeves as commanding officer. She helped maintain the weather station at 43°N, 165°E until her return to the United States for decommissioning on May 28, 1946.


USS BAYONNE (PF-21)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built by the American Shipbuilding Co. of Cleveland, Ohio, the USS Bayonne, (PF-21) was towed down the Mississippi River, arriving at New Orleans on September 16, 1944 she was ordered to report to Coast Guard Yard, Curtis Bay, Md., for fitting out and completion and arrived there October 3, 1944. It was not until February 14, 1945, that she was commissioned with Comdr. Elmer E. Comstock as her first commanding officer. Departing the yard on February 26, 1945 she proceeded to Norfolk. On March 3, 1945, she left Norfolk for Guantanamo Eay, where she engaged in shakedown exercises until April 3rd.

TO RUSSIA ON LEND LEASE
Stopping at Kingston, Jamaica on April 4, 1945, the Bayonne escorted the George Washington to New York and then reported to the Philadelphia Navy Yard for post shakedown availability until May 8, 1945. After several months of local escort duty off New York, she left New York July 3, 1945 for Seattle, via the Canal Zone, and was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease on August 26, 1945.


USS GLOUCESTER (PF-22)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Gloucester acquired her Coast Guard crew on December 10, 1943, with Lt. Comdr. C. R. Couser, USCGR, as her first commanding officer. She arrived at Bermuda April 4, 1944, for shakedown, and proceeded to New York on April 16, 1944, to remain there until the 25th.

TRAINING PF CREWS
The Gloucester proceeded to Norfolk on April 26, 1944, and on May 15th departed for Galveston in connection with the training of patrol frigate crews from the Coast Guard barracks there. This duty was performed at Miami and the assignment continued through January 7, 1945, with a ten day availability at Charleston from November 27, 1944, for overhaul. Returning to New York on January 10, 1945, the frigate was assigned to Commander Eastern Sea Frontier for patrol duty.

TO RUSSIA ON LEND-LEASE
The frigate remained on patrol duty at New York until May 30, 1945, and was then assigned to Air-Sea Rescue Station No. 10 at Gloucester until June 13th, when she returned to New York. Departing New York on July lit, 1945, she arrived at Seattle, via Canal Zone, on August 23, 1945 and on August 26, 1945, was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease.


USS SHREVEPORT (PF-23)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Shreveport (PF-23) was commissioned on April 24, 1944 at the Todd-Johnson Dry Docks

--144--


Company, Algiers, Louisiana. Commander H. A. Morrison, USCGR, assuming command. On May 12th she departed for Galveston for extensive shipyard availability. She left Galveston on September 30th, and after a short training cruise in the Gulf of Mexico, arrived in Bermuda October 13th, where she conducted daily shakedown exercises until November 6, 1944. She arrived at Boston November 9, 1944 for further shipyard availability and conversion into a weather patrol vessel. Lt. K. N. Akers, USCGR, assumed command on December 11th, 1944.

WEATHER PATROL
The Shreveport departed Boston March 2, 1945, for Argentia, Newfoundland, for weather patrol duty in the North Atlantic. The weather stations patrolled and the dates were as follows 1

March 7--27, 1945 Weather Station No. 8
April 4--20, 1945 Weather Station No. 7
May 11--June 5, 1945 Weather Station No. 2
June 20--July 17, 1945 Weather Station No. 7 (also as Air-Sea Rescue Vessel)

The frigate departed Boston July 19, 1945, for Casco Bay, Maine for training, after which she moored at U.S. Navy Yard Annex, Chelsea, Mass., for shipyard availability. Further weather patrol duty followed:

August 20--September 13, 1945 Weather and Plane Guard Station No. 3
September 28-- October 23, 1945 Weather and plane Guard Station No. 1

She remained at Argentia, Newfoundland until November 1, 1945, and then proceeded to South Boston Navy Yard November 3, 1945, for availability prior to proceeding to South America for Weather Patrol and Plane Guard duties.

SOUTH AMERICAN WEATHER PATROL
The Shreveport arrived at Recife on December 17, 1945. Her duty on weather stations in South America was as follows:

December 21, 1945--January 8, 1946 Weather Station No. 13
February 1--February 21, 1946 Weather Station No. 13

Departing Recife March 8, 1946 she arrived in New York, via Trinidad, March 23nd. After a brief stay in Boston, she proceeded to Charleston April 8, 1946 where she was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed May 9, 1946.


USS MUSKEGON (PF-24)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Muskegon (PF-24) was built in the Walter Butler Shipyard, Superior, Wisconsin, in the latter part of 1943 and towed down the Mississippi on pontoons to the Todd-Johnson Shipyard in New Orleans, where the Ship was outfitted. She was commissioned on February 9, 1944. Her first commanding officer Commander George D. Synon, USCGR, was succeeded October 25, 1944, by Lt. Joe L. Home, USCGR. After shakedown off Bermuda she returned to New York Navy Yard for main engine repairs, then to Norfolk for sea trials, then to Philadelphia for engine rebuild and finally passed her sea trials in September, 1944. Ordered to the Pacific, theMuskegon had reached the Panama Canal when she was ordered to return to Boston for duty.

WEATHER PATROL
Arriving in Boston early in October, 1944, the ship underwent conversion to a weather ship, and in the first week of November headed for Naval Operating Base, Argentia, Newfoundland, for duty. En route, on November 4, 1944, while underway through the Gulf of Maine, a sound contact was made on what was classified as a submarine. The Muskegon maneuvered to attack with projectors (hedge hogs). After closing in, the first salvo was fired with resounding bottom explosion. A second salvo followed. Since it continued to remain in the same position, the target was considered to be not a submarine, but possibly a wreck.

A ROUGH PATROL
The Muskegon was ordered to report to Weather Station Two at 58°N, 37°W located in the Irminger Sea. The weather was extremely bad, the wind never being below 30 knots, but several icebergs that were sighted provided excellent target practice. For 15 days the Muskegon took a pounding, three days with winds as high as 80 knots. The crew found it difficult to eat, impossible to sleep and almost too exhausting to work. On December 1, 1944, following a day of gale winds, a tremendous wave struck the ship on the starboard side forward. Damage was not severe but extensive.

SOME CALMER PATROLS
After a few days back in Argentia for repairs, the Muskegon was again ordered back to Weather Station Two to relieve another weather ship that had been damaged. This time the wind never went above 25 knots. It was cold, but calm and liveable. One January night while on Station Two, a target picked up by radar failed to answer a challenge by flashing light. General quarters was sounded and another challenge remained unanswered. Finally three star shells spread over the area revealed a low silhouette and HMRT Mediator answered and confirmed her friendliness. Back to Newfoundland for a brief respite and the Muskegon was off for another Weather Station--number Eight between Bermuda and the Azores. A friendly shipping lane and no submarines in the vicinity made the patrol both enjoyable and uneventful. The sound gear once experienced a contact in the middle of the night. The ship maneuvered for some time, gradually nearing the target. The projectors failed to fire and after the target drew away, a retiring search was conducted to regain contact. When daylight broke several whales were noted in the vicinity--the probable contacts. After another patrol on Station Seven, between Azores and Bermuda the ship returned to Argentia, where routine patrol was punctuated with such interesting experiences as destroying drifting mines, screening a convoy or lighting a friendly ship with star shells.

ANTI-SUB SWEEP
In April 1945, the Muskegon went to the aid of a Greenland-to-Boston convoy, encountering pack ice along the route. From Boston the ship joined an anti-submarine sweep in the Gulf of Maine. In a scouting line of ships abeam, two thousand yards apart, the group proceeded northward along the coast. On April 24th the Muskegon and USS Eberle, a destroyer, were detached to carry out inshore search near Monhegan Island. Operating two hundred yards off shore, at full speed, in 18 feet of water, with a 15 foot draft, smoke was sighted on the surface near Roaring Bull Rock Buoy in the afternoon. It was 3 miles distant and from no visible source. The smoke resembled diesel exhaust, apparently moving upwind, and was presumed to be an enemy submarine using a schnorchel. Depth

--145--


WEATHER OBSERVATION AT SEA WAS ONE OF THE COAST GUARD's MOST IMPORTANT FUNCTIONS OF THE COAST GUARD MANNED PATROL FRIGATES
Weather observation at sea was one of the Coast Guard-manned Patrol Frigates most important functions

--146--


charges were dropped and hedge hogs fired at the supposedly bottomed submarine, the entire Task Group coming to the Muskegon's assistance. No contact was made, however, after several hours of thorough search and the target was abandoned.

POTENTIAL FLOATING ROCKET
Back in Boston the ship was loaded with one thousand hedge hogs for transportation to Argentia. Every available compartment, the deck space and even the passages were filled with ammunition. A potential floating rocket, the Muskegon sped at full speed through the sub-infested Gulf of Maine. Constant alertness and excellent training brought the ship safely into Argentia with its dangerous cargo. Soon afterwards, the end of the war in Europe was followed by the termination of Pacific hostilities. The Muskegon was on weather patrol on both occasions, Station 2 in May and Station 10 in August, where she was now vigilant for airplanes instead of submarines. Her decks, once gray, now a brilliant yellow, as an aid to air navigation, she was furnishing trans-Atlantic planes constant radio and light beacons, as well as weather information and air-sea rescue service. Her Coast Guard crew was removed when she was decommissioned August 27, 1946.


USS CHARLOTTESVILLE (PF-25)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Commissioned April 10, 1944 at New Orleans, the USS Charlottesville (PF-25) had as her first and only commanding officer Lt. Comdr. William F. Cass, USCGR. On May 5, 1944 she arrived at Bermuda for shakedown. By June 5th she was at Philadelphia for post shakedown availability.

PACIFIC DUTY
Leaving Philadelphia on July 25th, 1944, she proceeded to Finnschaven, New Guinea, via Canal Zone, Bora Bora and Hollandia, arriving there on September 29, 1944. Proceeding to Biak she left there November 15, 1944, as escort for a convoy to Leyte, Philippine Islands. She returned to New Guinea on December 7, 1944. She was in the Philippine Area again on December 21, 1944, returning to New Guinea on February 14, 1945. Returning to Leyte February 20, 1945, she left for Pearl Harbor March 6, 1945, by way of Ulithi, Eniwetok and Manus.

TO RUSSIA ON LEND-LEASE
The Charlottesville left Pearl Harbor on March 31, 1946 for Cold Bay, Alaska, via Seattle and Kodiak. She was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease and arrived at Petropavlousk, Siberia, July 21, 1945.


USS POUGHKEEPSIE (PF-26)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built by the Walter Butler Yards, Superior, Wisconsin, the USS Poughkeepsie (PF-26) was towed down the Mississippi River for completion and fitting out. She was commissioned at New Orleans, September 6, 1944, her first commanding officer being Comdr. Quentin M. Greeley, USCGR, who was succeeded by Lt. Comdr. Charles B. Perkins, USCGR, on December 6, 1944. She departed New Orleans for shakedown on September 23, 1944, and remained at Bermuda until October 27, 1944. She was at Philadelphia on post shakedown availability until February 2, 1945.

PATROL DUTY
After a short period at Guantanamo for training she returned to New York on February 24, 1945, and departed on her first patrol duty under Commander Eastern Sea Frontier, (Task Group 02.9) on March lit, 1945. She remained on this duty until July 3rd, 1945, when she departed New York for Seattle.

TO RUSSIA ON LEND-LEASE
Arriving at Seattle on July 27, 1945, the Poughkeepsie was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease on August 26, 1945.


USS NEWPORT (PF-27)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Newport (PF-27) was built by Walter Butler, Superior, Wisconsin, and towed down the Mississippi to New Orleans where she was commissioned on September 8, 1944. Her first and only commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. George I. Holt. USCGR. After three weeks of shakedown exercises off Bermuda, the frigate returned to Philadelphia on November 9, 1944, for post shakedown availability.

PATROL DUTY
On February 2, 1945, the Newport reported to Commander, Eastern Sea Frontier (Task Group 02.9) for duty. After five days at Guantanamo, Cuba, for training she returned to New York and departed on her first patrol duty on March 14, 1945. She remained on this duty until May 7, 1945.

TO RUSSIA ON LEND-LEASE
Departing New York on July 9, 1945, the frigate arrived at Seattle, via Canal Zone, and was turned over to Soviet Russian on Lend-Lease August 26, 1945. She arrived at Petropavlousk, Russia on September 25, 1945.


USS EMPORIA (PF-28)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Emporia (PF-24) was built by Walter Butler, Superior, Wisconsin, and towed down the Mississippi River to New Orleans. in May, 1944. She was ferried to Galveston and then to Houston where she was prepared as a weather service vessel, and commissioned October 7, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Commander G. H. Miller, USCGR. He was succeeded by Lt. Comdr. L. Anderson on September 22, 1944, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. R. F. Althauser, USCGR. On September 29, 1945, Lt. Bradford J. Beeching, USCGR, became commanding officer, being succeeded by Lt. H. A. Vaughan, USCGR on June 1, 1946, who turned over command to Lt. J. L. Gilliken, USCGR, on July 1, 1946. After a three week's shakedown at Bermuda beginning October 25, 1944, the Emporia reported for duty with Task Force 24 at Boston on November 15, 1944.

WEATHER PATROL
Departing Boston November 29, 1944, for Argentia the Emporia was assigned to duty on the following weather stations:

December 9-24, 1944 Weather Station 8
January 23--February 7, 1945 Weather Station 2
February 22--March 9, 1945 Weather Station 1
March 25--April 9, 1945 Weather Station 5

--147--


April 19--May 11, 1945 At Boston on availability.
May 14--June 3, 1945 Weather Station 8
June 23--July 14, 1945 Weather Station 6
August 22--September 10, 1945 Weather Station 5
October 4--October 21, 1945 Weather Station 2
November 13--December 5, 1945 Weather Station 4
December 17, 1945--January 14, 1946 At Boston on availability.
January 27--February 10, 1946 Weather Station 2
February 19--February 22, 1946 Weather Station 2
March 2--March 24, 1946 Weather Station 3

DECOMMISSIONED
Returning to Boston on March 31, 1946 the Emporia remained there on availability until August 8, 1946, when she proceeded to New Orleans where she was decommissioned August 30, 1946.


USS GROTON (PF-29)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built by Walter Butler, Superior, Wisconsin, the USS Groton (PF-29) was towed down the Mississippi River to New Orleans in June, 1944. She left New Orleans for Charleston, S.C. for completion and fitting out on July 4, 1944. She was commissioned at Charleston on September 5, 1944. Her first commanding officer, Commander, John N. Zeller, USCGR, was succeeded by Lt. Comdr. P. L. Chase, USCGR. On June 24, 1946, Lt. Comdr. J. Lenci became her commanding officer. After a three week's shakedown at Bermuda, the Groton reported, on October 22, 1944, to Boston for post-shakedown availability.

WEATHER PATROL
The following is the record of the Groton on weather patrol during the next 20 months:

November 8--24, 1944 Weather Station 4
December 9--24, 1944 Weather Station 1
January 8--23, 1945 Weather Station 2
February 11--17, 1945 At Boston on availability.
February 21--March 10, 1945 Weather Station 8
April 8--April 24, 1945 Weather Station 3
April 30--May 24, 1945 At Boston on availability.
June 3--23, 1945 Weather Station 7
August 2--24, 1945 Weather Station 3
September 11--October 1, 1945 Weather Station 1
October 21--November 13, 1945 Weather Station 8
November 15, 1945--January 8, 1946 At Boston on availability.
January 11--20, 1946 Weather Station 8
February 10--March 3, 1946 Weather Station 6
March 9--April 10, 1946 At Boston vessel decommissioned and re-commissioned as Coast Guard vessel.
April 15--May 5, 1946 Weather Station 7
May 23--June 15, 1946 Weather Station D

DECOMMISSIONING
The Groton returned to Boston on June 20, 1946. She departed for New Orleans, arriving there on July 17, 1946. On September 25, 1946, she was decommissioned.


USS HINGHAM (PF-30)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Hingham (PF-30) was commissioned on November 3, 1944, at New Orleans, La. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. William K. Earle, USCGR. She proceeded to Bermuda where she underwent shakedown exercises. Departing Bermuda December 12, 1944, she went on post shakedown availability at Boston, where she was outfitted as a weather ship.

WEATHER PATROL
she was assigned to North Atlantic Weather Patrol, Air-Sea Rescue and Escort of Convoy duties on January 3, 1945, after escorting the Pontiac from Argentia to Boston. Escorting the Laramie to Argentia on January 19th she proceeded to Weather Station 5 on February 8th. Returning to Boston she again went on weather patrol for a ten day period on March 10th patrolling Station 1. After availability in Boston she patrolled Station 2 for a like period from April 9th. Back to Boston for availability and to Casco Bay for refresher training she patrolled Station 6 for a period from June 3rd, after which on July 5, 1945, Lt. Comdr. Hugh V. Hopkins, USCGR, took command. She was on Station 5 for a similar period from August 2nd, Station 2 for periods from August 31st and again from September 11th. From November 1st she was on Weather Station 4. Then after a period of availability, she patrolled Weather Station 2 for three consecutive ten day periods beginning January 14th, 1946, February 10th and February 22nd, basing at Reykjavik after two of them. Then she took over Weather Station 6 from March 14th, returning for availability to Boston until May 4th. She was decommissioned at Charleston June 5, 1946.


USS GRAND RAPIDS (PF-31)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Grand Rapids (PF-31) was built by the Walter Butler Shipbuilders, inc., at Superior, Wisconsin, and turned over to the U.S. Maritime Commission at that place in June, 1944. A skeleton crew from the Coast Guard Training Station, Manhattan Beach, Brooklyn, N.Y., went aboard on June 7, 1944, when she departed from Duluth, Minnesota, en route to New Orleans, La., via Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, down the Illinois and Mississippi rivers to Plaquemine, Louisiana. In August, 1944, she was moved to the Avondale Marine Ways, Avondale, Louisiana, where she was outfitted and placed in commission under the supervision of the Industrial Manager, 8th Naval District on October 10, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Theo. F. Knoll, USCGR. After completing river trials, the Grand Rapids departed Burrwood, La., on October 17, 1944, en route to Bermuda for shakedown. On the second day out, high winds and heavy seas from a hurricane were encountered off the west coast of Florida, causing damage to deck gear and on October 20th she was ordered back to New Orleans for repairs. Seven days later she was again on her way to Bermuda, but after two days out, engine trouble developed which kept her at Key West for seven days. She finally arrived at Bermuda on November 8, 1944. Completing shakedown on December 2, 1944, she was ordered into Boston for alterations and repairs and on January 6, 1945 sailed for Argentia, Newfoundland, for assignment to duty under Commander, Task Force 24.

--148--


WEATHER PATROL
Assigned to duty as Weather Vessel with Task Force 24, under Destroyers, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, her first orders were to proceed to Weather Station No. 3. Subsequent patrols in the Atlantic were Stations 4, 5 and 8. After the patrol of Station 8, the Grand Rapids put into Reykjavik, Iceland, for an inport period. During this period the war in Europe ended. Leaving Reykjavik, a patrol was made on Station 2, after which the ship put into Boston for a 30-day availability on June 6, 1945. She departed Boston on July 7, 1945 and returned to Argentia, leaving there on a 20-day patrol on Station 9. Upon completion of this patrol and while awaiting orders in Argentia the war with Japan ended. Lt. R. G. Osterfelt, USCGR, became commanding officer August 11, 1945. The vessel was then ordered to Air-Sea Rescue duty in conjunction with the Weather Patrol activities. She made two patrols in this status, one on Station 7, and one on Station 3, before reporting to Boston on November 17, 1945, for an inport period. On December 5, 1945, she departed Boston for a 22 day patrol on Weather Station No. 10, arriving in Boston on January 1, 1946. She patrolled Weather Station No. 12 from January 20, 1946, and Weather Station No. 3 from February 19, 1946. Her Coast Guard crew was removed May 9, 1946 after decommissioning on April 10, 1946.


USS WOONSOCKET (PF-32)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Woonsocket (PF-32) was commissioned at Boston, Mass., on September 1, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Commander William J. Conley, Jr. After this there were pre-shakedown tests which continued until September 17th. Between 20th September and 13th October, 1944, she was on shakedown exercises at Bermuda.

WEATHER PATROL
Returning to Boston on October 17, 1944, she was converted for Weather Patrol duty and on October 31st, arrived at Argentia, Newfoundland. She patrolled Weather Station 8 between the 3rd and 24th of November, 1944, and Weather Station 2 between the 9th and 24th of December, 1944. From December 27th, 1944 to January 19, 1945, she was undergoing repairs at Bermuda. She patrolled weather station 3 between January 23rd and February 8, 1945 and Weather Station 4 between February 23rd and March 13th, 1945. On March 15, 1945, she had a sonar contact off Cape Race, Newfoundland, which she followed up with negative results. Returning to Argentia, she proceeded to Boston, where she was on availability between March 20th and April 6, 1945, with refresher training at Casco Bay, Maine, between the 7th and 18th of April, 1945. Returning to Argentia, she patrolled weather station 1 between April 24th and May 14th, 1945, and weather station 8 between June 3rd and 28th, 1945. Commander Conley was relieved by Lt.Comdr. E. E. Schwenzgeger on July 7, 1945. After patrolling station 7 from July 13th to August 2nd, 1945, she again sailed for Boston for availability between August 6th and September 5, 1945. She was on two more weather patrols--one on Station 3 between September 11th and October 5, 1945, and one on Station 1, between October 21st and 21st, 1945. On November 9, 1945, while at Boston, Lt. Comdr, H. A. White relieved Lt. Comdr. E. E. Schwenzgeger, as commanding officer. During December, 1945, she patrolled Weather Station 2; during February, 1946, Weather Station 10; in April, 1946, weather Station 3 and in May, 1946, Weather Station 4. Lt. (jg) W. J. Zinck, USCGR, became commanding officer June 30, 1946. Her Coast Guard crew was removed September 18, 1946.


USS DEARBORN (PF-33)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built at Superior, Wisconsin by the Walter Butler Shipyards, the USS Dearborn was moved down the Mississippi River on June, 1944, and ferried from New Orleans to Charleston, S.C. for fitting out and completion. She was commissioned September 10, 1944, with Lt. Comdr. Fred F. Nichols, USCGR, as commanding officer. After three weeks of shakedown at Bermuda she proceeded to Boston for post-shakedown availability.

WEATHER PATROL
Assigned to Atlantic weather patrol, the Dearborn patrolled the following weather stations:

November 10--24, 1944 Weather Station 3
December 9--25, 1944 Weather Station 5
January 7-23, 1945 Weather Station 1
February 7--23, 1945 Weather Station 2
March 25--April 9, 1945 Weather Station 8
April 22--May 9, 1945 Weather Station 7
May 16--June 25, 1945 At Boston on availability.
June 27--July 14. 1945 Weather Station 10
August 2--22, 1945 Weather Station 11
September 11--October 1, 1945 Weather Station 6
October 6-12, 1945 Weather Station 3
November 13--December 7, 1945 Weather Station 8
December 11--27, 1945 At Ponta de Gada, Azores.
December 30, 1945--January 21, 1946 Weather Station 12
January 28--February 10, 1946 Weather Station 8
February 13--March 15, 1946 At Boston on availability.
March 23--April 14, 1946 Weather Station 2

DECOMMISSIONING
Returning to Boston on April 30, 1946, the Dearborn departed for Charleston and arrived there May 9, 1946. She was decommissioned June 5, 1946.


USS LONG BEACH (PF-34)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Constructed by the Consolidated Steel Corp., Wilmington Yard, Los Angeles, California, the 304 foot, 1100 ton, 18 knot USS Long Beach (PF-34) was launched May 5, 1943, and was christened by Mrs. Wlater H. Boyd, of Long Beach, California. Manned by a Coast Guard crew, the vessel was placed in commission at U.S. Naval Dry Docks, Terminal Island, California, on September 8, 1943, with Lt. Comdr. T. R. Midtlyng, USCGR in command. Shortly after completing shakedown training, the Long Beach was on her way to the Pacific.

ADMIRALTIES LANDING
Assigned to the Seventh Fleet Amphibious Force, the Long Beach took part in the Bismarck Archipelago operations during March 16-18, 1944, earning her first engagement star. The story of the Admiralties' operation is told by Lt. Max Sturgis, USCGR, who was aboard the Long Beach:

--149--


"During the night we weighed anchor and eased out to pick up our convoy in the dim light of the moon, heading out to sea. Our course to destination led right down by the Jap's 'front yard,' an area which, until rather recently, they had considered to be the Jap equivalent of 'mare nostrum'. The Coast Guard men and ships had a job of insurance on their hands--the safe arrival of those landing craft in the Admiralties for the Army. The Army Air Forces had promised us air protection during the trek to the islands, and they came through. At dusk a destroyer joined us, and after a prolonged twilight 'alert' at the guns, the formation altered course in the darkness and bored into the night for our destination--Seeadler Harbor at the east end of Manus Island in the Admiralty Group.

"Officers and crews of these patrol frigates have the firm conviction (and not without justification) that their vessels were built for the frigid weather of the North Atlantic sub patrol. They have an overabundance of lovely steam radiators all over the vessel. When the ship is blacked out in the evening, all lights above the deck are extinguished, all hatches, doors and portholes are closed and dogged shut so that no possible ray of light can leak out, and conversely, no fresh air can leak in! To the already sticky heat of the equator and the closely compressed bodies of over two hundred men, add the laboring steam engines, boilers and miles of steam pipe. Gun crews are more fortunate. They can sleep at their weapons on the steel deck but mattresses and bedding are forbidden as they constitute a fire hazard in event of battle.

"Just as the inconceivably beautiful, red, tropic dawn broke, the speaker blared 'unidentified planes bearing one nine zero, range seven miles' sleepless eyed gun crews whipped their weapons around to bear on 'one nine zero.' 'Bearing one-nine-eight range six miles' 'Bearing two-two-zero, three miles'. Then 'Friendly aircraft. Friendly aircraft.' The morning patrol of our Army air chaperones.

"With daylight, the physical characteristics of Los Negros (the smaller) and Manus (the larger) were revealed as being somewhat similar to that of southern California during the winter rainy season when its foliage is in full bloom, except that coconut palms and plantation extend down to the water's end. Smoke seemed to be rising from one of the hills just back of Seeadler Harbor and as we got closer there was no doubt as to what was happening--Army bombers were plastering the Jap with bombs--lots of them. Just prior to our arrival the Army ground forces had captured the Laurengau airstrip on Manus, forcing the Japs to retreat but only as far as the coconut plantation adjacent to the airfield where from a ridge their fire prevented its occupation. All day our bombers from Negros were bombing and strafing the ridge.

"There had been warning that Seeadler Harbor was mined by the Nips and by our own forces. Fortunately none was encountered as we went in to provide screen for the landing craft when they erupted toward the beaches. The frigate's task for the moment, being finished, the crews relaxed a little in the blistering, motionless air. Someone half heartedly suggested a swim, but this was quickly squelched by the reminder that Jap snipers were right down on the beach.

"The harbor and its surrounding hills presented a strange and unreal appearance, a curious admixture of peace and war--a beautiful harbor of quiet waters with small boats scurrying back and forth over it's surface, but small craft that were landing barges bent on invasion. Heavily laden groves of coconut palms, and these same groves filled with the sound of rifle and machine gun fire, as we steadily drove the enemy back into the hills. On our right, bombers were 'laying eggs' on the ridge and in the resulting explosions clouds of earth and debris would go hurtling into the quiet air, while occasional fires sent up clouds of greasy yellowish smoke. Navy warships, standing out from the harbor, sent shell after shell whistling into the ridge, while a spotter plane droned over the Jap positions at low altitude contemptuous of the weak AA fire. Over on the south side of the sack shaped harbor landing barges disgorged troops on the beaches where they were immediately lost to view in the palms. Soon rifles and carbines spoke up, with now and then a heavier voiced mortar joining, the cacophony. They had 'contacted' the Jap.

"Then blinkers were coming up. Orders to shove off. We're off to a new assignment."

Engaged in escort work, the Long Beach was awarded her second engagement star for her operations in Western New Guinea. In April, 1944, the vessel worked out of Humboldt Bay and other New Guinea ports.

BOMBARDS BEACH
On August 13, 1944, the Long Beach was requested by the commanding General, 41st Division, U.S. Army, to bombard the Napido Area, Soepiori Island, and the Wardo area, Biak Island, New Guinea. With several Army officers aboard, and a Japanese-American Army sergeant, as well as four native guides, the frigate moved within 500 yards of the beaches and let loose. Caves, rock barricades, and possible camp areas were raked. An Army reconnaissance party was then put ashore and was reembarked at the conclusion of its investigation, .

OTHER OPERATIONS
The Long Beach got underway from Mios Woendi Lagoon on September 14, 1944, to sortie with echelon M-7, consisting of five Navy and five Army tugs. The convoy, towing enough heavy equipment to outfit a small naval base, was escorted into Morotai without incident After rendezvousing with a Task Unit off Kokoja Island, the Long Beach proceeded to southern Race Island and at 1 P.M. screened the landing on Loleolawa Village. No enemy opposition was encountered. In November, 1944, the frigate moved up to the Philippines where she earned her third and final engagement star, participating in the Leyte operation during the period November 5-21, 1944.

TURNED OVER TO RUSSIA
New Year's Day, 1945, found the Long Beach homeward bound. She reached Balboa, Canal Zone, on January 14, 1945, stocked up with winter clothing, and headed into Boston where she was drydocked for overhauling in February. Lt. W. H. Stafford, USCGR, relieved Commander Midtlyng as commanding officer shortly after the frigate reached the Canal Zone, on her long journey back to the Pacific begun in April. She arrived in Seattle Washington at the end of Apr. 1, 1945, and proceeded to the Aleutians, where she was decommissioned July 12, 1945, and turned over to the Soviet Navy. Her final record indicates that she arrived in Petropavlousk, Siberia on July 21, 1945.


USS BELFAST (PF-35)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Belfast (PF-35) was commissioned at Mare Island, California on

--150--


November 24, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. John L. Hutson, Jr., USCGR. After completion, fitting out and shakedown she arrived at San Diego, California, April 4, 1944.

PACIFIC DUTY
Proceeding to San Pedro on the 13th, she sailed, in company with the USS Hutchinson (PF-45) for Cairns, Australia on April 29, 1944 and arrived at her destination May 29, 1944. She operated in the New Guinea area from June 15th to November 30th, 1944, when she arrived in the Philippines. Returning to New Guinea December 14, 1944, she departed for the United States, via Bora Bora and Canal Zone and arrived in Boston January 24, 1945.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
After a two month's availability at Boston, she departed for Seattle, via the Canal Zone, March 28, 1945, arriving there April 26th. Here she was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease and proceeded, via Kodiak and Cold Bay, Alaska to Petropavlousk, Russia, arriving there on July 21, 1945.


USS GLENDALE (PF-36)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The 304 foot Coast Guard manned USS Glendale (PF-36) was built by the Consolidated Steel Corp. Ltd., Wilmington Yard, Los Angeles, California, and commissioned October 1, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Commander Harold J. Doebler, USCGR. She closely resembled the British "River Class" frigates, with triple expansion engines, twin screws and capable of a speed of 20 knots. Her full load displacement was 2,500 tons. The frigate was christened by Miss Shirley Schlichtman of Glendale, California. Post shakedown repairs, outfitting and provisioning occupied the period from January 1-9, 1944, and following a trial run from Long Beach to San Diego, she departed San Diego, January 12, 1944 for Cairns, Australia, via Tutuila, Samoa, and Noumea, New Caledonia, in company with the Long Beach (PF-3I4).

TWO SOUND CONTACTS
She moored at Tutuila on January 27, 1944, and departed on the 29th in search of the YMS-184 in distress. On the 30th after contacting the YMS, and learning that the vessel had ample fuel to make port, she returned to Tutuila. On February 1st, 1944, she departed for Noumea in company with the Long Beach. On the 2nd the Glendale made a strong, sharp sound contact and fired a full pattern of hedge hogs, the Long Beach attacking the same target shortly afterwards. After several other attacks and a search of the area, the frigates resumed base course. Arriving at Noumea February 7, 1944, she departed next day for Gladstone, Australia, in company with the Long Beach. En route she made a sharp sound contact and fired several patterns of hedge hogs. The contact was strong and believed to be a submarine as the target was using full evasive measures and propeller noises were heard. Failing to regain contact the Glendale started a search and was joined by SC vessels from Noumea and planes on the 9th. On the 10th the search was abandoned and the frigates arrived at Gladstone on February 13th, and at Cairns on the 17th reporting to Commander Escort and Mine Craft Squadron, 7th Fleet for duty.

OPERATIONS IN THE ADMIRALTIES
On March 4, 1944, theGlendale got underway for Milne Bay, New Guinea, escorting two Australian transports. Ordered to reverse course the transports and the Glendale returned to Cairns, where she was joined by the Long Beach and then continued to Milne Bay. On the 13th she departed Milne Bay in company with the Long Beach and two LCS's for Cape Sudest. After a stop here the frigates departed early on the 16th for Admiralty Islands, convoying the LSD Carter Hall, entering Seeadler Harbor, Manus Island on the 17th. While here action was witnessed on land but the vessels of the Glendale group were not engaged. On the 20th she escorted six LST's with two SC's from Cape Sudest to Cape Cretin and returned with a convoy to Cape Sudest.

ESCORT MISSIONS--BOMBARDMENT OF TUMLEO AND SELEO
On April 11, 1944, she began escorting the USS Triangulum and USS William H. Byers [sic] to Lae, New Guinea, and then continued with the Byers to Finnschaven. She then proceeded to Buna, New Guinea until the 18th, when she turned toward Cape Cretin with the USS Fetcher, Murray and Long Beach. Arriving on the 19th the vessels formed an anti-submarine screen around Task Unit 77.4.3, and proceeded to Finnschaven where two other task units rendezvoused to form Task Unit 77.4. On the 20th the Task Unit formed a special cruising disposition to pass through the restricted area in the Admiralty Islands vicinity. On the 22nd two "bogies" were picked up which circled the formation well out of gun range and disappeared, They were believed to be "Betty's." The Glendale with the other escorts, and joined by four more escorts, accompanied Task Unit 77.4.3 to Aitape, New Guinea. Arriving on the 23rd, she left the anti-submarine screen and proceeded about one mile north of Tumleo Island to begin anti-submarine patrol. Destroyers began shore bombardment of Tumleo and Seleo Islands and when they ceased, TBF carrier based planes took up the bombing. At 2200 the Task Force was reforming and shortly after the Glendale became one of its escorts to Cape Cretin. On the 25th while still escorting the Task Force she sighted a small cabin Army cruiser, D-51, out of gas which had been drifting two days without food and water. The Glendale took it in tow and later turned it over to SC-981 and rejoined the convoy, which split on the 26th, one section anchoring in Buna Roads with the Glendale.

BRINGS IN SURVIVORS
Joining five other escorts on the 27th, the Glendale proceeded first to Cape Cretin and then to Humboldt Bay, where she and another escort formed an anti-sub-patrol at the entrance until May 3rd, departing next day for Cape Cretin. On the 5th she picked up an emergency IFF signal, sighted a plane circling and learned that a B-24 had crash landed, with seven survivors picked up by the Coronado (PF-38). They were transferred to the Glendale, who turned them over to the Army at Cape Cretin. Departing on the 8th for Seeadler Harbor, she escorted two vessels to Cape Cretin, returning with three Liberty ships to Humboldt Bay. After escorting another convoy to Cape Cretin and returning with two vessels to Buna Roads, she proceeded to Port Harvey for availability.

ESCORT DUTY
On June 2, 1944, as part of Escort Division 25, Task Force 76, she escorted two Liberty ships from Cape Cretin to Hollandia and then five more to Wakde Island. Proceeding to Humboldt Bay she escorted two vessels to Milne Bay, arriving on the 17th. After 5 days in drydock, she took freight, mail and personnel to Langemak. Here she escorted six LST's and LCI Flotilla 5 to Aitape and Humboldt Eay. On July 3rd, with k other escorts, she took an eight ship convoy to Langemak. On the 11th she

--151--


returned to Humboldt Bay with 12 merchant ships and an LCI. She then proceeded to Wakde Island with 2 LST's.

BOMBARDS ENEMY POSITION
On July 15, 1944, the Glendale proceeded to the vicinity of the Arai River mouth, New Guinea, to bombard enemy positions and fuel dumps. Here, with the aid of spotting planes, she destroyed an estimated 800 drums of enemy gasoline and blew up an ammunition dump. Maintaining anti-submarine patrol off Maffin Bay until the 21st, she proceeded to Humboldt Bay and returned to Maffin Bay with a convoy of seven LST's and one other vessel. Proceeding to Humboldt Bay she maintained anti-submarine patrol until August 2nd, 1944, when she moored in Hollandia Bay for maintenance.

CAPTURES JAPANESE
On August 12, 1944, she escorted two vessels, one to Woendi Island and the other to Sorido Lagoon, Biak Island, and then proceeded to Noemfoor with a Navy destroyer escort and a PC, patrolling 10 miles south of the island to intercept evacuating Japanese. On the 16th the Glendale received information that several out-rigger canoes had departed the island the previous midnight and she dispatched PC-477 to search. The PC captured nine Japanese in two native canoes and delivered them to the U.S. Army on Noemfoor Island. Proceeding to Pegun Island on the 21st to destroy enemy barges, she found all barges aground on a coral reef and beyond repair. After patrolling off Noemfoor until the 30th she left for 'Woendi Island.

ESCORT DUTY
The Glendale departed for Manus Island on September 7, 1944, for escort duty. She escorted one group of 5 LST's to Humboldt Bay and another group to Morotai Island on the 14th. Here while preparing to screen a convoy to Humboldt Bay, she observed enemy planes bombarding Morotai Island. On the 22nd she left the formation with 2 LST's for Oivi Island. Proceeding to Humboldt Bay, she left there on the 29th escorting a vessel to Palau Islands. Releasing the vessel at Angaur Island on October 4th she returned to Humboldt Bay on the 6th. Escorting 7 LST's to Biak on the 11th, she returned with 5 on the 15th.

TO LEYTE
Forming Task Group 76.2, with 4 other escorts and 20 merchant ships the Glendale departed Humboldt Bay October 29, 1944, for Leyte, Philippine Islands. En route, one of the escorts made three embarrassing attacks on a sonar contact. They entered Leyte Gulf on November 4th. There were many red alerts that night and the enemy was seen bombing shore establishments. On the 9th she departed for Hollandia with another convoy.

ALL DAY AIR ATTACK
On November 29, 1944, the Glendale stood out of Hollandia and formed up a convoy of 35 Navy, Army and merchant ships en route the Philippines with three other escorts. The frigate's most prolonged air attack came on December 5, 1944 while this convoy was en route Leyte Gulf. Early in the day large flights of friendly C-47 transport planes passed over the track of the convoy. At 8:30 A.M. alert Jap bomber pilots, learning of this situation, winged in among the C-47' s and dropped a bomb over a ship in the convoy, scoring a near miss with no damage. This introduced a problem of identification for ship's gunners but no friendly aircraft was hit. At noon another enemy torpedo bomber came in with a group of C-47's, swooped low and hit the SS Antone Saugrain. Half an hour later, two more closed successfully, one succeeding in scoring another hit on the Saugrain. A fifth bomber came in at 3 o'clock but its bomb fell wide of the target. At 3:26 P.M. a Jap fighter dropped a small bomb on the SS Marcus Daly's bow starting fires. Two later attempts were frustrated by barrage fire. Four destroyers now joined the convoy to provide additional fire power. The Saugrain dropped out of the convoy with the Coronado, San Pedro and LT-454 dispatched to her assistance. They rescued the 413 men aboard before she sank, not a single one injured. The Daly was able to reach port but 22 of her crew were killed, 50 missing and 30 wounded.

TO RUSSIA ON LEND-LEASE
This all day attack was the Glendale's final engagement. A week later the Frigate was on her way back to the United States. She arrived at Boston January 24, 1945. Next day Lt. Comdr. Ambrose Simko, USCGR, became commanding officer. After 2 months availability at Boston she proceeded to Seattle. Departing for Kodiak and Cold Bay the Glendale was decommissioned and on July 12, 1945, turned over to the Soviet Navy, under the Lend-Lease agreement.


USS SAN PEDRO (PF-37)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Commissioned October 23, the USS San Pedro (PF-37) had as her first commanding officer, Lt. Comdr. Charles O. Ashley, USCGR. After shakedown exercises she proceeded to the Southwest Pacific.

PACIFIC DUTY--RESCUE OF SURVIVORS
She operated in the New Guinea area from April 4, 1944, to November 10, 1944, when she arrived in Leyte. She was again in the Philippine area on December 7, 1944. The convoy she escorted to the Philippines on this occasion underwent an all day air attack by enemy planes. The SS Antone Saugrain and the USS Marcus Daly were hit and the San Pedro, along with the Coronado, and LT-454 were sent to the Saugrain's assistance. They rescued the 413 men aboard before she sank, not a single man being hurt. Returning to Hollandia December 14, 1944, the San Pedro departed for Boston, arriving there January 24, 1945.

TO RUSSIA ON LEND-LEASE
After a period of availability, during which Lt. Comdr. H. L. Sutherland, USCGR, became her commanding officer, the San Pedro left Boston March 25, 1945 for Seattle, Kodiak and Cold Bay. Here she was turned over to Soviet Russia on July 12, 1945, and arrived at Petropavlousk, Russia July 21, 1945.


USS CORONADO (PF-38)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Coronado (PF-38) was commissioned at Mare Island on November 12, 1943, and after shakedown exercises departed for Cairns Harbor, Australia. Her first commanding officer was Comdr. Ned W. Sprow, USCGR.

AGROUND
From 1 to 5 March, 1944, the Coronado and San Pedro were anchored at Noumea,

--152--


New Caledonia, undergoing voyage repairs, arriving at Cairns Harbor on the 10th. Getting underway on the 20th the Coronado went aground in Cairns Channel. At evening high-water an attempt was made by two tugs to pull the vessel off. She was finally slipped free on the 21st and towed to Admiralty Inlet to have the main circulators and condensers cleaned and the plant placed in operation. Docked for inspection on the 22nd, all damage was repaired and she was floated on the 23rd. She then proceeded to Milne Bay and left for Cape Sudest on the 27th.

RESCUES FLIERS
On March 29, 1944, in company with the San Pedro, she escorted four vessels to Cape Cretin, then, with 3 other escorts, she departed for Seeadler Harbor with 5 troop and cargo ships. Returning to Cape Sudest on April 2nd she anchored there until the 18th. On the 19th she proceeded to Tanah Merah Bay for anti-sub patrol until the 24th, when she returned to Cretin Harbor. Later she proceeded to Aitape Roads for anti-sub patrols until May 3rd. On the 5th while again on escort duty to Aitape, a U.S. Army B-24 began circling the Coronado and then crash landed off her port bow. A boat from the frigate departed for the scene. Two plane crew members were in the water, five were in a rubber raft and three more were said to be still in the plane. No one was discovered in the plane, whose bottom had been ripped out. The plane sank and all survivors were brought aboard, four being seriously injured. Three were listed as missing. The Coronado turned the survivors over to the Glendale and proceeded to Aitape, where she took over off-shore anti-sub patrol until the 11th.

BOMBARDS ENEMY
After a period of "at anchor upkeep from the 15th to 24th of May at Port Harvey, she proceeded to Hollandia where she was on anti-sub patrol and then screened ships anchored between Wakde and "Yellow Beach." On 31 May, she left her patrol to bombard areas #2 and #3 at a distance of 3500 to 4500 yards from the beach. The results were hidden by the dense foliage. The range was a little long for 40 MM's, many rounds falling a few hundred yards short or bursting in the air over the beach. No return fire was observed. Next day the beach was again bombarded this time areas 15, 18, 19 and 21 with similar results, except that a column of smoke arose from the area immediately after cessation of firing. It appeared to be an oil fire. Army operations informed Coronado personnel that 225 dead Japanese had been found in the area shelled. Again on the 2nd the Coronado shelled areas 16, 19, 21 and 22. Beginning at 4500 yards the bombardment was closed to 1000 yards on approaching area 25. No fires were set, but shells were seen bursting in one or more native huts. The Coronado was relieved by the Orange and proceeded to Humboldt Bay.

PICKS UP JAPS
On the morning of June 5, 1944, the Coronado got underway for Wakde. En route a crude raft was sighted bearing six men, who proved to be badly emaciated Japanese when they were removed to PT-160 which took them to Wakde. She also sighted a partially inflated life raft and picked up debris indicating a recent plane crash. Her findings were reported to Army operations at Wakde who sent out search planes.

ESCORT AND PATROL DUTY
The Coronado relieved the Orange of anti-sub patrol off Wakde continuing until June 8th, the crew going to battle stations on the 5th when bombs started falling on Wakde. She proceeded to Humboldt Bay and escorted a U.S. Army oiler to Wakde on the 12th, relieving the Van Buren on anti-sub patrol until the 16th. While on patrol on the 13th, during a red alert, shore batteries opened fire on a "bandit." She then escorted a vessel to Humboldt Bay, and after two days of patrol, escorted another vessel to Manus where she remained on "anchor upkeep" until the 25th. She returned to Humboldt Bay on the 29th for anti-sub patrol until July 3rd, when she escorted eight vessels, with three other escorts to Langemak. She returned with 12 vessels to Humboldt Bay on July 11th. She proceeded independently to Woendi next day and to Biak to relieve the USS Lovelace of anti-sub patrol. She was relieved on the 17th and proceeded to Humboldt Bay. She left for Alexishaven on the 20th for availability until the 26th. On the 30th she escorted an LST to Humboldt Bay. She departed for Woendi on August 3rd with a 6 vessel convoy, returning to Red Beach with 9 LST's and a merchant ship on the 11th. She returned to Woendi on the 17th.

FIRING MISSION
A group of U.S. Army officers were embarked on August 23, 1944, for a firing and reconnaissance mission in the vicinity of Warsa and Sansvendi, North Coast of Biak, Schouten Islands. At Warsa Bay the Coronado embarked a native to get information on Japanese movements and bivouac areas, and then opened fire with all guns on the area between Kwaree Point and Saoeadi Village, where Japanese were said to be living. Later she closed to the beach at Arivandi and opened fire with automatic weapons. She then stood up to Sansoendi Village and opened fire on various caves pointed out by native and Army interpreters. Disembarking Army personnel at Bosnik, she proceeded to Woendi Lagoon area to patrol. She departed on the 26th, picked up It LST's near Noemfoor Island and escorted them to Biak. She patrolled off Biak for a day and anchored in Woendi Lagoon until the end of August.

ESCORTS CONVOY
The Coronado returned to Humboldt Bay on September 1, 1944, for availability until the 13th, when she left for Aitape to escort an LST to Humboldt. She then escorted 5 LST's to Point Elk, where they were joined by four LST's and 3 AK's. They reached Loetoe on the 19th when the convoy proceeded to the beaches to unload as the Coronado began anti-sub patrol. She later escorted the returning convoy to Oivi and then returned to Humboldt Bay. She departed for Finnschaven on the 26th and returned escorting two vessels to Humboldt Bay.

FIRES ON ENEMY AIRCRAFT IN PHILIPPINES
The Coronado departed Humboldt Bay on October 10, 1944, escorting a large convoy of Army vessels to San Pedro Bay, Philippines Islands. Her mission completed she proceeded to screen southward of USS Blueridge anchored in the northern transport area. On the 26th she opened fire with all guns on a Japanese "Val" passing overhead. Five hours later she fired on enemy aircraft passing northward on the eastern side of San Pedro Bay. On the 20th Commander, Escort Division 25 transferred to the Coronado and she joined Task Unit 78.2.21 standing out of Leyte Gulf. Later she opened fire on an unseen plane when radar range was between 1500 and 1000 yards, but a splash, a little abaft the starboard beam at a distance of 300 feet, was believed to be a bomb which failed to detonate. Soon thereafter the plane crossed the Coronado's bow about 100 yards distant and 35 feet high and was identified as a "Lilly." At least one hit was observed in his greenhouse, as a tracer was seen to glow there after the plane passed out of sight. The Coronado arrived at Humboldt Bay on November 4th, 1944. Commander, Escort Division shifted flag to USS Long Beach,

--153--


CONVOY TO LEYTE AND RETURN
The Coronado got underway on November 12, 1944, as a member of Echelon L-13, consisting of 7 escorts and 22 LST's, APC-16, AK-102 and 11 merchant ships. Two joined on the 13th and AF-16 and 17 LST's joined on the 14th. USS and Shaw joined on the 14th the former becoming Escort Commander. The disposition became known as Task Group 76.5. Two more escorts joined on the 17th and on the 19th the convoy arrived off Catmon Hill, Leyte Gulf, where it began breaking up to proceed to assigned beaches. The Coronado screened merchant ships standing into Southern Transport Area and then moved to Northern Transport Area to rendezvous with screen for outbound convoy. She escorted LST-741 to the main body of the convoy consisting of 6 LST's and 4 merchant ships and screened by eight other escorts. A splash made by a bomb which missed its mark was observed near the leading LST on November 21 and at the same time a low flying twin engine Japanese bomber, streaked the length of the convoy from van to rear. It was not fired upon as there were numerous friendly carrier planes in the area at the time. A few minutes later another "Lilly" came in low on the starboard bow of the same LST and dropped a bomb which missed, but this plane was almost immediately destroyed by AA fire from LST's. The convoy reached Humboldt Bay on November 25th without further incident.

SAUGRAIN IS HIT
The Coronado departed for Woendi on November 29th, 1944, to escort any vessels departing for Leyte, receiving mail and 12 Naval Reserve passengers, and escorting two Army vessels. She joined Task Unit 76.U.7 on December 1, 1944, consisting of 4 other escorts and a convoy of 1 AF, 3 AK's, 5 LST's, 21 merchant ships and 9 Army vessels. When it was observed at 0638 on December 5, 19Vi, that the starboard side of the convoy was under attack by an enemy bomber, the Coronado went to general quarters. The bombs did no damage and the plane escaped. Another enemy plane was sighted at 1216, heading in on the port side of the convoy, flying very low. The Coronado opened fire and as the plane passed ahead it launched a torpedo which hit the SS Antone Saugrain's stern. Cease fire was ordered as the plane crossed the Coronado's bow. A few rounds, were fired from forward starboard automatic weapons. One of these rounds hit and killed a Coast Guard officer who had placed himself in the line of fire, unobserved by the crew. Seven minutes later another "Oscar" made a torpedo run on the convoy. The Saugrain, now dead in the water, was again hit and began settling slowly forward, taking a starboard list and was quickly abandoned by all hands. The Coronado, LT-454 and San Pedro put boats over to pick up the survivors. The Coronado received 223 Army troops, 9 Navy gun crew members and 31 merchant seamen, including the Saugrain's master. After a survey of the vessels it was recommended that it be sunk by gunfire. At 1600 seven enemy planes were sighted and at 1030 one "Oscar" started to make a run in. It was fired upon by the Coronado, hits from 20 MM being observed when the plane was 1000 yards from the Saugrain. The enemy dropped a bomb 300 yards on the Saugrain's starboard beam, streaked on over, was hit again, began to lose altitude, and was fired upon by the San Pedro, who claimed hits. The bomber was last seen losing altitude and sticking and disappeared suddenly from the radar screen at 6 miles.

LAST OF THE SAUGRAIN
The Saugrain refused to sink, having apparently reached a state of equilibrium. The LST-454 was ordered to take her in tow, stern first, and continued towing her through the night. At daylight on the 6th she seemed to have a good chance to make port. At 0741 on the 6th a "Betty" arrived in the vicinity, furiously chased by four P-36's and was shot down in flames. At 0600 the Coronado proceeded to San Pedro Bay. At 1600, it was learned that the towing mission had been unsuccessful and that the Saugrain had sunk after receiving a third torpedo.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
On December 6, 1944, the Coronado stood out of San Pedro Bay to form a convoy of 9 merchant ships and 15 Army craft, with seven other escorts. The convoy arrived at Humboldt Bay on the 14th. She left for Manus on the 15th and on the 17th for Bora Bora, anchoring there on December 29th, leaving next day for Balboa, Canal Zone, where she arrived January 14, 1945. Arriving at Boston for drydock and overhaul in February, she returned to the Pacific and was turned over to Soviet Russia on August 26, 1945, under Lend-Lease.


USS OGDEN (PF-39)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Ogden was commissioned at Mare Island, California on December 20, 1943, her first commanding officer being Lt. Comdr. Kenneth C. Tharp, USCGR. After shakedown exercises she departed for Cairns, Australia, arriving there April 4, 1944.

PACIFIC DUTY
Assigned to escort duty in the New Guinea area, the Ogden began operations in that area on April 13, 1944. She was engaged in the Hollandia operation from April 26 to May 3, 1944. While patrolling off Biak Island on June 6, 1944, the frigate engaged in anti-aircraft action with, the enemy. She arrived at Leyte, Philippine Islands and while there underwent air attack twice on November 17, 1944, once in San Pedro Bay and once off Dulag, Leyte Island. On a second trip to the Philippines sue experienced another enemy attack December 5, 1944, in which attack the SS Antone Saugrain was sunk. Returning to the New Guinea area on December 14, 1944, the Ogden departed for the United States.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA ON LEND-LEASE
The Ogden arrived at Boston on January 24, 1945 for a two month's period of availability at Boston Navy Yard. Following refresher training at Casco Bay, Maine, she departed for Seattle March 28, 1945, arriving there, via Canal Zone on June 7, 1945. She proceeded to Kodiak, Alaska where she was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease. She arrived at Petropavlousk, Siberia on July 21, 1945.


USS EUGENE (PF-40)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Eugene (PF-40) was commissioned January 15, 1944, at Terminal Island, California, Commander C. R. MacLean, USCGR, being, the first commanding officer. From that date until February 9th, various tests, alterations and repairs were completed, before she got underway for shakedown exercises, which continued through March 23, 1944. On the 24th she proceeded to San Francisco for post shakedown availability.

--154--


TO NEW GUINEA
On May 29, 1944, the Eugene stood out of San Francisco Harbor bound for the Southwest Pacific, via Samoa, and moored in Cairns Harbor, Australia on June 23rd. On the 29th three other Coast Guard manned patrol frigates the USS Bisbee, USS Corpus Christi, and USS Gallup arrived and anchored nearby. On July 1st the Eugene departed for Milne Bay, where after four days of anti-aircraft, shore bombardment and surface firing exercises, she stood out for Bougainville. On the 14th she was underway for Cape Cretin (Langemak), New Guinea.

AT NOEMFOOR UNDER ENEMY ATTACK
Rendezvousing with the USS Altamaha off Langemak on July 17th, 1944, the Eugene escorted her to Seeadler Harbor, Manus Island, and then departed on the 26th for Hollandia with several 7th Fleet staff officers aboard. Two days later she was bound for Mios Woendi escorting two AK's and 2 LCI's. Proceeding next to Noemfoor Island she began anti-sub patrol off the loading area, as Japanese planes raided the island. The Eugene continued on this duty until August 8th, during which time Noemfoor was raided almost daily by enemy planes. Three times she went to the rescue of crashed allied planes, picking up a pilot from one of them on the 5th.

ESCORT AND PATROL DUTY
Returning to Humboldt Bay on August 9th, she stood out on the 12th escorting an LST to Maffin Bay, where she relieved a Navy destroyer escort on anti-sub patrol. On the 16th she joined a convoy of Army craft bound for Mios Woendi and then proceeded to Biak, contacting the USS Bisbee and USS Coronado off Sorido for anti-sub patrol. On the 21st after escorting two vessels to a rendezvous with a west bound convoy, she departed for Bosnek to pick up a party of Army personnel, bound for Wardo Bay, Biak, which had been the scene of a recent mop-up landing. Proceeding next to Rani Island, where an Army party went ashore to question natives, she got underway for Sawendi, Soepiori Island where a shore bombardment was to be carried out.

SHORE BOMBARDMENT--SAWENDI
Going to general quarters at 1333 on August 22, 1944, between reefs to get closer to the village of Sawendi and commenced fire on the village at 1418. The charts of the area were almost useless, the islands being misplaced and the water depths incorrectly shown. The village was built on stilts over the water and was the usual quiet, peaceful village until the bombardment started. After 10 minutes the Eugene ceased fire. The tide bad fallen during the shelling of the village and the Eugene had to free herself from a coral head on which she had come to rest. No damage was noticed and she stood out between coral reefs and then engaged in 15 more minutes of firing on the village. Two hours later she was bombarding Pimonsbary Point, Soepiori Island, raking the gardens used by the Japanese to grow vegetables and the surrounding shacks and also the caves in the cliffs. Returning to Bosnek, Biak, the Army officers went ashore and the frigate resumed anti-sub patrol.

AIR ATTACKS AT SANSAPOR
Proceeding to Mios Woendi on August 21ith, 1944, the Eugene, in company with the El Paso escorted a merchant vessel and several LST's to Sansapor, where she relieved a Navy destroyer on anti-sub patrol. Japanese planes were over Sansapor during the next four days and heavy anti-aircraft firing was observed on the beach. On the 30th she was relieved by the USS Orange and proceeded to Mios Woendi with three Army officers. Japanese planes were over Biak on September 1st and 4th. On the 6th she proceeded to Bosnek and with Army personnel aboard departed for the bombardment of Korido Village, Soepiori Island.

SHORE BOMBARDMENT--KORIDO
Standing close to shore at Korido on September 7, 1944, the Eugene lowered a boat to take pictures of the firing and commenced fire at 0802. At 0902, after Allied planes had bombed the village, landing craft put personnel on the beach. The Eugene returned to Bosnek that evening and got underway again at 1943 for Bepondi Island for a survey.

TO LEYTE
Returning to Bosnek on the 9th, she departed next day for Mios Woendi, proceeding to Humboldt Bay on the 11th, in company with the USS Van Buren. On September 30th she stood out for Langemak and on October 6th escorted 4 LST's to Humboldt Bay. On the 19th she escorted 4 LST's to Seeadler Harbor, Manus Island and returned with them to Humboldt Bay on the 15th. On October 23rd, 1944, she stood out of Humboldt Bay, in company with the El Paso, Van Buren and Orange escorting 29 freighters and LST's bound for Leyte, P.I. On the 20th, five Navy destroyers joined the escort and next day the convoy entered San Pedro Bay in a heavy rain, amidst many air raid alerts. On the 30th she got underway as a typhoon began to blow, taking in tow an LCVP which was adrift and unmanned. Turning it over to a local boat pool, she began anti-sub patrol off Dulag. On November 1st she stood out of San Pedro Bay, under intermittent air raids for anti-sub patrol in Leyte Gulf, with the Orange and San Pedro. On the 3rd she departed for Humboldt Bay, Hollandia.

AGAIN TO LEYTE
On November 12, 1944, the Eugene was again underway with a convoy bound for Leyte, P.I., entering San Pedro Bay on the 19th. Forming another convoy for return to Humboldt Bay on that day, the convoy was attacked on the 21st by a Japanese plane, which did no damage. She stood into Humboldt Bay on the 25th.

ANOTHER CONVOY TO LEYTE
The Eugene was underway again on December 13th, standing out of Humboldt Bay as one of six escorts to a large convoy bound for Leyte. Two destroyers joined on the 20th and next day the convoy stood into Leyte Gulf and anchored in San Pedro Bay. Orders having been received to proceed to the States, when relieved on present assignment, several passengers reported for transportation home. On December 28th the Eugene stood out of San Pedro Bay with the El Paso for a rendezvous with a convoy for Humboldt Bay. The two frigates were to continue to the States via Seeadler Harbor, Bora Bora and Panama. On the 30th a fire broke out in the battery room and the main engines stopped, as all power failed. The fire was under control in two hours and three hours later the frigate was underway, having raised steam in No. 2 boiler, under portable lights.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
Arriving at Humboldt Bay on January 2, 1945, repairs were made to damaged electrical gear, and the Eugene departed for Seeadler Harbor on the 6th, with the El Paso. She left there on the 8th for Bora Bora,

--155--


where she arrived on the 19th. Passing through the Panama Canal on February 5th, she got underway for New York on the 7th escorting two Army transports as far as the western end of Cuba. The El Paso which had remained in Panama an extra day for repairs, joined the Eugene in the Straits of Florida and the two frigates moored at Brooklyn Navy Yard on February 15, 1945 for extensive overhaul, on March 21, 1945, Lt. Henry T. Hillard, USCGR, relieved Commander MacLean. Proceeding to Casco Bay, Maine, on April 3, 1945, the Eugene received orders on April 6th to report to the USS Knoxville (PF-64) for duty in connection with an anti-sub sweep off Cape Cod. On the 8th she rendezvoused with the El Paso and proceeded to New York.

CONVOY TO AFRICA
On April 13, 1945, she joined the New York section of convoy UGS-86 and stood toward Norfolk meeting the main convoy for Oran on the 14th. On the 21st she transferred a doctor via breeches buoy to one of the convoy vessels to examine an injured man. Two other medical cases were assisted during the voyage. Standing through the Straits of Gibraltar on the 20th, the Eugene moored at Mers-el-Kebir next day. On May 4th she entered drydock at Oran and on the 7th was underway standing towards Gibraltar with convoy GUS-88. She moored at Brooklyn on May 24th.

WEATHER PATROL
On May 25, 1945, the Eugene proceeded to Philadelphia Navy Yard for conversion to a weather ship. On June 12th she was standing out bound for her first Weather Patrol on Station 10, (Lat. 36°N--Long. 70°W) where she relieved the USS Gloucester (PF-22). She was relieved on weather station by the USS Dearborn (PF-33) on June 27th and stood into Charleston, S.C. on the 29th. On July 12th she departed Charleston for Weather Station 11 (Lat. 29°30'N--Long. 71°30'W), relieving the USS Peoria (PF-67). She patrolled this station until August 2, 1945, when she was relieved by the USS Dearborn and proceeded to Bermuda. From August 22 until September 11, 1945, she was on Weather Station 6; from October 20--31, 1945 she patrolled Weather Station 5. She patrolled Weather Station 7 from December 3rd, Station 3 from March 15, 1946 and Station 4 from March 23rd. Arriving at Charleston on May 16, 1946, she was decommissioned June 16, 1946.


USS EL PASO (PF-41)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS El Paso (PF-41) was constructed by the Consolidated Steel Corporation, Wilmington Yard, Los Angeles, California and launched on July 16, 1943. She was placed in commission on December 1, 1943. A member of the Tacoma class, the El Paso measured 304 feet in length, 38 foot beam, displaced 1100 tons and was credited with a speed of 18 knots. Her first commanding officer was Commander R. J. Borromsy, USCGR. He followed successively by Lt. Thos. W. Phillips, USCGR, on September 5, 1945, Lt. Comdr. Thomas W. Spencer, USCGR, November 12, 1945, and Lt. Comdr. J. A. Small, USCGR, her last skipper, on February 10, 1946.

BOMBARDS MAFFIN BEACH AND WAKDE ISLAND
The El Paso left San Diego, California, on February 20th, 1944, and set out on her long series of Pacific missions. After a period of anti-submarine patrol duty, she was directed on May 24th to bombard enemy positions on Maffin Bay, New Guinea. Her mission was to pour destruction into the enemy forces that had stopped the Allied Army at Maffin Village. With all guns firing the El Paso made several runs along the Maffin Beach, raking the Japanese gun positions sufficiently to permit an Allied breakthrough the next day. Three days later the frigate was requested to perform a similar mission at Wakde Island, New Guinea. Standing in company with two American destroyer escorts, the El Paso passed through inaccurate enemy fire and bombarded the Wakde section.

BOMBARDS AITAPE AND WAKDE
While on anti-submarine duty in the Aitape Area, New Guinea on June 14th, 1944, the El Paso was called upon to bombard enemy positions that night. Bivouac areas, supply dumps, and gun positions were shelled in this operation. Eleven days later the frigate struck again, this time hitting the eastern edge of the Maffin Airdrome, 7, Wakde Island.

TWO PART MISSION
On August 23, 1944, the El Paso was assigned to furnish fire support in a two-part mission. The first objective was to salvage an Australian Beaufighter plane which had been forced down on Fanildo Island and the second was to determine if members of a previous salvage crew were still alive and rescue them if possible. A PT boat landed the search party during the early rooming, At 9:20 the El Paso was called to cover the retreat of the scouts who were experiencing considerable opposition. The frigate laid down a blanket of fire at suspected Jap gun positions and an accompanying airplane strafed the Japanese who were shooting at the American scouts. Every one of the scouting force returned safely and the El Paso gave the area a thorough going over before the small task force departed.

IN ACTION AT MOROTAI
On September 16, 1944, the El Paso was one of an escort screen that led some 40 craft, including Liberty ships, LST's and LCI's into Morotai. A Japanese bomber, penetrating American aircraft cover, dropped two bombs and let go several bursts from his machine guns. The El Paso fired at the retreating enemy plane, which was reported shot down several minutes later by one of our planes. Next morning, a dawn enemy plane attack developed and El Paso gunners fired at an enemy plane as it passed across the inner end of the harbor.

AT LEYTE
The El Paso earned an engagement star for participating in the Leyte operation. She served there from October 23rd to November 5, 1944, and then, following her bombardment of Sarmi Point and Mount Makko, New Guinea on November 11, 1944, returned to Leyte again.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
Recalled to the United States the frigate left the Philippines December 26, 1944, and set out for home. She arrived at Panama Canal Zone, February 5, 1945, and left for New York three days later. After an overhaul at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, she proceeded to Casco Bay for a period of training.

WEATHER PATROL OFF LEYTE
In the summer of 1945, the El Paso returned to the New York Navy Yard for conversion to a weather ship. With her new meteorological gear installed, the frigate left Staten Island on August 7, 1945, bound for more Pacific duty. During the months following the war's end, the El Paso served as a weather ship off Leyte.

--156--


In the late spring of 1946 she was recalled to the United States for decommissioning. She arrived at Seattle, Washington on June 3, 1946, and her Coast Guard crew was removed June 30, 1946.


USS VAN BUREN (PF-42)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
After commissioning at San Pedro, California, on December 17, 1943, with Commander Charles B. Arrington, USCGR, as first commanding officer, the USS Van Buren (PF-42) left for a series of shakedown drills under Commander, Pacific Fleet Operational Training Command.

PACIFIC DUTY
The Van Buren arrived in the New Guinea Area on April 4, 1944, and after taking part in Hollandia Operations from April 26 to May 2, was engaged on June 9, 1944, in the bombardment of the Sarmi-Sawar Area, New Guinea where the allied armies had encountered strong enemy opposition. The first bombardment of this area was followed by a second on June 20, 1944. Between these assaults the Van Buren bombarded the Maffin Village area, New Guinea, on June 19, 1944, and followed this with a second bombardment of that area on June 23, 1944. She participated in the landings at Cape Sansapor from August 1 to 22, 1944. She escorted Echelon L-14 to Morotai Island for operations there on November 13-16, 1944. While part of Task Group 76.6 escorting a convoy to Leyte Gulf on November 23, 1944, she was under enemy aircraft attack. Later in San Pedro Bay she was engaged in anti-aircraft action. She returned to the New Guinea area on December 7--1944, and was back at Leyte on December 13, 1944.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
Returning to Manus she left for Pearl Harbor on December 22, 1944, arriving there January 2, 1945. Here she was assigned as a training vessel to Commander, Pacific Destroyers. On July 2, 1945, she arrived at San Francisco where she was assigned to Commander, Western Sea Frontier as a Weather Station Vessel. Leaving San Francisco March 13, 1946, she proceeded to Charleston, S.C. via Canal Zone, where she was decommissioned May 6, 1946.


USS ORANGE (PF-43)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Orange (PF-43) was built by the Consolidated Steel Corporation, Ltd., Wilmington Yard, Los Angeles, California, and commissioned on January 1, 1944, at Terminal Island. Her first commanding officer was Commander John A. Dirks, USCGR. The Orange left the Navy Yard at the end of January to begin a lengthy series of shakedown drills under Commander, Pacific Fleet Operational Training Command. The frigate is 304 feet in length, 38 foot beam and has a full load displacement of 2,300 tons. Her maximum speed is about 20 knots. Her main battery consisted of three 3"/50 caliber guns, two 40mm twin mounts and nine 20mm single mounts made up her anti-aircraft battery.

TWO SHORE BOMBARDMENTS
The Orange spent eight months in the Pacific lending the Army a hand in softening up New Guinea beaches and escorting convoys to forward areas. On June 2, 1944, she took part in her initial engagement. On verbal orders from the commanding general of the area, the frigate went within 1500 yards of the New Guinea beach west of the Tor River and shelled enemy installations known to be located there. Three days later, operating with an Army liaison officer aboard, she shelled supply dumps located along a road between Arami Village and the mouth of the Orai River. Several fires were left burning and no enemy opposition was encountered. Between bombardments, the vessel took a turn at anti-sub-patrol duty to protect the heavy flow of American shipping supporting the landings.

A QUICK RESCUE
On July 27, 1944, the Orange was directed to take three Army officers in search of a scouting party which had been operating behind enemy lines near Sarmi Point, New Guinea. The two officers and five enlisted men had been put ashore some time earlier in a small rubber boat. They carried only small arms and a "walkie-talkie" radio. The party had encountered a number of Japanese patrols and concern was felt for their safety. The frigate groped its way around Sarmi Point with all guns manned and a motor launch ready to dash shoreward for the rescue. Three miles distant from the Point an Army observation plane spotted a rubber boat. An armed guard boarded a motor launch, sped to the raft, took the Army men on board and returned without a shot being fired. There were two Japanese among the party. They had been a forward scouting party of a Japanese patrol and were captured before they could report the presence of the Americans.

BOMBARDS NAPIDO
On September 6, 1944, the Orange proceeded to Napido where an Army assault landing was to take place the next morning. Dawn of the 7th found the frigate laying heavy bombardment into the landing area. No damage was sustained from the enemy.

AT LEYTE
By the first of December, 1944, the Orange was working with an anti-submarine unit off Leyte, Philippine Islands. While escorting the HMS Reserve and its tow through Surigao Straits on December 5, 1944, the frigate repelled the attack of a lone Japanese plane. On the 6th she kept several more Japanese planes out of range by detecting them early and putting up a stream of fire that made the enemy craft decide to seek an easier target.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The Orange returned to the West Coast at the end of February 1945, and after a period of availability at Mare Island Navy Yard, was assigned to the West Coast Sound School and was still participating in sonar exercises when the war ended.

WEATHER PATROL
On December 1, 1945, the Orange equipped with new gear, reported to the Commander, Hawaiian Sea Frontier for duty as a weather station vessel, being recommissioned as a Coast Guard vessel April 15, 1946. She remained on this duty until July 1946, when she returned to San Francisco. She was decommissioned October 28, 1946.

--157--


USS CORPUS CHRISTI (PF-44)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Corpus Christi (PF-44) was built by the Consolidated Steel Corp. Ltd., and commissioned at Harbor Boat Works, Terminal Island, San Pedro, California, January 21, 1944, her first commanding officer being Comdr. W. W. Childress, USCGR. Shakedown exercises were completed under Commander, Pacific Fleet Operational Training Command.

TO AUSTRALIA
The Corpus Christi departed Los Angeles in company with USS Bisbee (PF-46) and USS Gallup (PF-47) May 31, 1944. After three days spent en route at Noumea, New Caledonia, she arrived at Cairns, Australia on June 28, 1944. On July 6, 1944, she departed Cairns for Perth, Australia for duty with Commander Task Force 71, arriving there on July 18, 1944.

RESCUES 92 IN INDIAN OCEAN
Operating until August 27, 1945, as exercise and training unit under Commander, Submarine Seventh Fleet, the ship received two commendations. On February 13, 1945, she rescued 92 survivors of the torpedoed American Liberty ship Peter Sylvester in the Indian Ocean. On June 13-15, 1945, she fueled the battleship HMS Howe. Lt. Charles H. Lavell, Jr., USCGR, became commanding officer August 4, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S. WEATHER PATROL
On August 27, 1945, the Corpus Christi departed Perth, Australia in company with USS Hutchinson (PF-45) for Pearl Harbor, via Manus, Admiralty Islands, for duty with Destroyers, Pacific Fleet. She arrived at Pearl Harbor on September 24, 1945, and departed next day for San Pedro, California, for further assignment by Commander, Western Sea Frontier. Proceeding to San Francisco she was assigned to Weather Station D. She was decommissioned August 2, 1946, at Seattle.


USS HUTCHINSON (PF-45)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Commissioned February 3, 1944, the first commanding officer of the USS Hutchinson (PF-45) was Commander Carl H. Stober, USCGR. After commissioning, the frigate was engaged in shakedown exercises until April 13, 1944, when she arrived in San Pedro, California.

TO SOUTHWEST PACIFIC
The Hutchinson left San Pedro on April 30, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific. On October 17, 1944, Lt. Comdr. E. H. Houghtaling, USCGR, became commanding officer. Arriving at Leyte on escort and patrol duty on November 10, 1944, she engaged in anti-aircraft action in Leyte Gulf on November 12, 1944, returning to New Guinea on November 30, 1944.

TO AUSTRALIA
On December 28, 1944, she arrived at Freemantle, Australia for duty with Commander, Task Force 71. She remained here until August 27, 1945.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
Departing Freemantle, Australia on August 27, 1945, she arrived at Manus September 8, 1945, and at Pearl Harbor September 24, 1945, leaving next day for Terminal Island, California. Here she entered drydock on availability until January 10, 1946 for conversion to a weather ship.

WEATHER PATROL
Proceeding to Seattle, she left there February 6, 1946, for Weather Station A, which she patrolled until March 5, 1946. Returning to Seattle for 10 days availability, she again patrolled Weather Station A from March 19th to April 5th, 1946. She proceeded to San Francisco where she was re-commissioned April 15, 1946, as a Coast Guard vessel, being transferred by the Navy to the Coast Guard on a loan charter basis. After two periods of sea duty, one from June 22 to July 7, 1946, and another from August 1-26, 1946, she proceeded to Seattle, where she was decommissioned September 23, 1946.


USS BISBEE (PF-46)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Bisbee (PF-46) was commissioned on February 15, 1944, being manned with her Coast Guard crew the same day. Her first commanding officer was Commander J. P. German, USCGR. She spent the next month and a half on shakedown exercises under Commander, Pacific Fleet Operational Training Command.

TO AUSTRALIA
She reported for duty to the Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet, on April 1, 1944 at Terminal Island, California, and on May 31, 1944, was ordered to report to the Commander, 7th Fleet for duty. She was to proceed to Australia and upon arrival report to the Senior U.S. Naval Officer. She arrived at Noumea on June 27, 1944.

BOMBARDMENT OF WARDO--LANDINGS ON BIAK
On August 10, 1944, the Bisbee was participating in the bombardment of Wardo Village on Biak Island and a week later she took part in the operations in support of the landings on the West Coast of Biak, where three ship-to-shore movements were made to expand the coastline holdings of our forces. These resulted in the eastern half of the island being in U.S. control by the end of August. Landings on the North Coast of Biak were made on August 25, 1944, and on the same day our forces went ashore in the vicinity of Cape Oboebari on Biak Island. The completion of bases on Biak and Noemfoor Islands and the occupation or Cape Sansapor on the extreme northwest coast of New Guinea in late July had completed the by-passing of New Guinea, eliminating all enemy aerial opposition and all shipping except a few coastal craft, off Southwest New Guinea and a few barges elsewhere.

AT LEYTE
The Bisbee next took part in the landing operations on Homonhon Island, Philippines, on October 18, 1944. This landing was made two days before the landings on Leyte Island, and followed landings the day previously on Binagat and Suluan Islands which commanded the approaches to Leyte Gulf. Together these three operations enabled minesweepers to remove the mines in Leyte Gulf and demolition teams to investigate and remove obstructions from those landing beaches which had been selected on Leyte. The Bisbee also acted as a patrol vessel at the four landings made on Leyte Island two days later. She continued on patrol operations in Leyte Gulf until November 20, 1944, and then acted as one of a Task Unit escorting a convoy from Leyte Gulf to Humboldt Bay, New

--158--


Guinea. The Bisbee continued on to Pearl Harbor, where she arrived on December 15, 1944. Commander Russell Cowan became commanding officer on December 17, 1944.

TO RUSSIA
She left Pearl Harbor for Dutch Harbor, Alaska on January 6, 1945. Arriving there seven days later, she departed for Adak, Aleutian Islands. Here the Bisbee operated as part of Escort Division 43 together with five other patrol frigates. Her Coast Guard crew was removed on April 28, 1945, and on July 6, she departed for Seattle, arriving on July 12. Escort Division hi was dissolved on August 14, 1945, and the Bisbee departed for Petropavlousk, Siberia. She arrived there September 5, 1945, having been turned over to Russia on Lend-Lease.


USS GALLUP (PF-47)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Gallup (PF-47) was commissioned February 29, 1544,, with Lt. Comdr. Clayton M. Opp as her first commanding officer. He was later succeeded by Comdr. J. P. German, USCGR. Shakedown exercises were completed April 9, 1944, under commander, Pacific Fleet Operational Training Command.

PACIFIC DUTY
Departing San Pedro, California on May 31, 1944, the Gallup proceeded to Cairns, Australia, via Noumea and arrived there June 27, 1944. She participated in the bombardment of the Wardo River area of Biak Island on August 17, 1944, and of the South Coast of Biak Island on August 25, 1944. The frigate next took part in screening operations in New Guinea and off Morotai Island between September 19th and 24th, 1944. Proceeding to the Philippines she participated in the operations in the landings on Dinegat Island between the 12th and 18th of October, and in subsequent patrol operations in Leyte Gulf between October 24 and November 20, 1944. She escorted a convoy from Leyte to Hollandia between November 22-28, 1944.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The Gallup arrived at Manus Island December 4, 1944, and at Pearl Harbor December 15, 1944, on her way home, arriving at Mare Island December 25th and Seattle January 12, 1945. Between January 20th and July 6th, 1945, she was at Adak, Alaska on patrol and escort duty.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
She returned to Seattle on July 12, 1945, and was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease, arriving at Petropavlousk, Russia on September 5, 1945.


USS ROCKFORD (PF-46)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Rockford (PF-46) was commissioned March 6, 1944, with Lt. Comdr. David W. Bartlett, USCGR, as her first commanding officer. Shakedown exercises were completed under Commander, Pacific Fleet Operational Command when the frigate arrived at San Pedro on May 21, 1944.

PACIFIC DUTY
The Rockford left San Pedro June 27, 1944, for Cairns, Australia, via Noumea, arriving on July 22, 1944. Between that date and October 18, 1944, she was engaged in patrol and escort duty in the Southwest Pacific area. She left Manus Island October 18, 1944, and arrived at Seattle, via Pearl Harbor and Oakland on January 9, 1945. Lt. Malcolm C. McGuire, USCGR, became her commanding officer on December 12, 1944.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
She proceeded to Dutch Harbor and Cold Bay where she remained on patrol duty until June 30, 1945. Departing Adak July 6, 1945, she returned to Seattle July 12th and was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease. She arrived at Petropavlousk, Russia on September 5, 1945.


USS MUSKOGEE (PF-49)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Muskogee (PF-49) was built by the Consolidated Steel Company of Wilmington, California, and commissioned March 16, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Commander Rufus E. Mroczkowski, USCGR. After shakedown exercises under Commander, Pacific Fleet Operational Training Command, she arrived at San Pedro, California on May 24, 1944.

PACIFIC DUTY
The Muskogee departed San Pedro June 13, 1944, for Cairns, Australia via Noumea, arriving there on July 18, 1944. After a period of patrol and escort duty in the Southwest Pacific she proceeded to the Philippines. She saw action against enemy aircraft in Leyte Gulf and San Pedro Bay between 24th and 26th of October, 1944. She returned to the New Guinea area November 30, 1944.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
From New Guinea she proceeded to Pearl Harbor arriving there December 15, 1944. Here Commander Edgar V. Carlson, USCGR, became commanding officer December 17, 1944. She left Pearl Harbor on January 5, 1945 and arrived at Dutch Harbor January 12, 1945, and at Akutan, Alaska January 17, 1945.She remained in Alaska on patrol duty until July 6, 1945, when she departed Adak for Seattle. Arriving at Seattle July 12, 1945, she was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease and arrived at Petropavlousk, Siberia September 5, 1945.


USS CARSON CITY (PF-50)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built by the Consolidated Steel Company of Wilmington, California, the USS Carson City (PF-50) was commissioned March 24, 1944, with Commander Harold B. Roberts, USCGR as her first commanding officer. After shakedown exercises she arrived at San Pedro June 5, 1944.

PACIFIC DUTY
She departed for tine Southwest Pacific via Cairns, Australia, stopping at Espiritu Santo on August 6, 1944. The frigate participated in the operations leading up to the invasion and occupation of Morotai Island on September 15, 1944. She continued on escort and patrol duty in the Southwest Pacific until November 27, 1944, when she arrived at Manus on her way home.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
The Carson City arrived at Pearl Harbor December 15,

--159--


1944. On December 18, 1944. Lt. Robert L. Barbee, USCGR, became her commanding officer. She departed Pearl Harbor January 5, 1945, and arrived at Dutch Harbor January 12, 1945, and at Akutan, Aleutian Islands, January 17, 1945. She remained in Alaska on patrol duty until July 6, 1945 when she departed Adak for Seattle. Here she was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease and arrived at Petropavlousk, Siberia on September 5, 1945.


USS BURLINGTON (PF-51)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Burlington (PF-51) was built by the Consolidated Steel Co., Wilmington, California and commissioned April 3, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Edgar V. Carlson, USCGR. Shakedown exercises were conducted under Commander, Pacific Fleet Operational Training Command.

PACIFIC DUTY
Departing San Pedro, California, July 27, 1944, the Burlington stopped at Espiritu Santo on August 14, 1944, and then proceeded to the Southwest Pacific area, via Cairns, Australia. Here she took part in the operations culminating in the invasion of Morotai Island on September 15, 1944. She was engaged in anti-aircraft action off Morotai on September 16th. Proceeding to the Philippines, she was engaged in operations during the invasion of Leyte between October 16th and 28th, 1944. She was in action against Japanese aircraft off Leyte Island on November 12, 1944. Returning to the New Guinea area November 30, 1944, she departed for home December 2, 1944, via Manus and Pearl Harbor where she arrived December 15, 1944. Here Lt. B. K. Cook, USCGR, became commanding officer December 16, 1944.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
Arriving at San Francisco December 25, 1944, the Burlington departed for Adak, Aleutians, and remained on patrol duty here until July 6, 1945. She returned to Seattle July 12, 1945, and was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease, arriving at Petropavlousk, Siberia, September 5, 1945.


USS ALLENTOWN (PF-52)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Allentown (PF-52) was built by Froemming Bros. Inc., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. and brought down the Mississippi River to New Orleans where work was completed at the Todd-Johnson Shipyards. She was commissioned March 24, 1944, with Commander Garland W. Collins, USCGR, as her first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. Comdr. Edward G. Cardwell, USCGR, on 1 February, 1945. She arrived at Bermuda April 13, 1944, for a month's shakedown.

PACIFIC DUTY
Proceeding to New York on May 13, 1944, the Allentown remained there under Commander, Task Force 29 until June 27, 1944, on escort duty. She was on duty at Hampton Roads from June 28 to August 15, 1944. Returning to New York on August 16, 1944, she left two days later for Charleston and then left for the Canal Zone where she arrived August 28th. She arrived at Bora Bora on September 14th and then proceeded to Hollandia and Finnschaven. On October 31, 1944 while anchored in Morotai Harbor, the frigate engaged in anti-aircraft action against Japanese planes which ware attacking. Leaving Biak November 15th, 1944, she arrived at Leyte November 18, 1944, for several weeks of patrol duty. Returning to the New Guinea area December 7, 1944, she was again in the Philippine area from December 21, 1944, to February 6, 1945. She returned to Hollandia February 12, 1945, and left two days later for a third trip to Leyte, where she remained until March 6, 1945.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
She returned to Pearl Harbor April 1, 1945, and arrived at Seattle April 7, 1945. After a 6 week availability, she arrived at Cold Bay, Alaska, June 15th, where she was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease. She arrived at Petropavlousk, Siberia, July 21, 1945.


USS MACHIAS (PG-53)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built by Froemming Bros. Inc., Milwaukee, Wis., the USS Machias (PF-53) was brought down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, La., where she was commissioned March 29, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Commander Robert J. Alexander, USCGR. She arrived at Bermuda April 21, 1944, for shakedown, after which she proceeded to Philadelphia for post shakedown availability.

PACIFIC DUTY
Proceeding to New York July 30th she left for Norfolk next day for Norfolk. She returned to New York August 16th and left 2 days later for Charleston and the Canal Zone where she arrived August 28, 1944. After a three days stop at Bora Bora on September 14th and at Espiritu Santo, she arrived in the New Guinea area. She was engaged in anti-aircraft action off Morotai Island, October 31, 1944, and then proceeded to Leyte, via Biak, November 15th. She returned to New Guinea December 7th and was again in the Philippine area from December 21st, 1944 to March 6, 1945.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
Returning to Seattle April 7, 1945, via Eniwetok, Manus and Pearl Harbor, she remained on availability until May 26th. Proceeding to Cold Bay June 15, 1945, she was turned over to Soviet Russia and left for Petropavlousk, Siberia, where she arrived July 21, 1945.


USS SANDUSKY (PF-54)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Sandusky (PF-54) was built by Froenming Bros. Inc., Milwaukee, Wis., and brought down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, La., where she was commissioned on April 18, 1944, with Lt. Comdr. Thomas R. Sargent III, USCGR, as her commanding officer. She proceeded to Bermuda where she underwent shakedown exercises from May 8th to June 1st, 1944. She was on post shakedown availability at Philadelphia until August 1, 1944.

PACIFIC DUTY
After two weeks at Hampton Roads, Va., the Sandusky returned to New York for two days on August 16th and then departed for the Southwest Pacific, putting in at Charleston and arriving at the Canal Zone August 28th. She reached Bora Bora September 14 and Finnschaven September 29, 1944. She was in the Philippine area for three tours of escort and patrol duty, one beginning November 30, 1944, one from December 21, 1944 to February 6, 1945 and one

--160--


from February 20, 1945 to March 6, 1945. After each Philippine tour she returned to New Guinea. She returned to the U.S. after the last Philippine duty arriving at Manus March 10th, 1945, Pearl Harbor April 1st and Seattle April 7th. Here she remained on availability until May 27, 1945.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
Proceeding to Cold Bay, Alaska on June 15, 1945, the Sandusky was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease and departed for Petropavlousk, Siberia, July 15, 1945, arriving there July 21, 1945.


USS BATH (PF-55)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built by Froemming Bros. Inc., Milwaukee, Wis., the USS Bath (PF-55) was brought down the Mississippi River to the Pendleton Shipyards, New Orleans, La., for completion and fitting out. Here she was commissioned September 9, 1944, with Commander John R. Stewart, USCGR, as commanding officer. She departed New Orleans September 25, 1944, for shakedown exercises at Bermuda, arriving at Philadelphia, Pa., on November 1, 1944, for post shakedown availability.

PATROL DUTY
After a few days on standardization trials for patrol frigates at Rockland, Me., the Bath returned to Philadelphia for availability and a re-run of economy trials. Proceeding to New York on December 31, 1944, she departed for Guantanamo, Cuba, January 6, 1945 and remained there until January 16th. She returned to New York on January 25th, and was assigned to regular patrol in that area until May 17, 1945. On May 18, 1945, she arrived at Weather Station No. 10 but was relieved the same day. Returning to New York, she was ordered on June 11th to report to Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet, and departed July 14, 1945.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
After leaving the Canal Zone July 22, 1945, she was ordered to Seattle. Here she was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease and departed August 28, 1945, for Petropavlousk, Siberia, arriving there September 25, 1945.


USS COVINGTON (PF-56)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS Covington (PF-56) was built by the Globe Shipbuilding Co., Superior, Wis., and commissioned on October 17, 1944, at Houston, Texas. Lt. Comdr. Frederick S. Brown, USCGR, assumed command of the vessel and its 160 officers and men at that time. After taking on fuel and ammunition at Galveston, the Covington departed for Bermuda on October 29, 1944, for shakedown. On November 28, 1944, she left Bermuda for post-shakedown availability at Boston.

WEATHER PATROL
The Covington departed Boston for Argentia, Newfoundland, on December 22, 1944, to join Task Force 24 and on the 27th left Argentia for Atlantic Weather Station No. 1, returning to U.S. Naval Operating Base, Argentia, N.F., on 10 January, 1945. Her subsequent duty on weather patrol was as follows:

1945        
20 January--13 February   Weather Station No. 8
17 February--25 February   Boston Navy Yard
8 March--27 March   Weather Station No. 3
8 April--27 April   Weather Station No. 4
12 May--4 June   Weather Station No. 4
7 June--13 July   Availability Boston Navy Yard
13 July--3 August   Weather Station No. 10
3 August--21 August   Charleston Navy Yard
21 August--13 September   Weather Station No. 11
13 September--28 September   Boston Navy Yard
28 September--26 October   Weather Station No. 6
26 October--4 December   Boston Navy Yard
1946        
7 December--3 January   Weather Station No. 8
4 January--5 January   Bermuda
7 January--14 January   Boston
30 January--ID February   Weather Station No. 7
13 February--3 March   Argentia
3 March--24 March   Weather Station No. 7
29 March--11 May   Boston
11 May--11 September   New York
11 September--17 September   En route New Orleans

She was decommissioned at New Orleans on September 23, 1946. During all these patrols the Covington was a unit of Task Force 24 with duties of taking and reporting weather observations, with additional Air-Sea Rescue duties.'

WEATHER OBSERVATIONS AND AIR-SEA RESCUE
The weather observations included the use of radiosonde balloons, the recording of ocean temperature at various depths, the computations of surface and aloft winds and temperatures which were reported to the Weather Bureau in Washington, D.C. and used in meteorological research, which proved valuable to the successful operation of the Air Transport Command. The Air-Sea Rescue phase depended primarily upon the accuracy of the navigational position of the vessel. It involved the transmission of radio beacons both on predetermined periodic schedule and upon request from airplanes. Extensive rescue gear was placed aboard for use in aircraft emergencies. Lt. Comdr. Brown was succeeded by Lt. Comdr. Roy M. Hutchins, Jr., USCGR on 19 September, 1945.


USS SHEBOYGAN (PF-57)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Sheboygan (PF-57) was built by the Globe Shipbuilding Co., Superior, Wis., and reached New Orleans May 19, 1944, via the Illinois Waterway and the Mississippi River. Her first commanding officer on her commissioning on October 14, 1944, at Tampa, Florida, was Lt. Comdr. A. J. Carpenter, USCGR. The frigate proceeded to Charleston on October 27th, where on November 17, 1944, Lt. William R. Dickinson, Jr., USCGR, became commanding officer. She departed Charleston November 20, 1944, for Bermuda where she underwent shakedown exercises until December 16, 1944, and then proceeded to Boston for post shakedown availability until February 19, 1945.

WEATHER PATROL
The Sheboygan arrived at Argentia February 21, 1945, for weather patrol duty. The frigate was on the following weather stations during the next 14 months:

--161--


1945        
February 24--March 7   Weather Station 3
March 9--March 13   Weather Station 3
March 2o--April 9   Weather Station 4
April 23--April 29   Weather Station b
May 13--June 3   Weather Station 1
June 23--July 13   Weather Station 4
July 16--August 19   Boston on availability
August 24--September 14   Weather Station 9
October 2--October 22   Weather Station 7
November 13--December 2   Weather Station 3
December 6--December 27   Boston on availability.
December 29--December 30   Weather Station 10 (old)
December 31--January 21   Weather Station 10 (new)
1946
January 22--February 22   Boston on availability
March 1--March 17   Weather Station 6
March 24--April 14   Weather Station 3

On March 14th, while on station, the Sheboygan was decommissioned as a naval vessel and immediately re-commissioned as a Coast Guard vessel. Returning to Boston on April 20, 1946, she departed for New Orleans July 24, 1946, where she was decommissioned August 9, 1946.


USS ABILENE (Ex-BRIDGEPORT) (PF-58)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built by the Globe Shipbuilding Co., Superior, Wis., the USS Abilene (PF-58) was brought down the Illinois Waterway and Mississippi River to New Orleans on June 15, 1944, where she was fitted out as a weather ship and commissioned October 26, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Chester I. Steele, USCGR. She was at Bermuda on shakedown exercises from November 10 to December 5, 1944, and then returned to Boston on post-shakedown availability until December 23, 1944.

WEATHER PATROL
Proceeding to Argentia, N.F., the Abilene was on weather patrol duty at the following stations from January 7, 1945, until March 24, 1946:

1945        
January 7--January 23   Weather Station 8
8 February 8--February 19   Weather Station 1
February 21--March 6   Boston and Casco Bay on availability and refresher training
March 25--April 6   Weather Station 3
April 25--May 14   Weather Station 4
May 19--June 24   Boston on availability
June 28--July 13   Weather Station 9
August 2--August 21   Weather Station 7
August 27, 1945   Lt. Frank k. Wyatt, USCGR becomes commanding officer
September 14--September 26   Weather Station 9
October 13--October 21   Weather Station 3
November 5, 1945   Lt. Comdr. DeWitt S. Walton, USCGR becomes commanding officer
November 13--December 7   Weather Station 10
December 9--January 17   Boston on availability
December 15, 1945   Lt. L. W. Wedemeyer, USCGR becomes commanding officer
1946        
January 21--February 10   Weather Station 6
March 3--March 24   Weather Station 4
March 30--April 15   Boston on availability

On March 13, 1946 the Abilene was decommissioned as a naval and commissioned as a Coast Guard vessel. She proceeded to Argentia April 18, 1946, but returned to Boston May 6, 1946, without performing further weather patrol duty. On August 1, 1946, she left Boston for New Orleans, La., where she was decommissioned August 21, 1946.


USS BEAUFORT (PF-59)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Beaufort (PF-59) was built by the Globe Shipbuilding Co. of Superior, Wis., and brought down the Illinois Waterway and Mississippi River to New Orleans, La., on July 5, 1944 and then to Boston on July 20, 1944. Here she was fitted out as a weather ship and commissioned on August 28, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. George R. Eoyce, Jr., USCGR, who later was succeeded by Lt. B. R. Henry, USCGR. She departed for Bermuda and shakedown exercises September 8, 1944, and returned to Boston for post-shakedown availability October 6, 1944. After refresher training at Casco Bay, Maine, she arrived at Argentia October 22, 1944.

WEATHER PATROL
The Beaufort's career as a weather ship Is outline in the following record of weather stations patrolled:

1944        
November 6--November 30   Weather Station 2
December 9--December 24   Weather Station 4
1945        
January 8--January 26   Weather Station 5
February 10--February 25   Weather Station 8
March 4--March 14   Boston on availability
March 25--April 9   Weather Station 2
April 25--May 12   Weather Station 6
June 3--June 23   Weather Station 4
June 28--July 30   Boston on availability
August 2--August 23   Weather Station 9
September 11--September 17   Weather Station 7
October 4--October 22   Boston on availability
November 13--December 6   Weather Station 7
December 29--December 30   Weather Station 6 (old)
December 31-- January 21   Weather Station 6 (old)
1946        
January 26--February 8   Boston on availability
February 9--February 20   Weather Station 10
March 3--March 15   Weather Station 12

The Beaufort departed Argentia for Boston on March 20, 1946, and left there on the 26th for Norfolk, where she was decommissioned April 19, 1946.


USS CHARLOTTE (PF-60)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built at the Globe Shipbuilding Co., Superior, Wisc. the USS Charlotte (PF-60) proceeded down the Great

--162--


Lakes, Illinois Waterway and Mississippi River to New Orleans, and then to Houston for a brief outfitting and final commissioning there on October 9, 1944. She departed on the 14th for Bermuda but put in at the U.S. Naval Station, Key West, Florida on the 20th for repairs. On November 1, 1944, she again headed for Bermuda, arriving on the 3rd to undergo shakedown until November 27, 1944. She then proceeded to Boston for post-shakedown repairs and alterations. Her first commanding officer was Commander Ralph D. Dean, DSCG, who was succeeded by Lt. Comdr. E. F. Fricke, USCGR on July 21, 1945, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. Charles A O'Reilly, USCGR on September 17, 1945.

WEATHER PATROL
Operating in North Atlantic waters as a weather ship the Charlotte patrolled assigned positions for approximately 20 days at a time. Not only did she furnish aircraft with positions but was always ready to render assistance when needed. At the same time she furnished periodic weather reports when on station which were relayed to weather stations in the United States. Beginning on January 18, 1945, she patrolled Weather Station 4, followed by Weather Station 5 beginning February 23rd and again beginning on April 9th. In May she was on Station 3 and in June on Station 8. Following a month's availability in Boston from mid-July, she was on station 10 in late August and Station 11 in early October. Another period of availability in Boston followed. A tour on Station 4 from mid-December was followed by a ten day availability in Boston. From January 20, 1946, she patrolled Station 8, and from February 7, Station 7. Returning to Boston in March her weather equipment was removed and she was decommissioned at Norfolk on April 15, 1946.


USS MANITOWOC (PF-61)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Manitowoc (PF-61) was built by the Globe Shipbuilding Co. of Superior, Wis., and brought down the Illinois Waterway and Mississippi River to New Orleans on October 22, 1944. She was ordered to Boston for conversion and outfitting as a weather ship and arrived there November 4, 1944. Here she was commissioned on December 5, 1944, with Lt. Comdr. James A. Martin, USCGR, as her first commanding officer. She departed Boston December 16, 1944, for shakedown exercises at Bermuda extending through January 18, 1945, when she returned to Boston for post shakedown availability until February 2, 1945.

WEATHER PATROL
Proceeding to Argentia, N.F. the Manitowoc was engaged in weather patrol duty until May 5, 1946, at the following stations:

1945        
February 8--February 24   Weather Station 3
March 13, March 28   Weather Station 4
April 6--April 17   Boston on availability
April 29--May 14   Weather Station 8
May 30--June 23   Weather Station 2
July 13--August 2   Weather Station 4
August 5--September 21   Boston on availability
August 6, 1945   Lt. Olcott Gates, USCGR, became commanding officer.
September 26--October 10   Weather Station 9
October 19, 1945   Lt. Wesley L. Saunders, USCGR, became commanding officer.
October 21--October 31   Weather Station 7 (old)
November 1--November 13   Weather Station 7 (new)
November 17--November 21   Patrol Duty--Return route Prime Minister Atlee
December 5--December 27   Weather Station 3
1946        
January 5--January 17   Boston on availability
January 21--February 10   Weather Station 10
February 10--March 22   Boston on availability
April 13--May 5   Weather Station 2

On March 14, 1946, the frigate was decommissioned as a naval vessel and recommissioned as a Coast Guard vessel. Proceeding to New York on May 14, 1946, she remained there until August 23, 1946, when she departed for New Orleans where she was decommissioned September 3, 1946.


USS GLADWYNE (Ex-WORCESTER) (PF-62)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built by the Globe Shipbuilding Co. of Superior, Wis., the USS Gladwyne (PF-62) was brought down the Illinois Waterway and Mississippi River to New Orleans August 15, 1944. From here she was ferried to Galveston, Texas, for further work by the Brown Shipbuilding Co. and commissioned November 21, 1944. Lt. Comdr. R. G. Miller, USCGR, was her commanding officer. She departed for shakedown at Bermuda, December 6, 1944, and arrived at Philadelphia for post shakedown availability January 8, 1945, after which she proceeded to Casco Bay for training on January 23, 1945.

CONVOY ESCORT
Arriving at New York February 3, 1945, the Gladwyne departed three days later for the first of two trans-Atlantic trips as a convoy escort, arriving at Oran February 23, 1945. She returned to Boston March 20, 1945, and left ten days later for Hampton Roads when she departed April 3rd for her second trans-Atlantic escort duty. She arrived at Oran April 19, 1945, and returned to Boston May 14th. Between May 20th and June 7th, 1945, she was at Casco Bay for refresher training. She returned to Casco Bay for another training period between June 10th and July 4th, 1945, after being assigned to Pacific duty.

PACIFIC DUTY
Returning to Boston July 4, 1945, the frigate was converted into a weather and plane guard ship and when conversion was completed departed Boston July 31, 1945, for Pearl Harbor, via the Canal Zone. The vessel arrived at Pearl Harbor August 23, 1945, at Majuro, Marshall Islands September 5, 1945, for plane guard duty. On November 27, 1945 she arrived at Kwajalein for a tour of plane guard duty until December 18, 1945, when she returned to Pearl Harbor. The frigate operated from Pearl Harbor as a weather and plane guard station vessel until February 27, 1946, and then patrolled Weather Station D until March 23, 1946. She departed Pearl Harbor April 2, 1946, and arrived at San Francisco, April 9, 1946, and was decommissioned as a naval vessel and placed in commission as a Coast Guard vessel April 15, 1946. She was on two subsequent assignments to ocean aircraft Station II, one from May 23 to June 7, 1946 and another from July 12 to August 3, 1946. On August 9, 1946, she arrived at Seattle and was decommissioned August 31, 1946.

--163--


USS MOBERLY (Ex-SCRANTON) (PF-63)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Moberly (PF-63) was built by the Globe Shipbuilding Company of Superior, Wis., and ferried down the Mississippi River to New Orleans and thence to Houston, Texas, where she arrived September 5, 1944, where work on the frigate was completed. She was commissioned December 4 1944. Lt. Comdr. Leslie B. Tollaksen, USCGR, served as commanding officer from September 5, 1944, until succeeded, late in 1945, by Lt. Comdr. Berthold Papanek, USCGR. Proceeding to Bermuda on December 23, 1944, for shakedown the Moberly arrived at Philadelphia January 29, 1945, for post-shakedown availability.

CONVOY ESCORT
The Moberly departed Hampton Roads on February 22, 1945, on her first convoy escort duty across the Atlantic and arrived at Oran, Algeria, March 11, 1945. She departed on the return trip March 18, 1945, but had to turn back. She departed a second time on April 17, 1945, and arrived at Boston, May 4, 1945, for a 16 day availability.

SINKS SUB
Immediately prior to the end of the European War, on May 6, 1945, the Moberly, along with the USS Atherton (DE-169), contacted, attacked and destroyed a German submarine, the U-853, in the vicinity of Block Island, Rhode Island. The submarine had sunk an American merchant ship, in a daring attack just ten miles off the coast. The Moberly and the DE arrived on the scene three hours later. The sub was discovered shortly thereafter hiding on the bottom in shallow water at 4l°13'N--71°27'W and a night long attack began. The sub was pounded to pieces and thus became one of the last enemy submarines sunk in the Atlantic and the first to be destroyed on the bottom in American waters. The commanding officer, Lt. Comdr. L. B. Tollaksen, USCGR, was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for this feat. The executive officer Lt. G. K. Kelz, USCGR; the antisubmarine officer, Lt. (jg) G. E. Raycraft, USCGR; the gunnery officer, Lt. S. F. Regard, USCGR; and the engineering officer, Lt. (jg) J. H. Moore, USCGR were given letters of commendation. A German submarine silhouette was authorized painted on the ship's bridge, and the officers and crew to wear the Engagement Star in their American Theater Ribbon.

CONVOY ESCORT
The vessel left New York for a second trans-Atlantic trip on May 22, 1945, and arrived at Oran June 8, 1945. She returned to New York June 18, 1945, via the Azores.

WEATHER PATROL--PACIFIC
Proceeding to Boston on July 6, 1945, she was made ready for duty as a weather ship in the Pacific and departed on July 31, 1945, with the Gladwyne for Pearl Harbor, via the Canal Zone. She arrived at Majuro, September 5th and Kwajalein October 8th. She patrolled Weather Station H from November 14th to December 6th, 1945, when she returned to Pearl Harbor. From then until March 31, 1946, she was on Weather and Plane Guard duty out of Pearl Harbor. She patrolled Weather Station #2 from April 3rd to April 22nd. While on station she was decommissioned as a naval vessel and immediately recommissioned as a Coast Guard vessel on April 15, 1946. Lt. Carl McNulty, USCGR, became commanding officer May 10, 1946. She again patrolled Weather Station #2 from May 20, 1946 to June 3, 1946, after which she departed Honolulu for San Francisco June 20, 1946. Proceeding to Seattle on June 29, 1946, she was decommissioned August 12, 1946.


USS KNOXVILLE (PF-64)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Knoxville (PF-64) was built at Leatham D. Smith Shipyard at Sturgeon Bay, Wis., and was launched there in July, 1943. She was delivered in New Orleans, La., on 29 December, 1943, and after extensive engine and hull alterations was commissioned on April 29, 1944. Lt. Comdr. 0. R. Reynolds, USCGR, assumed command. On May 12, 1944, in company with the Shreveport (PF-23) the frigate proceeded to Galveston for repairs and alterations. She left for Bermuda October 9th for shakedown training. Departing Bermuda November 13th she was assigned to escort the SS Betty Zane to rendezvous with convoy UGS-60 northwest of Bermuda and then proceeded to Norfolk for post shakedown availability until November 30, 1944.

CONVOY ESCORT--A VESSEL TORPEDOED
On November 30, 1944, the Knoxville was assigned temporarily to Commander, Fleet Operational Command, Atlantic Fleet until December 10, 1944, when she was assigned to Task Force 63, which escorted convoy UGS-63 from Lynnhaven Roads on December 11, en route to the Mediterranean. She arrived at Oran, Algeria On December 28, 1944 and departed January 2, 1945 escorting convoy GUS-13 to the United States. On January 13, 1945, at the Atlantic approaches to the Straits of Gibraltar, the SS Henry Miller, one of the convoyed ship's was hit by an enemy torpedo, and an unsuccessful search was instituted for the submarine. Arriving at Boston on January 20, 1945, she underwent voyage repairs and on January 30, 1945, was assigned to Task Group 60, 9 as escort of convoy UGS-72

TWO VESSELS HIT
The convoy departed New York February 1, 1945 and on February 17th as the ships were forming to enter the Straits of Gibraltar, two vessels in the convoy were torpedoed. An intensive search for the submarine began, aided by aircraft and ships from Gibraltar, but, after 12 hours, the Task Group was detached from the search and arrived at Oran on February 18th. The Task Group sailed from Oran February 26, escorting convoy GUS-74 en route the United States, arriving at the Navy Yard, New York on March 16, 1945. An completion of availability on April 1, 1945, the Knoxville was detached from the Task Group and departed for Casco Bay, Maine, for training units April 6th.

IN KILLER GROUP
The Knoxville left Casco Bay on April 6 as part of a killer group hunting the submarine which had torpedoed the SS Atlantic States off Cape Cod. After a continuous and unavailing search in the general area off Cape Cod, the Knoxville was detached from the search group and returned to Casco Bay for further training on the 18th.

AIR SEA RESCUE DUTY
Proceeding to Boston for minor repairs on April 22nd, the Knoxville sailed for Norfolk on the 28th escorting the USS Polana (AK-35). There she was assigned to Task Group 60.4 on May 6, 1945, and sailed next day as escort to convoy UGS-91

--164--


for Gibraltar. She was detached from the Task Group on May 16th and proceeded to Air Sea Rescue Station 19, where she patrolled until relieved on May 23rd and sailed for Philadelphia, Pa. En route there she was ordered to assist in a hunt for a submarine which had been sighted south of the Grand Banks but the search proved negative.

WEATHER PATROL
Arriving at Philadelphia June 2nd she was converted into a weather ship and departed for Argentia June 17th. Her duty on various weather stations follows:

1945        
June 30--July 13   Weather Station 3
August 2--August 22   Weather Station 1
September 11--October 2   Weather Station 8
October 5--December 3   Boston on availability
December 7--December 29   Weather Station 6
1946        
January 4--February 6   Boston on availability
February 12--March 3   Weather Station 4
March 12--April 10   Weather Station 8
April 13--May 5   Weather Station 8

Proceeding to Charleston, via Boston and Bermuda, she was decommissioned June 17, 1946.


USS UNIONTOWN (Ex-CHATTANOOGA) (PF-65)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built by the Leatham D. Smith Shipbuilding Co. of Sturgeon Bay, Wis. the USS Uniontown (PF-65) was brought down the Mississippi to New Orleans April 4, 1944, and commissioned there October 6, 1944, with Commander Richard E. Morell as first commanding officer. Proceeding to Bermuda for shakedown exercises from October 26th to November 24, 1944, she returned to Norfolk for a month's availability.

ESCORT DUTY
Reporting to Task Force 61 on December 27, 1944, the Uniontown departed Norfolk two days later for Oran, Algeria, escorting a convoy, which arrived there on January 15th, 1945. She returned to New York February 11th for availability and proceeded to the New London area on the 23rd for two days training before leaving for Hampton Roads. Her second trans-Atlantic trip began March 15th as she escorted a convoy to Oran, arriving there March 23rd. She returned to New York April 9th and proceeded to Casco Bay on the 16th for training exercises. Her third tour of escort duty began on April 28, 1945, when she left Hampton Roads for Oran, arriving there on May 13th. She returned to Philadelphia June 6th for availability until July 3rd, during which she was converted to a weather ship.

WEATHER PATROL
The Uniontown patrolled the following weather stations after her arrival at Argentia, Newfoundland, on July 10, 1945:

1945        
July 13 7 August 2   Weather Station 3
August 3--August 20   At Gron Dal, Greenland
August 8   Lt. Harry G. Young, USCGR became commanding officer
August 22--September 11   Weather Station 1
October 2--October 20   Weather Station 8
October 23--November 28   At Boston, on availability
October 29   Lt. F. X. Riley, USCGR, became commanding officer

Proceeding to Norfolk on November 30, 1945, she was decommissioned December 20, 1945.


USS READING (PF-66)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Reading (PF-66) was built by the Leatham D. Smith Shipbuilding Co. of Sturgeon Bay, Wis., and after being brought down the Mississippi River to New Orleans on November 8, 1943, was completed and commissioned August 19, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Nelson C. McCormack, USCGR. From then until December 4, 1944, the Reading underwent numerous tests on the Mississippi River and Gulf of Mexico, Commander H. A. Morrison assuming command on December 3, 1944. She departed for Bermuda and shakedown exercises on December 8, 1944, and after their completion on January 11, 1945, proceeded to Norfolk for availability until January 23rd. Lt. Comdr. C. Leupold, USCGR, became commanding officer January 23, 1945, when she was assigned to duty with Task Group 60.8.

ESCORT DUTY
The Reading made two trips across the Atlantic on convoy escort duty. Departing Norfolk January 28, 1945, she arrived at Oran February 13th and left there on the 21st for return to New York on March 11th. Proceeding to Norfolk via New London on March 24, 1945, she departed on her second escort assignment March 29, 1945, arriving at Oran April 15th and returning to Boston May 9th. After a short availability at Boston she proceeded to Philadelphia where she was converted to a weather ship, while on availability from May 25th until June 12th, 1945.

WEATHER PATROL
The frigate then served on the following Air-Sea Rescue and Weather Stations:

1945        
June 13-June 23   Weather Station 11
July 14-August 2   Weather Station 6
August 14-August 28   Weather Station IA
September 7   Lt. Jay G. Terry, USCGR assumed command
September 11-October 1   Weather Station 2
November 21   Lt. Comdr. Charles B. Masters, Jr., took command.

She proceeded to Norfolk on November 24, 1945, and was decommissioned December 19, 1945.


USS PEORIA (PF-67)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Peoria (PF-67) was built by the Leatham D. Smith Shipbuilding Co., of Sturgeon Bay, Wis., and arrived at Houston, Texas, via the Mississippi River and New Orleans July 15, 1944. After completion she was commissioned there on January 2, 1945,

--165--


with Commander George R. Leslie, USCGR, as her first commanding officer. She departed for Bermuda on a shakedown which extended until February 18, 1945, and then returned to Norfolk for post shakedown availability until February 20, 1945.

CONVOY ESCORT
The Peoria made one trans-Atlantic trip on escort duty. Departing Norfolk on March 4, 1945, she reached Oran with a convoy on March 20. On March 16th she depth charged a sound contact thought to be a submarine. She returned to New York April 13, 1945. After two week's availability at New York she proceeded to Casco Bay for a week's training and then spent two weeks In the New London area, training submarine crews after which she proceeded to Charleston for a month's availability while being converted to a weather ship.

WEATHER PATROL
The following Is a resumé of the periods of duty the Peoria spent on weather patrol:

1945        
June 23-July 13   Weather Station 11
July 17   Lt. Robert C. Carlln, USCGR, assumed command
August 2-August 22   Weather Station 6
September 5--September 21   At Boston on availability
September 17   Lt. Carl Ertokson assumed command
October 1-October 23   Weather Station 5
November 13-December 10   Weather Station 2
1946        
January 5-January 11   Weather Station 8
January 14-February 22   At Boston on availability
March 2-March 23   Weather Station 2

Returning to Boston April 15, 1946, the Peoria was ordered to Charleston for decommissioning on May 15, 1946.


USS BRUNSWICK (PF-68)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Built by the Leatham D. Smith Shipbuilding Co. of Sturgeon Bay, Wis., the USS Brunswick (PF-68) was towed down the Mississippi River to New Orleans and thence to Galveston. Texas, where she arrived May 23, 1944. There she was outfitted at the Todd Galveston Drydocks, inc., and commissioned on October 3, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Commander S. B. Sherry, USCGR. She left Galveston October 15, 1944, for Bermuda, where shakedown exercises engaged her until November 22, 1944. She then returned to Norfolk on post-shakedown availability until December 11, 1944.

CONVOY ESCORT
The Brunswick made three round trips on convoy escort duty to Oran, Algeria. The record of these trips follows:

1944 Convoy Route
December 11-28 UGS-63 Hampton Roads, Va. to Oran, N. A.
1945    
January 2-20 GUS-63 Oran, N. A. to Hampton Roads, Va.
February 7-24 UGS-73 Hampton Roads, Va. to Oran, i. A.
March 3-20 GUS-75 Oran, N. A. to Haw York, N.I.
April 28-May 13 UGS-89 Hampton Roads, Va. to Oran, N. A.
May 22-June 6 GUS-91 Oran, N. A. to Hampton Roads, Va.

PICKS UP SURVIVORS
While operating as part of the escort screen of convoy GUS-63, and when a short distance outside the Straits of Gibraltar, the merchant vassal SS Henry Miller was torpedoed. The Brunswick proceeded to pick up survivors and then made several runs on the submarine which was thought to have made the attack. She then escorted the crippled merchant vessel back to Gibraltar, landed the survivors there, and rejoined convoy GUS-63 en route to Hampton Roads, Va.

WEATHER PATROL
After completing the assignment to convoy GUS-91 on June 6, 1944, the Brunswick was ordered to the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa. for alterations and conversion to a weather ship type of vessel. Upon completion of the conversion, she proceeded to Norfolk for patrol duty on weather stations. Her record follows:

1945        
July 13--August 2   Weather Station 8
September 8   Lt. Comdr. William E. Long assumed command
September 11-October 2   Weather Station 10
October 23-November 1   Weather Station 11
November 1-13   Weather Station 10
December 1   Lt. (jg) Harold O. Nygren assumed command
December 5-13   Weather Station 4
1946        
December 29-January 22   Weather Station 3
January 27-March 1   At Boston on availability
March 4-24   Weather Station 8

Proceeding to Norfolk from Boston on April 8, 1946, the Brunswick was decommissioned May 3, 1946.


USS DAVENPORT (PF-69)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Davenport (PF-69) was built by the Leatham D. Smith Shipbuilding Co. of Sturgeon Bay, Wis., and was ferried down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, arriving there May 29, 1944. She departed June 4 for Houston, Texas, where she was fitted out at the Houston Iron Works. Hare she was commissioned on February 15, 1945, with Commander H. F. Stolfi as her first commanding officer. She departed Galveston February 25, 1945, for Guantanamo Bay and shakedown exercises, returning to Norfolk for post shakedown availability on April 4th.

CONVOY ESCORT
Proceeding to New York on April 16th for a few days of patrol duty, she departed as escort to a convoy an route to Oran, Algeria, on April 27th. She arrived at Oran on May 13 and returned to Charleston June 9, 1945, for a period of availability and conversion to a weather ship.

WEATHER PATROL
On June 26, 1945, the Davenport proceeded to

--166--


Argentia for weather patrol duty. Her record on various weather stations follows:

1945        
July 13-August 2   Weather Station 5
August 22-September 11   Weather Station 2
October 1-October 21   Weather Station 4

DECOMMISSIONED
After her last tour on Weather Station 4, the Davenport was ordered to Boston on availability. The frigate had encountered some very rough weather on her last patrol and was in need of extensive repairs. It was estimated that at least two and a half months would be required to return her to normal operation. In lieu of repairs, therefore, she was ordered to report to Commandant, First Naval District, for disposition. She was decommissioned at Boston February 4, 1946.


USS EVANSVILLE (PF-70)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Evansville (PF-70) was built by the Leatham D. Smith Shipbuilding Co. of Sturgeon Bay, Wis. and towed down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, where she was fitted out and commissioned on December 4, 1944. Lt. Comdr. Gerald T. A. Applegate, USCGR, assumed command. She departed New Orleans for Charleston, S.C. on December 20, 1944, and proceeded on January 8, 1945, to Bermuda for shakedown exercises. From February 11th to March 22nd she was at Philadelphia for post shakedown availability.

PATROL DUTY
On March 22, 1945, the Evansville reported to Commander, Task Force 24, at New York for patrol duty. She remained on patrol duty out of New York until June 1, 1945.

TO SOVIET RUSSIA
On July 9, 1945, she was ordered to proceed in company with the USS Newport (PF-27) to the Canal Zone and report to Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet. Arriving here on July 15, 1945, she proceeded to Seattle where she was turned over to Soviet Russia on Lend-Lease. She left Seattle August 26, 1945, and arrived at Petropavlousk, Siberia on September 25, 1945.


USS NEW BEDFORD (PF-71)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS New Bedford (PF-71) was built by the Leatham D. Smith Shipbuilding Co. of Sturgeon Bay, Wis., and launched there December 29, 1943. She was towed down the Mississippi River and ferried to Houston, Texas, for completion and fitting out. She was commissioned November 18, 1944, her first commanding officer being Lt. Comdr. J. S. Muzzy, USCGR. She proceeded to Bermuda on December 6, 1944, for a month's shakedown exercises, returning to Philadelphia January 12, 1945, for post shakedown availability.

CONVOY ESCORT
Departing New York on February 6, 1945, the New Bedford proceeded to Oran escorting her first trans-Atlantic convoy which put safely into Oran on February 23rd. On March 3rd the frigate joined the anti-submarine screen of a westbound convoy. The 43 ships of this group steamed back with the usual number of minor Incidents. A stowaway had to be landed at Gibraltar, and the chief engineer became ill and had to be removed to the nearest friendly port. A week later one of the crew became violently ill from an attack of appendicitis. A breeches buoy was rigged to the USS Gladwyne (PF-62) and the latter's medical officer rode across the gap of icy Atlantic water that separated the two ships and successfully performed the appendectomy. The frigate arrived at Boston March 20th. Departing Hampton Roads on her next convoy on April 8th, the frigate was detailed to search for a man who had fallen overboard from one of the merchant vessels, but the quest was unsuccessful. Arriving at Oran April 24th, the frigate departed on her final westbound passage on May 2nd and arrived at Boston May 19th, where she was converted to a weather ship while on an availability that lasted until July 31, 1945.

WEATHER PATROL--PACIFIC
Assigned to weather patrol in the Pacific, the New Bedford started from Boston on the first leg of the long journey to the Pacific on July 31, 1945. The war ended as she was en route from the Canal Zone to Pearl Harbor, where she arrived August 27, 1945. Three days later she departed for Guam. For the next six months the New Bedford stood regular weather station patrols, returning to Guam, her home base, only long enough to fuel, provision and afford a period of recreation for the crew. The weather patrols were, for the most part, dull and tiring. Violent tropical storms sometimes beat her unmercifully as she stood her station. Once a Japanese destroyer on a peaceful repatriation mission was sighted. On March 10, 1946, the New Bedford arrived at San Francisco and then proceeded to Seattle, where she was decommissioned May 24, 1946.


USS LORAIN (PF-93)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Lorain (PF-93) was built by the American Shipbuilding Co. of Lorain, Ohio. She was brought down the Illinois Waterway and Mississippi River and reached Curtis Bay, Maryland, October 25, 1944. Here she was completed and outfitted at the Coast Guard Yard. Lt. Comdr. L. B. Tollaksen, USCGR, who had been in command since October 14, 1944, had relinquished command to Lt. Harry E. Dennis, USCGR, who in turn was relieved by Lt. Comdr, J. G. Ramsay, USCGR, when the Lorain was commissioned on January 15, 1945. The vessel left Curtis Bay for Bermuda, via Norfolk, on January 28, 1945, for shakedown exercises which lasted until February 27th. Then after two days at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, she proceeded to Boston for post-shakedown availability until March 24, 1945.

WEATHER PATROL
After a week at Casco Bay, Maine, for training, she returned to Boston April 9th and then departed two days later for Argentia. She now entered upon a 13 month's tour of weather patrol which covered the following stations:

1945        
April 24-May 13   Weather Station 3
June 2-June 23   Weather Station 5
July 13-August 2   Weather Station 2
August 22-September 10   Weather Station 4
September 15-October 20   At Boston on availability
October 25-November 1   Weather Station 9
December 7-December 17   En route Recife, Brazil
December 17-December 31   Recife, Brazil

--167--


1946                
January 2-January 12   Trinidad
January 20-January 30   Weather Station 7
February 10-March 4   Weather Station 8
March 7-April 9   At Boston on availability
April 14-May 6   Weather Station 6

Proceeding to New York, via Boston, the Lorain remained there until August 15, 1946, when she departed for New Orleans, where she was decommissioned September 6, 1946.

USS MILLEDGEVILLE (PF-94)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Milledgeville (PF-94) was built by the American Shipbuilding Co. Lorain, Ohio, and after being brought down the Mississippi River to New Orleans, was ferried to Charleston, S.C. on November 22, 1944. Here she was converted to a weather ship and was commissioned January 18, 1945, with Lt. Comdr. Joseph H. Hantaan, USCGR, as first commanding officer. After three weeks of shakedown exercises at Bermuda beginning February 1, 1945, she proceeded to Boston for post shakedown availability until April 3, 1945.

WEATHER PATROL
Proceeding to Argentia, the Milledgeville began a year's duty patrolling the following weather stations:

1945        
April 9-April 24   Weather Station 1
May 14-June 2   Weather Station 5
June 8   Lt. Comdr. Carl J. Miller, USCGR, assumed command
June 22-July 13   Weather Station 2
August 2-August 22   Weather Station 4
August 25-October 4   At Boston on availability
September 26   Lt. B. M. Wineke assumed command
October 11-October 25   Weather Station 9
9 November 5-November 16   At Boston on availability
November 22-November 24   At Trinidad
December 1-December 18   At Recife, Brazil
December 21-December 29   Weather Station 12
1946
December 31-January 2   At Recife, Brazil
January 9-January 14   At Trinidad
January 24-February 12   Weather Station 4
February 19-February 24   Weather Station 10
March 24-April 13   Weather Station 8

DECOMMISSIONED
Returning to Boston on April 16, 1946, the frigate was decommissioned as a naval vessel and recommissioned as a Coast Guard vessel on May 7, 1946. On August 14, 1946, she departed for New Orleans, where she was decommissioned August 16, 1946.


USS ORLANDO (PF-99)

(See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships)