Title graphic

The Coast Guard at War
Transports & Escorts
Vol. II--Transports

 

PREPARED IN THE
HISTORICAL SECTION
PUBLIC INFORMATION DIVISION
U.S. COAST GUARD HEADQUARTERS
MAY 1, 1949

 


This edition is designed for service distribution and recipients are requested to forward corrections, criticisms, and comments to Commandant, Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, D.C., Attention Historical Section, Public Information Division.

 

 


COAST GUARD MANNED
TRANSPORTS AND ESCORTS PART II
TRANSPORTS


USS WAKEFIELD (AP-21)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

PRE-WAR HISTORY
"The fastest cabin ship in the world" was the SS Manhattan (later renamed USS Wakefield) when she was launched on December 5, 1931, at the New York Shipbuilding Company, Camden, N.J. The Manhattan was the first liner to be built in an American shipyard, for operation in the North Atlantic, in thirty-five years. She was christened by Mrs. Edith Kermit Roosevelt, widow of President Theodore Roosevelt. The "highest powered and largest merchant ship" ever built in America, the Manhattan was 705 feet long overall, 24,289 tons gross registered, with a beam of 86 feet, and moulded depth of 47 feet. Her service speed was 20 knots. The new "Queen of the Seas" sailed proudly down the Delaware on her trial run on July 23, 1932, and three days later maneuvered into her new berth in New York City, where she was greeted with hilarious demonstration. At midnight on August 10, 1932, she departed on her first North Atlantic crossing. She arrived in Hamburg August 20th and made a return crossing in five days, fourteen hours and twenty eight minutes, a record for a cabin vessel. She continued on her North Atlantic run from New York to Hamburg, via Cobh, Plymouth, Havre and return via Havre, Southampton and Cobh for three years. When Germany recalled her ships at sea by wireless on September 28, 1938, the Manhattan en route Hamburg, put in at English and French ports to bring back anxious passengers. During the first five months of 1940 she made trips to Naples and Genoa. On July 2nd a quick crossing was made to Portugal to bring more Americans home. Then she was placed on inter-coastal service from New York to San Francisco, via the Panama Canal and Los Angeles.

RUNS AGROUND
On her third trip in the inter-coastal service, she ran aground off West Palm Beach, Florida. It was only after the vessel was lightened, and assisted by heavy tugs, that she was freed from the sand bars on February 3, 1941. Then she sailed back to New York to undergo $1,200,000 in repairs.

CHARTERED BY U.S.
The U.S. Government chartered the Manhattan for a period of two years on June 6, 1941, and renamed her the Wakefield, after the birthplace of George Washington. The luxurious ship emerged from the Robins Drydock, Brooklyn, N.Y., as a troop transport. Her costly furnishings had been removed and carefully stored away, awaiting the day when she would discard her heavy coat of grey and resume her status as a luxury liner. On June 15, 1941, the Navy, which had taken custody of the vessel, turned the command over to Commander W. N. Derby, USCG, and Coast Guard officers and crew.

TO SINGAPORE
The Wakefield departed on July 13, 1941, for participation in the first joint amphibious training conducted by the U.S. Army, Navy, Marines and Coast Guard. On August 17, 1941, Commander William K. Scammel, USCG, relieved Commander Derby as commanding officer. Under his command the Wakefield, in company with five other troop transports proceeded to Halifax where she took aboard 6000 British troops for Singapore, Federated Malay States, to aid in the defense of that city against the Japanese. The convoy was escorted by U.S. destroyers, cruisers, and several carriers to Capetown, South Africa, which was reached the day after Pearl Harbor. The Wakefield reached Singapore on the morning of January 29, 1942, and disembarked her troops just twelve days before it was captured. On the morning of the 30th a formation of about 30 Japanese bombers appeared overhead, flying at an altitude of 20,000 feet and began dropping bombs in the vicinity of the Wakefield, who was awaiting the arrival of some 500 women and children, all British evacuees. One bomb penetrated the deck of the Wakefield forward on the starboard side, exploding seconds later in the sick bay, killing five men and wounding fifteen. A fire was started above the waterline. In less than two hours after the ship sustained its casualty, and amid air raid alarms, the loading of 401 British women and children evacuees began. Upon completion of loading, in the early evening of the 30th, the vessel stole out to sea to bury her dead and head for Colombo, Ceylon, for temporary repairs and discharge of passengers. Unable to obtain repairs at Colombo, the transport sailed for Bombay, India, where temporary repairs were made. Upon their completion the transport sailed for New York, via Capetown, with 336 American evacuees aboard. She docked in Brooklyn on March 23, 1942, and after discharging passengers proceeded to Philadelphia Navy Yard. Here Captain H. G. Bradbury, USCG, relieved Captain Scammel as commanding officer.

TO WELLINGTON AND RETURN
After repairs had been completed, the Wakefield departed for Norfolk on May 11, 1942, where she arrived on the 13th to load cargo in preparation for Naval Transportation Service Operating Plan "Lone Wolf." On May 19, 1942, having embarked 4,725 Marines and 309 Navy, Marine and Army personnel for duty in the South Pacific area, she moved to Hampton Roads and departed on the 20th as part of Task Force 32, consisting in addition of the SS Yarmouth, and escorted by the USS Philadelphia, with the USS Ericcson, Eberle, Aaron Ward and Woolsey as screen. On the 21st a destroyer on the Wakefield's port quarter attacked a submarine with depth charges, bringing lt to the surface, then attacking it with gun fire. Ten hours later a plane from the Philadelphia dropped a smoke bomb and the destroyers dropped charges on sound contacts. Air coverage was furnished on the 23rd with two Army bombers relieving a PBY plane from Puerto Rico. The transport arrived at Cristobal, Canal Zone, May 25th, and was released from T.F. 32. Clearing the canal on the 27th she was escorted by the USS Borie until the 30th, when she proceeded alone to Wellington, where she arrived without incident on June 14, 1942. The Wakefield departed Wellington, June 21, 1942, and stopping at Balboa, Canal Zone on July 5, 1942, for fueling and at Limon Bay on the 6th to take on passengers, arrived in New York on July 11th. Here she underwent repairs and alterations, loaded stores and fueled ship until July 28th.

WAKEFIELD AFIRE
On August 6, 1942, the Wakefield departed New York as part of convoy AT-18,

--1--


USS Wakefield (AP-21), FORMERLY SS Manhattan, ON FIRE AT SEA
USS Wakefield (AP-21), formerly SS Manhattan, on fire at sea

BURNING OF THE USS Wakefield (AP-21), FORMERLY SS Manhattan
Burning of the USS Wakefield (AP-21), formerly SS Manhattan

--2--


escorted by Task Force 38. There were twelve vessels in the convoy which was escorted by 12 escorts and which had aboard the largest number of troops ever to be transported across the Atlantic in one convoy up to that time. They were to proceed to Halifax and United Kingdom under secret orders. On the 11th two escorts left the screen on assigned tasks and on the 16th two vessels left the convoy with escorts for Iceland, shortly after HMS Curacao joined the convoy. On the 17th the convoy broke up for various destinations, that of the Wakefield and three others being the Clyde. On August 27th the Wakefield and three other vessels departed Clyde as part of convoy TA-18 with an escort of 11 vessels in Task Force 38. She carried 840 passengers and a crew of 750 persons. Fire broke out on the Wakefield on September 3, 1942, and had made considerable headway by the time the alarm was sounded at 1830. The vessel was in the port column of the formation and was swung to port to get before the wind. Fire fighting began immediately. Ready ammunition was thrown overboard and code room publications secured, sick bay and brig inmates being released. The destroyer Mayo and the cruiser Brooklyn took off passengers, a badly burned officer, and crew members not needed to man available hoses. Others departed in boats and were later picked up. At 2100 the Brooklyn came alongside again to remove the remainder of the personnel. A salvage crew was assigned to the damaged vessel. Towing the Wakefield began on September 5th and she was beached at McNab's Cove, near Halifax, N.S., at 1740 on September 8th. Fire fighting details came alongside with apparatus and began fighting fire, still burning in three holds and in the crew's quarters on two decks. It was not until September 12th that all fire on the vessel had been extinguished. The Wakefield was floated on the 14th and secured to Pier 39, Halifax Harbor. Torrents of rain, reaching cloud-burst intensity, now poured into her open interior causing her to list heavily. This condition was relieved by cutting holes in the ship's side, permitting the water to escape. The ship was then worked upon until the 29th, being cleaned up, holes welded, debris dumped, holds pumped, etc., and on that date got underway in tow of four tugs and with an escort of six vessels to Boston Navy Yard. Here it was necessary to strip the vessel to her waterline, which meant constructing the former luxury liner into virtually a new ship.

A NEW WAKEFIELD IS BORN
The charred Wakefield was declared "a constructive total loss" and the Government purchased its remains from the U.S. Lines. Soon torches flamed and air hammers roared, day and night, cutting away the deformed and twisted superstructure, as far down as the waterline. Then hundreds of skilled workmen swarmed aboard the vessel, to raise up a new modern troop transport. The converted luxury liner became a transport equipped with the most modern safety devices known. The new Wakefield was to be more than a transport. It must travel alone across the ocean. Powerful surface and anti-aircraft guns were prominent on every weather deck. A chain of heavy life rafts encircled the ship's railing, ready for any emergency.

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The new USS Wakefield was commissioned on February 10, 1944, with Captain R. L. Raney, USCG, as her new commanding officer. She remained at the Navy Yard Annex, South Boston, through March 8, 1944, while the yard force continued work and the crew engaged in outfitting her. On the 9th she got underway for Hampton Roads, reporting there on the 11th. Here she was depermed on the 14th and then maneuvered for three days in Chesapeake Bay while training exercises were held. Practices and drills followed and she returned to Norfolk Navy Yard on the 24th remaining there until April 3, 1944, for alterations. Her shakedown period terminated, she departed Hampton Roads on April 5th and arrived at South Boston on the 6th and at Boston on April 7, 1944.

TWENTY SIX ROUND TRIP VOYAGES
The Wakefield departed Boston on April 13, 1944, for Liverpool. This was the beginning of what were to be 23 round trips across the Atlantic and three across the Pacific. Between April 13, 1944, and February 1, 1946, the Wakefield transported 110,563 troops to Europe and Asia and brought back 104,674 passengers to America, making a grand total of 215,237. Adding to this the 18,082 persons transported in three round trip voyages in 1942, there were a total of 233,319 persons transported by the Wakefield up to this time. The transport made ten round trip voyages in 1944 during which she carried 92,203 passengers. In twelve round trips across the Atlantic and one across the Pacific in the thirteen months ending February I, 1946, she carried 123,034 passengers. In all these trips the Wakefield, because of her high speed which permitted her to outrun any submarine, travelled without escort, except for air coverage a few miles out of port. Zigzagging her way through sub infested waters, the Wakefield brought all of her precious cargo invariably to port. Liverpool was the ship's European port for a year. Members of the crew began to call the vessel "The Boston and Liverpool Ferry." A round trip consumed on an average of 18 days. Some of the crossings were very rough, the Wakefield being whipped by fifty foot seas, which on one occasion ripped guns off their foundations and carried them away and at other times entered hatchways and rushed into an empty troop compartment, ripping bunks from their moorings. Shortly after D-day the Wakefield had double duty to perform. On her return trips to America she was loaded with Nazi prisoners, to be interned in the United States. Soon afterwards, on her westbound trips, the Wakefield became a hospital for our own casualties. At times both prisoners and patients embarked for the same crossing. After thirteen trips to Liverpool the transport was directed to other ports. Men and equipment were transported to Italy and over-capacity of troops were brought back to America. Naples was visited three times; then Marseilles, Oran, Taranto, Italy, Le Havre and Cherbourg, as the Wakefield, after VJ-day, began to bring our boys home. After returning from her 22nd round trip voyage to Europe, the Wakefield left Boston on December 4, 1945, for Taku, China, on a "magic carpet" mission, returning to San Diego on February 1, 1946. Another Pacific voyage was made when she departed San Pedro on February 26, 1946, for Guam and returned to San Diego, March 26, 1946. Again leaving San Pedro April 12, 1946, a third Pacific crossing ended at Guam. The return trip brought the Wakefield to New York, via Panama on May 27, 1946. Her Coast Guard crew was removed June 15, 1946.


USS MONTICELLO (AP-61)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

EARLY HISTORY
The USS Monticello (AP-61) was built as the SS Conte Grande for the Lloyd Sabaudo of Genoa at Cantieri San Marco, Trieste, Italy, and was launched June 28, 1927. Her length over all was 652 feet 8½ inches, with steel hull, steel and wood superstructure and accomodation for 7798 persons. Troop spaces were later reduced to 6311 for enlisted men and 554 for officers by installing a gyro compass room and making other alterations as a troop transport. Her cargo capacity is 37,400 cubic

--3--


feet and full load maximum speed is 19 knots with sustained sea speed 18 knots and economical speed at 12 knots. She has a cruising radius at maximum sustained speed of 8428 miles, at 75% speed 10,536 miles, and at economical speed 12,605 miles. The Conte Grande was built for the North Atlantic tourist traffic and continued on that run until 1933 when she was transferred to the South American tourist trade. Early in June 1940, the Conte Grande was in Santos, Brazil, on one of her regular South American cruises. Here her officers held her awaiting developments after Mussolini's attack on France of June 10, 1940. On February 27, 1942, she was transferred to Brazilian registry and a Brazilian crew replaced the Italian crew.

NAVY DUTY
The vessel was placed in commission in the U.S. Navy on April 16, 1942, at Sao Paulo, Brazil. On May 15, 1942, she got underway for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, being escorted from the 25th of May by the USS Lansdale to destination. Here she underwent conversion to a troop transport. After taking troops to Casablanca in November, 1942, she proceeded to Sydney, Australia, with Navy and Marine enlisted personnel on December 25, 1942. The records of her movements for the next year are not available, but on December 1, 1943, she was returning to San Francisco from Sydney with casuals and patients. She next proceeded to Honolulu and returned to San Francisco December 28, 1943. During 1944 she carried passengers to Milne Bay and Noumea, and on June 21, 1944, returned to New York. Round trips were then made to Liverpool, Cherbourg, Marseilles and Naples from New York and Boston, during the remainder of 1944. In 1945 she made seven round trips to Le Havre carrying thousands of service personnel to Europe and returning with enemy prisoners of war. During these voyages escorts depth charged many enemy submarines. She returned to New York on July 20, 1945, after her last voyage, manned with Navy personnel.

COAST GUARD MANNED
The first group of U.S. Coast Guard officers and men reported on board for assignment to duty replacing naval personnel on July 21, 1945. Commander George R. Leslie, USCG, became commanding officer August 6, 1945. He was succeeded next day by Captain R. S. Patch, USCG. The vessel remained at Todd's Shipyards, Brooklyn, N.Y., until October 2, 1945, undergoing extensive repairs. During this period, with the surrender of Japan on August 14, 1945, all armament was removed from the ship. She proceeded to Naples soon afterwards, on October 8, 1945, with 176 Italian officers, 5590 Italian Army enlisted men, 13 U.S. Army officers and 34 Army enlisted men, a total of 5813 passengers. Returning to New York December 10, 1945, she set out on her last trip as a transport to Marseilles, December 20, 1945, and returned to New York January 1, 1946. Her Coast Guard crew was removed March 22, 1946.


USS GENERAL WILLIAM MITCHELL (AP-114)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
Named after America's colorful pioneer of air power, General "Billy" Mitchell, the 17,833 gross ton troop transport USS General William Mitchell (AP-114) was the fifth of the P-2 S-2 R-2 class transports, totalling ten, built by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Kearny, New Jersey, for the U.S. Maritime Commission. The vessel, sponsored by Mrs. Mitchell, was launched October 31, 1943, and is 622 feet, 7 inches long, with a beam of 75 feet 9 inches, an average speed of 19.3 knots and accomodations for 454 officers and 4725 troops. She was commissioned following trial runs and acceptance, on January 19, 1944, with Captain Henry Coyle, USCG, first commanding officer, and with a complement of 46 Coast Guard officers and 465 enlisted men. There followed six weeks of fitting out when all preparations were made for active duty. She underwent two weeks of shakedown training in upper Chesapeake Bay, with post shakedown availability at Norfolk Navy Yard. Finally at Newport News, Virginia, she reported to the Naval Transportation Service for duty.

ATLANTIC DUTY
During the period from March 3, 1944, to August 20, 1944, the Mitchell made five voyages across the Atlantic, two unescorted to North Africa and three in convoy to United Kingdom. In each of these crossings she carried capacity loads of predominantly Army personnel. She sailed for Casablanca, on March 3, 1944, carrying 5224 Army troops and returned to Newport News on March 23rd with rotation personnel and patients. She sailed again for Casablanca on March 28, 1944, and returned to Newport News on April 17, 1944. After a ten day availability in New York, she sailed in convoy on May 3rd with 5270 troops for Gourock, Scotland, destined to take part in the forthcoming invasion of France. She returned to New York on May 28, 1944. On her fourth return trip to the United States she brought 75 officers and 1950 enlisted German prisoners of war, guarded en route by an Army prisoner escort detachment. These embarked at Liverpool on July 1, 1944. She made her final Atlantic 1944 crossing leaving New York July 24 with 5178 troops. On this voyage she achieved the distinction of being the largest naval vessel ever to sail up the narrow channel of Lough Foyle to Lisahally, North Ireland. She returned to Norfolk, August 20, 1944, with a contingent of Marines.

TO BOMBAY, INDIA
The Mitchell now headed for the calmer waters of the Pacific. She left Norfolk August 29, 1944, with 5188 troops, passed through the Panama Canal, stopped briefly to fuel at Melbourne, Australia, and arrived at Bombay, India on October 8, 1944. From Bombay several hundred New Zealand, Australian and Dutch troops were ferried to Melbourne in addition to 1500 U.S. Army troops homeward bound. The USS General Randall (AP-115), a sister ship, accompanied her between Melbourne and Bombay both ways. The final lap of the voyage was made via Pavuvu in the Russell Islands where 3500 members of the Marine Corps First Division, veterans of Guadalcanal and Peleliu, were embarked. This voyage was completed November 17, 1944, at San Diego, California

1945

AGAIN TO BOMBAY
Following a general overhaul the Mitchell was again underway on December 20, 1944, bound for India. This time she was under a new commanding officer, Captain John Rountree, USCG. Refueling en route was accomplished at Hobart, Tasmania, and both Christmas and New Year's were spent at sea. Joined again by the General Randall on the Indian Ocean lap and also by the SS Empress of Scotland which was bound for Aden, the Mitchell reached Bombay on January 23, 1945. The return voyage brought back a varied assortment of passengers from India--U.S. Army and Navy personnel, British Navy officers, Chinese Air Force trainees, U.S. Army nurses, U.S. and British merchant marine men, troops of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, Air Force, Navy and Merchant Marine, Australian Air Force, Indian Army personnel, Red Cross entertainees and 2000 rabidly pro-Fascist Italian

--4--


COAST GUARD MANNED TRANSPORT USS <i>General William Mitchell</i> (AP-114) TOUCHES PALMY PACIFIC PARADISE
Coast Guard manned transport USS General William Mitchell (AP-114) touces palmy Pacific paradise.

WAR VOYAGER IN THE SOUTH SEAS USS GENERAL GEORGE M. RANDALL (AP-115)
War voyager in the South Seas
USS General George M. Randall (AP-115)

--5--


prisoners of war. The prisoners were debarked at Melbourne and the New Zealand forces were debarked at Auckland. On the return to San Pedro there were 195 female dependents of servicemen, mostly New Zealanders, including 60 babies and small children, a 7½ pound boy, Edward William Mitchell Albaniak, being born at sea on March 1, 1945.

TO THE PHILIPPINES
A third Pacific voyage began at San Francisco on March 19, 1945. Carrying 3864 Navy Sea Bees and casuals, bound for Tacloban, Leyte and Guiuan, Samar in the Philippines, the Mitchell stopped en route at Espiritu Santos, New Hebrides, Guadalcanal and Manus Island. The transport arrived in San Pedro Bay, Philippines on April 17, 1945. The return to San Francisco on May 16th after a refueling stop at Eniwetok brought 2510 rotatees and patients back to the United States.

TO ITALY AND LUZON
Exactly two weeks after VE-day the Mitchell set out for Atlantic waters, arriving at Norfolk, Virginia, on June 3, 1945, via the Panama Canal. Ten days of repairs and alterations were to prepare the ship for circumnavigating two thirds of the globe in the ensuing operation of transporting troops from the European to the Asiatic Theatre. Without passengers, the Mitchell again ploughed westward through the Atlantic for the first time in ten months and arrived at Leghorn, Italy, on June 24, 1945. Here 5148 service force troops were embarked for Luzon, Philippine Islands, via Panama Canal. After a brief stop at Naples the long tedious passage through the Panama Canal, began, touching briefly at Eniwetok and Ulithi and finally arriving at San Fernando, Luzon, on August 11, 1945. Here, after unloading, troops were brought aboard at San Fernando, Manila and Tacloban including 1126 casualties. Loaded with battle weary veterans, including many high pointers of the famed Americal and First Cavalry Divisions, the transport reached San Francisco September 6, 1945.

TO PHILIPPINES AGAIN
On September 21, 1945, the Mitchell was underway again from San Francisco carrying 4925 Navy personnel to Guiuan, Samar, Philippines which was reached October 5, 1945, in a non-stop run. The Mitchell now proceeded to Hollandia, New Guinea, where she embarked 5200 veterans of Southwest Pacific campaigns and taxied them back to Seattle, Washington by October 29, 1945.

"MAGIC CARPET" DUTY
As of November 1, 1945, the Mitchell had thus completed ten voyages, five in the Atlantic, four in the Pacific and one in the Atlantic-Pacific. During twenty months of active duty, she traversed more than 165,000 miles of ocean and transported 80,858 passengers. She left Seattle November 11, 1945, for another Pacific voyage arriving at San Fernando, Philippines on November 26, 1945, and returning to San Francisco December 12, 1945. On December 22, 1945, she again left San Francisco for Manila and returned February 1, 1946. Again departing San Francisco for China on March 2, 1946, she returned to the United States and her Coast Guard crew was removed April 22, 1946.


USS GENERAL GEORGE M. RANDALL (AP-115)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General George M. Randall (AP-115) is one of the class of P-2 Troop Transports built by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Kearny, New Jersey, for the U.S. Maritime Commission. She was launched on January 30, 1944, and named for an Indian fighter who lived from 1840 to 1905. Upon completion of builder's trial the vessel was accepted by the U.S. Maritime Commission and taken over by the Navy under a bare boat charter. On April 15, 1944, she was assigned to the Naval Transport Service and placed in commission, her first commanding officer being Captain Carl C. Von Paulsen, USCG. With a full load displacement of 19,650 tons and a gross tonnage of 17,833, she was 622'7" overall and had a molded beam of 75'6". Her full load draft was 25 feet and she had a speed under full load at maximum power of 19.86 knots. Her cruising radius at maximum speed was 11,700 nautical miles and at normal power 12,400 nautical miles. She carried four 5"/38 MK 12, Model 1 guns, four 40 MM twin mount and twenty 20 MM MK 4 machine guns. She carried a complement of 419 Coast Guard enlisted men, 20 Marine enlisted personnel and 9 Army enlisted men as a Transportation Corps.

TO BOMBAY, INDIA
The Randall proceeded to Norfolk April 26, 1944, for shakedown and training in Chesapeake Bay and returned to Norfolk Navy Yard for post shakedown repairs and alterations. On May 19, 1944, she loaded 4796 passengers, principally U.S. Army Air Force replacements and casuals, and on May 23rd departed for Bombay, India, via the Panama Canal. She arrived at Freemantle, Western Australia, on June 21, 1944, where she was refueled and departed on the 24th under escort of HMS Cumberland for Bombay, India. Here she arrived July 5, 1944, and 1951 passengers were embarked, mostly U.S. Army casuals for San Pedro, California, and the vessel departed July 11, 1944, under escort of two British men-of-war. Arriving at Melbourne on the 26th she refueled and departed for San Pedro July 28, 1944, arriving there August 12, 1944.

SECOND TRIP TO BOMBAY
Effecting repairs and alterations between August 15th and 30th, 1944, the Randall embarked 3919 passengers on August 28, 1944, principally U.S. Army 1891st Engineering Battalion personnel and replacements, and sailed on the 30th for Suva, Fiji Islands, en route Bombay. At Suva she took on 1187 more passengers, mostly Army hospital personnel, on September 11th, and on the 16th sailed for Melbourne arriving there on the 21st. Here she refueled and sailed on the 24th for Bombay, India, in company with the USS General William M. Mitchell (AP-114), rendezvousing on the 28th with HMS Nigeria, assigned as escort. On October 3, 1944, rendezvous was made with two additional British escorts who relieved the Nigeria. The Randall reached Bombay on October 7, 1944. On October 11, 1944, she embarked 1028 passengers, largely of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force and departed Bombay on the 14th, in company with the Mitchell and two British escorts for Wellington, New Zealand. On the 18th HMS Gambia relieved the two escorts until the 23rd. On the 27th an acute water shortage caused the Randall to stop at Williamstown, Melbourne, Australia, where 14 men of the New Zealand draft were disembarked and 27 others taken aboard. She arrived at Wellington on the 31st and, after debarking designated passengers, took on 430, Including many of the New Zealand Navy for San Pedro, California. She sailed for Noumea, New Caledonia en November 2nd and arrived there on the 5th, picking up 1039 passengers for Guadalcanal and 1550 for the United States. She stopped at Guadalcanal on the 6th and took aboard 2090 Army, Navy and Marine casuals, arriving at San Pedro November 21, 1944. Next day all remaining passengers were debarked at San Pedro, California.

--6--


1945

THIRD TRIP TO BOMBAY
The Randall remained at Terminal Island until December 16, 1944, undergoing repairs and alterations. Then she embarked 5088 passengers, most of which were U.S. Army replacements and sailed on December 19, 1944, for Melbourne. She was diverted en route to Hobart, Tasmania, where she arrived January 4, 1945, and after refueling departed in company with the USS General William A. Mitchell (AP-114) and HMS Empress of Scotland, under escort of three British men-of-war, for Bombay. Escorts were relieved en route and the convoy arrived at Bombay on January 23, 1945. After all passengers had debarked, the Randall took aboard 2347 troops, practically all U.S. Army casuals, and sailed January 30th in company with the Mitchell and with a British escort for Melbourne. Another escort joined on the 31st and on February 2nd both departed and the transports proceeded independently to Melbourne where they arrived on the 12th. Here 282 more passengers, principally Navy casuals were embarked and the Randall sailed for San Pedro on the 14th. During the voyage one of the passengers, a private first class, U.S. Army was reported missing overboard at 1650 and an hour's search failed to locate him. The Randall arrived at Terminal Island on February 28, 1945, and after debarking passengers moved to drydock for repairs and alterations. On March 7, 1945, Captain Lee H. Baker, USCG, reported on board and on the 12th relieved Captain Von Paulsen.

TO ULITHI
Moving to San Diego on March 22, 1945, the Randall embarked 1747 passengers, including 1448 Navy casuals for Pearl Harbor, and 236 Marine casuals for Ulithi and sailed for San Francisco. Here she embarked 217 more Navy casuals for Pearl Harbor and 3180 for Ulithi and sailed for Pearl Harbor on the 27th. Pearl Harbor was reached on April 2nd and after debarking passengers she picked up 181 more Army and Navy casuals for Ulithi and sailed on the 4th. Arriving here on the 14th she acted as receiving ship until May 23, 1945, redistributing some 4711 Navy and Marine casuals. She sailed for San Francisco on the 23rd with 459 Navy, Coast Guard and Marine casuals and arrived there on June 5, 1945.

TO MARSEILLES AND LUZON
The Randall sailed for Norfolk, Virginia, on June 8, 1945, passing through the Panama Canal on the 16th and arrived at Hampton Roads on June 20th. On July 8th she sailed for Marseilles, France, arriving there on the 17th. She embarked 5136 U.S. Army personnel, for Manila, Batangas and Canal Zone and departed on the 19th arriving at Cristobal on the 29th. She arrived at Eniwetok on August 16, 1945, where she fueled and left for Ulithi on the 17th. She departed Ulithi on the 21st with two other transports escorted by a destroyer escort and arrived off Homonhon Island, P.I., on the 23rd for convoy dispersal and onward routing. Arriving at Batangas on the 24th, she departed for Manila on the 26th, arriving the same day. Here she remained until September 2nd embarking 3456 Army, Coast Guard and Marine casuals. At Tacloban, she took aboard 1469 Army and Navy casuals and departed September 6, 1945, under escort, for Ulithi where a few more were picked up. She departed September 9, 1945, for San Francisco but was diverted en route to San Pedro, where she arrived September 21, 1945. Here on the 25th Captain Harold G. Belford, USCG, relieved Captain Baker as commanding officer. Up to this time the Randall had transported 50,537 passengers 129,017 miles.

TO YOKOHAMA
The Randall left San Pedro for Long Beach on October 8, 1945, and from there sailed for Yokohama, Japan, on the 18th, where she arrived October 29, 1945. She returned to Seattle on November 12, 1945, loaded with returning service personnel, and sailed once more for Yokohama on the 25th. She arrived there December 10, 1945. On her return to Seattle on the 19th, she proceeded to San Francisco on January 12, 1946, where her Coast Guard Crew was removed January 31, 1946.


USS GENERAL M. C. MEIGS (AP-116)

[See also
Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General M. C. Meigs was built in the Kearney New Jersey Yard of the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company and was launched March 13, 1944. Her namesake served in the Union Army during the Civil War. Her basic complement is 38 officers and 458 enlisted men and she was Coast Guard manned, with Captain George W. McKean, USCG, her first and only commanding officer. She was commissioned at Bayonne, New Jersey, June 3, 1944. The vessel is a Maritime P-2 hull length overall 622 feet and beam 75 feet, each of two shafts from her DeLaval geared turbines generating 8500 horse power at 20 knots. She can carry 414 troop officers and 4920 enlisted personnel, as well as 80,000 bale cubic feet of cargo.

TWO TRIPS TO NAPLES
After a shore shakedown in Chesapeake Bay waters and refitting at Norfolk Navy Yard, the Meigs took aboard her initial load of American troops at Newport News, Virginia, and got underway on her maiden voyage on July 7, 1944. The vessel has seen no combat since commissioning, since, with more than 5800 persons aboard, the basic doctrine called for avoiding enemy contact rather than searching it out. All except three voyages were made unescorted. The first two trips involved carrying troops to and from Naples, Italy, as replacements for the European Theatre of Operations, bringing casualties and battle-weary troops back.

TRANSPORTS BRAZILIAN TROOPS
The third voyage took the Meigs to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for the second contingent of troops which Brazil supplied to the Italian campaign. The trip from Rio to Naples was made with the General Mann, a sister ship, and an impressive escort of 2 DE's and the USS Memphis. The barrier of language caused some difficulty on the trip but the Brazilian Navy supplied three officers to act as interpreters and many of the Brazilian officers could speak English. After debarking the Brazilian troops, American troops and casualties were embarked for New York. The next trip followed the same pattern, New York to Rio to Naples to New York. Then on January 2, 1945, the Meigs departed New York for Newport News, Virginia, where one unit of the 10th Mountain Division was embarked for Naples. These troops were the only organized division carried by the Meigs. With a handful of Brazilian casualties and civilians aboard, the Meigs departed for Rio for her third load of Brazilian troops, bound for Naples. Recognition of this service came when the commanding officer was awarded the Brazilian Order of Merit by President Vargas in a colorful ceremony. By this time the name "Meigs" had become well known in Rio and the Brazilian people were very hospitable. The Meigs returned to New York from Naples with another load of American casualties and troops embarked.

--7--


VE-DAY
A diversion from the Naples routine was provided by the transfer of Puerto Rican troops from the Canal Zone to San Juan, Puerto Rico. The first trip through the Canal was exciting as was the brief time spent in Pacific waters. Returning to New York, the Meigs embarked American troops and Red Cross women personnel for Le Havre, France, and returned with some 2000 repatriated American Prisoners of War, the first such troops to be returned to Newport News. VE-day was celebrated aboard ship prior to the arrival at Norfolk on that trip, and the next trip across was made with a group of Red Cross girls bound for Naples. From Naples the Meigs returned Brazilian troops to Rio, the first victorious Brazilian troops to go home. The ship stood up Rio harbor to the cheers of hundreds of people in small boats swarming the harbor. Ship's personnel participated in the parade and were also included in many official receptions given, with General Mark Clark as guest of honor. Proceeding to Newport News with civilian passengers the transport stopped at Bahia to take on the remaining stock of the Naval Supply Base there and at Recife to embark Navy passengers. After a short availability in Norfolk the ship again got underway for Naples with a small group of Red Cross personnel. The trip to Rio which followed carried another load of returning Brazilian troops, as well as American troops taken on at Marseilles for return home for discharge.

TO INDIA
On return to Newport News a small load of about 2000 replacement troops for Naples were taken aboard. Arriving there the Meigs sailed for Karachi, India, via Port Said, Egypt. Returning via Suez on November 23rd, the Meigs took on board at Naples a group of passengers from the diplomatic ship Gripsholm whose engines had broken down. The 503 civilian passengers presented new problems of diaper service, baby formulae and women passengers on the second or mess deck. She arrived at New York December 3, 1945. Up to this time she had transported 97,717 passengers 146,900 miles since commissioning.

TO JAPAN
Leaving New York on December 9, 1945, the Meigs reached the Canal Zone on December 14th and arrived in Japan, on "Magic Carpet" duty January 10, 1946. She returned to San Francisco January 25, 1946. Her Coast Guard crew was removed March 5, 1946.


USS GENERAL W. H. GORDON (AP-117)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General W. H. Gordon (AP-117) was built by the Federal Shipbuilding Company, Kearny, New Jersey, and commissioned at New York on July 29, 1944, being assigned to the Naval Transport Service. She remained at New York Navy Yard until August 10, 1944, when she departed for Norfolk and shakedown exercises in Chesapeake Bay until August 28, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Captain Russell E. Wood, USCG. Her complement was about 40 Coast Guard officers and 450 enlisted men. She had a P-2 type of hull, of 19,700 tons, 623 feet long, with a beam of 75 feet and a speed of 20 knots. She carried about 400 troop officers and 5000 enlisted troop personnel.

TRANS-ATLANTIC OPERATIONS
From September 5, 1944, when she left Boston on her first trip to the United Kingdom until August 4, 1945, when she reached the Canal Zone on her way to the Pacific, the Gordon made nine round trips across the Atlantic. These trips may be summarized as follows:

EASTBOUND
LEFT ARRIVED
Boston 9/5/44 United Kingdom 9/14/44
New York 10/6/44 Southern France 10/19/44
Norfolk 11/13/44 Naples 11/24/44
New York 1/6/45 Marseilles 1/17/45
New York 2/11/45 United Kingdom 2/23/45
New York 3/23/45 United Kingdom 4/3/45
New York 5/2/45 Le Havre 5/15/45
New York 6/9/45 Le Havre 6/16/45
Norfolk 7/15/45 Marseilles 7/23/45
WESTBOUND
LEFT ARRIVED
United Kingdom 9/18/44 New York 9/30/44
Southern France 10/27/44 Norfolk 11/10/44
Casablanca 12/4/44 New York 12/14/44
Marseilles
Oran
1/19/45
1/24/45
New York 2/5/45
United Kingdom 3/2/45 Norfolk 3/9/45
United Kingdom 4/7/45 New York 4/18/45
Le Havre 5/19/45 Trinidad
New York
5/29/45
6/4/45
Le Havre 6/21/45 Norfolk 6/27/45
Marseilles 7/23/45 Canal Zone 8/4/45

On each of these trips to Europe the Gordon carried close to her full load of passengers, returning with prisoners-of-war and war weary American fighters from the European theatre.

TO THE PHILIPPINES
Passing through the Canal the Gordon left the Canal Zone August 5, 1945, and arrived at Ulithi August 24th for a day's stay. Then she left for Batangas where she arrived on the 29th reaching Manila the same day. She remained at Manila embarking high point service personnel for return to the United States and left September 3rd, stopping over at Tacloban from the 5th to the 10th. She was at Ulithi September 12th and 13th and arrived at San Francisco September 24, 1945.

TO YOKOHAMA ON TWO TRIPS
The Gordon departed San Francisco October 13, 1945, and arrived at Yokohama October 25th with replacement troops for duty in Japan. On the 28th she departed Yokohama with occupation troops for Jinsen, Korea, and left there November 4th for Seattle, where she arrived November 16, 1945. She left Seattle December 23rd for Portland where she embarked more replacement contingents for Japan and sailed for Yokohama December 29, 1945, arriving there January 12, 1946. She returned to San Francisco January 29, 1946. Her Coast Guard craw was removed as she was decommissioned March 11, 1946.


--8--


USS General M. C. Meigs (AP-116) COMPLETES A RUN
USS General M. C. Meigs (AP-116) completes a run

USS GENERAL W. P. RICHARDSON (AP-118) CARRIES THE TROOPS
USS General W. P. Richardson (AP-118) carries the troops

--9--


USS GENERAL W. P. RICHARDSON (AP-118)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General W. P. Richardson (AP-118) was built by the Federal Shipbuilding Corporation, Kearney, New Jersey, and placed in commission November 2, 1944, at the U.S. Navy Yard, Bayonne Annex. Her first commanding officer J. S. Rosenthal, USCG. The transport was a P-2 type of hull, 623 feet long with 75 foot molded beam, and displaced 19,800 tons. She had a speed of 20 knots and carried a complement of about 40 Coast Guard officers and 450 enlisted men. She could accomodate about 400 troop officers and 5000 enlisted troop personnel. Departing New York on November 14, 1944, she arrived at Hampton Roads next day for 19 days of shakedown exercises on Chesapeake Bay before proceeding to Boston December 5, 1944.

TWELVE ROUND TRIPS
Between December 10, 1944, and January 23, 1945, the Richardson made twelve round trips carrying close to her capacity of military service personnel to and from the battlefronts. These included one trip to Karachi, India, and another to Khorranshah, Iran, both of which were reached by way of the Suez Canal. These trips are summarized as follows:

EASTBOUND
LEFT ARRIVED
Boston 12/10/44 United Kingdom 12/18/44
New York
Norfolk>
1/9/45
1/14/45
Naples 1/25/45
Norfolk 2/18/45 Naples 3/1/45
Boston 3/31/45 United Kingdom 4/10/45
New York 5/12/45 Naples 5/22/45
New York 6/11/45 Le Havre 6/18/45
Boston 7/1/45 Le Havre 7/8/45
Boston 8/1/45 Marseilles 8/10/45
Boston 8/25/45 Marseilles 9/2/45
Boston 9/18/45 Le Havre 9/25/45
Boston 10/14/45 Port Said
Karachi
10/25/45
11/2/45
New York 11/30/45 Naples
Port Said
Khorranshah
12/10/45
12/13/45
12/21/45
WESTBOUND
LEFT ARRIVED
United Kingdom 12/24/45 New York 1/4/45
Naples 1/29/45 Norfolk 2/9/45
Naples 3/11/45 Boston 3/22/45
United Kingdom 4/18/45 New York 4/28/45
Naples 5/23/45 Trinidad
New York
6/1/45
6/7/45
Le Havre 6/20/45 Boston 6/26/45
Le Havre 7/12/45 Boston 7/19/45
Marseilles 8/11/45 Boston 8/20/45
Marseilles 9/3/45 Boston 9/12/45
Le Havre 9/26/45 Boston 10/3/45
Karachi
Suez
11/5/45
11/12/45
New York 11/24/45
Khorranshah
Suez
Naples
12/30/45
1/7/46
1/12/46
New York 1/23/46

DECOMMISSIONING
The Richardson, in thirteen months of service had travelled thousands of miles and carried many thousands of our boys safely to and from the European and Near Eastern Theatres of Operations. She had done this without losing a single man. On February 14. 1946, the transport was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed.


USS GENERAL WILLIAM WEIGEL (ex-GEN. C. H. BARTH) (AP-119)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General William Weigel (AP-119) was the tenth of a line of similar vessels of the P-2 type, built by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Kearney, New Jersey. She was launched September 3, 1944. She was named for one of the leaders of the U.S. Army in World War I. The vessel was 622 feet 7 inches in length, 75 foot 6 inch beam and 17,833 tons displacement. She had passenger accomodations for 5200 and carried a complement of 31 officers and 437 enlisted men of the Coast Guard. She had an average speed of 20 knots. The Weigel was commissioned January 6, 1945, at the Navy Yard Annex, Bayonne, New Jersey. Captain Thomas V. Awolt, USCG, was her first commanding officer. On January 17, 1945, the Weigel reported for duty to Commander, Operational Training, Atlantic. At Hampton Roads she underwent shakedown exercises in Chesapeake Bay, returning to New York February 7, 1945.

TWO TRIPS TO LE HAVRE
On February 10, 1945, U.S. Army personnel began loading the Weigel with approximately 5200 troops and she began her career as a troop transport. Her career was to take her not into battle zones with guns blazing and challenges ringing, but through a sober, cautious series of journeys as a ship of supply. Her most precious cargo was men--men and their equipment, men with packs, men with guns, men with armour, men to fight the battles in Europe and the Pacific. The Weigel proceeded in convoy to Le Havre, France, and after unloading, to Southampton

--10--


where debarkation was completed and new personnel, many of them wounded from the Battle of the Bulge were taken aboard for the return voyage to the United States. The Weigel docked at New York March 23, 1945, and after a period of availability took on another consignment of 5200 troops. She proceeded in convoy again to the same ports of debarkation, Le Havre and Southampton. The troops she debarked were rushed to augment the victorious armies already pushing across the Rhine. She returned to New York April 15, 1945, for another availability period. During these two voyages no enemy activity had been encountered, with the exception of several apparent submarine contacts.

TO PEARL HARBOR
The area of operation for the Weigel was now abruptly changed as orders were received to proceed to San Juan, Puerto Rico to load native troops for transportation to Honolulu, T.H. En route to San Juan but before arrival at the Panama Canal, the war in Europe ended. After passing through the canal one of the passengers, T/5 Miguel Rodriques became critically ill with brain tumor. Arrangements were made to have him taken off by a Coast Guard plane and flown to the nearest hospital in the United States. This meant reversing course to a rendezvous with the plane at Soccorro Island, a tiny speck of land off the coast of Mexico. After debarkation at Honolulu, orders were received to proceed to Marseilles, France, and embark troops for deployment to the Pacific area. The Weigel left Pearl Harbor May 28, 1945, on this mission, arriving at Marseilles June 22, 1945, via Panama Canal, and left next day for a return to Panama and the Pacific Theatre. After a 45 day voyage she reached Manila July 28, 1945, being unescorted through the entire journey. From Manila the ship made short stops at Tacloban, Leyte and Ulithi to pick up personnel returning to the United States. The day after she left Ulithi the war with Japan ended. The Weigel had at this time a record of 24,881 men carried, to and from the battle areas of the global war, a total of 58,000. On August 26, 1945, she discharged her human cargo at San Pedro, California.

"MAGIC CARPET" DUTY TO PEARL HARBOR
The Weigel now began the most important part of her career, for over in the reaches of the Pacific waited the tired and battle sick veterans of the war, wanting but one thing--to get home. Proceeding to San Diego on September 8, 1945, the transport loaded Marines for transportation to Pearl Harbor, where they were debarked and a record consignment of 6113 personnel embarked for return to the United States. The passenger list comprised all branches of the Armed Services, as well as Red Cross, dependants of Naval personnel, Army and Navy nurses and civilian personnel. For four and a half days the Weigel was more like bedlam than a transport. Her exhausted passengers slept on hatches, in fan rooms, clipping rooms, and in the shelter of stacks of luggage. The feeding problem was immense, the lines of apathetically waiting men everlasting. To get from one end of the mess deck to the other required the brawn of Atlas and the patience that only a man who knows he is going home for good, can have.

FOUR TRIPS ACROSS THE PACIFIC
After debarkation at San Francisco on September 24, 1945, the Weigel sailed for Yokohama, October 16th with the first group sent to Japan as replacements for high point veterans. She returned to San Francisco November 1, 1945, with over 5000 of these veterans on board. After a short period of overhaul she left again for Japan on November 26, 1945, this time with a new commanding officer, Commander J. P. Martin, USCG. Again loaded with war weary veterans the Weigel returned to Seattle, December 20, 1945. She had crossed the Pacific in nine and one half days. She had by this time, carried 52,421 personnel 101,000 miles. The end of 1945 found her at Bremerton Navy Yard undergoing a short overhaul before leaving Seattle on January 10, 1946, for her third Pacific voyage. This time she arrived at Oshimo, Japan, on January 27, 1946, and at Yokohama on the 26th. On February 8th she was back at San Pedro, California. She left San Pedro on March 10, 1946, for her last round trip to the Orient. Arriving at Tacloban March 24th she proceeded, after embarking thousands of troops, to Manila. She left there on March 27, 1946, and arrived at San Francisco April 11th. After debarking her passengers she proceeded on April 16, 1946, to New York, via the Panama Canal and arrived at her destination May 1, 1946. Here she was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed on May 10, 1946.


USS ADMIRAL W. H. CAPPS (AP-121)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS Admiral W. H. Capps (AP-121) was built by the Bethlehem Steel Company, Alameda, California, and was commissioned September 18, 1944. Her first and only commanding officer was Captain Neil S. Haugen, USCG. The Capps was 601 feet long, and displaced 22,400 tons. She attained a speed of 20 knots. Proceeding on September 30, 1944, from San Francisco to San Pedro she was on availability there until November 15, 1944, returning to San Francisco on November 16, 1944.

NINE VOYAGES
The Capps' duty took her on three round trip voyages to the Far East before VJ-day. Then she transferred to the Atlantic for four voyages bringing home troops from the European area. Finally two more "Magic Carpet" trips to Japan, finished her war time assignments. The summary of these voyages follows:

EASTBOUND
LEFT ARRIVED
San Diego 11/23/44 Noumea
Guadalcanal
12/6/44
12/10/44
San Diego
San Francisco
12/28/44
2/6/45
Finschaven
Hollandia
Philippines
2/19/45
2/21/45
3/27/45
San Francisco
Seattle
4/9/45
5/8/45
Pearl Harbor
Eniwetok
Ulithi
Okinawa
5/12/45
5/19/45
6/8/45
7/1/45
Norfolk 9/1/45 Marseilles 9/10/45
Norfolk 9/26/45 Naples
Marseilles
10/5/45
10/9/45
Norfolk 11/3/45 Le Havre 11/10/45
Norfolk 11/23/45 Marseilles 12/2/45
Norfolk 12/29/45 Canal Zone
Pearl Harbor
Yokohama
1/2/46
1/14/46
1/24/46
San Francisco 3/8/46 Okinawa 3/21/46

--11--


WESTBOUND
LEFT ARRIVED
Guadalcanal
Espiritu Santo
12/13/44
12/16/44
San Diego 12/26/44
Philippines
Manus
Pearl Harbor
3/18/45
3/24/45
4/3/45
San Francisco 4/8/45
Okinawa
Ulithi
Saipan
Canal Zone
7/8/45
7/11/45
7/12/45
7/29/45
Norfolk 8/4/45
Marseilles 9/11/45 Norfolk 9/2-/45
Marseilles 10/10/45 Norfolk 10/10/45
Le Havre 11/11/45 Norfolk 11/19/45
Marseilles 12/5/45 Norfolk 12/15/45
Yokohama 1/29/46 San Francisco 2/8/46
Okinawa 3/24/46 San Francisco
Canal Zone
New York
4/4/46
4/19/46
4/24/46

DECOMMISSIONED
The Capps was decommissioned on May 8, 1946, at which time her Coast Guard crew was removed.


USS ADMIRAL E. W. EBERLE (AP-123)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS Admiral E. W. Eberle (AP-123) was built by the Bethlehem Steel Company at Alameda, California, and was commissioned January 24, 1945. Her first commanding officer was Captain John Rountree, USCG. Following him as commanding officers were Captain George C. Carlstedt, USCG, Captain K. K. Cowart, USCG and Captain Peter J. Smenton, USCG. The Eberle was 609 feet long and had a displacement of 22,400 tons. She had a speed of 20 knots. After commissioning she proceeded to San Pedro for shakedown exercises and returned to San Francisco March 2, 1945.

SEVEN VOYAGES
The Eberle made seven round trip voyages during her service as a Coast Guard manned Navy transport. After a trip to Manila, March and April 1945, she returned to San Francisco, passed through the Panama Canal and proceeded to Naples in June, 1945, where she embarked Army personnel for return to the United States. Again proceeding to Marseilles in July, 1945, she embarked troops from the ETO for transfer direct to the Pacific Theatre where the war was still going on. Peace was declared August 14, 1945, before she reached Ulithi and her mission then changed to that of "Magic Carpet" service, bringing back high point veterans from the Pacific fronts. A summary of her operations follows:

WESTBOUND
EASTBOUND
LEFT ARRIVED
San Francisco 3/7/45 Hollandia
Leyte
Manila
3/21/45
3/31/45
4/6/45
San Pedro 5/14/45 Canal Zone
Gibraltar
Naples
5/21/45
6/1/45
6/4/45
Trinidad 6/18/45 Le Havre 6/28/45
Norfolk 7/14/45 Marseilles
Canal Zone
Ulithi
Manila
7/23/45
8/4/45
8/23/45
8/29/45
Seattle 10/24/45 Hagauski
Okinawa
Nagoya
11/5/45
11/12/45
11/14/45
San Pedro 12/6/45 Nagoya 12/17/45
Seattle 2/2/46 Jinsen Korea 2/16/46
LEFT ARRIVED
Manila
Leyte
Ulithi
Pearl Harbor
4/10/45
4/15/45
4/19/45
4/27/45
San Francisco 5/2/45
Naples 6/6/45 Trinidad 6/15/45
Le Havre 6/29/45 Norfolk 7/6/45
Manila
Tacloban
9/8/45
9/12/45
Seattle 9/25/45
Nagoya 11/17/45 San Pedro 11/27/45
Nagoya 12/20/45 Seattle 12/29/45
Jinsen Korea 2/21/46 Seattle
San Francisco
3/6/46
4/19/46

DECOMMISSIONED
The Eberle was decommissioned May 8, 1946, at which time her Coast Guard crew was removed.


USS ADMIRAL C. F. HUGHES (AP-124)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS Admiral C. F. Hughes (AP-124) was built by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Alameda Yard, Alameda, California, and completed January 30, 1945. She was commissioned as a U.S. Navy transport next day, January 31, 1945, with Captain John Trebes, USCG, as her first commanding officer. He was succeeded on May 22, 1945, by Captain Lester E. Wells, USCG, and on February 5, 1946 by Captain C. B. Cronk, USCG. The Hughes was 609 feet in length, displaced 20,100 tons, and had a speed of 20 knots. Her Coast Guard complement consisted of 48 officers and 475 enlisted men. She departed San Francisco, February 12, 1945, for shakedown exercises at San Pedro after which she had a seven day availability. On March 10, 1945, she sailed for San Diego, California.

PACIFIC DUTY
Loading 4217 Marine troops and 63 Naval officers the Hughes left San Diego

--12--


USS General William Weigel (AP-119) LOOMS LARGE IN PACIFIC
USS General William Weigel (AP-119) looms large in Pacific

USS ADMIRAL H. T. Mayo (AP-125) IN MARSEILLE, FRANCE
USS Admiral H. T. Mayo (AP-125) in Marseille, France

--13--


March 13, 1945, for Pearl Harbor, arriving there on March 18, 1945. Five days later she left Pearl Harbor for San Francisco with 2245 passengers of which 1200 were casualties from Iwo Jima. She arrived in San Francisco March 28, 1945.

TO GUAM
Proceeding to San Diego on April 9, 1945, with 70 Naval officer passengers, she left there on the 14th with 4890 troops for Apra Harbor, Guam, arriving there April 30, 1945. On the return trip which started May 3, 1945, she brought 221 Japanese prisoners of war and 524 troops to Pearl Harbor, arriving there May 10, 1945. Then she embarked 1722 passengers for San Francisco and arrived with them there May 17, 1945.

TO MARSEILLES AND MANILA
By this time the war in Europe was over and the Hughes was dispatched on May 26, 1945, via the Panama Canal to Marseilles to pick up Army personnel for direct transfer to Manila. She left Marseilles June 16, 1945, with 3831 troops and arrived at Manila via the Panama Canal on July 20, 1946. At Tacloban the transport picked up 881 troops and proceeded to Biak where she arrived August 2, 1945. Here she picked up 900 more troops and set sail for Hollandia, New Guinea, where 709 more troops were embarked and she left for San Francisco August 4, arriving at her destination August 17, 1945, with 2490 troops whose tour of duty in the Pacific was finished.

TO MANILA
The war was now over, but replacements for high point Pacific veterans anxious to get home had to be taken to the Pacific Theater. Embarking 3892 male and 73 female passengers for Manila, the Hughes sailed from San Francisco August 31, 1945, for her destination via Ulithi and Tacloban. She arrived at Manila September 18, 1945, and debarked all passengers. On the return trip beginning September 24, 1945, she brought back 3881 passengers including 1951 U.S. Army enlisted men, eligible for discharge, 465 Army personnel who had been prisoners of war and 1263 British, 141 Canadians, 18 British Indians, 13 U.S. civilians, 12 British civilians and 18 U.S. Army nurses, all of whom had been confined to Japanese prison camps. She was ordered en route to proceed to Victoria, British Columbia where she arrived October 9, 1945, debarking all British and Canadian passengers. Then she proceeded to Seattle where all remaining passengers were debarked. Up to this time the Hughes had cruised 63,288 nautical miles.

THREE MORE TRIPS AS "MAGIC CARPET"
The Hughes now made three more trips on "Magic Carpet" duty before she was finally decommissioned. Leaving Seattle October 22, 1945, she arrived at Manila November 6, 1945, and loaded a full load of military personnel for San Francisco which was reached November 24, 1945. Leaving San Francisco December 8, 1945, she proceeded first to Samar and then to Manila where she again embarked a full load of passengers for San Francisco arriving January 13, 1946. She departed San Francisco on her last trip on February 7, 1946, picked up more troops at Manila on February 21st, and brought them to San Francisco on March 21, 1946. She was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed May 3, 1946.


USS ADMIRAL H. T. MAYO (AP-125)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS Admiral H. T. Mayo (AP-125) was built by Bethlehem-Alameda Shipyard, Inc., at Alameda, California. The ship was commissioned at Alameda, on April 24, 1945, with Captain Roger C. Heimer, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was relieved on October 10, 1945, by Captain Paul W. Collins, USCG. Her Coast Guard complement was 45 officers and 469 enlisted men. The Admiral Mayo has a full load displacement of 22,380 tons, with a draft of 26 feet 6 inches and length of 608 feet 11 inches. Her maximum speed is 23 knots. The cruising radius at a maximum sustained speed is 16,000 nautical miles. She had accomodations for 617 officers and enlisted men and a passenger capacity of 4923.

FIRST TRIP TO FRANCE
After a 30 day shakedown period at San Diego, California, the Mayo departed May 24, 1945, for Le Havre, via the Panama Canal. Here she embarked 5819 RAMPS (Released American Military Prisoners) and rotation men and returned them to Boston on June 21, 1945.

TO MARSEILLES AND THE ORIENT
On June 27, 1945, the Mayo departed for Marseilles, France, and embarked 4,888 troops and officers of the Quartermaster and Engineer forces of the U.S. Army bound for Okinawa. Departing Marseilles July 10, 1945, she reached the Canal Zone July 21st, Eniwetok August 7th, and Ulithi August 11th, 1945. It was while she lay over here until the 27th that the war ended on August 14, 1945. She reached Okinawa August 31, 1945. Taking aboard 5014 enlisted men and officers of the Navy, Coast Guard, Marines and Sea Bees who were bound for the United States for discharge or reassignment under the point system, she departed Okinawa September 9, 1945, and reached San Francisco September 27, 1945.

FOUR "MAGIC CARPET" TRIPS
After an availability at San Francisco until October 18, 1945, she set sail for Tokyo and Manila on the first of a series of four "Magic Carpet" voyages carrying replacements for battle weary veterans whom she was to bring back home. She reached Tokyo October 29th and Manila November 4th and was back in San Francisco on November 22, 1945. Departing again on December 5, 1945, this time for Jinsen, Korea, she arrived there on December 19th and at Nagoya, Japan on Christmas Day. She was back in San Francisco again on January 11, 1946. She departed on her third "Magic Carpet" trip February 10, 1946, and reached Okinawa on the 22nd, being back at Seattle on March 10, 1946. She left for her last trip to the East on March 29, 1946, and arrived at Yokohama April 10th, reaching Seattle April 23, 1946. From there she proceeded by way of San Pedro and the Panama Canal to New York, where she arrived May 10, 1946. Here she was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed May 26, 1946.


USS GENERAL J. C. BRECKENRIDGE (AP-176)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General J. C. Breckenridge (AP-176) was the last of the P-2 type of Coast Guard manned transports to be commissioned. Built by the Federal Shipbuilding Company, of Kearney, New Jersey, she was

--14--


commissioned June 30, 1945, with Captain H. S. Berdine, USCG, as her commanding officer. With a displacement of 19,900 tons, she was 612 feet long and attained a speed of 20 knots.

SIX VOYAGES AS A NAVY TRANSPORT
Despite her late commissioning the Breckenridge made six round trip voyages as a Coast Guard manned transport. Five of these were across the Atlantic and the last was to Manila. The following is a summary of these voyages:

EASTBOUND
LEFT ARRIVED
Hampton Roads 8/4/45 Marseilles 8/14/45
New York 8/28/45 Marseilles 9/6/45
Hampton Roads 9/25/45 Marseilles 10/3/45
Norfolk 10/18/45 Le Havre 10/26/45
Boston 11/8/45 Marseilles 11/17/45
Boston 12/4/45 Canal Zone
Manila
12/9/45
12/31/45
WESTBOUND
LEFT ARRIVED
Marseilles 8/15/45 New York 8/24/45
Marseilles 9/7/45 Hampton Roads 9/16/45
Marseilles 10/4/45 Norfolk 10/13/45
Le Havre 10/28/45 Boston 11/4/45
Marseilles 11/28/45 Boston 11/26/45
Manila 1/5/46 San Francisco 1/20/46

NAVY MANNED
On February 10, 1946, Captain Rufus G. Thayer, USN, relieved Commander G. W. Holtzman, USCG, who had succeeded Captain Berdine as temporary commanding officer and a Navy crew replaced the Coast Guard crew of the transport.


USS GENERAL R. L. HOWZE (AP-134)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General R. L. Howze (AP-134) was built at the Kaiser Company, Inc., Richmond, California. The vessel was designed as a C4-S-A1 Troop Transport of 12,347 gross and 9064 net tons, with a length overall of 522 feet 10½ inches, a beam of 71 feet 8 1/4 inches and a displacement at maximum draft of 22,000 tons. She had a maximum sustained sea speed of 17.84 knots. Launched on May 23, 1943, the vessel was accepted December 31, 1943, and after being converted by the Matson Navigation Company of San Francisco, California, was placed in commission on February 7, 1944. Captain Lee H. Baker, USCG, was the first commanding officer. He was succeeded on March 3, 1945, by Captain William J. Austermann, USCG, and on December 21, 1945, by Commander C. H. Bowerman, USCG. Major General Robert Lee Howze, for whom she was named, had served in the U.S. Army from 1888 to 1926. From February 20 to March 12, 1944, the transport underwent shakedown exercises at San Diego, California.

14 VOYAGES IN TWO YEARS
In two years of active duty the Howze made 14 voyages, twelve of them across the Pacific and 2 across the Atlantic. A summary of its operations follows:

WESTBOUND
EASTBOUND
DEPARTED NUMBER
EMBARKED
ARRIVED
San Francisco   3495 Milne Bay
Goodenough Island
Lae
Milne Bay
4/8/44
4/9/44
4/11/44
4/13/44
San Francisco   3518 Noumea
Guadalcanal
5/26/44
5/31/44
San Francisco   3442 Noumea 7/21/44
San Francisco   3383 Pearl Harbor
Guadalcanal
Manus
8/17/44
8/31/44
9/4/44
San Francisco   3334 Pearl Harbor 10/30/44
San Francisco   3371 Pearl Harbor 11/23/44
San Francisco   3145 Finschaven
Oro Bay
Finschaven
Hollandia
1/1/45
1/1/45
1/5/45
1/9/45
San Francisco   3182 Honolulu 4/18/45
S.F. 5/2/45 3104 Pearl Harbor
Eniwetok
Ulithi
Leyte
Guinan
Leyte
Biak
5/8/45
5/16/45
5/21/45
5/25/45
5/26/45
5/28/45
6/3/45
S.F. 7/8/45 3264 Eniwetok
Ulithi
Manila
7/20/45
7/25/45
7/29/45
S.F. 8/29/45 2884 Eniwetok
Leyte
Balangas
Manila
9/10/45
9/16/45
9/19/45
9/23/45
S.F. 11/9/45   San Fernando, P.I.
Leyte
11/26/45
11/29/45
San Pedro 1/11/46   Canal Zone
Liverpool
Le Havre
1/18/46
1/31/46
2/4/46
New York 2/20/46   Le Havre 3/16
DEPARTED NUMBER
EMBARKED
ARRIVED
Milne Bay 4/15/44 2145 S.F. 5/2/44
Guadalcanal
Pavuvu Island
Guadalcanal
6/1/44
6/4/44
6/2/44
2025 S.F. 6/19/44
Noumea 7/22/44 1845 S.F. 8/4/44
Manus
Pearl Harbor
9/25/44
10/9/44
524 S.F. 10/14/44

--15--


DEPARTED NUMBER
EMBARKED
ARRIVED
Pearl Harbor 11/3/44 1254 S.F. 11/9/44
Pearl Harbor 11/25/44 50 S.F. 11/30/44
Hollandia
Leyte
Manus
Majuro
Pearl Harbor
1/14/45
1/23/45
2/1/45
2/7/45
2/13/45
3122
 
3186
S.F. 2/18/45
Honolulu 4/27/45 1722 S.F. 4/28/45
Biak
Mios Woendi
6/7/45
6/7/45
2224 S.F. 6/23/45
Manila
Eniwetok
8/4/5
8/11/45
83 S.F. 8/21/45
Manila
Leyte
9/27/45
9/29/45
2882 S.F. 10/15/45
Leyte 11/30/45 San Pedro 12/15/45
Le Havre 2/6/46 New York 2/15/46
Le Havre 3/4/46 New York 3/13/46

AIR AND SEA ATTACKS
While en route San Francisco from Pearl Harbor on November 6, 1944, with 1254 passengers on board and escorted by the USS Connolly (DE-306) the escort vessel had a sound contact at 2500 yards. Classified as probable submarine all hands were called to general quarters and zig-zag maneuvers were commenced. The Connolly attacked and dropped a full pattern of depth charges later conducting a deliberate hedgehog attack. Two heavy underwater explosions followed, not believed to have been caused by the charges. These were heard by the Connolly but no evidence of the result of the attack was observed. When the Howze anchored off White Beach, San Pedro Bay, Leyte, Philippines, on January 17, 1945, she was subject to air raids both on that and the succeeding days until she departed on January 23rd but no damage was done. On May 18, 1945, while en route Ulithi from Eniwetok, in company with the AST SS Puebla and escorts USS Jack C. Robinson (APD-72) and USS Cross (DE-448), the Cross left the convoy to investigate a sound contact and dropped one pattern of depth charges. The contact was classified as a submarine. Again next day the Robinson departed station to investigate a sound contact, while the Howze alerted gun crews and the convoy executed an emergency turn. This contact, however, was classified as negative. Later that day the Cross had a contact and the convoy executed an emergency turn but the alarm was apparently unfounded.

DECOMMISSIONING
The Howze was decommissioned and the Coast Guard crew removed April 1, 1946, at New York.


USS GENERAL W. M. BLACK (AP-135)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General W. M. Black (AP-135) was built by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company of Richmond, California and commissioned February 24, 1944, at San Francisco. Her first commanding officer was Captain J. P. Murray, USCG. He was later relieved by Captain D. G. Jacobs, USCG. The vessel was a converted C-4 type, 523 feet long, with a 72 foot beam and a displacement of 15,900 tons. She drew 26 feet and 6 inches and at an average speed of 17 knots had a cruising radius of 9,600 miles. She had accomodations for 5830 including a crew of 112.

15 VOYAGES IN 22 MONTHS
The Black made 15 round trip voyages from and returning to United States ports in 22 months between March 29, 1944, and January 5, 1946. Two of these were trans-Pacific and 13 trans-Atlantic, the last two being extended through the Suez Canal as far as Calcutta, India. The summary of these operations follows:

EASTBOUND
DEPARTED ARRIVED
San Francisco 3/29/44 Honolulu 4/4/44
San Francisco 4/24/44 Noumea
Guadalcanal
5/8/44
5/10/44
Norfolk 7/28/44 Naples 8/13/44
New York 9/12/44 United Kingdom 9/21/44
Boston
New York
10/19/44
10/22/44
United Kingdom 10/31/44
New York 11/25/44 Marseilles
Oran
12/4/44
12/12/44
Boston 1/3/45 United Kingdom 1/16/45
Norfolk 2/8/45 Naples
Oran
2/17/45
12/28/45
New York 3/31/45 Le Havre 4/12/45
New York 5/2/45 United Kingdom 5/13/45
Boston 6/4/45 Le Havre 6/12/45
Boston 7/3/45 Le Havre 7/11/45
Norfolk 7/27/45 United Kingdom
Bremenhaven
Le Havre
8/5/45
8/6/45
8/11/45
Boston 8/31/45 Port Said
Calcutta
9/12/45
9/26/45
New York 11/7/45 Port Said
Calcutta
11/20/45
11/20/45
WESTBOUND
DEPARTED ARRIVED
Honolulu 4/5/44 San Francisco 4/10/44
Canal Zone
New Orleans
Kingston
6/4/44
6/11/44
6/16/44
Norfolk 6/18/44
Naples 8/16/44 New York 8/31/44
United Kingdom 10/1/44 Boston 10/10/44
United Kingdom 11/6/44 New York 11/16/44
Oran 12/13/44 Boston 12/23/44
United Kingdom 1/19/45 Norfolk 2/1/45

--16--


DEPARTED ARRIVED
Oran 3/1/45 New York 3/12/45
Le Havre 4/17/45 New York 4/28/45
United Kingdom 5/18/45 Boston 5/28/45
Le Havre 6/15/45 Boston 6/24/45
Le Havre 7/14/45 Norfolk 7/22/45
Le Havre 8/11/45 Boston 8/19/45
Calcutta
Colombo
9/29/45
10/11/45
New York 10/24/45
Calcutta
Colombo
12/7/45
12/12/45
New York 1/5/46

DECOMMISSIONING
The Black was decommissioned as a Navy transport and her Coast Guard crew removed February 28, 1946. She was transferred to the Army.


USS GENERAL H. L. SCOTT (AP-136)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General H. L. Scott (AP-136) was a converted C-4 type vessel built by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company of Richmond, California, launched in September, 1943, and converted by the Matson Navigation Company in March, 1944. She was commissioned April 3, 1944, and has had the following commanding officers:

Captain John Trebes, USCG 4/3/44 - 9/22/44
Captain Joseph D. Conway, USCG 9/22/44 - 1/23/45
Captain Frank D. Higbee, USCG 1/23/45 - 7/5/45
Commander Allen Winbeck, USCG 7/5/45 - 5/29/46

The transport is 523 feet long with a 72 foot beam and a displacement of 15,900 tons. She drew 26 feet six inches and at an average speed of 17 knots had a cruising radius of 9600 miles. She had accomodations for 5830, including a crew of 112.

11 VOYAGES IN 22 MONTHS
The Scott made 11 voyages in 22 months, nine trans-Pacific and two trans-Atlantic, one of the latter taking her as far as Calcutta, India, via Suez. A summary of her war time operations follows:

WESTBOUND
EASTBOUND
DEPARTED ARRIVED
San Francisco 5/4/44 Noumea 5/21/44
San Francisco 6/11/44 Pearl Harbor
Eniwetok
6/16/44
7/15/44
San Francisco 8/16/44 Noumea 9/2/44
San Francisco 10/15/44 Manus 12/2/44
San Francisco 12/3/44 Finschaven
Langemak
Humboldt Bay
12/18/44
12/19/44
12/21/44
San Francisco 2/24/45 Pearl Harbor
Eniwetok
Ulithi
3/1/45
3/9/45
3/15/45
San Diego 5/8/45 Pearl Harbor
Manus
Hollandia
Zamboanga
Tacloban
5/15/45
5/27/45
5/30/45
6/4/45
6/7/45
San Francisco
Canal Zone
7/7/45
7/16/45
Naples 8/13/45
New York 7/21/45 Leghorn 8/15/45
Boston 9/2/45 Port Said
Calcutta
9/15/45
9/28/45
New York 11/3/45 Canal Zone
Pearl Harbor
Shanghai
11/15/45
11/28/45
12/10/45
Seattle 2/5/46 Jinsen, Korea
Shanghai
2/23/46
3/1/6
DEPARTED ARRIVED
Noumea 5/22/44 San Francisco 6/7/44
Eniwetok 7/16/44 San Francisco 7/30/44
Noumea 9/5/44 San Francisco 9/22/44
Manus
Majuro
Pearl Harbor
11/4/44
11/10/44
11/15/44
San Francisco 11/22/44
Humboldt Bay 12/31/44 San Francisco 1/18/45
Ulithi
Kwajalein
Pearl Harbor
4/7/45
4/12/45
4/21/45
San Francisco 5/6/45
Tacloban
Hollandia
Langemak
Pearl Harbor
6/10/45
6/14/45
6/17/45
6/26/45
San Francisco 7/2/45
Leghorn
Gibraltar
8/16/45
8/19/45
Boston 8/27/45
Calcutta
Colombo
9/30/45
10/5/45
New York 10/28/45
Shanghai 12/15/45 Seattle 12/31/45
Shanghai 3/6/46 Seattle 3/20/46

DECOMMISSIONING
The Scott was decommissioned at Seattle on May 29, 1946, and redelivered to the War Shipping Administration after her Coast Guard crew had been removed.


USS GENERAL A. W. GREELY (AP-141)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General A. W. Greely (AP-141) was launched November 5, 1944, at Kaiser Shipyard No. 3, Richmond, California, and was commissioned March 22, 1945. The first commanding officer was Commander George W.

--17--


USS General H. L. Scott (AP-136) LOADING FOR THE FRONT
USS General H. L. Scott (AP-136) loading for the front

USS GENERAL C. H. MUIR (AP-142) ON ONE OF HER SEVEN VOYAGES TO THE BATTLEFRONT
USS General C. H. Muir (AP-142)
On one of her seven voyages to the battlefront

--18--


Stedman, USCGR, who was relieved by Captain Fred G. Eastman, USCG, on December 12, 1945. The Greely was 523 feet long with a 72 foot beam and displaced 15,900 tons. She drew 26 feet and at an average speed of 17 knots had a cruising radius of 9600 miles. She accomodated 5830 including a crew of 112. The shakedown period at San Diego, California, ended on April 4, 1945, when the Greely proceeded to San Pedro, California.

TWO TRIPS AROUND THE WORLD
The Greely made two trips around the world, one trans-Atlantic voyage, and two voyages to Calcutta and return in the 23½ months she was in commission as a Navy transport. The Greely departed San Pedro, California April 16, 1945, for Melbourne, Australia, which was reached May 4th, 1945. Freemantle was the next stop on May 9th and from there the Greely crossed the Indian Ocean to Calcutta, arriving on May 20th. After seven days in port she began her homeward Journey via Colombo (Ceylon), Suez and Norfolk, where she arrived June 22, 1945. The entire Greely crew as well as many passengers were thereupon inducted into the Brotherhood of the Glorious and Illustrious Sons of Magellan. The Greely was the first Coast Guard manned transport to carry a Marine detachment or a rated Coast Guard band around the globe on any maiden trip. The next voyage of the Greely took her to Le Havre on July 7th, returning to New York July 18th, 1945. Ten days later she was off on a semi-circumnavigation of the globe, arriving at Gibraltar August 5th, Suez August 10th, and Calcutta August 23rd, 1945. On the return trip she touched at Colombo, Suez and Port Said and reached New York September 26, 1945. The fourth trip was another trip half way around the world. Sailing from New York on October 11, 1945, Port Said was reached October 24th, Calcutta November 6th, Colombo November 10th. She arrived home at New York, via Suez December 5, 1945. The last and fifth voyage was another entire circumnavigation of the globe. Sailing from New York December 13, 1945, Port Said was reached on Christmas, 1945, and Karachi, India, January 4, 1946. From Karachi the Greely started home via Singapore, reached on January 13th, and arrived at Seattle on February 2, 1946. Here she was decommissioned as a Navy transport and her Coast Guard crew removed on March 29, 1946. Turned over to the War Department she continued to serve as an Army transport.


USS GENERAL C. H. MUIR (AP-142)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
Built by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Corporation of Richmond, California, the USS General C. H. Muir, (AP-142) was commissioned April 12, 1945, with Captain J. D. Conway, USCG, as her first commanding officer. He was later succeeded by Captain W. C. Hogan, USCG. After shakedown cruises off Vancouver, Washington and San Diego, California the transport arrived at San Francisco on May 14, 1945. The Muir was 523 feet long with a 72 foot beam and a displacement of 15,900 tons. She drew 26 feet and at an average speed of 17 knots had a cruising radius of 9,600 miles. She accomodated 5830 persons, including a crew of 112.

SEVEN VOYAGES
The Muir made seven voyages in her thirteen months of duty as a Navy transport. A summary of these operations follows:

EASTBOUND
DEPARTED ARRIVED
San Francisco 5/23/45 Pearl Harbor
Eniwetok
Ulithi
Tacloban
Manila
5/28/45
6/4/45
6/9/45
6/15/45
6/17/45
New York 9/3/45 Gibraltar
Calcutta
9/12/45
9/29/45
New York 11/10/45 Port Said
Calcutta
11/24/45
12/7/45
New York 2/4/46 New Orleans
San Juan
2/8/46
2/14/46
New York 3/3/46 Le Havre 3/11/46
New York 4/9/46 Le Havre 4/12/46
New York 5/4/46 Liverpool
Leghorn
5/12/46
5/21/46
WESTBOUND
DEPARTED ARRIVED
Manila
Ulithi
Eniwetok
Pearl Harbor
Balboa
6/30/45
7/10/45
7/17/45
7/27/45
8/8/45
New York 8/14/45
Calcutta
Colombo
Suez
10/6/45
10/9/45
10/14/45
New York 11/1/45
Calcutta 12/9/45 New York 1/9/46
San Juan 2/16/46 New York 2/19/46
Le Havre 3/13/46 New York 3/23/46
Le Havre 4/16/46 New York 4/24/46
Leghorn 5/21/46 New York
Baltimore
6/2/46
6/8/46

DECOMMISSIONING
The Muir was decommissioned at Baltimore, Maryland, June 18, 1946, her Coast Guard crew removed and she was turned over to the War Shipping Administration for delivery to the War Department.


USS GENERAL H. B. FREEMAN (AP-143)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General H. B. Freeman (AP-143) was built at the Kaiser Shipyard, Vancouver, Oregon, April 26, 1945. Her only commanding officer was Commander Harley E. Grogan, USCG. She departed for San Diego, California, and shakedown exercises on May 7, 1945, and when these were completed proceeded May 22, 1945, to San Pedro, California, for post shakedown availability through May 26, 1945, The Freeman is 523 feet long with a 72 foot beam and displaces 15,900 tons. She draws 26 feet and at an average speed of 17 knots has a cruising radius of 9,600 miles. She accomodates 5830 personnel, including 112 crew members.

--19--


MAIDEN VOYAGE 3½ MONTHS
The Freeman departed San Pedro on June 1, 1945, with 3040 troops and passengers en route Calcutta, India, returning via Okinawa, a maiden voyage which took 3½ months to complete. Calling at Freemantle, Australia, on July 27, 1945, she continued on across the Indian Ocean and reached Calcutta on July 9, 1945. Embarkation of 3068 troops and passengers for Okinawa took place on July 11th and 12th and on July 13, 1945, she was underway. She stopped at Ceylon on the 18th and reached Freemantle on the 27th, Hollandia August 9th, Homonhon, Leyte the same day and finally arrived at Hagushi, Okinawa on August 16, 1945. While en route to Okinawa from the Philippines the cease fire order to stop hostilities between the United States and Japan was received. At the time the order was received all hands were at battle stations, due to a submarine contact which had been made by the escort vessel. After debarking troops at Okinawa, the Freeman took aboard 100 officers and 1828 enlisted men for transportation to the United States. The transport sailed from Okinawa on August 21, 1945, stopping at Ulithi and Saipan on the 27th and at Pearl Harbor on September 5, 1945. She reached San Pedro on September 12, 1945.

TWO VOYAGES TO JAPAN ON "MAGIC CARPET" DUTY
After an availability which extended to September 29, 1945, she again loaded replacements troops and supplies and sailed October 7, 1945, for Tokyo. Here on the 25th and 26th she embarked 3000 high point veterans of the Pacific Theater for return to the United States. She reached Tacoma, Washington, with these on November 5, 1945. After moving to Seattle for a week's availability she continued her "Magic Carpet" operations by embarking another load of replacement troops and sailing for Yokohama on November 16, 1945. Arriving there on the 29th she embarked another contingent of veterans and sailed December 3, 1945, for Seattle, arriving on December 16, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONING
Here she was decommissioned as a Navy transport on March 4, 1946, and her Coast Guard crew removed. She was turned over to War Shipping Administration for delivery to the Army.


USS GENERAL H. F. HODGES (AP-144)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General H. F. Hodges (AP-144) was built at the Kaiser Shipyard, No. 3, Richmond, California and commissioned April 6, 1945. After shakedown exercises and post shakedown availability at Oakland, California, she was ready for her maiden voyage after embarking troops at San Francisco. The Hodges was 523 feet long with a 72 foot beam and displaced 15,900 tons. She drew 26 feet and at an average speed of 17 knots had a cruising radius of 9600 miles. She accomodated 5830 personnel including 112 crew members. Her only commanding officer was Captain Carl H. Hilton, USCG.

FIVE VOYAGES IN ONE YEAR--ONE AROUND THE WORLD
During the year of her service as a Navy transport the Hodges made five voyages, one to the Philippines, one to Naples, one to Karachi and two to Calcutta, the last one of these taking the transport around the world. These operations are summarized as follows!

EASTBOUND
DEPARTED ARRIVED
San Francisco 5/11/45 Finschaven
Hollandia
Manila
5/26/45
5/27/45
6/3/45
New York 8/6/45 Naples 8/17/45
Boston 9/8/45 Gibraltar
Port Said
Calcutta
9/16/45
9/22/45
10/3/45
New York 11/8/45 Port Said
Karachi
11/22/45
11/29/45
New York 1/31/46 Port Said
Colombo
Calcutta
2/15/46
2/25/46
3/1/46
WESTBOUND
DEPARTED ARRIVED
Manila
Tacloban
Biak
Woendi
6/6/45
6/14/45
6/17/45
6/19/45
San Francisco
New York
7/4/45
7/23/45
Naples 8/21/45 Boston 8/31/45
Calcutta
Ceylon
Suez
10/6/45
10/7/45
10/19/45
New York 11/1/45
Karachi
Suez
12/1/45
12/9/45
New York 12/25/45
Calcutta 3/5/46 Seattle 3/19/46

DECOMMISSIONING
The Hodges was decommissioned at Seattle May 13, 1946, and her Coast Guard crew removed.


USS GENERAL A. W. BREWSTER (AP-155)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General A. W. Brewster (AP-155) was built at the Kaiser Shipyard, No. 3 Richmond, California and commissioned at San Francisco April 23, 1945. She arrived at San Diego, May 3, 1945, for shakedown and, after post shakedown availability at Wilmington, California until May 12, 1945, arrived at San Pedro May 20, 1945. Her only commanding officer was Commander E. E. Hahn, USCG. The Brewster was 523 feet long with 72 foot beam and displaced 15,900 tons. She drew 26 feet and at an average speed of 17 knots had a cruising radius of 9600 miles. She accomodated 5830 personnel, of whom 112 were crew members.

FOUR VOYAGES IN 11 MONTHS
During the eleven months from May 28, 1945, to April 10, 1946, that she operated as a Navy transport, the Brewster made four voyages, one of which was made to Europe and Manila over a period of 3 months and three to Manila and return. A summary of these operations follows:

EASTBOUND
DEPARTED ARRIVED
San Pedro         5/28/45 Canal Zone
Avonmouth, Eng.
Canal Zone
Hollandia
Manila
6/5/45
6/20/45
7/3/45
7/27/45
8/2/45

--20--


DEPARTED ARRIVED
San Francisco
San Pedro
9/4/45
9/27/45
Tacloban
Manila
10/14/45
10/16/45
San Francisco 11/15/45 Manila 11/30/45
San Francisco 1/9/46 Manila 1/26/46
WESTBOUND
DEPARTED ARRIVED
Manila
Tacloban
Ulithi
Pearl Harbor
8/7/45
8/8/45
8/15/45
8/28/45
San Francisco 9/2/45
Manila 10/19/45 San Francisco 11/3/45
Manila 12/7/45 San Francisco       12/23/45
Manila 1/30/46 San Francisco 2/16/46

DECOMMISSIONING
The Brewster was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed at San Francisco and she was returned to the War Shipping Administration for delivery to the War Department on April 10, 1946.


USS GENERAL D. E. AULTMAN (AP-156)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS General D. E. Aultman (AP-156) was built at Kaiser Shipyard, No. 3, Richmond, California and commissioned there on May 20, 1945. Her first commanding officer was Captain S. P. Swicegood, USCG, who was succeeded by Commander E. h. Thieler, USCG, on August 12, 1945, at Panama. He in turn was succeeded by Commander Benjamin B. Sherry, USCG, on February 11, 1946. Her shakedown exercises at San Diego, California, continued until June 22, 1945, after which she proceeded to San Pedro for 4 days of post shakedown availability. The Aultman was 523 feet long, with a 72 foot beam and displaced 15,900 tons. She drew 26 feet and at an average speed of 17 knots had a cruising radius of 9600 miles. She accomodated 221 troop officers and 3107 enlisted men besides her officers and crew.

THREE VOYAGES IN THREE MONTHS
The Aultman made three voyages in the 8½ months she operated as a Navy transport. Departing San Pedro on July 1, 1945, she reached the Canal Zone on July 8th and Marseilles July 22, 1945. Here she embarked 3298 troops of the 1367th Engineers, 229 General Hospital troops and various port companies and departed July 26, 1945, for Manila via the Canal Zone and Hollandia. At Panama the ship's power failed while in the locks and with steering control lost she swung into the canal bank bending her screw and denting her hull plates. She was drydocked and repaired by the 12th of August and able to proceed. The second day out of the Canal Zone the report of Japan's surrender was received on August 14, 1945. She arrived at Humboldt Bay on September 2, 1945, 22 days after leaving Panama. She arrived at Manila September 13, 1045, where all troops were discharged and Coast Guard and Navy personnel taken aboard for transportation to the United States. Departing Manila on September 17, 1945, she anchored at Naha Bay, Okinawa on the 20th where more troops were loaded until a total of 3162 miscellaneous casuals plus 84 Army nurses were embarked. She departed Okinawa September 27th bound for San Francisco but was diverted to Portland, Oregon, en route. Portland was reached October 12, 1945, where all troops were debarked, and many Coast Guard and Navy personnel transferred. After this she was drydocked for further repair of the damage incurred at Panama and remained there until November 5th. She then proceeded to Astoria and departed for the Philippines on November 7, 1945. She arrived at Tacloban November 19, 1945, and after taking on 16 officers and 125 enlisted men of the Coast Guard and Navy for transportation to the United States proceeded to Agusan, Mindanao. Philippine Islands. Here 3525 enlisted men and 234 officers of the 31st Army Division were taken aboard and arrived at San Francisco December 14, 1945. Her last voyage, begun December 29, 1945, was on "Magic Carpet" detail to Nagoya where replacements for Pacific Theater veterans were picked up on January 14, 1946, the transport returning to San Pedro on February 3, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONING
The Aultman was decommissioned as a Navy Transport on March 15, 1946, at Terminal Island, San Francisco, and redelivered to the War Shipping Administration who delivered her to the War Department.


USS LEONARD WOOD (APA-12)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Leonard Wood (APA-12) was taken over by the Navy from the Army Transport Service early in 1941. During the period of national emergency beginning in 1939 when the war in Europe began and up to the attack on Pearl Harbor, energetic steps had been taken to increase our fleet of transports. As one of these steps the passenger liner Western World, a 17 knot ship of 13,712 tons, which had been running to South America, was purchased by the Army and converted into the transport Leonard Wood. Her capacity by peacetime standards had been 1500, but this was greatly increased when she became an Army transport. On June 10, 1941, the transport was placed in commission at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, with Commander H. G. Bradbury, USCG, commanding. From that date until the end of the war she was manned by Coast Guard personnel.

TO BOMBAY, INDIA
From June to November, 1941, the Leonard Wood was engaged in various training exercises off the coast of North Carolina. Proceeding to Halifax, Nova Scotia, in November 1941, she embarked British troops and transported them by way of Cape Town, South Africa to Bombay, India. She returned to the United States in March, 1942, and was converted into an amphibious attack transport, the alterations being completed on April 26, 1942, when Commander E. Zoole, USCG, relieved Commander Bradbury as commanding officer.

TRAINING EXERCISES
For the next six months, the Wood, along with other amphibious ships, engaged in training and amphibious warfare exercises in Chesapeake Bay in conjunction with Army troops. These consisted of disembarkation drills, landing exercises, short range battle practice and boat drill. During August, secret scientific experiments were conducted as she moored at Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth for repairs and alterations. These were completed on September 12, 1942, and more maneuvers and landing exercises were followed by more repairs and alterations until October 18th. Meanwhile on

--21--


October 1, 1942, Captain Merlin O'Neill, USCG, relieved Commander Zoole as commanding officer.

NORTH AFRICAN LANDING
On October 23, 1942, 92 officers and 1800 enlisted men from the 3rd Division, U.S. Army, were embarked and supplies loaded at Army Base, Norfolk. She got underway on the 24th in convoy formation. On November 7, 1942, she maneuvered into her assigned position in the transport area off the port of Fedala, French Morocco, Northwest Africa. Army personnel began disembarking at 0145 on November 8, 1942. The first four waves departed for the beach at 0340. The first visible firing was seen at 0525. Heavy gun fire was exchanged all morning between supporting vessels and shore batteries, with repeated dashes toward the beach made by supporting destroyers to silence shore batteries and protect landing boats. Disembarkation continued throughout the day. At 1201 enemy planes straffed the beaches, destroyers replying with anti-aircraft fire. Following an armistice with French forces, the American flag was hoisted at 1314 at Cape Fedala. As the evening advanced the scarcity of landing boats became acute, some boats having been damaged on the rocks during the darkness and some being stranded.

TRANSPORTS SUNK IN ENEMY ATTACK
Disembarking continued on November 9, 1942. The Wood opened fire on a single enemy plane over the transport area at 0735 and ten minutes later was firing on a ten plane enemy squadron on its way to bomb and strafe the beaches. American planes appeared shortly thereafter. There were difficulties of identification and our own aircraft were fired upon during the day. Landing operations, hampered by the heavy surf continued with air activity throughout the afternoon. Unloading of ammunition, gasoline, rations and motor vehicles continued on November 10th. Aerial bombardment of Casablanca was visible in the early afternoon, accompanied by bombardment from the sea. At 0630 casualties from the beach were received on board. To overcome the shortage of landing boats, chains of liferafts, loaded with gasoline cans, were utilized. Although formal French resistance had ceased at Fedala, fighting continued back from the coast. Sniping within the city was a problem, with reports of Arabs slaying soldiers while they slept. As unloading continued on November 11th, it was announced that Casablanca had capitulated. At 1950 the transport USS Joseph Hewes was torpedoed and sank within two hours. Nine minutes later the tanker USS Winooski had also been hit. The Wood sent all available boats to the Hewes to aid in rescue work. An enemy submarine attempting to escape on the surface was reported hit by a destroyer. The first boat loads of Hewes survivors came alongside the Wood at 2100. Half an hour later the USS Hambleton was reported torpedoed but still afloat, as was the Winooski. Survivors continued to come aboard on November 12th as unloading proceeded. At 1730 the USS Edward Rutledge and USS Hugh Scott were hit by torpedoes. Boats from the Wood were sent to their assistance. Seven minutes later the USS Tasker Bliss was torpedoed. The Wood started heaving anchor shortly afterwards and stood out of Fedala Bay, along with the rest of the transport division. In the sudden departure officers, crew and ship's boats had been left on the beach. The convoy headed toward the Coast again on the 13th with a heavy escort, including strong air support. The Wood moored in the inner harbor at Casablanca at 2245, and unloading continued on the 14th with more casualties being received on board. The Wood departed Casablanca on November 17, 1942, and arrived at Norfolk on the 30th. The Wood had been flagship for Commander Task Group 34.4 and 34.9 of Task Force 34, from 1-17 November, 1942, and for Task Group 34.9 from 17-30 November, 1942.

AMPHIBIOUS TRAINING EXERCISES
After a period at Norfolk Navy Yard for alterations and repairs, the Leonard Wood departed Norfolk on January 4, 1943, to conduct training exercises and drills in the Chesapeake Bay area. Here she was engaged until June 3, 1943, in the training of embarked Army troops in the technique of amphibious landing attack operations, handling as many as 900 troops and 45 vehicles in ten day training periods.

SICILY LANDING
On June 3, 1943, approximately 2300 officers and men of the 179th Regiment, 45th Division, U.S. Army were embarked at Newport News, Virginia, and the Wood sailed in convoy as part of Task Force 65, arriving on June 22nd at Mers-el-Kebir, Algeria. After practice landings northeast of Oran on June 25th, the Wood re-embarked on July 1st Army troops who had been on maneuvers ashore, and on the 5th was underway en route the island of Sicily. On July 9th she anchored in the transport area and began unloading waves of troops and equipment five and a half miles west of Scoglitti, Sicily. The first wave of the assault group landed on the assigned beach at H hour, 0345, on July 10, 1943. At dawn the Wood's gunners fired at an enemy bomber which dropped bombs 200 to 300 yards astern of the ship, and continued to fire at enemy planes throughout the day. Unloading continued on the 11th with a working party dispatched to assist in clearing the congested beach. At 2230 enemy aircraft bombs fell near the ship's port bow, and in the ensuing anti-aircraft barrage fire from all the ships in the transport area, three planes were observed to fall near the starboard quarter of the Wood. Unloading was completed on the 12th and after a shore party had salvaged landing craft damaged during the landings, the Wood got underway to her advanced base where she arrived on the 15th and began debarking Italian prisoners of war and U.S. Army casualties. She then embarked 766 German prisoners and 145 U.S. Army casualties and got underway for Norfolk on July 22nd where she arrived on August 4, 1943.

TO PEARL HARBOR
The Leonard Wood departed Norfolk on August 24, 1943, and on the 30th proceeded through the Panama Canal. At Balboa, Canal Zone, 1959 troops were embarked and the ship proceeded to San Francisco arriving there on September 10, 1943, and debarked troops. After alterations and repairs, 2403 Army troops were embarked on September 20th and the Wood departed for Honolulu, T.H., arriving there September 27, 1943. The troops were debarked and on October 2nd she moved to a berth at Pearl Harbor and began loading troops of the ship's platoon. On the 4th the ship got underway to carry out landing exercises, as well as other drills, until the 10th when she moored at Pearl Harbor, debarked troops and unloaded cargo. Stores, cargo, ammunition and Army troops were embarked until October 30th when she departed to carry out landing exercises off Maui Island. Returning to Pearl Harbor on the 4th, troops were unloaded and again embarked on November 9th and 10th.

MAKIN ISLAND LANDING
The Wood departed Pearl Harbor on November 10, 1943, for the Makin Atoll Operation, the objective being the capture and occupation of the Atoll. On board were 1788 officers and men of the 165th Combat Team of the 27th Division, U.S. Army. On November 20th, at 0525, the

--22--


signal "take stations for attack" was executed, the vessel reaching the transport area, 2½ miles west of Makin Island at 0600. Here she commenced lowering away all boats and loading them with equipment. At 0617 our carrier planes began bombing the island and at 0640 all boats were waterborne and were forming waves in the rendezvous area. At 0815 the assault waves were proceeding to the line of departure and at 0834, LVT waves from LST's were landing on Red Beach. The first of the Wood's landing boats were on Red Beach by 0840 and at 0900 the first empty boats returned to the ship. From then on the Wood's boats were engaged in evacuating casualties, hoisting boats for repair and reloading boats for return shuttle trips to the beach. By 1800, when the vessel was secured from unloading, 38% of the cargo had been taken off. The boats were sent into the lagoon for the night, and the Task Force formed up in cruising disposition for the night. At 0625 on November 21st the Wood returned to her station off Beach Red Two, and commenced lowering boats and unloading all holds. At 1000 the Wood proceeded to a point off Yellow Beach and continued unloading into landing boats and into LST-179. Japanese prisoners of war were brought aboard. Retiring for the night in cruising disposition, she returned on November 22nd for another day of unloading. On the 23rd enemy aircraft were reported and she again got underway at 0800 returning to the transport area at 0830. Here she drifted, loading wounded and prisoners and unloading cargo. At 0513 on November 24th, personnel aboard the Wood observed a violent explosion 13.5 miles away and it was later discovered that this explosion was the USS Liscombe Bay which had been torpedoed. At 0640 the Wood proceeded into the transport area northwest of Flint Point, Makin Island, lowered all boats and prepared to re-embark troops and receive survivors from the USS Liscombe Bay. At 1011 the destroyer USS Hughes came alongside to transfer the 150 survivors from the torpedoed vessel. Altogether 245 casualties from six vessels were taken aboard and the Wood maneuvered closer to the beach to facilitate reloading of Army equipment from the ship's boats. At 1435 on the 24th the vessel stood out to form convoy and departed for Pearl Harbor, arriving there December 2, 1943.

KWAJALEIN LANDING
From December 2, 1943, until January 23, 1944, the Leonard Wood, after repairs and alterations, was engaged in landing maneuvers at Maalaea Bay, Maui, T.H., and Kahului, T.H. Returning to Pearl Harbor on January 17th, she was underway on the 23rd as fleet guide of Task Group 51.2, and arrived at Kwajalein Lagoon on February 2, 1944. Embarked were 1617 troops of the 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marines. The Task Group was to serve as Attack Force Reserve Group during the landing operation. She proceeded into the lagoon of Kwajalein Atoll on February 2nd and on the 4th shifted to an anchorage off Kwajalein Island. Following the capture of the Atoll, the Wood remained in Kwajalein Lagoon until February 15, 1944.

ENIWETOK LANDINGS
Standing out of Kwajalein Lagoon, as flagship of Transport Division Task Unit 51.14.2, on February 16, 1944, the Wood proceeded to Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands to participate in its assault and capture. The Transport Group constituted a unit of the Eniwetok Expeditionary Group under Rear Admiral H. W. Hill, USN. Embarked were the 3rd Battalion, 22nd Marines (reinforced) and attached units. 622 long tons of equipment and supplies were carried for the assault landings. The Wood entered Eniwetok Lagoon on February 17, 1944, and proceeded to carry out its mission to boat the embarked troops as reserves for assaults on Engebi, Eniwetok and Parry Islands. Engebi Island was reported as secured at 1540 on the 18th and the Wood began re-embarking troops at 1800, all troops being aboard by 1920. The vessel stood down the swept channel en route to Eniwetok Island on February 19th, anchoring off the island at 0904. Boats were then lowered and troops debarked for landing on Eniwetok. They were re-embarked after the island had been secured on February 21, 1944. Next day, after lowering boats and debarking troops, the Wood shifted anchorage to a position off Parry Island. Although there were about 1000 Japanese on Parry Island there were no signs of activity as the ship passed 800 yards off shore. Some troops were re-embarked on the 23rd and the balance on the 24th. The Wood departed Eniwetok Atoll on the 25th and arrived at Kwajalein Atoll on the 26th, where troops and equipment were unloaded and the 1st Battalion, 25th Marines were embarked. Also received on board were 5 Japanese and 5 Korean prisoners of war. Loading and unloading operations were completed on February 28, and on the 29th the transport stood out of the lagoon enroute to Hawaii. She arrived at Maui, T.H. on March 9, 1944. Troops and cargo were debarked and she sailed for San Pedro, California, where she arrived March 19, 1944, and underwent repairs and alterations. On April 29, 1944, at San Pedro, Captain H. C. Perkins, USCG, relieved Captain Merlin O'Neill as commanding officer.

SAIPAN LANDING
On May 2, 1944, the Wood sailed from San Pedro with about 1000 Sea Bees en route to Pearl Harbor, arriving there on May 9, 1944. After embarking elements of the 4th Marine Division, she departed on May 29, for Eniwetok, arriving there June 8, 1944. She departed Eniwetok on June 11, 1944, as Flagship of Commander, Transport Division Twenty, in company with Task Group 52.15, to participate in the capture and occupation of Saipan Island, Marianas Island Group. Embarked were Major General H. Schmidt, USMC, Commanding General, 4th Marine Division and Staff, 3rd Battalion, 25th Marines. Attached units comprised a total of 154 officers and 1700 enlisted men, together with 825 short tons of cargo. The Wood arrived at its designated position on June 15, 1944, and landed all assault troops, completing the operation on June 24, having stood off the island from the 18th awaiting its turn of unloading. The boat group remained in the area throughout this period, assisting in unloading other ships until the return of the Wood. 356 casualties from shore were received and treated prior to her departure from Saipan. She sailed from Saipan June 24th and arrived at Eniwetok on the 28th and at Pearl Harbor July 20, 1944.

PALAU LANDING
The Wood sailed from Honolulu, T.H., en route to Guadalcanal on August 12, 1944, with 1848 troops of the 2nd Battalion, 322nd Infantry, U.S. Army embarked, arriving there on August 24, 1944. On September 3, 1944, she sailed from Guadalcanal en route the Palau Island Group to participate in the capture and occupation of Angaur Island. She arrived off Peleliu Island on September 15th and took her assigned position off Angaur Island on September 17th, unloading all assault troops by the 21st and departing for Manus Island on the 27th. During the operation 234 casualties were received on board and treated.

LEYTE LANDING--UNDER ATTACK ON SECOND TRIP
On October 12, 1944, the Wood sailed from Manus Island in company with Commander, Task Group 78.2 to participate in the capture and occupation of Leyte Island, Philippine Islands. Embarked were elements of the 1st and 8th Cavalry

--23--


USS Leonard Wood (APA-12) LANDED TROOPS ON MANY SHORES
USS Leonard Wood (APA-12) landed troops on many shores

USS JOSEPH T. DICKMAN (APA-13) WAS IN IT EARLY AND STAYED TO THE END
USS Joseph T. Dickman (APA-13) was in it early and stayed to the end

--24--


Divisions and other Army units totaling 1770 troops. She arrived at her assigned position off Leyte Island on October 20, 1944, and landed all troops and cargo. The 696 tons of cargo was unloaded in the record time of 166 tons per hour. The Wood departed the same day for the Palau Islands arriving there on the 23rd. On the 31st she had arrived at Guam. On November 3rd she embarked troops and equipment of the 77th Division, U.S. Army and after a brief stop at Manus Island arrived again at Leyte Gulf on November 23, 1944, debarking all troops and supplies. On this second trip to Leyte Gulf, Transport Division Twenty, of which the Wood was part, was under enemy air attack. The Wood left Leyte on the 24th and arrived at Hollandia, New Guinea, on November 29, 1944.

LINGAYEN GULF LANDING
On December 30, 1944, the Wood sailed from Sansapor, New Guinea, with Commander, Transport Division Twenty aboard as part of Task Group 78.5 for the capture and occupation of Lingayen Gulf area, Luzon Island, Philippine Islands. Embarked were 6th Division units and other Army elements totaling 95 officers and 992 enlisted men. Also aboard were 457 short tons of cargo. En route the Wood's anti-aircraft guns assisted in the destruction of a Japanese plane, the convoy being attacked several times. The Wood arrived in Lingayen Gulf on January 9, 1945, unloaded all troops and supplies and departed on the same day in company with Task Group 79.14.1 for Leyte Island, arriving there on January 12, 1945.

LANDING AT MINDORO
The Wood departed for Biak Island on January 18, 1945, with Commander Task Group 78.6 on board and arrived there on the 22nd. Here elements of the 41st Division, consisting of 540 troops were embarked and transported to Mindoro Island, Philippine Islands, where they were unloaded on February 9, 1945. The Wood departed next day, arriving at Ulithi on February 19, 1945, after a stop at Leyte.

UNITED STATES-MANILA TRIPS
The Wood sailed for home on March 6, 1945, stopping at Pearl Harbor from the 18th to 20th of March, 1945, and proceeded to San Francisco, California, where she arrived on March 27th, 1945. During April and May and until June 5, 1945, she underwent repairs and alterations at San Francisco. Then she was placed on the run between the United States and Manila and continued on this run making two trips to Manila and one to Tokyo by December 18, 1945. Her Coast Guard crew was removed on March 26, 1946.


USS JOSEPH T. DICKMAN (APA-13)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

DESCRIPTION
The USS Joseph T. Dickman (APA-13) was formerly the USS President Roosevelt. Built by the New York Shipbuilding Company at Camden, New Jersey, in 1922, she is a steel twin screw vessel of 13,869 gross tons and a full load displacement of 21,325 tons. With an overall length of 535 feet and an extreme beam of 72 feet, her moulded depth to "C" deck is 50 feet. When loaded, her draft forward is 30 feet 6 inches, and 32 feet aft. She has a cruising range of 7000 miles at 16 knots or 11,000 miles at 12 knots and her twin screws are powered by geared turbines, which develop 12,000 HP while turning her screws at 120 revolutions per minute. Eight water tube boilers generate steam pressure of 265 pounds per square inch at 481° F. Her total bunker capacity is 1,068,000 gallons and while cruising at 16 knots, 47,000 gallons of bunker fuel oil per day are consumed in the generation of steam.

PRE WAR SERVICE
The Dickman, then the President Roosevelt, was owned and operated by the U.S. Lines Company of New York until early in 1941. During these years she was employed in the passenger-mail-freight run between New York, Cobh, Southampton, Cherbourg and Hamburg. She had 165 staterooms and was allowed to carry 241 first cabin and 216 third cabin passengers, a total of 457. At the same time her crew of 249 officers and men made a total of 706 on board. On January 24, 1926, the Roosevelt made history when Captain George Fried responded to an SOS from the British steamship Antoine, which was sinking in an Atlantic gale, and after standing by for 3½ days finally rescued all on board the doomed vessel. In 1929 she took a delegation of the Veterans of Foreign Wars to Northern Russia to recover the bodies of 75 American soldiers who lost their lives in the Polar Bear Military Expedition of 1918 and 1919. She carries a bronze tablet in commemoration of this trip. At the outbreak of World War II she brought back many stranded Americans from Europe.

1941

BECOMES NAVY TRANSPORT
Early in 1941 the Army Transport Service took over the Roosevelt as an Army transport. At first she was named the USAT President Roosevelt but was shortly renamed the USAT Joseph T. Dickman, in honor of the late Lt. Gen. Joseph T. Dickman who commanded American troops in France and later in Germany in World War I, and also served in the Spanish American war and the Boxer Rebellion in China. On June 10, 1941, the Dickman was commissioned at the New York Navy Yard and Lt. Comdr. Charles W. Harwood, USCG, assumed command. At the time she was undergoing conversion to a Navy transport. On June 18, 1941, she left the Navy Yard as AP-26 and moored at the Brooklyn Army Base. At this time she carried 25 surf landing boats and two tank lighters. She was capable of carrying 1910 personnel, including 470 officers and enlisted men and 1440 officers and troops. On the 26th with 46 officers and 1198 troops on board she proceeded to Hampton Roads, Virginia, in company with the USS Hunter Liggett, USS Leonard Wood and USS Betelgeuse. On the 28th she proceeded to New River Inlet, North Carolina, and joined Transport Division Three of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet.

LANDING EXERCISES
At New River, in company with other naval transports, the first of many landing exercises were carried out. With 52 officers and 1463 U.S. Army troops embarked, the exercises, in the light of later operations, were crude and full of errors, but they laid the groundwork for the Transport Doctrine which proved of great value in later amphibious assaults. She returned to Brooklyn Army Base July 11, 1941 and next day 1127 troops with 57 officers under command of Colonel Theodore Roosevelt embarked. She proceeded to New River Inlet, for landing exercises until July 23rd. During the first 12 days of August, extensive ship maneuvers, in addition to landing exercises, were carried out with the Hunter Liggett, Leonard Wood, Wakefield, Alcyone and Betelgeuse and other transports at Onslow Bay, North Carolina. At these exercises not only were jeeps and trucks put ashore from the transports, but also tanks. This was no mean feat considering the boats and equipment then in use and the lack of experience of all hands in this modern type of warfare. The Dickman returned to New York

--25--


and after Army personnel had debarked proceeded to Boston. Here she remained for overhaul and conversion.

TO BOMBAY, INDIA
The Dickman left Boston Navy Yard on October 1, 1941, and after various tests in Narragansett Bay, proceeded to Hampton Roads, where practice drills were held in Chesapeake Bay, the transport acting as flagship for Commander, Transport Division Seventeen. On the 2nd of November she left Norfolk and proceeded to Halifax, Nova Scotia, in company with the USS Leonard Wood, Orizaba, Mt. Vernon, West Point, and Wakefield. On November 6th flag of the Division was transported to the Leonard Wood. A total of 57 officers and 1336 enlisted personnel of the British Army reported on board on November 8, 1941. Two 40 MM anti-aircraft guns were installed aboard. As a member of Task Force 14, the Dickman left Halifax on November 10, 1941, with the five other transports, bound for Bombay, India. The ocean escort of the convoy consisted of two CA's, one CV and seven DD's. The first stop on this long voyage was made at Port of Spain, Trinidad on November 17, 1941. The task force was again underway on the 19th for Capetown which was not reached until December 9, 1941. While the attack on Pearl Harbor had taken place two days [before] the task force reached Capetown, no mention of the fact is made either in the deck or visual log. In all respects the task force was a fighting unit carrying British troops. While the United States had not been in a state of war before the task force reached Capetown, battle routine was carried out by all ships of the force. This consisted of nightly blackouts, daily general quarters at sunrise and continuous zig-zagging while underway in precise convoy formations. These routines, plus the heavy escort provided, indicated that the Task Force was prepared for any eventuality. As a matter of fact on 22 November, 1941, submarine contacts were made by the screen. On December 13, 1941, the task force got underway on the next leg of the voyage which was to take it to Aden, Arabia. As escort for this leg there was one British CA and six DD's. On December 23rd the destination was changed to Bombay, India, and that port was reached on the 27th. All troops were debarked here.

1942

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The task force did not depart from Bombay, India, for the homeward voyage until January 10, 1942. The Wakefield continued on to Singapore where she was subsequently hit by Japanese bombs just before the fall of that city to the enemy. Fourteen days after departing Bombay, the rest of task force reached Capetown without escorts for a stopover of eleven days. At Capetown she took on a cargo of 3019 tons of graphite, wool, mica, raffia and vanilla beans for shipment to the states. Leaving Capetown on February 2, 1942, in company with the Leonard Wood and Orizaba, and still without escort, the Dickman proceeded to Bahia, Brazil. An escort of one CL and one DD met up with the transports on February 12, 1942, two days before it reached Bahia. Two days later the three ships, with escort, departed for New York where the Dickman arrived February 28th, after a round trip voyage of 28,836 nautical miles. The Dickman underwent a period of availability at the Bethlehem Steel Company's Yard at Brooklyn, until April 25, 1942. Here eight new boat davits with three boats per davit were installed and nine boats and two tank lighters were provided stowage on the hatches. Diesel fuel for these craft was given stowage in 19,000 gallon capacity tanks. Accomodations were increased to 2578, including 2016 troops. The armament radically changed, with fire power increased by one 5"/51 cal, 4-3"/50 cal, 8-20MM and 8-.30 cal. machine guns. Galleys were greatly improved.

SUB ATTACK IN ROUTE PUERTO RICO
On April 28, 1942, the Dickman proceeded to Hampton Roads, Virginia, and early in May departed for Guantanamo, Cuba, with 298 Marine, 271 Army personnel and 884 Naval personnel, escorted by one DMS. On May 15th the escort hoisted the emergency submarine signal and torpedo tracks were sighted on the port quarter. The position of the attack was 23°59'N, 73°07'W. At Guantanamo Bay 175 personnel were debarked and 527 tons of cargo unloaded and the Dickman in company with the USS Kennebec departed for San Juan Puerto Rico with two DM's as escort. Here 857 troop personnel debarked and 276 tons of cargo were unloaded while 23 British officers, 49 Lascars and 1148 bags of sugar were taken aboard and the transport departed for Norfolk, via Bermuda. Another trip to Bermuda with 870 Army, Navy and civilian passengers and a DD escort, was made on June 5, 1942, returning on the 12th with 71 passengers.

MORE LANDING EXERCISES
From late June until early August, 1942, more maneuvers and landing exercises were carried out at Solomons Island, Maryland, in company with other ships of the Atlantic Amphibious Fores. Vehicles, bulldozers and heavy equipment were all landed under true battle conditions. Another period of availability at Norfolk Navy Yard extended to September, 1942, when six more 20 MM guns were added, bringing the total to 14. Her total cargo capacity now amounted to 254,429 cubic feet about one sixth being for ship's stores. Provision for 35 landing craft of various types more clearly distinguished the Dickman as an amphibious assault transport.

NORTH AFRICA LANDINGS
On October 17, 1942, the Dickman began to load army supplies and personnel at Newport News, Virginia. By the 24th total embarkation was completed and the transport proceeded to sea as part of Task Force 34 to play her part in the initial amphibious invasion of North Africa. On board were 1370 men and 73 officers of the 2nd Battalion, 30th Infantry, 3rd Division, U.S. Army and 43 officers and 80 enlisted men of the U.S. Navy Sea Frontier Unit and Western Task Force Headquarters. Her holds bulged with vehicles, gasoline, ammunition and general army equipment and gear. Her trip across the Atlantic was uneventful. As she reached her destination six miles off Fedala, nine minutes after midnight on November 8, 1942, boats were lowered and debarkation commenced. Unloading of equipment and personnel continued vigorously day and night until the Dickman aboard 80 per cent unloaded was driven out of the area on November 12, 1942, by submarine attacks in which six transports--the USS Scott, Bliss, Hewes, Winooski, Hambleton and Rutledge were torpedoed. All sank except the Winooski and Hambleton which were taken to Casablanca for repairs, when that port was secured on the 15th. At this time the Dickman entered Casablanca harbor and completed her unloading1. During the whole operation 10 LCV's and 7 LCP(R) boats were stranded or wrecked. No boats were lost because of enemy fire. The coxswain of one boat was severely wounded by strafing and the bowman killed. Two members of the ship's beach party were wounded by strafing and one man in a support boat was wounded by gunfire from a shore battery at Fedala. The return passage to Norfolk, begun on November 17, 1942, was uneventful. 60 survivors from the USS Scott and 129 British released prisoners of war made the return trip which ended November 30, 1942.

--26--


1943

TO AUSTRALIA AND RETURN
Taking aboard 970 tons of cargo, 1770 troops and 118 Army officers at Newport News, Virginia, the Dickman, now listed as APA-13, departed December 27, 1942, for her first trip to the Pacific. The Panama Canal was reached and traversed on January 2, 1943, and after debarking and embarking troops and unloading and loading cargo, the task force departed for Noumea, New Caledonia on the 5th. The equator was crossed January 10th with appropriate ceremonies, and on the 27th the transport reached Noumea for a one day stop. Brisbane, Australia was reached January 31, 1943, after traveling a distance of 10,200 nautical miles. Here all troops were debarked. On February 3, 1943, the long return trip, with neither passengers nor cargo, was begun. Stopping at Noumea on February 8th, 33 landing boats and 47 men and 3 officers of the ship's complement were transferred to Amphibious Forces, South Pacific, and the Dickman struck out, without escort, for Balboa. Zig-zagging during daylight and with morning general quarters the rule, Balboa was reached on February 26, 1943, and traversing the canal the transport reached Norfolk March 10, 1943.

SICILY LANDING
April, 1943, was occupied with preparations for the trip to North Africa and for the Mediterranean Amphibious landings to follow. A shore period of availability resulted in some changed characteristics. Her troop carrying capacity was listed at 95 officers, 42 NCOs and 1913 troops or a total of 2050. For combat duty 1645 troops could be carried. Her boat allowance was 2 LCS(S)'s, 31 LCVP's and 2 LCM(3)'s. A decided improvement in armament for modern warfare included 4-40MM's, 18-20MM's and 4-3"/50 cal. as well as 8-.30 cal. machine guns for anti-aircraft protection. After loading and embarking troops the Dickman sailed from Newport News on May 10, 1943, for Mers-el-Kebir, Oran, North Africa, and reached her destination on May 23rd, after an uneventful crossing, where all troops were debarked. On June 11th, 100 officers and 2428 enlisted men embarked, plus naval units, for the trip to Algiers, Algeria, where all were debarked two days later. At Algiers the Dickman was loaded and final preparations were made for her second amphibious assault on Gela, Sicily, including a full dress rehearsal on June 23-24, 1943. On July 6th the transports and escorts left Algiers with the Dickman as flagship for CTU 81.2.1, with Captain C. W. Harwood, USCG, commanding. This task unit consisted, in addition to the Dickman, of HMS Prince Charles, HMS Prince Leopold, 3 LCI's and a control group of 1 PC and 2 SC's which joined up at the beachhead. The Dickman landed the 1st Ranger Battalion, 4th Ranger Battalion, and 1st Battalion of the 39th Engineers, the 83rd C.W. Battalion and attached units, on Red-Green Beach at Gela, Sicily, on the morning of July 10, 19432. Heavy weather on the 9th had moderated sufficiently for small boat operation at "H" hour. On approaching the beach, landing craft encountered machine gun and small caliber H.E. shellfire, from which six members of the boat crews were wounded, one mortally. Unloading, which had proceeded expeditiously on "D" day lagged on the following days. Army unloading crews were called and the ship was completely unloaded by 2000 on D+1 day. Enemy bombers appeared on the morning of the 11th and again at 1550 on that day and while no direct hits were sustained by the transport, six men were wounded by bomb fragments. Another bombing attack took place at 1640. Bombing and straffing continued on the 12th. The SS Robert Rowan received a direct hit, caught fire and finally exploded. The Dickman is credited with destroying four German planes during the landing operations. 99 casualties were evacuated from the beach and received hospitalization aboard the vessel, two being Italian prisoners, 18 landing craft were lost during the operation, eight being subsequently salvaged. At 1855, on July 12, 1943, the transports, guided by the Dickman, left the transport area and commenced the return trip to Algiers which was reached on the 15th. Twelve days later she departed for Mers-el-Kebir, where on July 27, 1943, Captain Harwood turned over his command to Captain Raymond T. Mauerman, USCG.

SALERNO LANDING
After two periods of landing exercises, one at Andalouses Bay, Algeria on August 10-11, 1943, and one at Arzew, Algeria on August 25, 1943, a total of 81 commissioned officers and 1623 enlisted men of the 2nd Battalion, 142nd Infantry, 36th Division, U.S. Army and attached units were taken aboard at Mers-el-Kebir on September 4, 1943, for the amphibious landing at Salerno, Italy, Weather conditions were excellent and the beachhead was reached September 9, 1943. Boats were lowered at 0015 and the first wave hit the assigned beach only ten minutes late. Very heavy machine gun and H.E. shell fire was encountered. 34 rockets fired by the LCS(S) caused a lull in the enemy fire and contributed much to the safe landing and retraction of all boats in the assault waves. An LCM(3), in the second wave was hit by an H.E. shell and three of the crew were wounded. In all, seven boat crew members of the Dickman were wounded in the operation. All unloading was completed by 1600 of D+1 day, although it was hampered by shelling from enemy artillery hidden in the hills behind the beach. Enemy bombers attacked on the 9th and again twice on the 10th, second of the latter attacks lasting for 32 minutes as the transports were preparing to leave the area. No ships were damaged. An intense anti-aircraft barrage rendered the enemy's aim erratic. 57 casualties were evacuated from the beach and received treatment aboard the Dickman, of whom two were German prisoners. The ship returned to Mers-el-Kebir for a brief period of availability.

FOLLOW UP TRIPS
A series of three follow up trips to Italy now ensued. On September 30, 1943, 44 officers and 1504 enlisted men on the Dickman plus a full cargo of vehicles and supplies, in company with other transports left Mers-el-Kebir for Naples, via Bizerte where the opening of Naples was awaited three days. Naples was reached on October 6, 1943, and the ship was unloaded the same day, the return trip to Mers-el-Kebir commencing next day. Again on October 25, 1945, 96 officers and 1660 enlisted men were taken aboard and arrived at Pozzouli Bay, Italy on October 28, 1943. Passengers and cargo were unloaded and the return trip to Mers-el-Kebir started the same day. After five days of extensive embarkation, debarkation and landing exercises at Arzew with 61 officers and 1180 enlisted men of the French Army, the Dickman returned to Mers-el-Kebir and began loading cargo for the last of the following trips, this one to Naples. With 95 officers and 1815 enlisted men embarked, plus vehicles and cargo, the Dickman departed November 14, 1943, and reached Naples via Bizerte on the 17th. After all troops had debarked and all vehicles and cargo unloaded, 87 officers and 1642 enlisted men were taken aboard for the return trip to Mers-el-Kebir.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
At Mers-el-Kebir, 124 additional troops were embarked and on November 30, 1943, in company with other transports of the 6th Amphibious Force, the Dickman departed

--27--


for the voyage home, by way of Belfast, Ireland, and Firth of Clyde, Scotland. The trip to Belfast was uneventful and the troops were debarked there on December 9, 1943. The vessel then proceeded to the Firth of Clyde where all cargo was unloaded and 31 LCVP's and 1 LCM(3) were transferred to Base Two, Rosneath, Scotland. On December 20, 1943, the Dickman departed the Clyde for Norfolk, Virginia. Heavy seas on December 24, 1943, caused rather extensive damage to deck equipment. Norfolk was reached January 1, 1944.

1944

BACK TO ENGLAND
Following a 28 day availability at the Norfol Navy Yard, when new boats were obtained, but the ship changed little physically, the Dickman left for New York on February 2, 1944, and on the 10th a total of 141 officers, 2141 Army troops and 212 enlisted naval personnel were embarked and the transport sailed in convoy for Glasgow the following day, arriving at Clyde Anchorage on the 22nd. All troops were debarked at Glasgow and on March 2nd the transport proceeded to Loch Long Anchorage which was to be her base for the next several months. Intensive training of boat crews and all personnel to take part in the coming Normandy operations was begun immediately. On the 16th exercises were held in the lower Firth of Clyde and Rothesay Sound. On the 121st the Dickman, with other transports, proceeded to Plymouth, England. Here two full scale practice landings were held in Start Bay, one on March 25th and, after a return to Loch Long, another on April 27th. New developments and techniques were tested.

NORMANDY LANDING
To take part in the greatest amphibious operation of all, in the invasion of Normandy, the Dickman reported to Falmouth, England, on May 26, 1944, in company with the USS Barnett and HMS Empire Gauntlet. From here, as part of Task Force UTAH, the transports proceeded to Plymouth Harbor and then to Tor Bay anchorage on May 31, 1944, where vehicles and cargo were loaded. On June 3, 1944, 130 officers and 1833 enlisted men were embarked, plus two naval salvage teams end two war correspondents. Departure from Tor Bay anchorage was at 1227 on June 5, 1944, and the Dickman, with HMS Enterprise as guide, and in company with vessels of the Task Force, proceeded without incident to Transport Area UTAH, Bay of Seine, France. By 0353 on June 6, 1944, all boats were over the side and the 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry and supporting units of the 237th Engineers, 87th Chemical Battalion, 1st Engineer Specialist Brigade, 29th Field Artillery, 531st Engineers, 81st Airborne Anti-aircraft Artillery 449th Military Police Company, 3207th Quartermaster Supply Unit and 1st and 3rd Naval Salvage Units were all landed on Tare Green Beach UTAH in the Baie de la Seine. All troops in the Dickman's boats reached the beach without a single serious casualties, with the troops debarking from the landing craft in about 3½ feet of water due to the heavy loading of the boats and the flat beach gradient. Weather conditions were most unfavorable, with the wind westerly, force 5, causing a moderate sea, which hampered loading the landing craft alongside the transport, drenched the troops and swamped several boats when ramps were lowered at the beach. Despite these adverse conditions all troops and cargo were debarked by 1210 on D-day. By 1308 all ship's boats had returned and were hoisted except seven LCVP's, four of which were damaged by gunfire and three swamped on the beach and abandoned. The crews of these seven boats returned to the Dickman except one seaman who was badly wounded and believed dead and one seaman badly wounded who was placed on the DD-639 (Shubrick). Early boats encountered little enemy fire until after debarking troops. Troop casualties were apparently light in crossing the beach.3 A total of 3 dead and 154 casualties were taken aboard for landing in England. The Dickman departed the assault area in convoy, arriving at Portland on June 7, 1944, and at Falmouth ten hours later. A shuttle trip was made to the UTAH area on June 14, 1944, with the 313th Infantry Regiment with a return to Falmouth next day.

SOUTHERN FRANCE LANDING
On June 21, 1944, the Dickman was again at Loch Long, Scotland, where preparations were made for the trip to the Mediterranean and the invasion of Southern France. On July 4, 1944, the transport started, with no passengers or cargo, for the Mediterranean, with other transports of the amphibious force. Mers-el-Kebir was reached on July 16, 1944. On August 6, 1944, at Naples, 136 officers and 1790 troops were embarked for practice landings at Salerno Bay, less than one year from the initial assault on the beach. On August 13, 1944, the task force of which the Dickman was part, departed for Operation ANVIL, the invasion of Southern France. A total of 136 officers, 1790 troops and 80 vehicles, and 10 tons of stores were landed on Blue Beach, Baie de Bougnon, without damage or casualty. Included were the 3rd Battalion, 180th Infantry and supporting detachments from the 179th Infantry, 40 Engineers; 4th Beach Battalion U.S. Navy; 10th and 11th Field Hospital Corps; 2nd Auxiliary Surgical Group; 58th Medical Detachment, 93rd Evacuation Hospital; 450th Engineers; 157th Infantry; 71st Signal Corps; 682nd Ordnance; 171st Field Artillery; 83rd Chemical Battalion, Naval Demolition Units S3, 47, 197, 28, 29 and 30; 693rd Port Company and 389th Medical Collecting Company. Weather conditions were ideal, there being only a light variable breeze, slight sea and no swell. Visibility was excellent except for a slight haze. Early boats were launched at 0520 and unloading proceeded in an orderly fashion. All troops and vehicles were debarked by 1547 on "D" day. Enemy fire in the landing area was light and LCS(S)'s from the Dickman aided in silencing several enemy strong points. No damage was sustained by enemy fire. Only 11 action casualties were treated aboard, two being French civilians who were returned to the beachhead. The transport departed the assault area late on "D" day, and as the vessel proceeded south a heavy enemy air attack occurred at the beachhead. Naples was reached at 1122 on August 17, 1944.

FOLLOW UP TRIPS
Five follow up trips from ports in Italy and Algeria to Southern France beachheads followed. While at Naples on August 26, 1944, Captain F. A. Leamy, USCG, assumed command of the Dickman, relieving Captain R. J. Mauerman, USCG. Next day with 60 officers and 631 enlisted men of the U.S. Army, 36 officers and 611 enlisted men of the French Army, and 30 other miscellaneous Red Cross and other personnel embarked, the transport proceeded to Cavalier Bay, France, and after landing this personnel on August 30, 1944, returned to Naples. A second follow-up trip made on September 9, 1944, brought 39 officers and 351 enlisted men of the U.S. Army, 144 enlisted women, 810 enlisted men, 22 female officers and 40 male officers of the French Army, together with vehicles, baggage and cargo to St. Tropez, France. On a third follow-up trip from Naples 55 officers and 911 enlisted men of the U.S. Army and 35 officers and 649 enlisted men of the French Army were debarked at Marseilles on September 19, 1944. A fourth group of 91 officers and 1806 U.S. Army troops comprised the bulk of a force landed at Marseilles

--28--


on September 29, 1944. Proceeding now to Mers-el-Kebir, 79 French officers (including 10 female officers) and 1518 French troops (including 56 female troops), together with 10 Italian officers and 243 Italian troops were embarked for the final follow-up, with Captain Leamy of the Dickman acting as Convoy Commodore over seven transports. These troops were landed at Marseilles on October 19, 1944, and the Dickman then returned to Mers-el-Kebir.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The long awaited return of the Dickman to the United States began on October 25, 1944, and the transport moored at Navy Yard Annex, South Boston, on November 8, 1944 for an availability which extended to December 28, 1944. This permitted drydocking and the removal of considerable woodwork from the vessels interior as well as machinery repairs.

1945

TO THE PACIFIC
Departing New York, Panama was reached after an uneventful voyage on January 4, 1945, and the Dickman proceeded to San Francisco arriving there on the 14th. On the 24th, 5 naval officers and 1013 enlisted personnel were embarked for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides. The equator was crossed on February 3, 1945, for the fifth time since the ship was commissioned amidst appropriate ceremonies. Arriving at destination February 8th the transport unloaded and loaded cargo and reached Guadalcanal on the 12th. Here she joined Transport Division 54, Squadron 18 of the Pacific Amphibious Force. Intensive training for the coming campaign began March 1st, with the Dickman being designated flagship for TRANSDIV 12 (temporary) under Captain Leamy, who was thus made responsible for training, tactical movements and logistics of six other transports as well as his own--the USS Barnett, Procyon, Cepheus, Arcturus, Theenim and Monitor. Intensive training and rehearsal operations were carried out near Cape Esperance. Returning to Guadalcanal on March 15th, Transport Division 12 joined up with Transport Divisions 52, 53 and 54, comprising Transport Group BAKER of TRANSRON 18 and proceeded to Ulithi for final logistics.

OKINAWA LANDING
On March 27, 1945, Transport Group BAKER departed Ulithi and proceeded without incident to the transport area off the southwest coast of Okinawa. The Dickman, together with other ships of Transport Division 12, remained in the transport area off the beachhead from April 1st to April 9th, except for a night withdrawal on "D" day, when the formation was subject to air attacks. Due to the heterogeneous troops and miscellaneous cargo carried, unloading was delayed and some of the troop passengers did not debark until D+7. The prolonged stay offered the enemy numerous targets of which he took good advantage. Besides air attacks, midget submarines, suicide boats and swimmers were a constant menace. No battle damage, however, was received by the Dickman. During the entire operation only two LCVP's were lost, neither the result of enemy action. There were no casualties to vessel personnel or that of its attached landing craft.4

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The Dickman left Okinawa on April 9, 1945, and reached Saipan April 13, 1945. She then proceeded independently to Pearl Harbor arriving there on the 25th. The transport remained at Pearl Harbor until May 22nd when she departed for San Francisco. Following a period of availability until June 16, 1945, she embarked 174 naval, Coast Guard and USPHS officers, and 1689 naval, Coast Guard and civilian personnel which she debarked at Pearl Harbor June 22, 1945. Then she returned to San Francisco on July 1, 1945, with 1303 officer and enlisted personnel from Honolulu. A return trip to Pearl Harbor on July 14th brought 175 naval officers 259 naval, 82 Coast Guard, and 1848 C.B. naval enlisted personnel, Until August 10, 1945, the Dickman went through a period of conversion at the Navy Yard, Pearl Harbor. Various changes in the arrangement of the sick bay area, the installation of new operating space and a general enlargement of hospital facilities now permitted her to function as a casualty evacuation ship without changing her designation of APA. Upon completion of these alterations a total of 1826 Navy, Marine, Coast Guard and Merchant Marine officers and enlisted casualties and others were embarked for San Francisco.

TO THE PHILIPPINES
The Dickman was at sea on this voyage to San Francisco on August 14, 1945, when the following entry was made in the log "1415 ceased offensive action against Japanese forces in accordance with CinCPOA dispatch 142304." After debarking her passengers at San Francisco on the 16th she loaded on the 24th 80 Army officers and 1717 troops and departed for the Philippines. She stopped at Eniwetok September 6, 1945, for a two day layover and reached Tacloban, Leyte Island on September 14, 1945, where part of the troop passengers were to debark, but due to change of orders, all were debarked at Manila on the 17th. On the 24th, 1763 United States, Canadian, and British Army and Navy personnel, as well as Canadian and United States civilians and ex-allied prisoners of war were embarked for transportation to the United States. These officers and men had endured untold tortures and suffering while under the Japanese and were the first to be returned home. Among them were four British Army personnel, who, after three and one half years as war prisoners, started their journey home on the Dickman, the very same vessel which in 1941, had carried them from Halifax to Bombay, on the beginning of their war mission. Arriving at San Francisco November 6, 1945, the transport made one more trip to Pearl Harbor, returning to Seattle, December 2, 1945. She proceeded to San Francisco on January 13, 1946.

CONCLUSION
It was not until March 7, 1946, that the Coast Guard crew was finally removed from the Dickman. In her long service as a transport she had travelled 156,908 miles, which was the equivalent of 7.26 times around the earth at the equator. During these four years she had transported 73,030 personnel, 10,327 in assault operations, 15,390 in follow-up to assault areas, 18,819 on training exercises and 28,494 as straight transport passengers. 5 of her crew had been killed and 35 wounded in six assault operations, but not a single one of the 73,030 passengers entrusted to her care had suffered a single casualty.


USS HUNTER LIGGETT (APA-14)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS Hunter Liggett was 19 years old when she was placed in commission at New York on June 9, 1941. Captain (then Commander) Louis W. Perkins, USCG, was her first commanding officer. For 17 years, since she was built in 1922, the 13,712 ton vessel had been the SS Pan-America. On April 3, 1939, she had become the USAT Hunter Liggett. Now Commander Perkins had to

--29--


train his 51 Coast Guard officers and 634 Coast Guard crew for attack transport (APA) duty. 538 feet in length, she was one of the largest attack transports in the Southwest Pacific Amphibious Force. She carried 35 landing boats including 2 tank lighters. She had bunks for 1600 troop officers and men, although in action she could carry as many as 2085. She could carry 8,137 tons of cargo and her cruising radius was 12,780 miles. She soon became known as the Lucky Liggett. The only Congressional Medal of Honor received by a Coast Guardsman was awarded posthumously to Douglas C. Munro, Signalman First Class, USCG, who had been transferred from the Liggett to duty on Guadalcanal.

1942

CONVERSION AND TRAINING
Conversion work began at Brooklyn in June, 1941, and by the end of June training began when troops from the Liggett were put ashore at Onslow Bay, North Carolina. Later at Solomon's Island, Chesapeake Bay, Coast Guard surfmen reported aboard from lifeboat stations and displayed their outstanding skill in small boat handling as coxswains of landing craft. After Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the effort to get the ship and crew ready for action was intensified, with work at the Bethlehem Shipyard, Brooklyn, only interrupted by training operations and loading of supplies.

TO NEW ZEALAND
Finally on April 9, 1942, the Liggett left New York with 87 officers, 1461 troops, 12 nurses and one civilian aboard. She had to lay over at Balboa, Canal Zone, for a week, while the rest of the convoy went ahead, for necessary overhaul, but she anchored in Tongatabu Harbor, in company with a Dutch ship a week after the Battle of the Coral Sea. She finally arrived at Wellington on May 28, 1942. During June and July further work was done on the ship, new guns were installed and training continued, and on July 22nd she left Wellington as flagship of Transport Group X-RAY of the Amphibious Force, South Pacific Fleet. A three day dress rehearsal at Koro Island in the Fiji's followed and on the 31st the Group left for the long approach to the Solomons.5

GUADALCANAL LANDING
The Liggett was the first ship in the center column of Group X-RAY and acted as guide for the entire formation, with the screen disposed in three concentric circles of one, two and three miles radius from her. There were many submarine and airplane contacts en route. Before daybreak on August 7, 1942, the transports of Task Force 62 divided into two units, one of which passed to the northwest of Savo Island to take positions for the assault on Tulagi, Gavutu, and Florida Island, while the Liggett headed the other unit which passed south of Savo Island to land the First Marines on the North Coast of Guadalcanal Island. None of the Liggett's troops were landed in the assault waves, as they were support, special weapons and headquarters troops, so most of her boats were dispatched to other vessels for the first assault waves. At 1323 about 20 Japanese bombers, flying very high, dropped bombs but there were no hits. Unloading continued between air raids and by 2200 the beach had become so clogged that unloading ceased. At 1054 on the 8th the Liggett and the rest of the unit got underway in anticipation of an air attack which came at 1204 when 17 heavy enemy bombers swept over the rear screen in an apparent torpedo attack and dropped to an altitude below the height of the deck before reaching the transports. Two Japanese bombers, passing 75 yards to starboard of the Liggett below the level of the bridge, were shot down by the starboard batteries, while two more were brought down by the port batteries. None of the attacking planes escaped, the forward screen getting those which the transports missed. For several minutes after the attack, the transports steamed through plane wreckage. The Liggett suffered superficial damage. A crippled Japanese bomber crashed on the deck of the USS George F. Elliott (APA-13) on the Liggett's starboard flank and set a fire which burned fiercely, got out of control and caused the loss of that transport.

BATTLE OF SAVO ISLAND
Unloading was continued shortly after 1300 on the 8th when the Liggett and other ships returned to the transport area. They got underway again an hour later on a second alert but resumed unloading at 1630 when no raid materialized. During the afternoon Lt. Comdr. D. H. Dexter, USCG, was detached to set up the naval establishment on Guadalcanal and 25 enlisted men from the Liggett accompanied him. In the evening Captain W. O. Bailey, USN, with 22 officers and 308 enlisted men from the sunken Elliott came aboard the Liggett. At 0145 on August 9th heavy gunfire was heard off Savo Island and flashes were seen about four miles away. Enemy flares dropped from a great height silhouetted the transports as though a full moon were shining. As the savage battle of Savo Island was raging, the transports got underway in the vicinity of Guadalcanal and were not secured from general quarters until 0350 when they returned to the transport area and continued unloading. They had to stand out in cruising disposition and maneuver in open water twice more on reports of approaching enemy aircraft. Shortly before noon on August 9th, orders were received to hoist all boats and prepare to get underway. Survivors and casualties of the cruisers Vincennes, Astoria and Quincy sunk in the battle of Savo Island were taken aboard, making a total of 686 American survivors and 3 wounded Japanese prisoners on board, and at 1510 the Liggett as guide of the transport group put to sea. The USS Chicago torpedoed at Savo Island and able to make only 11 knots, with five destroyers acted as escorts to Noumea, New Caledonia.

RETURN TO GUADALCANAL
The Liggett remained at Noumea until September, 1942, and then proceeded to Tongatabu for training exercises. Toward the end of September she departed for Wellington, New Zealand, for drydocking and overhaul, returning to Tongatabu in October for availability, repairs and overhaul, with the training program continuing. She left Tongatabu for Pago Pago, Samoa, October 22, 1942, in company with the Barnett and President Hayes and here took aboard 69 officers and 1458 enlisted troops of Marine Combat Team No. 3. After a day's training in landing exercises at Vila Harbor, Efate Island, New Hebrides, she left for Guadalcanal on the 31st. After a temporary retreat southward due to the presence of Japanese warships and planes she reached Guadalcanal November 4, 1942. While unloading off Lunga Point that morning the transports were fired upon by a Japanese shore battery which bracketed the Liggett. She had to move out of range before resuming unloading. The Liggett's cargo was principally aviation gasoline and ammunition. That night the transports got under way to maneuver throughout the night. Next morning unloading was resumed but at 1045 Japanese aircraft were reported 40 miles distant and all ships got underway for Espiritu Santo as enemy bombers attacked Henderson Field.

--30--


LIGGETT A GOOD SAMARITAN
The Liggett was not designated as a supply ship and therefore it was not part of her regular duty to furnish supplies to other units of the military forces, but "in the traditional Coast Guard spirit of helpfulness, this Coast Guard manned attack transport extended a helping hand to all in need, even though it often meant shortages for the Liggett's own personnel." Survivors of the aircraft carrier Lexington were furnished clothing and toilet articles from the Liggett's lockers at Tongatabu after the Coral Sea Battle, as were also the survivors of the cruisers Astoria, Vincennes and Quincy at Guadalcanal who had lost everything in the Savo Island engagement. The Minneapolis lost her bow and all her bagged dry foods in an engagement near Guadalcanal. She had no coffee or flour for a few days till the Liggett arrived and transferred ten tons of the needed foods to her. Survivors of the destroyer DeHaven were furnished clothing and small stores. The battleship North Carolina, in need of fresh stores, was furnished a 15 day supply of fresh fruit, meat and vegetables for her 2000 men. On each arrival of the Liggett at Guadalcanal there was a lineup of officers to see the Supply Officer, representing the needs of fighting contingents of the Army, Navy, Marines and Coast Guard on the beach. None were turned away empty handed. Thirty tons of beef steaks went to the Marines; galley and mess gear and insecticide to the Navy and Coast Guard shore unit; candy bars and cigarettes went to the Army. Ice cream, fresh bread and canned fruits went to many of the Navy Destroyers. These are sample items, the list was long and continuous. Individual fighting men of all the U.S. Services and New Zealanders and Australians came aboard to get scarce items like candy, pipes, cigarettes, cigars, toilet articles, ice cream, soda pop, gloves, dungarees (or even just a hot bath), all luxuries in those early days of the Guadalcanal campaign. It seemed as though word must have spread rapidly on the Island and among the ships of the South Pacific Force, that the Liggett was a helpful ship where you could get the things you needed. The personnel of the Liggett were happy and anxious to help and the needy men were grateful indeed for all the little items that made their hardships a little easier.

PERILS FROM ATTACK
On December 3 and 4, 1942, Japanese submarines were the principal threat to the Liggett and other ships that had returned to Guadalcanal. Many depths charges were dropped by the escorts. The most dangerous moment came when the USS Southard made a sound contact less than a mile away, inside Gavutu Harbor on Florida Island, where the Liggett was anchored. For an hour all hands remained at general quarters while the ship was swung on her anchor to keep her head in the most favorable position to avoid being hit by torpedoes, but no ships were hit.

1943

TO BRISBANE AND RETURN
Again on December 13, 1942, the Liggett arrived at Guadalcanal and on the 15th with 1636 officers and troops of the First Marine Division aboard left for Brisbane, Australia. The ship arrived at Brisbane on the 19th and after debarking all troops departed for Noumea when she arrived Christmas morning 1942. She began 1943 by leading a group of transports from Noumea to Guadalcanal, carrying 60 officers and 1417 enlisted Army and Marine Corps personnel and their cargo. After many submarine attacks the unit arrived safely at Guadalcanal on January 4, 1943.

TO AUCKLAND AND RETURN
When all troops had been disembarked and cargo put ashore, 17 officers and 744 men of the 6th Naval Construction Battalion and their equipment were taken aboard for transportation to Auckland, New Zealand. Embarked also were 27 planters and missionaries who had been evacuated from Bougainville by the submarine USS Nautilus. The Liggett arrived in Auckland on January 12, 1943, and after disembarking passengers and their cargo, loaded stores and embarked personnel of the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Navy, U.S. Army Air Corps, Royal New Zealand Navy and Air Force. She left Auckland for Noumea on January 17, 1943, and arriving there on the 20th to take aboard additional Marine Corps personnel and cargo direct from the SS Lurline. On January 24th with 2085 troops and passengers aboard, the most she ever carried, the Liggett sailed for Efate Island. Here the Marines and their cargo were put ashore and, after other cargo had been loaded, the Liggett got underway for Guadalcanal. On February 2nd the convoy was ordered to return to Espiritu Santo because a force of Japanese destroyers was reported headed for Guadalcanal and at evening the ships anchored at the New Hebrides base. It was not until the 5th day that they finally got underway again for Guadalcanal. On February 7 the Liggett arrived at Guadalcanal for the 6th time since August 7, 1942. Unloading operations started even before the ship was anchored off the Tenaru River.

TO WELLINGTON AND RETURN
Once more the Liggett now took aboard for transportation, survivors from a ship sunk in recent naval action. One officer and 109 men of the destroyer DeHaven were embarked and at 1755 on February 7, 1942, the Liggett and other transports and escorts were ordered to get underway, immediately for Espiritu Santo. So precipitate was the departure that the beach party and a number of boats were left behind and many troops and some cargo had not been put ashore. The convoy steamed toward New Hebrides for nearly a day before being ordered back to Guadalcanal. Anchoring off Tenaru River at 1225 on the 9th the remaining troops and cargo were unloaded and units of the 8th Marines were embarked for transportation to Wellington, New Zealand, in company with the USS American Legion and George Clymer. A new and longer course through the New Hebrides was ordered because of the activity of enemy submarines. Arriving at Wellington February 16, 1943, the Marines and their cargo were put ashore. On February 19th the Liggett stood out to sea bound for Noumea and on the 24th with the rest of the unit, departed for Guadalcanal. There was a moment of excitement on the evening of the 26th when the USS Lardner, an escort, accidentally fired a torpedo during routine general quarters. The torpedo ran directly through the middle of the formation causing a flurry of emergency turns but hit nothing. The Liggett arrived safely at Guadalcanal for the seventh time on February 28, 1943.

TO FIJI ISLANDS
After taking aboard personnel and equipment of the 164th Infantry, the Liggett got underway on March 1, 1943, for Suva, Fiji Islands, mooring there on the 5th. Here the 164th Infantry was disembarked and other troops and cargo taken aboard for Espiritu Santo and the Liggett departed on the 11th in company with the USS American Legion, Fuller and 3 destroyers as escorts. She anchored there on the 13th and put her troops and cargo ashore the same day. On March 14th the Liggett began a 15 day availability period at the New Hebrides base. On the 26th she was designated temporary flagship of Transport Division 14 and two days later left for Lautaka, Viti Levu, Fiji Islands, arriving there

--31--


on the 30th. Here 115 officers and 1520 enlisted man and their cargo were taken aboard and on April 2nd the Liggett, as fleet guide and flagship, got underway for Guadalcanal. Although the Japanese were officially said to be defeated and the island secured on February 8, 1943, ships approaching or lying off the island for the rest of the year were in great danger of attack by sea and air. At no time was this more evident than as the Liggett arrived with Transport Division 14 on April 6, 1943.

ENEMY AIR ATTACKS
The Liggett was about 85% unloaded by 1845 on April 6th when all ships got underway to maneuver throughout the night. At 1934 some 6 high flying Japanese bombers, just out of range of a continuous barrage of anti-aircraft fire, dropped bombs on Henderson Field. Searchlights picked up and followed the planes as the anti-aircraft fire sought to reach them. Another spectacular air raid took place at 1942 when a second group of bombs were dropped on Henderson Field and Tulagi was also attacked. Firing continued until 2015. The Liggett returned next morning to complete unloading and embark the 18th Naval Construction Battalion. The USS Chevalier moored alongside to fuel. No sooner were the passengers and their cargo on board when suddenly at 1159 a red alert was sounded as Japanese planes were detected approaching. So quickly did the USS Cavalier cast off that she left an officer and 2 men aboard the Liggett, and so swiftly did the Transport Division and its escorts get underway that the Liggett left behind 23 boats and 61 members of her crew. Moreover, 29 men from the Lunga Boat Pool, U.S. Army and Royal New Zealand Air Force found themselves aboard without orders. The air strike was a big one. Over 100 planes had been sent in an effort to halt our advance north through the Solomons. Transport Division 14 had gotten underway barely in time and no enemy planes came near it, but at 1445 bombs were seen dropping 4 or 5 miles astern of the Liggett on a formation of ships, several of which were hit and sunk. The sky was filled with antiaircraft bursts until 1630.

TO WELLINGTON AND RETURN
The Liggett left her convoy and steamed into Espiritu Santo on April 9, 1943. Here she left all men carried away from Guadalcanal without orders and sailed for Noumea arriving on the 11th. Here Japanese prisoners were taken ashore and 65 casuals embarked for New Zealand On April 16th the Liggett arrived in Wellington for one month's availability. On May 16, 1943, the Liggett proceeded from Wellington to Pago Pago, Samoa, mooring there on the 21st. Here units of the 3rd Battalion, 3rd Division were embarked for Auckland. Here also Captain Roderick S. Patch, USCG, reported aboard as relief for Captain Perkins. Standing out of Pago Pago with other transports and escorts on the 23rd, the Liggett reached Auckland on the 29th and after discharging troops and cargo arrived in Wellington on June 3rd. On this day Captain Perkins was relieved as commanding officer by Captain Patch. Next day 49 officers and 1159 enlisted men of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marines were embarked for Training which was conducted off Paekakoriki, 50 miles north of Wellington and lasted until June 22nd. The Marines were then disembarked at Wellington and the Liggett sailed for Auckland, arriving on the 24th. Here Marines, cargo and stores were taken aboard and in company with the USS American Legion and George Clymer, the Liggett got underway for her ninth trip to Guadalcanal. Submarines were again the principal menace as the convoy approached Guadalcanal on July 6th, and depth charges were dropped by the escort USS Foote and ships made emergency turns until the contact was lost. Anchoring at Koli Point the Liggett, for the first time, remained at anchor until completely unloaded, omitting the usual night maneuvering.

TO AUCKLAND AND RETURN
On July 7, 1943, the Liggett got underway with other ships of her unit and, stopping briefly at Noumea for stores and fuel, proceeded to Auckland arriving July 15th. Here 79 officers and 1643 men and cargo of the 2nd Battalion, 19th Marines were taken aboard and on the 23rd the Liggett departed for her tenth trip to Guadalcanal. General quarters was sounded at 1121 on July 29th and the escorts opened fire on airplanes which had been challenged but failed to answer. The planes retreated hastily. The Liggett arrived off Koli Point, Guadalcanal on July 30th, and was unloaded without interruption by 0925 next day.

TO VILA, NEW HEBRIDES AND RETURN
157 casualties were taken aboard on July 31, 1943, for transportation to Vila, Efate Island, New Hebrides, where the Liggett anchored on August 3rd. After disembarking the casualties, the 828th Engineers, a Negro outfit, and their cargo, were taken for transportation to Guadalcanal. On the 11th possible submarine contacts caused emergency maneuvers twice before she arrived at Guadalcanal for the eleventh time on August 12, 1943. On the 13th after disembarking some troops, the remainder were put ashore off Kokumbona and shortly after noon the Liggett returned to Koli Point.

AIR ATTACK
That night a red alert was sounded at 2030 and the ship was completely blacked out, general quarters sounded and the anchor hove short. Shore searchlights sweeping the sky occasionally picked up a high-flying Japanese plane and two flares floated down over the Lunga Point anchorage. Then came a terrific explosion. A fierce fire was seen rising high into the sky. It burned until 2210. Not 'til after midnight was it learned that the USS John Penn had been sunk by an aerial torpedo while berthed in the very anchorage off Lunga Point which had been occupied by the Liggett the previous day. Next night at 0245 on August 14th the Fuller and Crescent City got underway on evasive tactics as escorts attacked sound contacts, dropping depth charges close aboard the Liggett. Returning to Koli Point at 0500 the transport stood out for Lunga Point to take aboard Captain Need and 26 officers and 308 enlisted men of the John Penn.

TO VILA AND RETURN
The Liggett then got under way and on August 18th anchored in Noumea where the survivors departed. The Liggett now became flagship for Transport Division 10 and for the next several days troops and cargo of the Third Division, New Zealand Army Expeditionary Force were taken aboard. On the 24th the Liggett led its unit into Vila Harbor, Efate, New Hebrides, where intensive exercises were conducted until September 1st when the transport got underway for Guadalcanal. On the 2nd two torpedo wakes were sighted and were visible for 4 minutes when they exploded at the end of their run close astern of the USS Fuller. A destroyer was detached from the convoy to search for the enemy submarine. The Liggett anchored off Point Cruz, Guadalcanal, on September 3rd.

ATTACKED EN ROUTE AUCKLAND
30 officers and 250 men of the Marine Air Group Twelve were now embarked and at 2051 on September 3, 1943, the Liggett was underway bound for Auckland with

--32--


the USS Craven as escort and screen. Shortly after noon on September 4th two or three bombs exploded close off the starboard bow. The Craven's radar had given no warning of this attack, nor had the Liggett's lookouts reported the danger. The Craven, mistakenly thinking a torpedo had exploded at the end of its run, took immediate anti-submarine action and dropped several depth charges. However, an enemy plane at 15,000 feet elevation was seen after the attack but it rapidly passed out of anti-aircraft range and did not attack again. Auckland was reached September 9th and, after unloading, the Liggett left next day for Wellington, where on September 13th she began an availability until the 25th. During this period, radar was installed on the Liggett for the first time. With units of the Third Marine Defense Battalion and their cargo aboard, and in company with the USS Libra, the Liggett departed Wellington on the 28th, other ships Joining the convoy en route. She arrived at Guadalcanal on October 5, 1943, and for the thirteenth time disembarked troops there.

TO VILA AND RETURN
The Liggett got underway for Vila Harbor, New Hebrides on October 7, 1943, performing evasive maneuvers when sound contacts showed enemy submarines in the area, and anchored there on the 9th. She stood out on the 15th with other ships, for Guadalcanal which was reached on the 17th for the fourteenth time.

BACK TO VILA
Proceeding to Koli Point, Guadalcanal, she embarked 1712 officers and men of the 3rd Marine Division and 172 officers and men of the U.S. Navy, with their equipment and on the same day got underway with the rest of the unit for Vila Harbor, New Hebrides, where she anchored on October 22, 1943.

BOUGAINVILLE LANDING
The weeks that followed were among the most eventful in Liggett history. The landing of Marines on Bougainville, northernmost Solomon Island had been set for November 1, 1943, and the Liggett had been designated to carry the flag of Commodore Reifsnider, Commander of the Transport Group. The rehearsal for the attack extended from October 22 to 28 at Efate Island, where one complete landing of Marines and all their equipment was made. Admirals Halsey and Fletcher held amphibious critiques aboard the Liggett. The Task Force got underway on October 28th. Dangers from enemy sea and air action never ceased and escorts dropped depth charges on the 29th and 30th. On the 31st general quarters was sounded frequently. At 2140 the radar picked up unidentified aircraft which remained on the radar screen as the convoy waited to repel enemy air attack. The approach was made to Empress Augusta Bay, Bougainville, Solomon Islands, early on the morning of November 1, 1943, and at 0550 destroyers began to bombard the beach. At 0615, the Liggett, at the head of the transport column opened fire on Torokina Point with 3 inch batteries and fired bursts of 20mm fire at Puruata Island on passing it abeam. At 0640, the Liggett anchored and six minutes later "Land the landing force" was ordered. The first wave landed at 0715 and the second at 0720. Machine gun fire from the center of the Liggett's beach fell on waves to the right but a dive bombing attack by ten of our planes wiped out this resistance. At 0729 the Transport Group got underway on emergency maneuvers and prepared to repel a Japanese air attack which came at 0805. Five minutes later 3 enemy planes had been shot down and the transports were back at their anchorages.

BEACH CONDITIONS BAD
Meantime, the operations on the beach assigned to the Liggett had not been progessing well. Surf on the beach was bad, especially on the four northernmost of the twelve beaches assigned respectively to the Crescent City, American Legion, Alchiba and Liggett. Here the beach was very narrow and had a 12 foot bank immediately behind the surfline for much of its length. Its steepness prevented proper grounding of boats along the length of their keels. The terrain consisted of swamp except for two narrow corridors of land raised a few inches above swamp level. In most places two bulldozers could not pass abreast between Jungle and sea. Admiral Halsey pronounced the beach "worse than anything ever encountered before in the South Pacific." Beach Yellow Four assigned to the Alchiba proved almost entirely unworkable, but effective measures to stop landing on it were not taken until all LCVP's and tank lighters were hopelessly broached or out of commission. By noon 20 boats of the American Legion were stranded. The request to move the location of the Liggett beach was denied and 19 of her LCVP's were lost during the landing operations. Altogether 86 landing craft from the entire Transport Group were broached and stranded during the landing operations.

AIR ATTACKS
In the midst of this confusion at 0839 the beach was straffed by enemy planes and several men were injured seriously on the Liggett and several Marines killed. One tank lighter was so seriously damaged it was lost. Later in the morning the surf grew worse and the Liggett's beach was shifted to a more favorable location to the east. This caused considerable delay and confusion, the loss of a large number of boats proving a serious handicap. At 0935 the Liggett was once more anchored and began unloading and debarking again. The first casualties were received aboard at 0940. Just before 1300 the transports got underway again as enemy bombers and fighters were sighted. As destroyers opened fire on the planes the transports maneuvered to avoid torpedoes. By 1456 the Liggett was anchored and unloading again and by 1700 all Marines had debarked but only about 20% of the cargo had been landed. By 1806 the Liggett was leading the task unit out to sea for night maneuvers.

BATTLE OF EMPRESS AUGUSTA BAY
The furious and famous Battle of Empress Augusta Bay was seen raging on the horizon at 0250 on November 2nd. At 0323 the alarm for general quarters was sounded and at 0339, with the sea battle dying in intensity the Liggett was secured from general quarters. Occasional gunfire and flares were still sighted as the naval battle drew farther away from the transport group. Unidentified planes showed on the radar screen and anti-aircraft fire was visible until morning. At 0904 the Liggett resumed unloading and by 1402 was completely unloaded. An hour later she got underway with part of the Transport Group for Tulagi Harbor when she anchored November 4th. Two days later she again became flagship of Transport Division 10.

RETURN TO BOUGAINVILLE
On November 10, 1943, troops and equipment of the 129th Army Combat Team were loaded and on the 11th the Transport Group again got underway for Empress Augusta Bay. En route there were attacks by air and undersea, the danger increasing as the task force neared Bougainville. From midnight on the 13th, when a destroyer opened fire on an unidentified aircraft, the screen continued to fire intermittently. The situation grew more tense as the Japanese planes dropped many float lights and it soon became apparent that the Task Force was surrounded by enemy planes

--33--


and the ship went to general quarters and commenced evasive maneuvers. Anti-aircraft fire, thought to be from our cruiser force, grew more violent. At dawn on November 13, 1943, no Japanese planes were in sight and for the second time the Hunter Liggett safely led its unit into Empress Augusta Bay. The beach assigned to the Liggett was in the lee of Puruata Island, making surf conditions excellent and by 1500 the transport was completely unloaded. The Liggett got underway at 1607 on the 13th, with casualties aboard, and arrived at Gavutu Harbor, Florida Island November 14, 1943.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The Liggett now prepared to return to the United States for extensive repair and alterations. Transferring 21 boats to other ships and most of her ammunition, she got underway for Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, on November 18, 1943, and arrived there safely on the 20th, though her escort dropped 8 depth charges on two sound contacts en route. She stood out for Samoa on the 22nd with 101 casualties aboard and arrived there on the 25th when 436 more patients were embarked and the transport departed for the United States on the 26th. She anchored in San Francisco on December 9, 1943. She underwent extensive repairs at Oakland, California until April 3, 1944, while her officers and crew were undergoing training at service schools.

TRAINING SHIP
On April 3rd, 1944, she departed for San Diego where she was attacked to Transport Division ONE as an amphibious training ship. From then until December 10, 1944, she was engaged in training Army and Marine troops in amphibious operations at Pyramid Cove, San Clemente Island and on the beaches near Camp Pendleton, California. After that until VJ-day emphasis was placed on special groups of trainees. On July 20, 1945, Commander (now Captain) C. C. Paden, USCG, relieved Captain Patch as commanding officer.

"MAGIC CARPET" DUTY
With the victory over Japan achieved on August 14, 1945, the Liggett was assigned to "Magic Carpet" duty of transporting officers and men of all the armed services back to the United States. After an availability for overhaul and repairs at San Diego, the Liggett left there on September 15, 1945, with 106 officers and 1559 enlisted men for Guam, Ulithi and Peleliu via Pearl Harbor where she embarked 25 more officers and 125 more enlisted men on September 23rd, arriving at Guam on October 4, 1945, Ulithi on the 13th and Peleliu on the 16th of October, 1945. She returned to San Francisco on November 2, 1945, and on the 17th departed for Guam arriving there December 5, 1945. She returned to San Francisco from the last of the "Magic Carpet" duty on December 20, 1945. Proceeding to Olympia, Washington, on March 9, 1946, her Coast Guard Crew was removed March 18, 1946.


USS ARTHUR MIDDLETON (APA-25)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

LAUNCHING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS Arthur Middleton was the first of three sister ships built by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Company of Pascagoula, Mississippi, for the American South African Lines, Inc. The hull design was the U.S. Maritime Commission type C3P. The sister ships were the Samuel Chase (APA-26) and George Clymer (APA-27). The keel of the Middleton was laid July 1, 1940, and she was launched June 28, 1941. Designed as a combination cargo passenger ship to run between New York and South and East African ports, she was named the African Comet. She was 489 feet overall, with a maximum beam of 69 feet 3 inches; a mean full load draft at 16,700 ton displacement, was 27 feet 4 inches The ship is all welded construction, single screw, geared turbine driven of 8500 shaft horsepower and has a maximum sustained speed of 16.5 knots. Her gross registered tonnage is about 11,800 and net tonnage about 8,150. She was originally designed to carry 116 passengers and a crew of about 220 men.

CONVERSION AND COMMISSIONING
The ship completed her trials shortly after the outbreak of World War II, and, with a civilian crew, proceeded to the west coast in January 1942, from where she made several trips to the South Pacific with troops. It was during this time that her name was changed to the Arthur Middleton, in honor of a South Carolina lawyer and revolutionary patriot and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The vessel now underwent a conversion for war service at San Francisco between July and September 1942, and after considerable alterations became the AP-55. The alterations consisted mainly of the installation of armament, elimination of the greater part of the boat deck, and the removal of her glass enclosed promenade to provide for the carrying of landing craft. Holds 1, 4 and 5 were subdivided by installing bulkheads. The ship was placed in formal commission on September 7, 1942, and manned by Coast Guard and Naval personnel Her first commanding office was Commander, (later Captain) Paul K. Perry, USCG:

1943

AMCHITKA, ALEUTIAN LANDING
The Middleton departed San Francisco on September 10, 1942, for San Pedro and San Diego where she engaged in training exercises for the next three months including landing rehearsals on Southern California beaches. She arrived at Oakland, California, on December 21st where she was loaded with Army equipment. Departing on the 23rd she arrived at Adak, Aleutians, via Dutch Harbor on December 29, 1942, and remained there until January 11, 1943, loading 102 officers and 2060 enlisted Army personnel. She arrived at Constantine Harbor, Amchitka Island in the Aleutians on January 12, 1943, slipping through the small inlet into the harbor at daybreak, where landing operations began. They followed the pattern that had been learned in the Solomons and at Adak and Atka. 36 foot Higgins boats and 50 foot tank lighters were used. The first wave moved in on the shallow, rocky beach with the temperature at 30°. All went well until later in the day when a fast williway (sudden wind peculiar to the Arctic) whipped down the harbor, threatening all the landing craft. To save the boats "men donned rubber suits and waded out to their armpits in the harbor to serve as human docks. They unloaded barges and passed supplies back, hand over hand, to keep them above water and the scum of the oil from the two ships." The wind increased to gale velocity before nightfall. Despite every precaution, most of the landing barges were wrecked in the storm. At 2307 on the 12th the Middleton unfortunately went aground on her port quarter, although her boats continued unloading operations in the harbor.6

RESCUES CREW OF DESTROYER WORDEN
The destroyer Worden, one of the escort vessels, dragged aground on the

--34--


reefs and eventually became a total loss. The Middleton's boats took off the Worden's crew, one boat being lost in the operation, but without casualties. The weather was extremely bad for the rescue. When the distress call came, a Coast Guard landing boat under Lt. Comdr. R. R. Smith, was rushed to the scene to render assistance. More help soon became necessary and Coast Guardsmen pulled their boats near to the vessel and amid "mountainous seas that threatened to swamp the landing boats" passed lines aboard to enable the man to slide down into the rescue craft. The Middleton's crew saved 6 officers and 171 men of the Worden's personnel but 14 of the destroyer's crew were lost. Lt. Comdr. Smith, Lt. (jg) C. W. MacLane, USCGR, Ens. J. B. Wallenberg, USNR, Russell M. Speck, Cox, USCG, Robert N. Gross, Cox, USCG, George V. Pritchard, Cox. USCG, and John S. Vandeleur, Jr. SM 3/c, USCG, all received the Navy and Marine Corps Medal, while four other officers and 42 enlisted men of the Middleton received letters of commendation from the Commander, North Pacific Force.

AGROUND
With the rescue of the Worden's crew completed, the work of debarking the troops and their equipment continued, the soldiers being debarked in the late afternoon, although the landing of the equipment continued for several days. Several boats mere severely damaged on submerged reefs in the harbor. The Middleton remained aground until April 6, 1943, salvage operations having continued in the meantime. There was very little light or heat on board during this time. There were constant alerts, Japanese planes coming over Amchitka daily for part of this period. On one occasion two bombs were dropped within 100 yards of the ship. On April 9, 1943 the transport was taken in tow by the USS Ute and, escorted by three destroyers, arrived at Dutch Harbor on the 13th where she remained until June 17, 1943, to make such repairs as would permit her to be towed to the continental United States. Departing for Bremerton Navy Yard on the above date, in tow of the commercial tug James Griffiths and the USS Cree, she arrived there June 27th.

TO THE PACIFIC
Having finished her repairs, the Middleton was again ready for sea September 9, 1943. Meanwhile the ship's type designation was changed from AP-55 to APA-25. Captain Severt A. Olson, USCG, had relieved Captain Paul K. Perry, USCG, as commanding officer on July 31, 1943. On September 12th the transport was at San Francisco, where 78 officers and 1354 men of the Army 119th AAA group were embarked. The ship sailed on the 18th for Suva in the Fiji Islands, where some stores were landed and then proceeded to Lantaka Harbor, Viti Levu Island, where the troops and a considerable amount of cargo and equipment were discharged. On October 6th, 3 officers and 97 soldiers of the New Zealand army came aboard for transportation to Wellington when the ship arrived October 12, 1943.

LANDING AT TARAWA
A few days later, personnel of the Third Battalion, Second Regiment, Second Marine Division Assault Landing Team, consisting of 54 officers and 1331 Marines, together with a small group of naval personnel, came on board. Training in landing operations were held in the vicinity of Wellington during the next few days, and the Middleton, now assigned to Task Group 53.1 of Task Force 53, proceeded to Hawke Bay for more rehearsals. Returning to Wellington on October 24th, the division, designated Transport Division 4, of Task Unit 53.1.1, with flag in the Zeilin, left November 1, 1943, for Efate in the New Hebrides. Here additional exercises were carried out until the 14th when the task group sailed for the occupation of Tarawa.7 The Tarawa Operation began on the morning of "D" Day, November 20, 1943, when the transports arrived in the transport area at 0350. Immediately the LVTs (AMTRACS) were unloaded and the Marines debarked into them. Other ships carrying LVTs sent them to the Middleton to receive troops all of whom were debarked by 0608. The first wave was ashore at 0913 where they were stopped against a barricade running parallel to the beach and 20 yards inland. The Middleton's beach party consisting of 3 officers and 43 enlisted men with Lieutenant (jg) Robert Hoyle, USCG, in charge, went ashore in the morning and remained there for the next five days, handling the boats and equipment as they came to the beach. Two of the Middleton's officers were wounded during the operation. Transport Division 4 remained at Tarawa until November 29, 1943, discharging supplies and equipment and while there acted as receiving ship for Marine casualties from the fighting ashore. On November 29th the Middleton proceeded to Pearl Harbor as a unit of task group 53.8 arriving there December 7, 1943.

1944

KWAJALEIN LANDING
Between December 13, and 20, 1943, a detachment of Marine and Naval personnel embarked upon the Middleton for training in amphibious landings near Kahuili, Hawaiian Islands, in preparation for the next assault. Returning to Honolulu, the transport returned to Kahuili on January 4, 1944, where 63 officers and 1389 men of the First Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment were embarked and after additional training and rehearsals in the vicinity of Maalaca Bay, Maui Island, through the 17th, returned to Pearl Harbor. Here Captain G. W. McKean, USCG, temporarily relieved Captain Olsen, who went to the hospital. The Middleton as a member of Transport Division 20, consisting Of the Heywood, President Monroe, Electra, and Leonard Wood (Flag), all assigned to Task Group 51.1, departed Pearl Harbor, January 23, 1944, as the Attack Force Reserve Group for the operation against Kwajalein. The capture and occupation of the atoll went exceedingly well and the Reserve Group was not required in the initial operation, but entered the lagoon next day where it remained until February 15, 1944.

LANDING AT ENGEBI ISLAND
The Transport Division, consisting of the same ships, now designated Task Unit 51.14.2, entered Eniwetok Atoll on the early afternoon of "D" day, February 17, 1944. Some howitzer troops and equipment were transferred from the ship to LST's and from them to LVTs (Amtracs) for the occupation of the small islands to the west and southeast of Engebi Island. These troops were to harass the enemy on Engebi during the night and prevent their escape to the small islands when the main assault got underway on February 18, 1944. "W" hour for the first wave of LVT's on Engebi was set for 0900. Engebi, the largest island in the northern part of the atoll, contained an air strip, and was the objective of the Northern Attack Force to which Transport Division 20 was attacked. The first wave, led by boats from the Middleton, landed at 0902. The island, in the meantime, had received a thorough pounding from the battleships and cruisers of the fire support force, which materially contributed to its subjugation and reduced resistance. Word was received from the

--35--


ship's beachmaster, Lt. (jg) Robert Hoyle, USCG, that the beach assigned to the Middleton had been secured by 0930. One member of the beach party was wounded in action. The ship's beach party received very favorable comments for its work under fire and Lt. (jg) Robert Hoyle, USCG, the ship's beachmaster was later awarded the Silver Star. Two other members of the crew, Malcolm Anderson, RM 3/c, USCGR, and Russell Alson, RM 3/c, USCGR, were awarded Bronze Stars. The securing of Engebi went well and mopping up operations were in progress before nightfall. Five Japanese prisoners were brought aboard and the transport also received a total of 76 Marine casualties aboard by evening. Supplies and equipment continued to be unleaded until the afternoon of the 19th when the First Battalion was re-embarked to assist in the operation on Eniwetok Island. The Middleton arrived at the southern area and anchored about 2200. The situation on Eniwetok Island however had clarified and the troops aboard the Middleton were not needed.

LANDING AT PARRY ISLAND, ENIWETOK ATOLL
The occupation of Parry Island was set for February 22, 1944, this island being one of the atoll about 2 miles NNE of Eniwetok Island. "Z" hour for the landing of the first wave was set for 0900 and it landed exactly on time, the Marines debarking from the Middleton beginning at 0600. The assault went well, but it was the following morning before Parry Island was secured. The Marines who engaged in the assault re-embarked on board on the 24th. During the operation 276 Army, Navy and Marine Corps casualties were received on board, 12 of whom died later. During the assault on February 22, 1944, the LCI 442, a rocket fire ship of the first wave, was hit by an enemy shell and was seen to burst into flames. Lt. (jg) John M. Johnson, USCGR, the first wave guide officer from the Middleton, in an LCVP, want alongside and learned that the magazine was on fire and that the ship was in imminent danger of blowing up. A number of dead and injured were lying on the deck. Lt. Johnson and members of his boat crew removed the injured to their LCVP and transferred them to the hospital ship Solace, all received the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for their heroism. The Eniwetok operation having been completed, the Middleton, on February 25, 1944, proceeded to Pearl Harbor, stopping off at Kwajalein to discharge the Marines taken aboard for the Eniwetok operation and to re-embark 1118 Marine officers and men of the 25th Regiment, 4th Marines, for transportation to the Hawaiian Islands. On arrival at Pearl Harbor, Captain S. A. Olsen, USCG, returned and resumed his command, relieving Captain G. W. McKean.

SAIPAN LANDING
The Middleton was in quarantine from March 12, 1944, until May 1, 1944, when an epidemic of bacillary dysentery broke out on board. All personnel were kept on board. Meanwhile the transport proceeded to sea on April 20th to search for the LST-20 reported broken down 400 miles southwest of Honolulu. She located the LST on the 23rd and took her in tow, returning to Pearl Harbor four days later. On May 7, 1944 the 2nd Battalion Marines of the 2nd Regiment, 2nd Division were embarked and the ship engaged in landing rehearsals and drills until the end of May, when on the 30th, now assigned to Transport Division 10, and Task Unit 52.3.1, the Middleton sailed with Transport Divisions 10, 18 and 28 for the occupation of Saipan. They arrived at Eniwetok on June 9th and left there on the 11th for Saipan where they arrived on June 15, 1944, which was "D" day. Transport Division 10 conducted a feint on the northwest side of the island at Tanapag Harbor, for the purpose of splitting the enemy's defending forces, while the main assault was taking place at Charan Kanoa, about 8 miles southward. The ship's boats were lowered and several waves, without troops, were started for the beach. They were recalled when a few miles off shore, hoisted, and all ships of Division 10, then proceeded to the scene of the main attack. The diversionary plan succeeding in dividing the Japanese and undoubtedly contributed materially to the successful landings at Charan Kanoa. Debarkation of troops and equipment from the Middleton began there at 1400 and continued until dark, when the transports retired from the area until the following daybreak. Marines who were debarked in the afternoon were compelled to remain in the LCVP's overnight because of bad surf landing conditions, but landed next morning by transferring to Amtracs. The next two days were occupied in discharging armament, equipment and troops. Casualties from the fighting area were periodically received on board. Between the night of the 17th and 21st the Middleton was absent in the retirement area. Returning to the anchorage off Charan Kanoa, the Middleton completed her discharge of personnel and cargo and on the evening of June 23rd, together with two other transports and three escorts, formed Task Unit 51.18.16 and, with a destroyer escort, departed for Eniwetok, arriving on June 27, 1944. At Eniwetok the Middleton took aboard 122 Japanese prisoners, including 4 children and 1 woman, for transportation to Pearl Harbor. 350 Army personnel were picked up at Tarawa and Pearl Harbor was reached on July 9th. Next day the ship proceeded to San Diego, arriving there on the 17th. After a short stay she sailed on the 22nd to Hilo with members of the 3rd Battalion, 26th Regiment, 5th Marine Division debarking them on the 31st. Another return trip was made to San Diego, when Marine personnel of the 3rd Battalion, 27th Regiment were taken aboard and landed at Hilo on August 20th.

LANDING AT LEYTE
Preparation for the next operation, that against Yap, were now proceeding and after a few days in repair status, Army personnel of the 2nd Battalion, 381st Infantry Regiment, 96th Division, came on board for several days of amphibious warfare. Sailing on September 15th, assigned to Transport Division 10, Task Group 33.2, the Middleton stopped at Eniwetok for a few days and then proceeded to Manus, anchoring in Seeadler Harbor on October 4th, 1944. Here a change in plans occurred. The Yap operation was cancelled, and the group was reorganised as Task Group 79.4, Transport Division 10, consisting of six other transports with the Middleton, as Task Unit 79.4.1 for the operation against Leyte, Philippine Islands. The Division arrived at Leyte Gulf on "A" day, October 20, 1944. The troops on board the ships of the division constituted a reserve of the Sixth Army making the assault landings. Some field artillery troops and their equipment were landed on "A" day on the beach near Dulag. The greater part of the remaining troops and their equipment were debarked on the 23rd. The ship, completely discharged on the following morning, sailed for Humboldt Bay, New Guinea where it arrived October 29, 1944, with a number of other transports in Task Unit 79.15.2. Proceeding to Morotai Island, 600 Army personnel, vehicles and cargo were leaded for Leyte and discharged at Dulag on November 14, 1944, the ship returning to Manus on November 20, 1944.

1945

LINGAYEN GULF LANDING
Transport Division 10 left Manus on November 27, 1944, and proceeded to Borgen Bay, New Britain,

--36--


where next day Army personnel of the 2nd Battalion, 185th Regiment, 40th Division were taken aboard and, during December, 1944, landing rehearsals were held frequently, the Middleton going from Borgen Bay on the 10th, to Manus, and then to Huon Gulf, and back to Seeadler Harbor on the 21st remaining there until the 31st. On New Year's Eve, Transport Division 10 sortied out of Manus to participate in the Lingayen Gulf, Philippine Islands operation. "S" day for the assault was set for January 9, 1945, and on arrival in the Lingayen Area, unloading operations began immediately. The Middleton's boats were assigned to the fourth and succeeding waves, the fourth wave landing at 0800, the others a few minutes later. No enemy opposition was met at the beach, which was quickly established by the ship's beach party. The landing operation went smoothly and neither boats nor personnel suffered even minor injury or damage. All troops and their equipment were debarked by 1810. The transports, however, were subject to frequent air attacks throughout the day. Although the Middleton was not hit or damaged, flak from numerous ships repelling an attack at 0750 fell on board injuring one officer and 14 of the ship's crew. In order to avoid after dark attacks, the transports sailed hurriedly for Leyte, the Middleton's beach party and 10 boats being left behind to be taken on board the Cambria, Joining the ship later in Leyte Gulf.

RETURN TO LINGAYEN GULF
While at Leyte, Transport Division 10 was dissolved and the Middleton was assigned to Transport Division 35 of Transport Division 12. 1215 officers and men of the 8th Regiment, First Cavalry Division were loaded and with other units of Task Group 78.4 returned to Lingayen Gulf, discharged the troops and immediately came back to Leyte on January 30, 1945. While en route to Lingayen and when off the southwest end of Negros Island on the night of the 24th, a torpedo was seen passing across the bow of the ship. The Shadwell, another ship of the convoy, had been torpedoed a few hours before.

OKINAWA LANDING
Departing Leyte on February 2, 1945, Task Unit 78.2.9 to which the Middleton was attached sailed for Gavutu Harbor, Florida Island in the Solomons, arriving on the 11th and remained there until the 23rd, when she moved over to Guadalcanal to load for the Okinawa operation. The period between February 23rd and March 14th was spent in the vicinity of Guadalcanal, holding exercises with other ships of Transport Division 35 and loading Army, Navy and Marine Corps units including Sea Bees, Medical Teams, Military Government Units, and Military Police, totaling 77 officers and 954 men, including an 850 ton cargo and 87 assorted vehicles. The Transport Division then became a unit (TU 53.1.2) of Task Group Able (TG 53.1) of the Northern Attack Force for the operation against Okinawa and sailed for Ulithi March 15, 1945, arriving there on the 19th. Departing Ulithi, the staging point for the Okinawa assault, on March 27, 1945, the Task Group arrived on the outer area off the southwest part of Okinawa on "L" day, April 1, 1945. The embarked units were not expected to be landed for a few days and the Middleton's boats were detached to assist in the debarking of the 29th Marines, from other ships in the division. The ships retired from the area for the night but returned to the transport area next morning, when unloading personnel and equipment continued until another night retirement. Discharging was resumed on the 3rd and by the afternoon of the 4th all troops and equipment had been landed. There were numerous air alerts and one enemy suicide plane crashed 1000 yards off the Middleton's starboard beam, having been shot down by the ships in the area. The Middleton left Okinawa for Saipan on April 5th, 1945, when she anchored on the 9th where she fueled and proceeded to Pearl Harbor. Arriving there on the 21st she departed next day for San Pedro, California, to undergo a needed overhaul. She remained here until August 31, 1945, and in this period was converted to a relief amphibious group command ship. On August 20, 1945, Captain Olsen was relieved by Captain J. A. Glynn, USCG.

"MAGIC CARPET" DUTY
Hostilities having come to an end on August 14, 1945, the Middleton departed for Leyte on September 8, 1945, with 1210 officers and man, as army replacements. She arrived there on September 29th and was assigned to Commander Service Force Pacific under Commander Task Group 16.12 for "Magic Carpet" duty of returning military personnel home. She sailed for San Francisco on October 5, 1945, with 1450 officers and men of Army and Navy personnel, was diverted to Portland, Oregon, and arrived there October 21, 1945. Here over 200 of. the Middleton's officers and crew were transferred either for release or for other assignments. The Middleton departed on November 9, 1945, for another trip to the Philippines arriving at Leyte on November 27th and at Dumaguete, Negros Island on the 30th where 1558 Army officers and men were taken on board for arrival at San Pedro December 18, 1945. This was the Middleton's last trip as a Coast Guard manned Navy transport. She proceeded to San Francisco on January 15, 1946 and February 9, 1946, her Coast Guard crew was removed and steps were taken to return her to her former status in the American Merchant Marine.


USS SAMUEL CHASE (APA-26)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Samuel Chase (APA-26), formerly the SS African Meteor, was commissioned as a Navy Transport on June 12, 1942. She is 489 feet long, with a beam of 69.5 feet, and is 16,480 gross tons. Her loaded cruising speed is 16.5 knots. She was placed under the command of Commander Roger C. Heimer, USCG, with a full complement of 41 Coast Guard officers and 454 Coast Guard crew. She departed on her first test run in Chesapeake Bay on July 1st, and on August 25th began a training program under Commander, Amphibious Training Command, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. She was designated as a unit of Transport Division 11, under Commander, Transport Amphibious Force, the Division Commander and his staff coming aboard September 26th.

1942

TO BRITISH ISLES
With 1431 officers and men of the First Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th U.S. Army Division (re-enforced) aboard, the Chase got underway on September 26, 1942, as part of convoy AT-23, consisting of nine transports, with the USS Arkansas as guide. Nine destroyers in the escort swept and scouted, and the convoy proceeded at 15 knots on a zig zag course. Stopping at Halifax, Nova Scotia, on the 28th, the convoy continued toward its destination until October 6th when it split up and the Chase became convoy guide, dropping anchor at Belfast Lough, North Ireland, the same night. The troops disembarked next day. The troops returned on board on October 14th, together with several English Army and Navy officers and men and moored at Firth of Fyne, Scotland, two days later. She anchored at Greenoch, Scotland on the 23rd.

--37--


USS Arthur Middleton (AP-25) FROM ALASKA TO OKINAWA
USS Arthur Middleton (AP-25)
From Alaska to Okinawa

USS Samuel Chase (APA-26)--NICKNAMED 'THE LUCKY Chase'
USS Samuel Chase (APA-26)
Nicknamed "The Lucky Chase"

--38--


LANDING AT SURCOUF, ALGERIA
The Chase as a member of convoy KMF-1, consisting of 44 United States and British ships departed for North Africa on November 4, 1942. They passed through the Straits of Gibraltar two days later. On November 7, 1942, at 0545, a plane glided in from the port quarter dropping a torpedo which hit the USS Thomas Stone. Another torpedo dropped off the quarter of the Chase, missed her by 50 yards. Enemy bombing planes were engaged at 1639 and signal lights, believed to be from an enemy submarine were also sighted. The boats were swung over the side and debarkation commenced at 2242, north of Surcouf, Algeria. By 0105 on the 8th all boats were loaded and the first wave hit the beach at 0138. Very little resistance was reported. Of 23 boats used in the initial waves by the Chase, 7 foundered and sank. Debarkation of troops and supplies continued all day, a concentrated bombing attack by enemy bombers and torpedo planes being carried out at 1700. Bombs of one attack fell 75 yards off the starboard bow of the Chase, while in another, a stick of bombs fell 100 yards off the stern. Torpedo planes released two torpedoes simultaneously, one of which missed the starboard quarter by 20 yards, the other passing between the ship's bow and the anchor chain. Choppy water continued and the Chase lost all but 7 of its boats by broaching and filling up. Bombing attacks continued on November 9th, many directed at the Chase, and several near misses were encountered. Several ships in the convoy were hit and sunk. Three enemy planes were shot down by the Chase, which got underway and maneuvered during the attack. Two more torpedoes missed her by less than 100 yards. On November 10th, 37 officers and 455 crew survivors of the USS Leedstown came aboard. More enemy bombers came over on the 11th, the forward batteries opening fire. Unloading was resumed after the attack and the Chase sailed with two members of her crew missing, but with 29 Coast Guardsmen who had been attached to the USS Exceller when she sank. There was more gun fire and depth charges in the area on the 12th. On the 14th she entered Gibraltar Harbor. Underway again on the 15th, at 0312, the carrier HMS Avenger was torpedoed on the Chase's port quarter. She was hit in such a fashion that her screw could be seen rotating above water. Two minutes later there was a tremendous blast accompanied by a long roar, with smoke reaching 250 feet in the air. Her entire flight deck seemed to blow off and her hull tear apart. She probably broke in two, before sinking. The USS Almack was torpedoed and the USS Etterick believed to be hit, as escorts dropped depth charges on the 18th. On November 21, 1942, the Chase anchored at the Firth or Clyde.8

RETURN TO ALGIERS
Loaded with 1397 officers and men of the British and United States Armies, the Chase was underway again on the 27th as a member of Section A of convoy KMF-4. On December 1st submarine contacts were reported within attacking distance. Surface contacts were also reported as the Chase cleared for action. Escorts were dropping depth charges on the 2nd and 4th as other subs were contacted. On December 6, 1942, the Chase dropped anchor at Calais Dock, Algiers, Algeria, and debarked troops and equipment. After she was unloaded the Chase got underway. Ten minutes later two torpedo planes approached and dropped torpedoes which passed right through the spot where the Chase had been anchored. On December 9th troops were picked up for transfer and next day the Chase was underway in convoy KMF-4. A British escort was observed to be hit and sunk and after other depth charge explosion the transport entered Gibraltar on December 12th. Here precautions were taken against the enemy's suicide methods of attacking our ships. These precautions consisted of full sea watches, lookouts, all guns manned, riflemen and small boat patrols. The Germans were using swimmers who attached TNT to the keel of a ship, as well as swimmers who guided torpedoes toward ships.

1943

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
On December 30, 1942, a convoy was formed with the USS Philadelphia as convoy commander and the USS New York as convoy guide and was en route on January 1, 1943. A submarine was spotted on the surface at 10,000 yards on the 3rd. Firing commenced and depth charges were dropped after the sub had crash dived. More sub contacts and firing continued and on the 4th the wreckage of a sub, whose sinking was credited to one of the escort vessels, was sighted. Arriving at Norfolk on January 12th, the Chase went into drydock on the 26th.

TO ORAN
On February 21, 1943, the Chase was moored at St. George, Stated Island, New York, and on March 3rd 148 officers and 538 enlisted men of the Navy came aboard at Bayonne, New Jersey, for further transfer. On March 5th, there were 170 officers and 1103 enlisted personnel of the Navy aboard for passage and the Chase was underway in convoy UGF-6. On the 14th escort vessels, for the third straight night reported contact with undersea vessels. These and surface contacts continued for two days. On the 17th a plane on the port beam dropped depth charges and unidentified aircraft were picked up with the enemy broadcasting frequently. Escorts continued to drop depth charges next day as the convoy entered the Straits of Gibraltar and continued as the ships proceeded into Oran Harbor, Algeria on the 19th. On the 23rd, while moored, tracer bullets were observed astern and it developed that a ship anchored outside the break water had been bit by an aerial torpedo. The following day the Chase disembarked the Navy personnel and moved to Arzew, Algeria. On April 1, 1943, the Chase was attached to the Commander, U.S. Amphibious Forces, Northwest African Waters.

AMPHIBIOUS TRAINING
During April 1943, the small boat division trained at Advanced Amphibious Training Base at Arzew while the Beach Party was stationed at Demarne, Algeria, for training. On May 19, and 20 the Chase fired on enemy planes and on the 24th was underway anchoring at Arzew while training continued with boats at Ain El Turk beaches. Beginning May 26, joint training operations with the 16th Regimental Combat Team of the First Infantry Division were held. This was believed to be the first time that a full Battalion Combat Team had been loaded from the rail and the first time that boom boats bad been loaded at the rail. It was found to take 30 minutes from the time of lowering the first boat to the rail to the time of lowering away the fourth wave. On June 12th as flagship of Task Force 81 the Chase proceeded to Algiers with 92 officers and 734 enlisted men of the First Infantry Division and 43 U.S. Army, and 43 officers and 124 men attached to the flag of Admiral Hall, and on the 24th proceeded 65 miles off the beach southwest of Cape Caxine where maneuvers were held.

SICILY LANDING
On July 9, 1943, the Task Force was on its way to Sicily when ack-ack fire commenced. The Chase boats were unloaded July 10, 1943, with the fourth wave in the vicinity of Gela and some later on.9 Planes were overhead, with

--39--


heavy gunfire continuing most of the time. The USS Maddox was sunk. Dive bombers dropped a string of 50 pound bombs from the bow to stern of this vessel, the last one only 50 feet away from the starboard side of the fantail. Our boats had to do their own unloading as no beach party assisted them. The beaches were very heavily mined and strafing and dive bombing was heavy. Four JU-88's flew over dropping bombs, the nearest to the Chase being 75 yards off the port quarter. The USS Barrett was hit by a skip bomb. Later 13 JU-88's flew over without a warning and dropped bombs. A 10,000 ton Liberty ship with its cargo still aboard was hit. All available boats were detached to pick up survivors. More sticks were dropped, presumably at the transports who seemed to be the object of such attacks. Another dropped 75 yards astern. The Chase started unloading on July 10th and its boats made some 247 trips to the beach. During the entire operation five boats were lost. On the other hand 31 boats were salvaged by the Chase crew in the specially equipped salvage boat (LCM-converted). Boats in need of repair were brought aboard, repaired and placed in the water. Likewise VP's were repaired and serviced. The Chase's boats brought back wounded from the beach. While enemy planes were overhead very little of the time during the 10th to 12th, sea conditions were far from ideal. On July 15, 1943, the Chase anchored at Algiers. On July 28th she became a member of Transport Division Five.

SALERNO LANDING
Amphibious training continued from August 9th to 15th with 34 officers and 908 enlisted men of the First Battalion, 143rd Regiment, 36th Division on board; also 322 members of the 344th Engineers' Regiment U.S. Army, and 3 officers and 43 enlisted men of the 4th Beach Battalion, USN. Troops of the 36th Division and Brigadier General M. A. Cowels came aboard on the 17th, the total on board now being 48 officers and 1238 enlisted men. Major General F. L. Walker, USA, also came aboard. In company with the Dickman and Barnett maneuvers at Arzew started on the 27th, with Rear Admiral John L. Hall, Jr. USN, Commander Eighth Amphibious Force in the Chase. On September 3rd the 36th Infantry re-embarked and on the 5th the Chase left Oran, proceeding as part of the Southern Attack Force against the Italian Coast, south of Frume Sele, Gulf of Salerno. The ship proceeded through the swept Tunisian war channel with red alerts and heavy gunfire beginning. Numerous floating mines caused the boats to proceed cautiously. The Chase anchored 15 miles from the beach, having on board all reserve troops. Casualties and prisoners of war were brought back in the boats. The British ship Abercrombie hit a mine. No one was on the beach to unload the boats. The whole operation was a repetition of Gela, Sicily. Fighter bombers straffed continually. All cargo was unloaded in 25 hours. Boat trips were 32 personnel; 172 cargo; 15 miscellaneous and 17 LCM loads. The Chase received a "Well Done" from Commander Task Force 81 when unloading was completed. On September 10 heavy bombing attacks were met on a night when flares were dropped. Six bombs dropped close to the Chase, two 500 pound delayed action bombs exploding 150 yards off the port bow, jarred the ship terrifically. More depth charges were dropped on the 11th. "E" boats were contacted and fired upon. One of the ships in the convoy was torpedoed. More depth charges on the 13th. Next day the Chase anchored at Mers El Kebir, Algeria, and on September 26, 1943 at Algiers.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
Joint French and American amphibious training begun on October 22 extended through the 31st. On November 1, 1943, the Chase was attached to Transport Division Five, and on November 21, 1943, anchored off Pier 19, Staten Island, where 1000 passengers were disembarked. From November 26 to 30 the ship was under repair, and on the 30th was assigned to the Sixth Amphibious Force and reported to Commander, Amphibious Training Program of the Atlantic Fleet. Moored at Norfolk from 1 to. 13 December, the Chase held drills and assisted with Amphibious Training.

1944

TO GLASGOW
On January 1, 1944, the Chase was assigned to Commander Task Group 20.1 and anchored in the transport area of Chesapeake Bay carrying out scheduled training program. Between January 5th and 7th officers and men of the 34th Battalion, 305th Infantry came aboard for training and on the 22nd the Chase engaged in Amphibious Landing Training with the 2nd Battalion, 307th Infantry aboard. Captain E. H. Fritzsche, USCG, reported aboard for duty as commanding officer and on January 29th took over command while the ship was in drydock at Norfolk. On February 1st the Chase was assigned to the Commander Transport Division One, Amphibious Training Command, U.S. Atlantic Fleet and 62 officers and 1290 enlisted men reported aboard on February 10th for transportation. On the 12th as part of convoy VT-8, including Bayfield, Dickman, Barnett and Henrico, the Chase assumed convoy guide temporarily and arrived at Glasgow, Scotland, on February 22, 1944. Four days later the troops disembarked. On March 1st, the Chase proceeded to Plymouth and on the 8th took aboard 84 officers and 1152 enlisted men of Regimental Combat Team No. 60, Major General Hubner, USA, and Colonel Bacon, USA, reporting for temporary duty. Army personnel departed next day as the Chase anchored at Firth of Clyde and on the 29th moved to Devonport, England.

ATTACKED BY BOMBERS
On April 1, 1944, the Chase was assigned to Commander of Transports, 11th Amphibious Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet and on May 1st 116 officers and 1271 enlisted men of the First Division, U.S. Army were embarked, with Brigadier General W. C. Wyman, U.S. Army and aides reporting on board next day. On May 4th maneuvers and disembarkment of troops was held and next day the ship anchored at Plymouth, England. On May 23rd, the Chase, still practicing gunfire anchored at Loch Long, Scotland. While at Portland, England, on May 28th at 0100 general quarters were sounded and 3 bombs were heard, one off the starboard quarter, and the other two off and near the port bow. All the Chase guns opened fire. Two more bombs straddled a ship on her starboard beam. The second exploded 300 yards just forward of the Chase's beam.

NORMANDY BEACH LANDING
On June 6, 1944--D-day--all personnel of the First Infantry Division, U.S. Army, disembarked at Normandy10 Beach and casualties were brought aboard. On the following day the ship anchored at Weymouth, England, and the casualties departed. The Chase remained at Weymouth until June 19, 1944. The Chase had gotten underway from Portland Harbor, England, as a convoy unit in Assault Force "O" Task Force 124, on June 5th, 1944. At 0510 lowering of boats commenced at UTAH beach and by 1110 all vehicles and planes had been unloaded, and all hatches secured. LCI(L) 85, hit by shell fire on the beach, came alongside and a fast job of removing casualties started, all available boats being used. Six boats failed to return, having become casualties of gunfire, underwater obstacles or swamping.

--40--


The Chase still assigned to Transport Division One, Commander, Transports 11th Amphibious Force anchored at Loch Long, Scotland, after leaving Weymouth on June 19th.

LANDING IN SOUTHERN FRANCE
On July 10th she moored at Oran, Algeria, and two days later was reassigned to Transport Division One, 8th Amphibious Force, U.S. 8th Fleet. She entered Naples July 16th, departing three days later and on the 24th began embarking officers and men of the First Battalion, 15th Infantry, 3rd Division, for temporary duty and training exercises until the 31st, anchoring at Pozzouli Bay, Italy, on August 1st, 1944. On August 13, 1944, the Chase got underway out of the Bay of Castlemere, Italy, having embarked officers and men of the Third Infantry Division, U.S. Army. Unloading commenced at 0546 on August 15, 1944, at Yellow Beach, Bale de Pampelonne, Southern France. Enemy fire was moderate, two crew members receiving gunshot wounds. Casualties were brought aboard. All vessels opened fire on enemy planes in the area and there were frequent alerts.

TO NAPLES AND MARSEILLES
On August 26, 1944, the Chase took on officers, nurses and 942 enlisted men of the French Army at Mers-el-Kebir, Algeria, for transportation and September 1st found the Chase en route from the Dragoon Area of Southern France to Naples, Italy. From September 4th to 6th while anchored at Naples, 16 French officers, 85 U.S. Army officers and 1110 enlisted men of the 17th Field Artillery Battalion embarked for transportation and were underway next day. The Chase anchored at the Gulf de St. Tropez, Southern France, and disembarked the troops. Again entering the Bay of Naples on 12 September, officers and men of the 376th Engineers and attached units of the 7th Army reported aboard for transportation. On the 15th and 16th more men of the 376th Engineers reported aboard, also 48 French officers and nurses and 688 French enlisted personnel. Entering Marseilles on September 19th the troops and French personnel disembarked and the following day the Chase was underway anchoring at the Bay of Naples on September 22nd. Two days later 6 officers and 93 enlisted men of the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion reported aboard and on the 26th 61 officers and 1200 enlisted men of the same outfit reported on board and next day the Chase got underway unloading all cargo and troops at Marseilles on the 29th. On the 30th, with 30 officers and enlisted men of the U.S. Navy aboard, the ship moved to Marseilles Roads and on October 2nd were en route to Oran in company with the Henrico, Dickman and Barnett anchoring at Mers-el-Kebir, Algeria on the 4th. On the 12th with officers and men of the U.S., French and Italian Armies on board, the Chase left for Marseilles and arrived there on the 13th, unloading on the 14th. On the 15th, 21 officers and 409 enlisted men, repatriated prisoners of war of the British Imperial Force, and 8 officers and 457 enlisted men, repatriated prisoners of the Polish Army, moving to the Bay of Naples where they disembarked October 11, 1944.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
On October 20, 1944, the Chase arrived at Oran, where orders were received to proceed to the United States on the 25th. She arrived at South Boston Annex, Boston Navy Yard, on 8 November, 1944, and was placed in drydock on the 13th, with repairs continuing for the rest of the month. On December 1st she moored at South Boston Navy Yard.

1945

TO THE PACIFIC
On January 15, 1945, with 49 officers and 1146 enlisted personnel of the 111th USNCB reporting on board, the Chase was ordered to proceed to the Canal Zone. On the 17th she moored at Norfolk and arrived at Cristobal, Canal Zone on January 24th. She arrived at Pearl Harbor February 6th and was underway for Eniwetok on the 11th arriving on the 20th. On March 1, 1945, she was assigned to Commander, Transport Division 50, Transport Squadron 17, U.S. Pacific Fleet. She anchored in Leyte Gulf March 4th and at Calicoan Island Dock, Samar, on the 7th, where she commenced to unload the Sea Bees. Arriving back at Leyte on the 9th she began embarking officers and men of the 77th Division U.S. Army on the 10th. While on maneuvers on the 14th and 15th of March, the vessel struck the edge of a five fathom shoal and on the 20th the USS Pitt took off the troops. Captain Paul K. Perry relieved Captain Fritzsche as commanding officer on the 19th and a Board of Investigation conducted an inquiry from March 22 to 26th. Arriving at Ulithi, Caroline Islands, on March 30th, the Chase was reassigned to Commander, Amphibious Force 13, and next day moored at Guam, embarking casualties and troops of the 3rd Marine Division from Iwo Jima on the 3rd and 4th.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
Heading for the United States the Chase arrived at Pearl Harbor on April 14, 1945, and at San Diego, on April 23rd, where troops were disembarked. She arrived at San Francisco next day. On June 1st she was assigned to Transport Squadron 17, of Transport Division 50 and arrived at San Diego, June 3rd to participate in maneuvers until June 6th arriving back at San Francisco on the 11th of June, 1945.

BACK TO PACIFIC
On June 19, 1945, 40 officers and 1086 enlisted men of the 37 USNCB reported for transportation to Eniwetok and the Chase departed same day arriving at Eniwetok on July 2, and at Ulithi on July 17. On July 20th she was en route Okinawa, where she picked up many underwater contacts and alerts. She arrived at Buckner Bay, Okinawa, on the 24th and during a two week stay many alerts were held, mostly at night, as Japanese suicide planes concentrated on United States ships. Arriving at Ulithi on August 10th, war was declared over while there on the 15th.

TO JAPAN
On August 20, 1945, she anchored in San Pedro Bay, moving to Cebu on the 24th where she was assigned to Commander Transport Division 35 (Temporary) Com TransRon 13. On August 27th men of the 182nd (Americal) Division were embarked and on September 2nd, she started for Tokyo Bay where she anchored in the outer Breakwater area, Yokohama, Japan, on September 8th, unloading next day at the pier. On September 10th they were underway on the return trip to the Philippines.

RETURN TO JAPAN
Arriving at San Pedro Bay on September 16th she commenced loading sen and equipment of the 77th Army Division on the 20th, and from 25th September to October 5th, 1945, was underway for Hokkaido, Japan. Here she debarked troops of the 77th Division in landing craft and moored at the pier at Otaru where she commenced unloading cargo. She commenced the return trip to Leyte Gulf on October 7, 1945. Putting into Tokyo Bay for two days to avoid a hurricane she arrived in the Philippines October 17, 1945.

--41--


TO CHINA
From October 21 to 25, she embarked supplies and personnel of the 96th USNCB for Tsingtao, China, getting underway on the latter day. She anchored there November 1, 1945, and after unloading remained there until November 18th, when she began loading high point military personnel for transportation to United States.

TO UNITED STATES
On November 19th, 1945, the Chase was underway again, arriving at Guam on the 25th, and after loading additional passengers departed for the United States arriving at San Diego, December 10, 1945. She left San Diego December 29, 1945, for Okinawa, Hongkong and Yokosuka, Japan, returning to San Francisco February 18, 1946. She proceeded to Norfolk and on March 21, 1946, her Coast Guard personnel was removed and she was assigned to the 16th Fleet (Inactive).


USS BAYFIELD (APA-33)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Bayfield (APA-33) was converted to an attack transport from a standard Maritime Commission C-3 hull. She was built by the Western Pipe and Steel Company at San Pedro, California, and launched on February 15, 1943. Conversion to a naval auxiliary was accomplished by the Atlantic Basin Iron Works, Brooklyn, New York, and she was placed in full commission as an APA (attack transport) and RAGC (reserve Headquarters communication ship) on November 30, 1943, with a Coast Guard crew under the command of Captain Lyndon Spencer, USCG. Berthing space was provided for about 2000 men. She began her shakedown cruise on December 4, 1943, out of Hampton Roads, Virginia, and during the trials was sent to the Norfolk Navy Yard for further alterations found necessary while undergoing her tests. The shakedown cruise in Chesapeake Bay was completed December 21, 1943.

1944

NORMANDY LANDING
The Bayfield was assigned to Task Group 20.1 on December 21, 1943, for amphibious training and on its completion the transport was drydocked at Norfolk for repairs. Work was completed in February, 1944, and she was ordered to New York to load troops for overseas destination. On February 11, 1944, she sailed in convoy UT-8 for Glasgow, and arrived there on February 22nd without incident. She then proceeded to Portland, England, to await further orders. She arrived at Plymouth on March 11th and on the 14th departed for Clyde to carry out landing exercises. She returned to Plymouth on March 21st. On March 29th Rear Admiral D. P. Noon, USN, and his staff reported on board and the Bayfield became flagship of Force "U". From this time until early June, the ship was headquarters for planning the procedures Force "U" was to implement in the Normandy invasion. Short runs executing various maneuvers and orders were conducted and further alterations were made during April. On April 26, the ship proceeded to sea to carry out rehearsal exercises which were completed on the 29th, when she returned to Plymouth. Troops composing the assault elements of the 4th Battalion, 8th Infantry and 87th Chemical Battalion, Company C, were embarked on May 7, 1944, and on June 5, 1944, the ship was in convoy for Bay of the Seine in execution of plans for the invasion of Normandy. On June 6, 1544, at 0305 troops debarked bound for UTAH beach near Marie Dumont, France. For 19 days the Bayfield functioned as a supply and hospital ship in addition to carrying out her regularly assigned duties as the Admiral's flagship. She returned to the United Kingdom on June 25, 1944.11

SOUTHERN FRANCE LANDING
After a short period allowed for necessary repairs the Bayfield was assigned to Task Group 120.6, formed on July 5, 1944, and sailed for Oran, Algeria, where she arrived on the 10th when the unit dissolved. Reassigned to convoy UGF-12 the Bayfield proceeded to Naples on the 12th. Here Task Force 87 was organized and on the death of Admiral Moon, Rear Admiral Spencer Lewis, USN, assumed command of it. Training exercises were held on August 6 and 7 in preparation for the invasion of Southern France and on August 13, 1944, the Bayfield departed Naples for the assault on the Southern Coast of France, Here she debarked the Commanding General and troops of the 36th Division near St. Raphael in the early morning of August 15, 1944. Captain Rutledge B. Tompkins, USN, became Commander of the Task Force on August 29, 1944, and on September 5, 1944, Captain Spencer was detached and Commander Gordon A. Littlefield, USCG, assumed command of the Bayfield. Returning to Naples on September 10, 1944, the Bayfield was ordered to Oran, via Bizerte, and on September 16, 1944, she was underway for the United States in convoy GUF-14. She arrived at Norfolk on September 26, 1944, and debarked passengers. Captain W. R. Richards, USCG, assumed command on September 27, 1944.

TRAINING EXERCISES IN HAWAII
The Bayfield was drydocked and overhauled at Norfolk Navy Yard between September 28th and October 29, 1944, and on November 7, 1944, sailed for Panama and the Pacific in Task Unit 29.6.11 with Amphibian Group 7 and passengers for Pearl Harbor. The task unit was dissolved at Cristobal and the Bayfield arrived at Pearl Harbor November 26, 1944, where passengers were debarked. On November 27, 1944, Commander Transport Squadron 15 and staff reported on board. The Bayfield departed Pearl Harbor on December 6, 1944, as flagship of Task Unit 13.10.16 on maneuvers conducted off Maul. Mooring at Honolulu on December 9, 1944, she embarked troops of the 2nd Battalion, 390th Infantry, USA, on December 11th and departed to continue amphibious exercises which were completed with her return to Honolulu on the 16th.

1945

IWO JIMA LANDING
On January 1, 1945, she sailed to Maui to load cargo and troops of the Fourth U.S. Marine Division at Kahului Harbor and returned to Pearl Harbor January 4th. She was on amphibious exercises from January 6, to 9 at Haul, and from January 12 to 18 conducted further amphibious exercises. She sailed from Pearl Harbor January 27, 1945, in Joint Expeditionary Force 51 (Vice Admiral R. K. Turner) en route to Iwo Jima via Eniwetok and Saipan, arriving at the latter place on February 11, 1945. Rehearsal exercises were conducted off Tinian on February 12 and 13. The Force departed Saipan for Iwo Jima on February 16, 1945, and on "D" day (February 19, 1945) the Bayfield anchored off Iwo Jima, where she landed troops and equipment and functioned as a hospital and prison of war ship as well as flagship for Task Group 53.2. Ten days were spent off Iwo Jima and on March 1, 1945, the Bayfield sailed for Saipan in Task Unit 51.29.2.

--42--


Passengers, casualties of the Fourth Marine Division and prisoners of war were discharged there on March 4, 1945.12

OKINAWA LANDING
Supplies and equipment of the Second Marine Division were loaded on March 6 and 7, and the Bayfield was underway on the 11th to participate in rehearsal exercises in preparation for the invasion of Okinawa. She returned to Saipan on March 19, 1945, and on the 27th was underway to Okinawa with Task Unit 51.2.1. On Easter morning, April 1, 1945, she hove to off the southeastern coast of Okinawa, unloading troops for a diversionary feint, this operation being repeated on April 2nd. From April 2nd to 11th, the Bayfield was at sea, in retirement, awaiting orders. On April 11th she set course for Saipan in Task Group 51.2.2 with troops still on board and the Task Group was dissolved on arrival at Saipan on the 14th, troops being disembarked the same day. The equipment was unloaded May 17th. From April 14th until June 1945, the Bayfield lay at anchor in Saipan Harbor awaiting orders, while she was being painted and routine repairs were being made.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
On June 4, 1945, the Bayfield was underway in Task Group 12.2.2 en route to islands in the South Pacific for pool-up lifts. From Tulagi the ships of the Group were ordered to various ports to load cargo. The Bayfield departed Tulagi for Espiritu Santo on June 14, 1945, and arrived there on the 17th. After loading she sailed for Tinian on July 1, 1945, and arrived there on the 9th. After unloading cargo she proceeded to Saipan the same day, where more cargo was unloaded and passengers embarked for Guam for which island the Bayfield departed July 13th and arrived on the 14th, unloading passengers and the balance of her cargo. On July 16, 1945, the transport loaded passengers and departed for San Francisco where she arrived July 30, 1945. Here she received drydocking and routine maintenance work in preparation for the expected invasion of the Japanese home islands.

LANDING IN JAPAN
The Bayfield was still in San Francisco, however, when the war ended on August 14, 1945. She sailed on August 25th to Eniwetok for outward routing to Subic Bay, Philippines, to discharge passengers and cargo and then to proceed to Zamboanga, Philippine Islands. Arriving at Eniwetok September 7th she departed next day on revised orders for Tacloban, Philippine Islands and arrived at Leyte Gulf, September 14th and after unloading passengers and cargo at Samar, reported to Commander, Amphibious Group 3 for duty in the occupation of Aomori, Japan. On September 17 and 18 elements of the 81st Division and their equipment were combat loaded and on the 18th the Bayfield departed in Task Force 34 for Aomori, where she arrived on September 25, 1945, and, amphibious landings were carried out. On the 29th she sailed for Saipan as part of Task Unit 34.3.25 which was dissolved on arrival on October 4, 1945, and the Bayfield reported for "Magic Carpet" operations of returning personnel to the United States. She departed Saipan October 7, 1945, loaded to capacity and arrived at San Pedro on the 20th. She made two more trips across the Pacific, to Jinsen, Korea one leaving San Pedro November 3, 1945, and another leaving Seattle December 29, 1945. She returned to San Francisco February 6, 1946. Her Coast Guard crew was removed March 8, 1946.


USS CALLAWAY (APA-35)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS Callaway (APA-35) was built by the Western Pipe and Steel Corporation at San Francisco, California. She was launched October 10, 1942, as the SS Sea Mink. Her length was 439 feet 7½ inches, with a full load displacement of 17,321 tons. Upon completion of construction as a straight cargo ship she was moved to the East Coast to be converted into an APA (attack transport) and on September 11, 1943, was commissioned at the Atlantic Basin Iron Works, Brooklyn, New York, as the USS Callaway (APA-35) by the U.S. Navy, an assault Coast Guard manned transport. Captain D. C. McNeil, USCG, was her first commanding officer. On October 8, 1943, two LCM's, two LCPL's, 24 LCVP's, with 12 officers and 118 men were brought aboard to form the boat landing division. Her ordnance consisted of two 5"/38's, 18-20 MMs, and two quad 1.1 inches.

1943

TO THE PACIFIC
She proceeded to Norfolk to load ammunition, fuel and take on the balance of the crew and on October 23, 1943, departed for Panama where she arrived October 29th en route San Diego. Arriving at San Diego on November 9, 1943, she began embarking troops of the 4th Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, and from then until January 13, 1944, was engaged with other transports of the amphibious attack type in extensive war practice maneuvers off San Clemente Island, California. On January 13th the Callaway departed San Diego in Task Group 53 en route Hawaiian Islands where further maneuvers were held off Maui.

1944

KWAJALEIN LANDING
After two days for refueling at Lahaina Roads, the Task Group, with the Callaway as flagship for Transport Division 26, departed Hawaii for the invasion of Roi-Namur, Kwajalein Atoll. The ships arrived at the transport area at 0515 on January 31, 1944, and standing off the island objective began disembarking troops and unloading cargo in the lowered boats in the first assault wave. On February 4, 1944, the Callaway departed Kwajalein for New Caledonia in Task Group 53.13, stopping at Funa Futi Harbor in the Ellice Islands to refuel and arrived at Noumea on February 19, 1944.13

EMIRAU LANDING
On March 7, 1944, as flagship for Task Unit 32.4.4 the Callaway departed Noumea en route Guadalcanal where she arrived March 10th and embarked troops. The ships of Task Unit 31.2.2 engaged in maneuvers until March 18, 1944, and then headed for Emirau Island in the St. Matthias Group which was invaded on March 20, 1944. In this operation the Callaway landed the reserve troops and departed for Guadalcanal the same day. On arrival there she discharged the few Marine and Navy personnel on board and on March 24th left in company with Task Unit 34.9.1 for Funa Futi where she arrived March 28th. Here having refueled and supplied ships in the atoll with fresh water, she departed with the Task Unit on April 2nd for Canton Island in the Phoenix Group. There she embarked troops for transportation back to Honolulu where she arrived on April 10, 1944.

--43--


SAIPAN LANDING
On May 5, 1944, the Callaway headed for Maui where she loaded a battalion landing team of the 23rd Regiment, 4th U.S. Marines as well as Regimental Headquarters troops and departed for Pearl Harbor on May 8th. On May 14th as part of Task Force 52 (Vice Admiral Turner) and flagship of Transport Division 26, the Callaway left for practice maneuvers in Lahaina Roads returning to Honolulu on the 29th. She stood out for Eniwetok the same day where she arrived 10 days later to refuel and reprovision other ships of the Task Group, such as destroyers, LST's and LSD's. Here she remained until June 11, 1944, when she departed with Task Group for Saipan, Mariannas. Arriving at Saipan on June 15, 1944, at 0531, the first wave of boats hit the beach at 0835. At 1435 the Callaway began receiving casualties from the beach, these being the first of 224 casualties to come aboard during the nine days the transport remained in the area. An air attack from a group of six planes followed and was met by concentrated anti-aircraft fire from all ships present. On June 24th the Callaway departed for Eniwetok and from there to Pearl Harbor, arriving on July 20, 1944.

PALAU LANDING
On August 7, 1944, the CallawayY embarked the 321st Infantry, 81st Division, U.S. Army, and on the 12th stood out from Oahu, T.H. with Task Group 32.4, again as flagship of Transport Division 26, arriving at Guadalcanal on the 24th. Here amphibious maneuvers were held until September 8th when the Task Group stood out for the invasion of Palau, where the Callaway again landed the first assault waves for her fourth invasion, this time hitting the island of Anguar in the Palau Group on September 17, 1944. She retired as part of Task Unit 32.19.8 from the Palaus and arrived at Seeadler Harbor, Manus Island on September 27, 1944. Here she remained until October 7th when she proceeded independently to Humboldt Harbor, New Guinea to load troops and cargo for her next invasion.

LEYTE LANDINGS
On October 16, 1944, the Callaway stood out of Humboldt Harbor with Task G roup 78.6 as flagship for Transport Division 26 en route to the invasion of Leyte Island, Philippines. The convoy had to dodge submarine contacts several times en route and one night barely escaped torpedoes launched from Japanese aircraft. She arrived at San Pedro Bay October 22nd to discharge troops and cargo within 4 hours, and departed with Task Group 78.6 for Kossel Passage off the northern tip of Babelthuap Island in the Palau Group. After a short stay here, she left with Task Group 78.13 for Guam to load troops of the 77th Division, U.S. Army, for transportation to Noumea. Her destination was changed, however, to Manus Island where she arrived November 15, 1944 and loaded troops and cargo until the 17th when she departed to re-enforce the Leyte Landing forces which were still undergoing severe resistance and air attacks from the Japanese. En route the convoy was again attacked by Japanese planes without damage. The convoy arrived on November 23, 1944, and unloaded amid 14 air attacks. The next day the Callaway shot down an enemy plane of the "Judy" type which had dropped two bombs near a ship anchored some 1500 yards off her port bow. That night the Task Group stood out for Humboldt Bay where she arrived November 29, 1944.

ENEMY AIR ATTACK
On December 12, 1944, the Callaway proceeded to Sansapor, New Guinea, where she loaded troops and cargo. While at Sansapor there were several probable enemy air attacks but none came within visual range until December 30, 1944, when an enemy plane was picked up by radar coming overland toward the anchorage and was then sighted visually. The plane was identified as a "Jake", a Japanese reconnaissance plane, and was fired on by all shore batteries. The ships in the area did not open fire until the plane had circled over the water and started back inland, east of the Army shore installations. Then the order to fire was given and the Callaway scored a direct hit with her 1.1 inch starboard quad mounts, making the second enemy plane to her credit.

1945

CALLAWAY HIT BY SUICIDE PLANE EN ROUTE LINGAYEN GULF
With the Seventh Fleet's Task Group 78.5, the Callaway, as flag of Transport Division 26, steamed out of Sansapor early in January, 1945, for the long, treacherous route through Dinagat and Surigao Straits, between Leyte and Mindanao, close to the southern tip of Sulu and Mindoro on the way to Lingayen Gulf, Northern Luzon, It was on this trip that the Callaway was accredited with her third plane and that several crew members lost their lives. On January 8, 1945, the Callaway was attacked by a Jap fighter plane classified as a "Tony". The plane first attempted bombing but only scored near misses and continued on a straffing run from aft to forward, injuring one of the crew who was at his station forward. The plane then passed over the bow making a wide circle to starboard about 3000 yards distant. Then it started on its suicide run, encountering strong and heavy anti-aircraft fire f rom all the starboard batteries. This set the plane afire before it hit the superstructure of the Callaway aft of the navigator's bridge At the instant of impact the plane burst into flames, enveloping the crew and equipment of that sector of the ship, with an intense localized heat. Four landing boats (LCVP's) in No. 1 davit were rendered useless. While thirty one of the ship's crew lost their lives from this attack, not a single soldier aboard suffered any injury and the Callaway continued to steam along under her own power, on station in the convoy, and remained in formation. Nineteen of the Callaway's crew were buried in the China Sea immediately after the attack. Three more were buried later the same day. Other men who died subsequently were buried at sea on January 9th and 10th. Among the dead was Lieutenant Commander Leland M. Burr, Jr. USNR, a member of Commodore Wright's (Task Force Commander) staff. Of those killed, twenty were Coast Guardsmen and eleven were of the Navy.

LINGAYEN GULF LANDING
On January 9, 1945, the Callaway successfully and expeditiously did her part on schedule in the Lingayen Gulf operation under numerous air attacks from enemy planes which escaped through the outer screen. In company with Task Group 78.9 the Callaway left Leyte Gulf and headed for Ulithi where she arrived on January 23, 1945, to reprovision and repair damage sustained in the suicide attack.

IWO JIMA LANDING
The Callaway was made flagship for Transport Division 33 on January 31, 1945, and on February 6th, after completing structural repairs, proceeded to Guam where she loaded U.S. Marines and cargo for the floating reserve of amphibious troops for the invasion of Iwo Jima. She arrived off Iwo Jima March 1, 1945, and anchored in the transport area, unloading troops as called for. She received casualties from the beach by hoisting loaded LCVP's to the rail and by

--44--


USS Callaway (APA-35) ATTACKED BY JAP DIVE BOMBERS OFF LUZON
USS Callaway (APA-35) attacked by Jap dive bombers off Luzon

CAPTAIN R. T. McELLIGOTT, USCG (RIGHT) HEARS HIS ORDERS ON TAKING COMMAND OF USS CAVALIER (APA-37)
Captain R. T. McElligott, USCG (right) hears his orders on taking command of
USS Cavalier (APA-37)

--45--


boards loaded with ambulatory cases from LSM's alongside. She remained off Iwo Jima until March 5, 1945, when she departed for Guam to unload the same troops she had embarked there previous to Iwo Jima. On March 9, 1945, she left for Tulagi, where she picked up additional crafts and proceeded to Noumea, arriving there on the 21st. Proceeding to Espiritu Santo on the 27th she was drydocked and repaired.

TO LEYTE
Returning to Noumea on May 1, 1945, she embarked troops of the 1st Battalion, 323rd Regiment, 81st Division, U.S. Army, as floating reserves for transshipment to Okinawa and departed May 3, 1945, with Transport Squadron 11 for Seeadler Harbor, Manus Island, where ammunition and stores were loaded. Departing for Leyte next day the Squadron arrived there on the 16th and disembarked troops and unloaded cargo at Tulosa.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The Callaway departed Leyte on June 1, 1945, for Pearl Harbor, proceeding independently and unescorted, and arrived there on the 9th, where she embarked 202 Japanese prisoners of war and civilian war workers and proceeded alone to San Francisco. Arriving there on June 16, 1945, she discharged passengers and anchored mid-stream where Captain McNeil was relieved as commanding officer by Commander J. H. Betzmer, USCG. On the 18th the Callaway commenced a complete overhaul at the Western Pipe and Steel Company, Pier 27, San Francisco.

TO JAPAN
On August 22, 1945, the Callaway took aboard 52 civilian women, 60 Navy officers and 161 enlisted naval personnel for transportation to Honolulu arriving there August 27, 1945, where all passengers were debarked. On September 7, 1945, as part of Transport Division 57 she departed Honolulu with elements of the 389th Infantry Battalion and 890 tons of supplies and equipment to be used for the occupation of Wakayama, Japan. She arrived at Saipan on September 19, 1945, and departed for Wakayama September 22, 1945. She anchored there on the 27th and after unloading departed on the 29th in the same transport division for Tinian where she picked up military personnel for San Francisco. Orders were changed en route and she arrived at Portland, Oregon, October 21, 1945. She made two more round trips to Manila, finally arriving at New York April 14, 1946. Her Coast Guard crew was removed May 10, 1946.


USS CAMBRIA (APA-36)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND EQUIPMENT
Having been launched by the Western Pipe and Steel Company, San Francisco, as the Sea Swallow, the USS Cambria (APA-36) sailed as a merchant ship for a short time before she was drafted for service by the U.S. Navy. A C-3 type cargo ship she was 492 feet long with a displacement tonnage of 12,500 tons. After being converted into an attack transport she came out of the Navy Yard, Hoboken, New Jersey, with a Coast Guard ship's crew of 48 officers and 488 enlisted men as well as a group of 70 staff officers. She was equipped to carry 54 troop officers and 1071 enlisted troop personnel, and land them, with their tanks, trucks, Jeeps and other equipment on enemy beaches in bar 27 landing craft. She was commissioned on November 10, 1943, with Captain Charles W. Dean, USCG, as her first commanding officer. Daring the latter part of November, training in drills, handling of landing craft and normal ship routine was designed to make sailors out of a green crew of Coast Guardsmen.

1944

MAJURO LANDING
On December 11, 1943, she put out to sea en route Pearl Harbor, via the Panama Canal, continuing the training program and holding practice firing on the way. Arriving at Pearl Harbor, on January 6, 1944, a few days later, she became the flagship of Rear Admiral Harry W. Hill, USN, Commander Group 2, Fifth Amphibious Force, Pacific. On January 23, 1944, carrying the 2nd Battalion, 106th Infantry Regiment, she departed Honolulu as part of Task Group 51.2. On January 31, 1944, she participated in the landing on Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, in which no opposition was encountered.14

ENIWETOK LANDING
On February 17, 1944, the Cambria carried into the lagoon at Eniwetok Atoll the Commander of Expeditionary Troops, Brigadier General T. E. Watson, USMC, and the 3rd Defense Battalion. During the remainder of February the Cambria functioned as flagship, providing boats and crews for assault waves and shuttle service, for the securing of Engebi, Eniwetok and Parry Islands. These operations were ones in which little opposition was encountered and no casualties were sustained or equipment damaged on the Cambria. On March 5, 1944, the Cambria departed for Pearl Harbor. She arrived at San Francisco on March 21, 1944, and repairs and alterations were begun which continued through all of April, 1944.

SAIPAN LANDING
The Cambria departed for Hawaii on May 1, 1944, carrying 1100 Army and Navy personnel as passengers and exercising in anti-aircraft firing en route. Arriving at Pearl Harbor on May 8, 1944, Rear Admiral Hill again hoisted his flag in the Cambria. During the rest of May wide scale amphibious maneuvers were carried on in the Hawaiian Islands, with 595 officers and men of the Headquarters Group, 8th Marines, 2nd Marine Division, and 465 officers and men of the Northern Troops and Landing Force, which the Cambria was to carry to Saipan. On June 11, 1944, the transport departed Eniwetok as part of Task Group 52.16. The landing at Saipan on June 14, 1944, was characterized by hard work under daily air raid alerts, as many as four alerts a day being sounded between the period of the initial landing on June 14 and July 9, 1944, when the island was finally declared secured. The Cambria's boats carried support landing teams from the transports to the LVT transfer area, and seven boat officers acted as wave guides to the reef off Green beaches. An hour and ten minutes after "H" hour, casualties began to be received from the beach and during the operation the Cambria handled 715 wounded men. Since Commander Group Two was in the C[ ]BRIA, the ship remained after being unloaded and gave assistance by providing working parties and boats for the unloading of other ships, as well as furnishing fighter direction control during the daylight hours. A number of Japanese prisoners were received for medical care and safe-keeping. No bombs fell closer than 200 yards of the ship.

TINIAN LANDING
On July 15, 1944, Bear Admiral Admiral Hill assumed command of Task Force 52 designated to effect the capture of Tinian. The Cambria acted as Headquarters Ship and

--46--


carried no troops. Boat officers were used in the landings, the beach party being employed as before, and men and boats assisting in unloading other ships. 613 casualties were handled during this operation and on August 1, 1944, Tinian Island was declared secure. On August 9th the Cambria loaded with 150 officers and men of Sea Bee Detachment 1038, and 68 officers and 759 men of Headquarters Detachment, 4th Marine Division, departed for Pearl Harbor, via Eniwetok. On August 27, 1944, two days after unloading troops at Honolulu Rear Admiral Hill shifted his flag to quarters ashore and two days later Captain H. B. Knowles, USN, Commander, Transport Division 18, transferred his flag to the Cambria.

LEYTE LANDINGS
September 1944, was spent in preparation for the next offensive and on October 3, 1944, the Cambria entered Seeadler Harbor, Manus Island, with 75 officers and 1102 enlisted men of the 96th Division, U.S. Army. A week later she became a part of Task Group 79.2 for the Leyte operation. The landings on Leyte were effected October 20, 1944. The Cambria's beach party remained on shore after the ship departed for Manus Island three days following the initial landing. 70 casualties were taken care of by the medical staff. Another trip was made to Leyte to transport 59 officers and 1026 enlisted men of the 187 Paraglider Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army, which embarked in New Guinea.

1945

LINGAYEN LANDINGS
The Cambria now rehearsed at Manus and Cape Gloucester, New Britain for the next landing during December, 1944. The routine consisted of air raid alert drill, use of landing craft, streaming paravanes, practice firing, making smoke, debarking and re-embarking. As the flagship of Commander, Transport Squadron 12, the Cambria departed for Lingayen Gulf carrying 52 officers and 545 enlisted men of Headquarters Company, 108 Infantry Regiment and other units of the 40th Division. She was a member of Task Group 79.2. On the trip to Luzon the crew had their first experience with suicide plane attacks, and witnessed successful enemy attacks on the CVE Kitkun Bay and USS Columbia. There was practically a continuous air raid alert during January 9th and 10th as the Cambria was engaged in landing troops at Lingayen. Early the first day a single bomb was dropped 100 yards a stern and an hour later three bombs fell in the vicinity of the ship. An assist was scored by the 1.1's in the latter instance and the following day another assist was scored on an enemy plane which dropped bombs off the starboard quarter and astern. Upon completion of the mission the Cambria departed for Leyte. Within 11 days the transport was attached to the 1st Lingayen Reenforcement Group, with ten transports and six LSD's in the squadron. En route, the LSD Shadwell was hit by a torpedo from a Jap plane and sent back to Leyte. The unloading of reenforcements at San Fabian, Lingayen Gulf, was completed in one day, January 27, 1945, and the squadron left late that afternoon arriving at Leyte three days later.

OKINAWA LANDING
The Cambria and other ships of Transport Squadron 12, as part of Task Force 53, spent the latter part of February and all of March, 1945, in the Solomon Islands and Ulithi Atoll. On March 27, 1945, she departed Ulithi with 44 officers and 670 enlisted men of the 6th Marine Division. On Easter morning, April 1, 1945, she arrived at the outer transport area ABLE off the southwest coast of Okinawa, experiencing four air alerts before 0700, there being seven alerts, in all on the first day. The first three days were spent unloading troops and cargo and on the 3rd the beach party of 3 officers and 43 enlisted men went ashore to assist in the unloading. CIC and gun crews were constantly alerted and these, together with the use of smoke screens, served to good advantage in the protection from aircraft. On the 6th, over 100 Jap suicide planes were shot down by surface and air support within 30 miles of the Cambria, four reaching the transport area, all of which were destroyed. Instead of leaving the area after unloading, the Cambria, as flagship of Transport Squadron 12, remained and assisted in unloading other transports, LST's and cargo ships. When the ship finally pulled away from the scene of action on April 10, 1945, her casualties were only two minor ones. The Cambria got underway for San Pedro, California, to make repairs and alterations. Soon after her arrival Captain H. W. Stinchoomb, USCG, took command, and started a program of training for officers and men.

TO JAPAN
On August 26, 1945, the Cambria now an AGC relief ship, departed the west coast still the flagship of Commodore Knowles. The capitulation of Japan had been announced on August 14, 1945, and this changed the plans for landing on Japan from one of force to that of landing occupation troops. After picking up casual Marine troops at Pearl Harbor, the Cambria proceeded to Guam where they were discharged. On September 17, 1945, as flagship of Temporary Squadron 12 composed of 21 ships, she left Saipan carrying the Headquarters Company of the 2nd Marine Division. As if it were a summation of all the other landings the Cambria had made, she led her squadron through the narrow channel of Nagasaki Ko, into Japan itself. In the afternoon of the 23rd of September, 1945, the Cambria wardroom was the scene of an impressive ceremony as Japanese Lieutenant General Toguchi and Governor of Nagasaki Prefecture and Acting Mayor of Nagasaki Naguao, received instructions from Major General Leroy B. Hunt, USMC, Commanding General of the 2nd Marine Division Occupational Forces, Brigadier General John T. Walker, USMC, Chief of Staff and Commodore H. B. Knowles, USN, ComTransRon 12. Through the porthole one could see effective results of precision wreckage of the Mitsubishi shipyards, and a little further away, the almost unbelievable destruction by the second atomic bomb.

"MAGIC CARPET" DUTY
On October 9, 1945, the Cambria put into Manila Bay and soon was assigned "Magic" Carpet" duty, that of taking troops back to the states. First going to Shanghai, China, and a few days later to Okinawa to complete the load, the Cambria departed for the United States. She arrived in Seattle on November 12, 1945, with passengers of all the United States services as well as Canadian Naval Officers. She then again departed November 23rd for Tokyo Bay to continue the job of carrying American servicemen back home. She returned to San Francisco December 24, 1945, and arrived at Norfolk, January 20, 1946, where her Coast Guard crew was finally removed March 13, 1946.


USS CAVALIER (APA-37)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND TRAINING
The USS Cavalier (APA-37) was placed in commission at Hoboken, New Jersey, on January 15, 1944. Originally built on the West Coast as a cargo ship for the United States Maritime Service, the vessel was brought to New York for conversion at the Hoboken Yard of the Bethlehem Steel Company to an assault transport and relief communications ship. After eleven days of

--47--


loading, testing and trial runs, the ship was reported to the Chief of Naval Operations as ready for sea and any assignment. She reported for duty on January 27, 1944, and was ordered to Hampton Roads, Virginia, where she obtained her quota of landing boats, prior to a hurried shakedown cruise up Chesapeake Bay. There followed an endless day and night succession of emergency drills and indoctrination lectures. The men, recruited and selected from all over the United States were hastily whipped into a coordinated team. Boat crews trained in North Carolina learned to work in harmony with hatch crews trained in New York, while damage control parties drilled in Philadelphia labored in close cooperation with engineers from every type of Coast Guard ship. Four days availability at the Norfolk Navy Yard was granted to correct deficiencies uncovered during the shakedown.

TO THE PACIFIC FOR TRAINING
Immediately after this availability the Cavalier proceeded to Rhode Island where she took on a load of Navy Sea Bees. Then stopping one day at Norfolk, she sailed on February 26, 1944, for the Hawaiian Islands via the Panama Canal. The voyage to Honolulu took three weeks, with no stop-over in the Canal Zone. After five more days availability at Pearl Harbor, the transport was assigned to the Fifth Amphibious Force and departed for Maui, T.H., for landing drills and exercises in the hoisting and lowering of boats, the formation of boat waves and the launching of attacks upon an enemy held beach. Returning to Pearl Harbor the Cavalier became the flagship of Commander, Amphibious Group One. April 1944 was spent at Maui leading a transport group in amphibious landings and in teaching assault ship techniques to U.S. Army personnel. In May 1944, the Commander of Amphibious Group One shifted his flag from the Cavalier and it was replaced by that of Commander, Transport Division Seven. One more short voyage to Maui was made with the Army preparatory to setting forth on the attack on Saipan.15

SAIPAN LANDING
The Cavalier sailed from Pearl Harbor on June 1, 1944, as head of the reserve transport group for the Saipan Operation. Kwajalein Atoll was utilized as the final staging point before launching the attack against the island. She arrived at Saipan June 16, 1944, and immediately began putting troops ashore to reinforce the hard-pressed attackers. After retiring from the beach area for the night, she returned next day to continue unloading. The sudden approach of the Japanese fleet caused a protracted retirement of the transports. The Cavalier left her landing boats at Saipan and stayed at sea one week before returning to the task of getting all her assault troops ashore. In the meanwhile, the First Battle of the Philippine Sea had been fought and won. The Cavalier suffered no casualties in this first operation despite several air alerts and submarine contacts. The Cavalier returned to Eniwetok where she debarked a large number of Marine casualties from Saipan.

TINIAN LANDING
On the 10th of July, 1944 the Cavalier returned to Saipan to plan and load for the assault on Tinian Island, a few miles south of Saipan. The attack on Tinian was launched on July 24, 1944. The Cavalier hovered off the narrow beaches for three days consolidating the flow of cargo across the beach and serving as communication ship for the varied needs of the command. There was no damage to ship or personnel, but the medical department cared for numerous casualties from the fighting ashore. A quick voyage, via Saipan and Eniwetok followed. Here the Cavalier underwent a routine drydocking and repair period from August 13th to 17th, 1944, followed by another training exercise at Maui.

LEYTE LANDINGS
On September 15, 1944, the Cavalier sortied from Oahu as head of a transport group in the Third Fleet, destined for an attack on Leyte, Philippine Islands. Steaming to Eniwetok and thence to Manus, Admiralty Islands, the transport transferred to the control of the U.S. Seventh Fleet. The task force departed Manus for Leyte on October 14, 1944. The approach to Leyte was made with grave caution. For the first time the ship streamed her paravanes to protect against mines. An anticipated strong Japanese air opposition did not materialize and only a few enemy planes appeared over the beaches on D-day, October 20, 1944. The Cavalier completed her unloading quickly despite frequent air alerts and protracted intervals making smoke screens. She sailed for Manus unscathed on October 23, 1944, two days before the Second Battle of the Philippine Sea in which the Japanese fleet was decisively defeated. After replenishing her supplies she proceeded to Oro Bay, British New Guinea to load Army troops for a reinforcement run to Leyte, where she arrived November 18, 1944, returning to Seeadler Harbor, Manus Island for Thanksgiving.

LINGAYEN LANDING
December was passed with the ship anchored at Aitape, New Guinea, embarking troops and their equipment for the next assault destined to be Lingayen Gulf, Luzon. While proceeding to Luzon through enemy waters of the Mindanao and China Seas, the transports were subjected to repeated submarine and air attacks. The Cavalier's radar detected an enemy destroyer approaching the transports off Manila. This destroyer was later sunk by escorts in a night naval engagement. Most of the opposition encountered by our forces in the landings at Lingayen on January 9, 1945, was met on the beaches assigned to the Cavalier's transport group. Casualties were suffered both by the landing boat personnel and the beach party. The vessel itself was raked by bursts of five inch shells and sustained casualties. The Cavalier returned to Leyte after unloading and was assigned as flagship of Commander, Transport Squadron 14.

CAVALIER IS TORPEDOED
The Army progress on Luzon was rapid. A transport group, headed by the Cavalier, was dispatched to land an Army attacking force behind the Japanese lines at San Antonio, Zimbales, Luzon, in order to cut off a probable Japanese retreat down to Bataan, and also to secure Subic Bay. This landing was made without beach opposition on January 29, 1945. Early the next morning at 0133, the Cavalier was torpedoed at Latitude 14°48'N, Longitude 119°18'E. The torpedo struck just ahead of the propeller and fully crippled the vessel, which buckled and started to split at the number three hatch forward. After executing emergency damage control and treating the injured, the Cavalier was taken in tow by the USS Rail (ATO-139), at a speed of four knots for Leyte, 500 miles distant. En route two more submarine attacks were driven off by the escorts which had reported to guard the crippled transport. Increased air cover from Leyte drove away threats of enemy air attacks.

BACK IN SERVICE
This terminated the active war career of the USS Cavalier. She was towed the 5000 miles to Pearl Harbor by the USS

--48--


Sands Point (WSA) with the USS Baldhead (WSA) as retriever. An average speed of five knots was made with stops at Ulithi and Eniwetok en route. On arrival at Pearl Harbor on May 1, 1945, the ship was given an availability for battle damage repair and major overhaul. Over sixty days were spent in drydock repairing of hull and machinery, and she was ready for sea again late in August. By this time hostilities with Japan had officially ended. The Cavalier sailed on September 12, 1945, with a load of service passengers for Eniwetok and Manila. She remained in Manila for a short time debarking passengers and embarking Navy men scheduled for discharge in the United States. More dischargees were embarked at Subic Bay and the ship sailed October 12, 1945, for Pearl Harbor and San Francisco where she arrived November 1, 1945. Two more trips, one to Tacloban between November 9 and December 17, 1945, and one to Samar between January 2 and February 20, 1946, completed the transport's active duty. Her Coast Guard crew was removed at Treasure Island, San Francisco, California, on April 16, 1946.


USS ENCELADUS (AK-80)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Enceladus (AK-80) was built by the Penn Jersey Shipbuilding Company at Camden, New Jersey, and was commissioned August 22, 1943. She was 269 feet long. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Melville M. Coombs, USCGR, was succeeded August 7, 1945, by Lt. Lloyd R. Freeman, Jr. USCGR. On September 27, 1945, Lt. Comdr, Victor A. Johnson, USCG, took command.

ENTIRE OPERATIONS IN SOUTHWEST PACIFIC
The Enceladus operated entirely in the Southwest Pacific area while Coast Guard manned, shuttling supplies between supply bases such as Noumea, New Caledonia, Tongatabu, Torokina, Bougainville, Russell Islands, Green Islands, Emirau, and Guadalcanal. From April 4, 1944, when she is first recorded as being at Tongatabu until she reached Pearl Harbor on August 4, 1945, the Enceladus was entirely occupied with inter-island freight traffic in the Southwest Pacific. The ports of call and dates of arrival follow:

ARRIVED
  Tongatabu 4/4/44
  Noumea 4/13/44
  Tongatabu 5/8/44
  Noumea 5/11/44
(Dep) Villa (Fiji Is.) 10/21/44
  Noumea 10/24/44
  Efate 11/7/44
  Noumea 11/30/44
  Russell Is. 2/5/45
  Tulagi 2/21/45
  Russell Is. 3/16/45
  Torokina 3/29/45
  Green Is. 4/3/45
  Emirau 4/6/45
  Torokina 4/16/45
  Green Is. 4/22/45
  Torokina 4/28/45
  Guadalcanal 5/2/45
  Torokina 5/12/45
  Guadalcanal 5/20/45
  Tulagi 5/30/45
  Espiritu Santo 6/4/45
  Auckland 6/14/45
  Noumea 6/23/45
  Auckland 6/29/45
  Pearl Harbor 8/3/45
  San Francisco 10/10/45

DECOMMISSIONING
The Enceladus was decommissioned December 18, 1945, for disposal when her Coast Guard crew was removed.


USS ALBIREO (ex-JOHN G. NICKOLAY) (AK-90)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS Albireo (AK-90) was the first of the Liberty Ships to be converted to cargo transport. Built by the Permanente Metals Corporation at Richmond, California, she was an (EG-2)-S-C1 type and was commissioned March 28, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Commander Edward M. Benton, USCGR, who was succeeded on September 25, 1944, by Commander Carmelo L. Manzano, USCGR. On September 15, 1945, Lt. Comdr. Frank Paul, USCG, took command. Her length overall was 441'6" and her beam 57'. She attained a speed of 11.7 knots when light and 11.0 knots when loaded and displaced 14,246 tons, with a deadweight tonnage of 10,900, gross tonnage 7,194 and net tons 4,382. She had a vertical triple expansion marine steam engine developing 2500 I.H.P.

SEVEN VOYAGES IN THREE YEARS
The mission of the Albireo was carrying cargo for advanced shore bases and floating units. In her first five voyages she left San Francisco with tows for trans-Pacific bases. In performing these duties she made seven voyages across the Pacific from August 1943 to June 1946 as follows:

WESTBOUND
DEPARTED ARRIVED
San Francisco 8/43 Espiritu Santo 9/43
San Francisco 1943

San Francisco 1944
(escorting Alcoa Pioneer 6000 miles)
San Francisco 5/4/44 Manus
Milne Bay
6/14/44
8/3/44
San Francisco 11/24/44 Pearl Harbor
Espiritu Santo
12/9/44
12/25/44
San Francisco 2/25/45 Manus
Pearl Harbor
3/20/45
5/10/45
San Francisco
San Diego
6/13/45
6/17/45
Leyte 7/16/45
San Francisco
San Pedro
9/23/45
10/5/45
Samar
Manila
Yokosuka
11/3/45
11/10/45
12/3/45

--49--


USS Enceladus (AK-80) OPERATED IN SOUTHWEST PACIFIC
USS Enceladus (AK-80) operated in Southwest Pacific

USS ERIDANUS (AK-92) MADE SIX ROUND TRIPS TO THE PACIFIC
USS Eridanus (AK-92) made six round trips to the Pacific

--50--


EASTBOUND
Espiritu Santo 10/43 San Francisco 11/43
Milne Bay 10/10/44    
Pearl Harbor 10/17/44 San Francisco 11/1/44
Espiritu Santo
Pearl Harbor
1/3/45
1/24/45
San Francisco 2/6/45
Pearl Harbor 5/11/45 San Francisco 5/20/45
Leyte
Ulithi
8/7/45
8/13/45
San Francisco 9/3/45
Yokosuka
Eniwetok
Canal Zone
3/25/46
4/9/46
5/29/46
Norfolk 6/18/46

HAZARDOUS DUTY
The Albireo from May to August 1943, assembled sections of ABSD #1 from Seattle and Eureka, California, and Astoria, Oregon at San Francisco and departed San Francisco August 1943, towing a section of the drydock to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, making the trip in 34 days, a distance of 5600 miles. This was the first time that a tow had been made with one of these drydocks and it 1s understood that Commander Benton was commended by the Navy Department for the job. She next towed the Alcoa Pioneer alone and unescorted in submarine infested waters for a distance of over 6000 miles. Warned that a submarine was thought to be trailing her and her tow, she zig-zagged in adverse seas at a rate of three knots for several days. Commander C. L. Manzano was awarded the Seamanship Medal for this feat. The Albireo departed San Francisco on May 4, 1944, as part of convoy PW 2393 in company with 5 WSA tugs and two Navy tugs towing six sections of Advance Base Section Dock #2, three YF barges and two ARD barges and arrived at the Admiralties June 22, 1944, a distance of 7199 miles which was covered in 50 days with no stops for fuel or repairs at an average speed of 5.97 K.P.H. The last 1000 miles was in waters where enemy submarines were known to be. The convoy passed unescorted 200 miles of enemy bases at Rabaul and Kavieng. On this voyage the Albireo carried high test gasoline and inflammable cargo. The task was accomplished without the assistance of surface escorts, air coverage, submarine detecting aids or depth charge equipment.

ATTACKS SUBMARINE SUBMARINE
While proceeding independently on May 12, 1945, en route from Pearl Harbor to San Francisco the Albireo encountered a hostile submarine and subsequently attacked it. At 1955 radar contact was made on a small surface target and 3 minutes later a periscope was sighted crossing the Albireo's wake from starboard to port. Eleven minutes later the cargo ship passed through a slick area of about 200 yards radius and 3 minutes later the radar contact on the periscope faded. The vessel continued on a zig-zag course for 43 minutes when at 2055 the radar contact was again established at 6700 yards. It was maintained until the target was 2000 yards distant. Meanwhile the Albireo had begun to maneuver, swinging to right in an effort to keep the submarine directly astern and fire had been opened with the 5"/38 DP battery located on the fantail house. By 2111 the range had receded to 4000 yards. In the next 4 minutes it again closed to 2000 yards, as fire rounds were expended. At 2115, the target faded at 2500 yards. Radio report of the contact was made at once and at 0140 on May 13th two destroyers and a PCE arrived and commenced a search. A third joined later. Whether a torpedo was fired at the Albireo by the submarine could not be determined. Commander Manzano received a letter of commendation from the Commander, Western Sea Frontier.

DECOMMISSIONED
The Albireo was decommissioned July 5, 1946, and her Coast Guard crew removed.


USS COR CAROLI (ex-SS BETSY ROSS) (AK-91)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Cor Caroli (AK-91) was built in March, 1943, by Permanente Metals Corporation, Richmond Shipyard No. 2 at Richmond, California, and converted by the Matson Steamship Company of San Francisco for naval service. She was commissioned April 15, 1943, as an auxiliary cargo ship. She was originally a Liberty Ship (KC2-SC1) type. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Justus A. Lewis, USCGR. He was succeeded on April 20, 1944, by Commander Q. C. B. Wev, USCG, who in turn was relieved on September 5, 1944, by Lt. Comdr. Fred E. Morton, USCGR. He was subsequently relieved of command on October 6, 1945, by Lt. Comdr. C. S. Hoag, USCGR.

LOSES TOW--VOYAGE TO AUCKLAND, N. Z.
While underway to Seattle, Washington, by way of Tiburon, California on May 11-15, 1943, with a tow, heavy seas were encountered off Parallon Islands which resulted in loss of the tow and breaking of the towing machine. The ship returned to San Francisco where a week was spent in effecting repairs. Proceeding to San Diego on May 22nd the vessel towed a barge to San Francisco on May 25-27th. From then until June 11th was spent loading cargo at San Francisco, whereupon the ship proceeded to San Diego for further loading and departed June 13, 1943, for Noumea, New Caledonia, which was reached July 11, 1943. She arrived at Auckland, New Zealand, July 18, 1943, and remained there until August 8, 1943, discharging cargo.

SOUTHWEST PACIFIC DUTY
The Cor Caroli next proceeded to Guadalcanal, via Noumea, arriving there August 27, 1943. After discharging cargo she returned to Auckland, via Noumea, September 21, 1943. Her next trip was to Suva, Fiji Islands where she arrived October 8, 1943, and remained until the 21st discharging cargo. She returned to Noumea November 5, 1943, and took on another load for Tulagi Harbor, Tenaru Beach and Russell Islands. Finishing this duty on December 19, 1943, she returned to Auckland, via Espiritu Santo, on December 27, 1943.

TO TOROKINA AND EMIRAU
After drydocking and repairs at Auckland until January 8, 1944, the Cor Caroli proceeded to Guadalcanal, via Noumea arriving on the 23rd. On February 6, 1944, she departed for Torokina, Bougainville, where she experienced several enemy air raids until the 17th, when she returned to Purvis Bay, Florida Island, and remained there and at Guadalcanal until March 4, 1944, loading cargo. She then again proceeded to Torokina and returned to Guadalcanal on the 13th. She loaded cargo there and at Russell Islands until April 5, 1944, and departed for Emirau where she drifted in the bay and unloaded into LCT's, cruising in convoy at night. She returned to Guadalcanal April 20, 1944, and left next day for Espiritu Santo where she arrived April 24, 1944.

--51--


TO GUAM
Leaving Espiritu Santo on April 30, 1944, with a load of cargo for Guadalcanal, the Cor Caroli was en route to Sasavelli, New Georgia on May 6, 1944, and remained there until the 12th discharging cargo. She returned to Guadalcanal on the 18th and was next day placed under operational command of Commander Group 3, Third Amphibious Command, preparatory to the operations against Guam. Loading cargo at Tulagi and Russell Islands until June 12, 1944, She reached Guam, via Eniwetok July 27, 1944, and cruised in the inner and outer transport areas there until August 15, 1944, discharging cargo for our invading forces. She arrived at Espiritu Santo September 2nd, 1944, via Eniwetok to undergo repairs until September 21, 1944, when she departed for Upolu, Samoan Islands. Here she loaded cargo at Apia and Pago Pago for Espiritu Santo where she arrived October 23, 1944, and then proceeded to Noumea for further discharge. Between November 3, 1944, and December 12, 1944, she carried cargo from Efate, New Hebrides, to Noumea. After working cargo there until December 22, 1944, she proceeded to Empress Augusta Bay, Bougainville, returning to Wellington, New Zealand, via Guadalcanal and Auckland on January 16, 1945.

TO GUAM AND LEYTE AND HOME
Departing Wellington January 24, 1945, she arrived at Apia Harbor, Guam, via Eniwetok on February 20th and returned to Noumea, via Eniwetok on March 11, 1945. She departed for Leyte, via Espiritu Santo, and Guadalcanal on March 19, 1945, and arrived there July 13, 1945. She departed Samar August 4, 1945, and reached Los Angeles via Guadalcanal, Espiritu Santo, and Pearl Harbor, September 17, 1945. Here she was overhauled and remained until October 25, 1945. She then departed Los Angeles for Norfolk, via Panama Canal, and arrived there November 17, 1945. Here she was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed November 30, 1945.


USS ERIDANUS (ex-SS LUTHER BURBANK) (AK-92)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Eridanus (AK-92), an EC-2, S-C1, (Liberty Ship) type of auxiliary cargo transport, was commissioned May 7, 1943, with Lt. Comdr. Frank W. Johnson, USCG, her first and only commanding officer.

SIX VOYAGES IN TWO YEARS
During the two years between April 1944 and April 1946, the Eridanus made six known round trip voyages in the Pacific. The record that is available follows:

WESTBOUND
DEPARTED ARRIVED
San Francisco 4/11/44 Pearl Harbor 4/15/44
San Francisco 6/3/44 Admiralty Islands
New Guinea
6/19/44
8/3/44
San Francisco 10/1/44 Pearl Harbor 10/10/44
San Francisco
Hueneme, Cal.
San Pedro
12/19/44
12/30/44
1/4/45
Eniwetok
Palau
Leyte
1/23/45
1/31/45
2/9/45
San Francisco 5/30/45 Pearl Harbor
Saipan
6/8/45
6/20/45
6/26/45
San Francisco 9/19/45 Pearl Harbor
Wake
Guam
Peleliu
9/26/45
11/2/45
11/11/45
12/17/45
EASTBOUND
DEPARTED ARRIVED
Pearl Harbor 5/7/44 San Francisco 5/11/44
New Guinea 9/1/44 San Francisco 9/16/44
Pearl Harbor 11/26/45 San Francisco 12/4/44
Leyte
Hollandia
4/8/45
4/14/45
San Francisco 5/5/45
Saipan
Pearl Harbor
7/8/45
7/24/45
San Francisco 8/2/45
Peleliu
Guam
Pearl Harbor
Canal Zone
1/15/46
1/26/46
2/27/46
4/5/46
Norfolk 4/15/46

DECOMMISSIONED
The Eridanus was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed May 8, 1946.


USS ETAMIN (AK-93) (IX-173)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Etamin (AK-93) was commissioned on May 24, 1943. Her only commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. George Stedman, USCG.

AT AITAPE
The first available record of the Etamin is the night before the landing at Aitape on April 21, 1944, when she was part of a convoy which broke off from the main body for the Aitape assault. Lt. Comdr. Stedman told his men exactly where they were headed and what might be in store for them. A hit on the ship, with her 6000 tons of high explosives would probably be fatal. Next morning when general quarters was sounded the atmosphere was strained. Men grouped their way to gun positions, deck winch or deck house as the ship entered Aitape Harbor at 0545. In the mist ahead minesweepers were clearing a path, LCD's, LST's, destroyers and SC's were somewhere on each beam. All bridge personnel had been or ordered to the wheelhouse below in case of attack. The mist lifted slowly. The dark islands of Tumleo and Seleo took form on either side. Suddenly the first destroy shattered the dawn with a yellow belch of flame and then the ship's five inch gun began rhythmically to pound target "B" on Tumleo Island. Up forward the 3"/50 guns were throwing their shells on target "A". These guns got credit for knocking out a Japanese barge with some eighty troops. Also two pillboxes. The first indication that the landing craft were over the side and that troops were disembarking was the soft purr of their diesel engines at 0620. The naval barrage ceased at 0630 and carrier based planes took over the job of pounding the beach and island. An ammunition dump on Seleo Island went up with a gigantic roar. The combat teams from the Coast Guard manned LST's hit the beach at about 0800 and 40 minutes later the Etamin's deck hatches were off, winches rigged and cargo was going over the side. 12 hours later the winches were still whinning and supply dumps were growing on the beach. Ashore it was easy to see that the Japanese had been taken by surprise. Crumpled bodies, clad in underwear and lying

--52--


in slit trenches indicated that the enemy had taken the initial shelling for an air raid.

ETAMIN TORPEDOED
Five nights later on 27, 1944, the Etamin, while still anchored in Aitape Roads, New Guinea, was attacked by Japanese planes. At about 2300 an aerial torpedo struck the starboard side, rupturing the shell plating and shaft alley about 10 feet above the keel. The No. 5 hold and shaft alley began flooding, the cargo in that hold being gasoline in drums, ammunition, explosives and engine parts. The explosion sprayed gasoline over the after part of the ship but there was no fire. Steam smothering was released, and as the engine room flooded, all precautions were taken to prevent fire and explosion. Gasoline and fumes came in contact with the hot furnaces and boilers, however, and an explosion did occur which set fire to the engine room and severely burned three crew members. CO2 was released and extinguished all but a minor blaze around the pipe lagging and fidley which was extinguished by hand. The ship was now settling fast by the stern and the commanding officer deemed it advisable to beach her. No ship's power was available. A tow line from the bow was given to an LCT with a request to tow her to shallow water. The LCT could not move the ship and in view of the danger of explosion, all of the crew of 200 and the 150 Army personnel were removed without loss of a single man, although two dead bodies were later discovered in No. 5 hold. Three officers and 6 men returned to the ship which was now considered unsafe to remain in the harbor another night. The vessel was accordingly towed to Finschaven with 2 officers and 64 men aboard, where preliminary salvage operations were begun. The three seriously burned Coast Guardsmen were flown to Port Moresby. On May 24, 1944, it was decided not to repair the Etamin as an auxiliary cargo ship but to convert her into the IX-173. The crew was returned to the United States about August 1, 1944.


USS MINTAKA (AK-94)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Mintaka (AK-94) an EC-2 S-C1, (Liberty Ship) type, was commissioned as an auxiliary cargo vessel on May 10, 1943. Her various commanding officers took command on the following dates:

July 14, 1944 Lt. J. E. Reavis, USCGR
October 4, 1944 Lt. Comdr. W. C. Hart, USCG
December 12, 1944 Lt. Comdr. Magnus J. Johnson, USCGR
September 18, 1945 Lt. Comdr. Frank Bronski, USCG
November 1, 1945 Lt. Comdr. Ray Thorpe, USCG

15 MONTHS IN SOUTHWEST PACIFIC
The Mintaka spent fifteen months in the Southwest Pacific carrying cargo from one supply base to another. After that six months were spent on a single voyage from San Francisco to Okinawa and return. The ports of call and dates of arrival during the first 15 month period are as follows:

ARRIVED
Efate, New Hebrides 4/4/44
Espiritu Santo 4/13/44
Green Islands 4/25/44
Espiritu Santo 9/1/44
Manus Island 9/30/44
Departed
Peleliu, Palau Is.
12/1/44
Guadalcanal 12/10/44
Noumea 12/16/44
Espiritu Santo 12/31/44
Guadalcanal 1/27/45
Treasury Islands 2/7/45
Langemak 2/8/45
Manus 2/22/45
Munda 2/24/45
Russell Islands 2/26/45
Tulagi 3/4/45
Espiritu Santo 3/7/45
Noumea 3/12/45
Guadalcanal 3/17/45
Wellington, N. Z. 3/30/45
Noumea 4/12/45
Guadalcanal 4/18/45
Eniwetok 4/30/45
Ulithi 5/14/45
Okinawa 6/6/45
Pearl Harbor 6/21/45
San Francisco 7/5/45

SIX MONTH'S VOYAGE TO OKINAWA AND RETURN
The six month's voyage which followed began on July 16, 1945, when the Mintaka left San Francisco, arriving at Portland, Oregon, and leaving there July 25, 1945, for Pearl Harbor. She stopped at Pearl Harbor from August 2, until August 4, 1945, and then pushed on to Eniwetok where August 13-16 was spent. Saipan was reached on August 19th and after 5 days she left for Iwo Jima where she spent the period from August 26th to September 8th. Okinawa was reached on September 11th and the Mintaka lay over here until October 4, 1945. Then she started back to San Francisco, reaching Ulithi on October 9th and remaining there until the 27th; Guam was reached on October 29th and left November 10, 1945; arrival at Saipan was November 10th and departed November 23rd; another call at Iwo Jima was one day from the 25th to 26th; followed by a second call at Saipan from November 28th to 30th. Finally Los Angeles was reached December 19th and San Francisco December 30, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONING
The Mintaka was decommissioned at San Francisco, February 13, 1946, and her Coast Guard crew removed.


--53--


USS MURZIM (AK-95)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Murzim (AK-95) was an EC-2 S-C1 (Liberty Ship) type of auxiliary cargo vessel which was commissioned May 14, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. James E. King, USCGR, who was succeeded on September 16, 1944, by Lt. Comdr. Dewitt S. Walton, USCGR. He was in turn succeeded by Lt. David E. Green, USCG.

SOUTHWEST PACIFIC DUTY
All of the war operations of the Murzim were in the Southwest or Western Pacific and those of record extend from April 4, 1944, to April 17, 1946. A summary of ports of call with dates of arrival follows:

ARRIVED  
Tulagi, Solomon Islands 4/4/44
Espiritu Santo 4/13/44
Tulagi 5/15/44
Guadalcanal 6/4/44
Brisbane 7/15/44
Hollandia, New Guinea 8/30/44
Leyte, Philippine Islands 11/10/44
Philippine Area 12/14/44
Hollandia 2/6/45
Philippine Area 2/33/45
New Guinea 5/3/45
Morotai 5/10/45
Manus 5/15/45
Brisbane 5/31/45
New Guinea 6/28/45
Manus 7/1/45
Leyte 8/5/45
Subic Bay 9/5/45
Manila 10/7/45
Subic Bay 10/14/45
Seattle 12/23/45
San Francisco 3/28/46
Pearl Harbor 4/17/46

DECOMMISSIONED
The Murzim was decommissioned June 8, 1946, at Pearl Harbor and her Coast Guard crew removed.


USS STEROPE (AK-96)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Sterope was an K-2 S-C1 (Liberty Ship) type of auxiliary cargo vessel which was commissioned May 14, 1943. Her only commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Leo P. Toolin, USCG.

PACIFIC DUTY
The Sterope's operations which are recorded extended from April 4, 1944, to April 18, 1946. A summary of her ports of call with dates of arrival follows:

ARRIVED
Espiritu Santo 4/4/44
Guam 8/3/44
Guadalcanal 8/21/44
Villa, New Hebrides 10/30/44
Wellington 1/1/45
Auckland 1/12/45
Noumea 1/26/45
Tulagi 2/15/45
Espiritu Santo 3/15/45
Noumea 3/25/45
Guadalcanal 4/9/45
Eniwetok 4/16/45
Ulithi 5/2/45
Okinawa 5/10/45
Ulithi 6/6/45
Manus 6/11/45
Espiritu Santo 6/19/45
Noumea 6/21/45
Pearl Harbor 7/24/45
San Francisco 8/6/45
Guam 10/30/45
Espiritu Santo 10/26/45
Pearl Harbor 2/25/46
San Francisco 4/18/46

DECOMMISSIONING
The Sterope was decommissioned at Pearl Harbor, May 17, 1946, and her Coast Guard crew removed.


--54--


USS Sterope (AK-96) CARRIED MEN AND MATERIALS TO INVASION SHORES
USS Sterope (AK-96) carried men and material to invasion shores

COAST GUARDSMEN KELSIE K. KEMP, SEAMAN, FIRST CLASS, LEFT, OF BARRON SPRINGS, VIRGINIA, AND GEORGE S. KENNEDY, SEAMAN, FIRST CLASS, OF SAN MARCOS, TEXAS, THE ONLY SURVIVORS OF 198 OFFICERS AND MEN WHO WERE ABOARD WHEN THE COAST GUARD MANNED USS SERPENS CARRYING A CARGO OF AMMUNITION WAS LOST BY AN EXPLOSION OF UNDETERMINED ORIGIN, LATER EVALUATED NOT ENEMY ACTION, AS IT LAY ANCHORED APPROXIMATELY A MILE FROM THE GUADALCANAL SHORE ON JANUARY 29, 1945
Coast Guardsmen Kelsie K. Kemp, Seaman, First Class, left, of Barron Springs, Virginia, and George S. Kennedy, Seaman, First Class, of San Marcos, Texas, the only survivors of 198 officers and men who were aboard when the Coast Guard manned USS Serpens carrying a cargo of ammunition was lost by an explosion of undetermined origin, later evaluated not enemy action, as it lay anchored approximately a mile from the Guadalcanal shore on January 29, 1945

--55--


USS SERPENS (AK-97)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Serpens (AK-97) was an EC-2 SC-1 (Liberty Ship) type of auxiliary cargo vessel built by the California Shipbuilding Corporation of Wilmington, California, and launched April 5, 1943. She was commissioned May 28, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Magnus J. Johnson, USCGR. He was succeeded on July 22, 1944, by Lt. Comdr. Perry L. Stimson, USCG.

EXPLODES AT GUADALCANAL
The Serpens was at Auckland, New Zealand, on April 4, 1944, according to available records and departed June 9, 1944, for Guadalcanal. She arrived at Manus Island on October 3, 1944, and returned to Guadalcanal January 16, 1945. On January 29, 1945, while at anchor off Lunga Beach, loading 350 lbs. of torpedo depth bombs, the Serpens exploded. The explosion undetermined, was not enemy Action. Out of a total complement of 206, 196 were killed. Lt. Comdr. Stinson who survived the explosion and seven others, one officer and 6 crew members, were ashore at the time of the explosion. Of the personnel aboard only 2 survived. "I felt and saw two flashes" Lt. Comdr. Stinson reported "after which only the bow of the ship was visible. The rest had disintegrated and the bow sank soon afterwards." The two survivors who were aboard had been in the boatswain's locker when the blast occurred. "They showed a lot of savvy," Lt. Comdr. Stinson reported, "by grabbing a couple of water lights that we kept stowed in the locker. They used them to attract attention when they climbed out onto the floating portion of the bow." Both men were injured when rescued by a base commander in the area. In addition to the Coast Guard crew, 57 Army personnel, including one officer, were killed in the explosion.

EYE WITNESS ACCOUNT
"As we headed our personnel boat shoreward" an eye-witness reported, "the sound and concussion of the explosion suddenly reached us, and, as we turned, we witnessed t he awe inspiring death drama unfold before us. As the report of screeching shells filled the air and the flash of tracers continued, the water splashed throughout the harbor as the shells hit. We headed our boat in the direction of the smoke and as we came into closer view of what had once been a ship, the water was filled only with floating debris, dead fish, torn life jackets, lumber and other unidentifiable objects. The smell of death, and fire, and gasoline, and oil was evident and nauseating. This was sudden death, and horror, unwanted and unasked for, but complete."


USS MENKAR (AK-123)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Menkar (AK-123) was an EC-2 SC-1 (Liberty Ship) type of auxiliary cargo vessel which was commissioned on June 2, 1944. Her first and only commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. N. P. Thomsen, USCG.

TRANSPORTS LORAN EQUIPMENT IN THE PACIFIC
For not quite a year and a half from October 4, 1944 to March 3, 1946, the Menkar acted as cargo transport for LORAN equipment for the many LORAN stations the Coast Guard was building in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas.16 Her record of movements is shown the following listed ports of arrival with dates:

ARRIVED
(Departed) Alameda, California 10/4/44
Pearl Harbor 10/9/44
Kwajalein 10/20/44
Eniwetok 10/26/44
Saipan 10/31/44
Guam 11/5/44
Peleliu 12/1/44
Guam 12/6/44
Saipan 12/8/44
Ulithi 12/16/44
Eniwetok 12/23/44
Majuro 12/27/44
Pearl Harbor 1/5/45
Eniwetok 2/21/45
Guam 2/25/45
Peleliu 3/1/45
Pula Anna 3/10/45
Morotai 3/12/45
Peleliu 3/27/45
Guam 4/6/45
Guam 4/13/45
Saipan 4/15/45
Iwo Jima 4/19/45
Saipan 4/27/45
Okinawa 5/19/45
Saipan 5/25/45
Guam 5/25/45
Peleliu 5/31/4
Anguar 6/2/45
Pula Anna 6/2/45
Morotai 6/4/45
Manila 6/13/45
Subic Bay 6/28/45
Eniwetok 7/6/45
Pearl Harbor 7/23/45
Seattle 8/6/45
Pearl Harbor 9/24/45

--56--


Guam 10/25/45
Saipan 10/27/45
Okinawa 11/1/45
Yokanuki Jima 11/7/45
Okinawa 11/13/45
Kagoshima Wan 11/16/45
Okinawa 11/25/45
Guam 11/30/45
Subic Bay 12/11/45
Luzon 12/20/45
Subic Bay 1/10/46
Guam 1/22/46
Honolulu 2/7/46
San Francisco 3/3/46

DECOMMISSIONING
The Menkar was decommissioned as a Navy transport on April 15, 1946, and her Coast Guard crew removed.


USS CRAIGHEAD (AK-175)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Craighead (AK-175) was an EC-2 SC-1 (Liberty Ship) type of auxiliary cargo vessel built by Froemming Brothers, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The hull left Chicago April 15, 1945, and was floated down the Illinois Waterway and Mississippi River to New Orleans and thence to Beaumont, Texas, where she arrived June 23, 1945. Reassembled at Samuelson's Shipyard whence she was moved to Galveston for conversion and commissioned there on September 5, 1945. Her first and only commanding officer was Lt. George M. Walker, USCG.

OPERATIONS
Later she proceeded to Bayonne, New Jersey, arriving October 2, 1945, and at Davisville, Rhode Island, October 4, 1945. She returned to San Francisco December 8, 1945, via Canal Zone, San Pedro and Hueneme, California, and on December 14th proceeded via Balboa, Canal Zone to Norfolk where she arrived January 5, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONING
The Craighead was decommissioned at Norfolk on January 18, 1946, and her Coast Guard crew removed.


USS CODINGTON (AK-173)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Codington (AK-173) was an EC-2 SC-1 (Liberty Ship) type of auxiliary cargo vessel, built by Froemming Brothers, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and commissioned July 23, 1945. Her first and only commanding officer was Lt. A. F. Pittman, USCG.

OUTFITTING AND CONVERSION
Proceeding down the Illinois Waterway from Chicago on January 25, 1945, the hull of the Codington reached New Orleans via the Mississippi River on April 20, 1945, and Beaumont, Texas, April 29, 1945, where she stopped at Samuelson's Shipyard for reassembly and arrived at Galveston, Texas, June 28, 1945, for conversion. When this was completed and the vessel had been commissioned on July 23, 1945, she proceeded to Gulfport, Mississippi via New Orleans, arriving there on August 13, 1945. Ten days later she departed Gulfport for Leyte via Panama Canal, arriving at her destination October 11, 1945.

TURNED OVER TO A FOREIGN COUNTRY
The Codington departed Leyte on November 30, 1945, and arrived at Finschaven December 7, 1945. Ten days later she left Langemak and arrived at Batangas, Philippine Islands on December 27, 1945. On January 16, 1946, she left Subic Bay for Yokosuka. There she was decommissioned "to be turned over to a foreign country" February 27, 1946, and her Coast Guard crew removed.


USS SUSSEX (AK-213)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Sussex (AK-213) was built by the Leathem D. Smith Shipbuilding Company of Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, and her hull was floated down the Illinois Waterway and Mississippi River reaching New Orleans on May 6, 1945. She was an EC-2 SC-1 (Liberty Ship) type of auxiliary cargo vessel. She arrived at Beaumont, Texas, on May 10, 1945, for reassembly and was commissioned there August 20, 1945. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. L. N. Ditlefsen, USCG, who was succeeded on October 30, 1945, by Lt. Comdr. F. E. Simmen, USCGR.

TO PACIFIC
Returning to New Orleans on September 13, 1945, she left nine days later after loading for Manila via Canal Zone and Pearl Harbor arriving on November 28, 1945. From there trips were made to Subic Bay on December 16, 1945, and Samar on December 26, 1945, after which she returned to Manila. She departed Manila for Port Chicago, California, near San Francisco via Manus, and Pearl Harbor. She arrived at destination April 26, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONING
The Sussex was decommissioned at Port Chicago, California, on May 23, 1946, and her Coast Guard crew removed.


USS AQUARIUS (AKA-16)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS Aquarius (AKA-16) was built by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Kearney, New Jersey, and was launched in July 1943. She was a standard U.S. Maritime Commission C2-S-B1 hull, arranged for naval use as a combat loaded cargo vessel. She was commissioned August 21, 1943, with Captain R. V. Marron, USCG, as her first commanding officer. After a run to Pearl Harbor with cargo and passengers, she returned to San Diego where she joined the Fifth Amphibious Force, Pacific Fleet and engaged in amphibious training operations with the Marines off the coast of Southern California.

--57--


KWAJALEIN LANDING
On January 13, 1944, the Aquarius left San Diego as a unit of Northern Attack Force, with a detachment of the Support Group of Combat Team 24, Fourth Marine Division, on board to take part in the occupation of islands of the Kwajalein Atoll.17 Proceeding to Lahaina Roads, T.H., she departed for Kwajalein, Marshall Islands as a member of Task Force 53 and stood into the transport area off Roi and Namur Islands on January 31, 1944. From then until February 6, 1944, she unloaded cargo as needed by the Headquarters Fourth Marine Division which had been put ashore in the transport's boats to neutralize enemy forces on the islands of the atoll. The Aquarius suffered no damage or losses in the operation.

TRAINING
After the securing of Kwajalein the Aquarius was assigned to the Third Pacific Fleet and, proceeding to Guadalcanal, took aboard the 160th Regimental Combat Team of the 40th Infantry Division, U.S. Army on February 28, 1944, for preliminary amphibious training and the 140th Regimental Combat Team of the same Army Division for similar training on Guadalcanal beaches until March 4, 1944.

ADMIRALTY ISLANDS OPERATIONS
On April 2, 1944, the Aquarius attached to Task Unit 32, loaded cargo and equipment along with 179 personnel of the 147th Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army, at Noumea and transported them to Emirau Island, in the Admiralties, as a garrison force. She then took aboard 19 officers and 103 enlisted men of the Fourth Regiment, U.S. Marines on April 11, 1944, and transported them to Guadalcanal.

CAPE GLOUCESTER OPERATIONS
Assigned to Task Force 34, the Aquarius then transported 6 officers and 111 enlisted men of the 185th Infantry Regiment, Cannon Company, 40th Division, U.S. Army, from Guadalcanal to Cape Gloucester, New Britain, arriving April 23, 1944, where 6 officers and 117 enlisted men of the First Marine Division were embarked for Russell Islands. On April 28, 1944, she proceeded to Espiritu Santo for repairs and docking.

TRAINING
Proceeding to Guadalcanal May 6, 1944, elements of the Third Marine Division were embarked May 12, 1944, for amphibious training until the end of May.

SAIPAN OPERATIONS
Loading 11 Marine officers, 249 enlisted men, 1610 tons of equipment, and 37 war dogs of the Third Marine Division at Guadalcanal on June 1, 1944, the Aquarius was underway on the 4th for Kwajalein where 88 additional troops of the 21st Regiment, Third Marine Division, were embarked. D-day at Saipan was June 15, 1944, when the amphibious assault was launched by the Second and Fourth Marine Divisions. W-day for landings on Guam had been tentatively set for June 18th but was postponed when Task Force 53 was ordered to retire eastward. Greater resistance was met at Saipan than had been anticipated and also adjacent enemy held airfields on Guam, Rota and Tinian were still too active to launch a second assault on Guam immediately. Also a sizeable Japanese task force was reported entering the Marianas from the Philippines which would materially support the airpower already in the vicinity. Thus the Third Marine Division and the First Provisional Brigade were to be held in reserve until such time as they were either committed to Saipan or recalled. The Aquarius stood by until June 25, 1944, when she received orders to proceed to Eniwetok still loaded to await further orders.

GUAM LANDING
W-day at Guam had now been set forward to July 21, 1944, with 0830 as H-hour. At H-2½ hours, the Aquarius reached Guam and began lowering landing craft and debarking personnel and materiel of the Third Marine Division in preparation for the landings on assigned beaches of the Ashan area. When other transport divisions retired for the night, Transport Division 24, including the Aquarius remained in the transport ares and continued to unload. On July 22, 1944, despite heavy mortar fire on the reef and beaches to which landing craft were exposed, the Marines were consolidatihg their positions and transfer of assault cargo to the beaches was being expedited, some 200 tons of small arms and high explosive ammunition having been transferred to the beach, where it was urgently needed. On the 23rd unloading continued as the situation ashore became more tenable. A Hellcat pilot who had made a forced landing 300 yards from the ship was rescued, the plane sinking in 45 seconds. On the 26th, the Aquarius proceeded to Eniwetok.

PELELIU LANDINGS
Taking on elements of the First Marine Division at Russell Islands and Guadalcanal between August 17th and 24th, rehearsals of the forthcoming assault on Peleliu, Palau Islands, were conducted off Guadalcanal on the 27th and 29th. With a combat load of 1580 tons, including 40 tons of pool boat equipment as part of Task Unit 92, the Aquarius arrived at the unloading transport area off Peleliu on D-Day, September 15, 1944. Casualties from the beach were received from time to time throughout the day. By the 16th the transfer of ammunition and equipment to the beach was being carried out according to schedule and by 1030, 53 casualties were aboard, seven having died while being transferred or while on board. By the 18th, the beaches were secured and the airfield to the southeast had fallen to our forces. Heavy fighting continued for the remainder of the island however. The 81st Infantry Division, U.S. Army, made an amphibious landing on Angaur Island, 6 miles southwest of Peleliu on the 18th. Two enemy planes flew over and dropped bombs within the transport area during the 18th. On the 19th a red alert and escort vessels made smoke around the ships in the transport area. On the 20th a Japanese prisoner of war and three casualties from the beach were received, and on the 21st transfer of all First Marine Division supplies and equipment to the beach was completed. On the 22nd 8 LCM(3)'s and 3 LCVP's were transferred to SLCU #32 together with 42 boat pool personnel. The Aquarius departed for Hollandia arriving there September 25, 1944. On the same day Commander Ira E. Eskridge, USCG, assumed command, succeeding Captain Marron.

LEYTE LANDING
The Aquarius began loading operations for the Leyte Landings on October 6, 1944, and by the 9th completed loading 12 officers and 218 men of the 24th Infantry together with 906 tons of equipment and material. On the 7th Captain F. D. Higbee, USCG, had reported on board for temporary duty in the Leyte operation. Later on, the 41 men of the 19th Infantry reported and on the 10th 1 Army officer and 40 men with 8 LCM's embarked. On the 11th 12 enlisted men departed to care for and maintain 10 LCVP's transferred temporarily to the storage pool. On the 12th an occupational rehearsal was conducted. On the 20th of October, 1944, A-day, while on the way into San Pedro Bay the Task Unit was under air attack with one enemy plane shot down. At 0841, the

--58--


the Aquarius commenced lowering cargo from holds to boats alongside. At 1000, Captain Higbee went ashore in the first naval amphibious landing force to touch on Philippine soil in World War II. At 1104, 7 ambulatory casualties were received on board and two of the transport's LCVP's were reported sunk by enemy fire from the beach, three of the boat crews being injured. A red alert at 1607 was secured at 1636. Unloading continued on the 21st and more casualties were brought aboard, with some transferred. By 1715 all cargo was unloaded and 12 minutes later the ship was underway departing Leyte.

SECOND OPERATION--LEYTE
A second trip as part of Task Unit 79 was begun to Leyte on November 6, 1944, with 12 officers and 133 men of the 32nd Infantry Division aboard. On the 13th, while en route, a Japan-ess torpedo plane made a run on the Task Unit, coming in very low and headed either for the Aquarius or the ship astern of her. He was shot down before doing any damage. The transport anchored in San Pedro Bay and cargo was unloaded under recurrent air attacks. By 1550 on November 15, 1944, the transport was underway for Aitape, New Guinea.

LINGAYEN GULF LANDING
Proceeding to Hollandia on December 11, 1944, the Aquarius, as part of Task Force 78, prepared for the operations against Lingayen Gulf, Central Luzon, Philippines. S-day had been set at January 9, 1945, and H and J hour 0930. On 21 December, the Aquarius received vehicles of the 43rd Infantry Division, U.S. Army completing combat unit loading of 1481 short tons of cargo and equipment. By the 27th, 7 officers and 31 men, a few from the 52nd and 58th Signal Batallions, but mostly of the 43rd Infantry Division had reported aboard and on January 3rd the task unit was underway, the combat air patrol shooting down one Japanese plane. On the 8th, observers on the Aquarius, noted heavy anti-aircraft fire from vessels of Task Group 78.5 astern and from another group on the port beam. On the 9th of January, 1945, the Aquarius anchored in the Transport Area in, Lingayen Gulf, Luzon Island, lowered boats and commenced unloading troops and cargo. Later she moved 3.9 miles off the beach at San Fabien to expedite unloading. At 1859, during an enemy air attack, the Aquarius opened fire on an enemy plane. Unloading continued all day on the 9th, and during the night, when the ship was under fire from an unknown source, believed to be enemy shore artillery. The entire task force was under attack by enemy motor torpedo boats. On January 10th, 3 LCVP's ware transferred to the 533rd Engineer Boat and Shore Regiment, and all Army personnel in LCM's had reported to unite ashore. Unloading was completed by 1759 and the vessel was underway, being the only vessel in the Task Unit to complete its unloading oh schedule, thus earning the commendation of the Task Unit Commander. On the 10th at 1919, an enemy plane made a suicide attack on the convoy and crashed into the superstructure of the USS DuPage, first ship in Section II. Shortly after the crash, word was received from the vessels ahead to proceed with caution and remain alert for survivors in the mater. Accordingly, the Aquarius lowered all debarkation nets and all hands mere notified to be prepared to throw Kapok life jackets to any survivor sighted. At 1935 several survivors in a raft were sighted on the starboard side and reported to the nearest screening vessel in a more favorable position to effect the rescue. Speed was resumed when it was learned that she had begun to pick up the men. The DuPage maintained its position in the column. On January 17, 1945, a red alert was sounded and "make smoke" ordere>d. On the 18th the same thing occurred. The Aquarius, proceeded to Leyte.

ZIMBALES, BATAAN
While anchored in Leyte Gulf for 13 days, during which the Aquarius was subject to several air attacks, none of which caused any damage, the transport loaded 1349 short tons of cargo and equipment of the 38th Infantry Division, U.S. Eighth Army by the 23rd and next day took on 6 officers and 196 enlisted men of the 149th Regimental Combat Team. She approached the Transport Area off La Paz, Luzon on January 29th and anchored off San Narciso, when all boats were lowered to assist in the amphibious landing attack on Red Beach Two. Unloading of cargo was completed at 2047 on 30 January, 1945, and the Aquarius prepared for sea. Anchored in Leyte Gulf on February 8, 1945, the transport participated in unloading merchant vessels anchored in the vicinity, provided berthing and sustenance for officers and men from various unloading units and repair facilities for LCM's.

TRAINING
Returning to Guadalcanal as part of Task Force 53, the Aquarius began loading cargo of the Sixth Marine Division and received 8 LCM's from the Amphibious Training Center and on 3 March began carrying out training exercises off Tenaru Beach, Guadalcanal, with 5 officers and 83 enlisted men of the 22nd Regiment, Sixth Marine Division. Training was completed March 6, 1945.

OKINAWA LANDING
As a unit of Transport Division 36, Transport Squadron 12, the Aquarius next took part in the amphibious assault on Okinawa, being continuously under attack during the operation by Japanese suicide planes and midget submarines. Combat loading of the transport at Guadalcanal was completed March 14, 1945, with 1801 short tons of cargo and equipment of the Sixth Marine Division as well as 12 officers and 245 men of the Marine Corps and Navy attached to the 22nd Regiment of that Division. As part of Task Unit 51, the Aquarius departed Ulithi for Okinawa on March 27, 1945, and entered the Transport Area off Western Okinawa on April 1, 1945, at 0500, when the attack phase of the operations became effective. By 0731 all boats were waterborne and cargo was being unloaded for transportation to the beach. At 1618, the transport departed for night retirement. Anchored off Zampa, Misaki Point, Okinawa, on April 2, 1945, the Aquarius continued to unload cargo for debarkation to Green Beach intermittently as ships boats became available, again departed on retirement at 1718. On the 3rd during a red alert a single engined fighter plane, a Japanese "Zeke" crashed into the water 300 yards off the vessel's starboard bow. On the 4th unloading was interrupted by heavy weather which continued through the 5th, but was resumed on the 6th. On the 7th the transport proceeded to a new area off Mamorida Saki Point, 10 miles from the Transport Area and unloaded cargo, delivering it directly to beaches near the Marine's advanced positions. Having completed unloading by 1317 on April 8, 1945, the Aquarius departed Okinawa April 9, 1945, with other ships of Task Unit 51. While underway to Pearl Harbor, Commander (now Captain) Edwin C. Whitfield, USCG, assumed command of the vessel, relieving Captain Ira E. Eskridge, USCG, on April 11, 1945. The Aquarius reached Seattle May 4, 1945 for availability.

TRAINING
By July 24, 1945, the Aquarius was anchored in the training area, San Pedro Harbor, as part of Task Unit 13, Training Command, Amphibious Forces, which training continued until the 26th.

--59--


USS Aquarius (AKA-16) CARRIED AMERICAN INVADERS TO THE PACIFIC
USS Aquarius (AKA-16) carried American invaders to the Pacific

USS Cepheus (AKA-18) TOOK TROOPS BOTH TO EUROPE AND THE PACIFIC
USS Cepheus (AKA-18) took troops both to Europe and the Pacific

--60--


TO GUAM, SAIPAN AND JAPAN
Japan surrendered while this training program was in progress and on August 18, 1945, the transport left San Pedro for Guam with Marine officer replacements and cargo arriving September 4, 1945, and proceeded to Saipan on the 6th. Here elements of the Sixth Marine Division were loaded and the transport proceeded to Nagasaki, Japan, where the second atomic bomb had been dropped, arriving September 23, 1945. After unloading, the vessel departed on the 26th for Manila anchoring there on October 1, 1945. She departed for Mindoro October 4th, arriving there on the 5th and returning to Manila on the 11th. On November 21, 1945, she proceeded to Tsingtao and returned to Okinawa on the 25th. On December 13, 1945, she arrived at Seattle, where Commander Warren L. David, USCG, assumed command. After stopping at San Francisco on the 8th she proceeded through the canal to New York, via Norfolk, arriving there on March 4, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONING
The Aquarius was decommissioned May 23, 1946, at New York and her Coast Guard crew removed.


USS CENTAURUS (AKA-17)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS Centaurus (AKA-17), named for the southern constellation "Centaurus" or "Man-Horse," was built by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Kearney, New Jersey. She was a standard U.S. Maritime Commission C2-S-B1 hull, arranged for naval use as a combat loaded cargo vessel and was launched September 3, 1943. Commissioned October 21, 1943, her first commanding officer, Captain George E. McCabe, USCG, served until October 28, 1944,when he was succeeded by Commander John P. Gray, USCGR, who served as commanding officer until July 21, 1945, when Captain K. P. Maley, USCG, took command. He, in turn, was succeeded by Commander George I. Holt on January 15, 1946, who turned over command to Captain Clarence C. Paden, USCG, on February 1, 1946. From date of commissioning until November 6, 1943, the vessel underwent authorised alterations at the New York Navy Yard and then sailed for Chesapeake Bay where she held amphibious exercises in the vicinity of Solomons Island for 18 days. After ten days of post shakedown availability at the Norfolk Navy Yard the Centaurus began loading cargo for Hawaii.

KWAJALEIN LANDING
The Centaurus departed Norfolk on December 11, 1943, bound for Pearl Harbor, via the Canal Zone, where she arrived December 30, 1943. After unloading cargo and undergoing voyage repairs for 14 days, the transport loaded combat cargo until January 21, 1944, and on the 22nd left Hawaii with Task Unit 52.52, Transport Division 6, to rendezvous with Task Force 52 for the assault on Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands. For 8 days while en route to target area, the fleet exercised at emergency drills and maneuvers and on January 30, 1944, the D-day assault transports and bombardment group, of which the Centaurus was a part, were detached from the main fleet and proceeded to the transport area in the vicinity of Porcelain Atoll, Marshall Islands, arriving on the morning of January 31, 1944.18 Landings on Cecil, Carlos and Carlson Island were carried out during the day and in the evening the ship entered and anchored in Kwajalein Lagoon. The Centaurus sent four waves of landing craft ashore under protective fire from the guns of the battleship Pennsylvania, and only 43 casualties among the landing forces from the transport were sustained during the entire operation. The Centaurus crew came through unscathed. The ship remained in Kwajalein Lagoon, unloading and dispatching combat cargo to various beaches until February 5, 1944, when she sailed with Task Unit 52.19.3 for Funafuti, Ellice Islands. En route the Equator was crossed with appropriate ceremonies and the ship berthed in Funafuti Lagoon on the 9th. She remained there 10 days before departing for Noumea, New Caledonia, where she arrived on the 24th. The crew now underwent 13 days of intensive training at Port Noumea from the 26th in preparation for the next amphibious operation.

TO SEEADLER HARBOR
The Centaurus departed Noumea for Guadalcanal as part of Transport Division 6, and in Task Unit 32.4.1 on March 8, 1944, where she transferred to Transport Division 4 and started loading cargo and personnel for Emirau Island. Departing for Emirau on the 31st, escorted by a destroyer and destroyer escort, she joined Task Group 31.6 en route and on that same day picked up survivors from an Army B-24 bomber that had crashed in the sea near the convoy. Instead of stopping at Emirau next day as planned the Centaurus proceeded to Seeadler Harbor, Admiralty Islands, arriving on April 5, 1944. The cargo and personnel were unloaded and on the 9th the ship departed for Langemak, New Guinea, to load army cargo and troops of the 127th Infantry for the assault on Aitape, New Guinea.

AITAPE LANDINGS
The landings at Aitape were effected on April 23, 1944, with only minor casualties to boat crews. The surf and beach conditions were extremely difficult, two boats being broached in the surf and abandoned because of insufficient time for salvage. All Army personnel and cargo were landed in Aitape Beachhead, however, and the Centaurus returned to Cape Sudest, New Guinea. Here she remained temporarily for logistics and then moved to Dekays Bay for another load of troops and cargo. These were put ashore at Berlin Harbor, Aitape and the transport returned to Cape Sudest and thence, in convoy, to Lunga Point, Guadalcanal, where she arrived on May 10, 1944, and immediately began loading ammunition and gasoline into all holds.

SAIPAN OPERATION
At this time submarine warnings ware so frequent that the Centaurus was obliged to shift anchorage and be ready to slip her anchor cable sometimes twice a day. After loading and three weeks of amphibious exercises, in and around Tulagi, Bunina Point and Cape Esperance, the Centaurus sailed again after reloading ammunition, g uns, vehicles and gasoline for Kwajalein on June 3, 1944, in company with Task Group 53.2. This time the lagoon was in United States hands and was to be used as a jumping off place for the assault on the Marianas. All during June 1944, the transport, as part of the Marianas Operation Floating Reserve, remained in the vicinity of Saipan, Tinian and Guam. The reserve was never called to support the Saipan Operations, so, at the end of the month, the Centaurus was sent back to Eniwetok to replenish fuel and commissary supplies and prepare for the attack on Guam. Training in shallow water mine sweeping from LCVP's followed, intelligence reports studied and detained plans made to land equipment over the reefs off Guam.

GUAM LANDINGS
Guam was invaded by United States troops on July 21,

--61--


1944, and the Centaurus' role consisted of landing troops, tanks and guns over the reef on to Agat Beach. Each night during the operation, the transport groups would retire from the beaches so as not to present "sitting duck" targets and be back in the transport area at dawn, unloading cargo and troops. At the end of a week all gear had been put ashore and then a group of ships formed to return to Eniwetok with the wounded. Transferring her casualties, the Centaurus set out from Eniwetok for Guadalcanal where she arrived on the 6th of August, 1944, spent a fortnight undergoing repairs, giving her crew much needed relaxation and then commenced loading general cargo for her fifth operation. The few remaining days of August were spent in practice landings and conditioning of troops and in early September, 1944, the Centaurus set out with Task Group 32.17 for Palau.

PALAU LANDINGS
The Centaurus landed in the vicinity of Peleliu Island in the middle of September 1944, and the accompanying task force subjected the island to a terrific air and sea bombardment to soften the defense forces. On September 15, 1944, transport and cargo ships began a 9-day period of unloading. In addition to unloading supplies during this period, the Centaurus handled casualties from the beach and provided boat transportation and repair for other large ships' in the area. She took aboard numerous prisoners of war and on the last of September embarked officers and men of the 1st Marine Division for transportation back to the Russell Islands. The seaborne phase of the Peleliu Operation was a long and bloody one, and it was not until October 4, 1944, that the Centaurus left the Palau Islands in command of Task Unit 32.19.11. The Unit dropped anchor off Pavuvu Island, Russell Islands on the 10th, the Centaurus discharged her cargo and troops and left for Guadalcanal arriving there on the 13th. Here the weary but happy crew learned that their ship was returning to San Francisco for a thorough overhaul. Embarking 200 men and 100 prisoners of war the Centaurus was off for San Francisco and after an uneventful passage of 15 days, entered the Golden Gate. There followed almost two months of well-earned leave and liberty for the crew and general repair, overhaul and alterations for the ship. But the Centaurus was destined to spend her second Christmas, as her first, at sea.

TO GUAM
On December 22, 1944, the Centaurus left San Francisco and arrived at Pearl Harbor on December 29, 1944, almost a year to the day after her first visit. After 3 days of unloading and nine days of re-loading she was off for Guam, via Eniwetok. She arrived there on February 1, 1945, and discharged her cargo in seven days under constant threat of enemy air attack. Then she stood out of Apra Harbor, Guam, once again bound for Guadalcanal, where she took her old berth off Lunga Point en February 14, 1945, and spent the rest of February loading cargo and personnel of the First Marine Division for maneuvers.

OKINAWA LANDING
A full month of practice followed and on March 27, 1945, the Centaurus, as part of Task Force 53, left Ulithi for Okinawa. The target was reached April 1, 1945, and there followed eight days and nights of the bloodiest and most bitter fighting in the experience of the officers and crew of the Centaurus. Under constant threat of fanatical suicide attacks, the crew remained at General Quarters for the entire time that the ship was in the area. Two Japanese pilots were sent to their ancestors when the Centaurus' 20 MM gunners splashed two Kamikaze planes intent on landing on the ship, but not a single casualty occurred on board the transport. Then, having put all her cargo and troops ashore, and having fueled several smaller ships, the Centaurus joined an east-bound convoy for Saipan on April 9, 1945. Here she was rerouted to Pearl Harbor for more cargo to bring back to Okinawa.

RETURN TO OKINAWA
Arriving at Pearl Harbor on April 24, 1945, she was loaded and on her way back to the Western Pacific by May 10, 1945. Stopping at Eniwetok on the 18th for fuel and at Ulithi on the 29th to join a convoy, she arrived again in the Okinawa area on June 3rd, 1945. Enemy activity was still very apparent and necessitated a full condition of readiness while unloading cargo. Smoke screens were used regularly to hide the ship from the visual observation of the enemy. This enabled the transport to remain in the transport area 24 hours a day, rather than to retire at nightfall as was done on previous operations. Cargo unloading was completed on June 14, 1945, and she returned to Saipan in convoy for rerouting to Pearl Harbor. Here on June 29, 1945, she took on a cargo of ammunition to be returned to the United States and arrived with it at the Naval Ammunition Depot in Seattle, Washington, on July 21, 1945. Here the crew had leave and the ship underwent repairs at Everett, Washington. It was while loading another cargo in Seattle for return to the forward area that news of the Japanese capitulation was broadcast.

TO TSINGTAO, CHINA
On August 22, 1945, the Centaurus left Seattle for Guam, via Eniwetok. Here she arrived September 10, 1945, and then proceeded via Saipan to Tsingtao, China, with Transport Squadron 24 and arrived in December 1945 with troops and equipment of the Sixth Division of the Marine Third Amphibious Corps stationed there to disarm Japanese troops in the China Area. Subsequently an independent assignment took her to Tientsin December 10, 1945, with cargo for the Marine Third Amphibious Corps. She returned to Okinawa on December 27, 1945, and returned to Seattle February 1, 1946, via Guam and Pearl Harbor. Leaving Seattle February 12, 1946, she arrived at New York March 23, 1946, via San Francisco, Canal Zone and Norfolk.

DECOMMISSIONING
The Centaurus was decommissioned April 30, 1946, at New York and her Coast Guard crew removed.


CENTAURUS (LCC-38)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

PART OF CENTAURUS COMPLEMENT
The landing craft control boat (LCC-38) was part of the Centaurus' boat complement for one year. It was one of four of these craft taken aboard at Norfolk, Virginia, shortly after commissioning of the Centaurus. Three of the craft were dropped off at Pearl Harbor to be assigned to other amphibious units while the fourth remained on board. Its crew consisted of two officers and fourteen enlisted men of the U.S. Navy. The LCC participated in the Kwajalein, Aitape, Guam and Peleliu invasions, and were used as "guides" for other landing craft in initial landings.

AT KWAJALEIN
Its outstanding achievement was in the Kwajalein campaign when it was used as a decoy to draw fire from hidden Japanese machine gun nest positions ashore. Approaching the fringe of that island, the LCC was suddenly met with a burst of

--62--


machine gun fire, thus forcing the Japanese to reveal their position which were then blasted by mortars. None of the crew was injured, in spite of bullets that whizzed dangerously close overhead. The LCC-38 was used for a variety of other duties, the most notable of which was securing mail for the Centaurus during the trip to Aitape, New Guinea. The Centaurus was in convoy and not scheduled to stop at Lae, New Guinea, where considerable mail awaited the ship. Because the convoy was slow moving, it was decided to launch the LCC some 100 miles from Lae, have her speed to that point and rendezvous with the Centaurus as the convoy reached that area. The LCC carried out her mission, but it was a sea sick crew that finally returned, for during the trip, the craft bucked heavy seas and a strong headwind, all during which she maintained an 11 knot speed, in order to be on time at the rendezvous. The LCC was dropped off at Pearl Harbor after the Palau campaign in October, 1944.


USS CEPHEUS (AKA-18)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The USS Cepheus (AKA-18) named for the constellation, was launched in October, 1943, at the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Kearney, New Jersey. Mary Jane Sharpe of Milburn, New Jersey was the sponsor. After trial runs, the Cepheus went into the New York Navy Yard and was commissioned December 16, 1943, as a naval vessel under the command of Captain R. B. Hall, USCG. She was assigned to operate under the Commander, Amphibious Forces, U.S. Atlantic Fleet.

CHARACTERISTICS
With a length of 459 feet, breadth 62 feet, maximum speed 18½ knots, displacement 13,923 tons, steaming radius 25,000 miles and fuel capacity of 450,000 gallons, the Cepheus carried 15 LCVP's, 1 LCPL (gig) and 8 LCM's. Her armament consisted of one 5-inch 38 gun, four 3-inch 50's, and eighteen 20mm's. For the comfort of the crew she was equipped with a ship's store, laundry, tailor shop, ice cream maker, cake machine, and two movie projectors. The crew averaged 380 enlisted men (120 being boat crew) and 40 officers, all hands being Coast Guard. 86% were reserves and 80% of the crew experienced their first sea duty on the transport.

SHAKEDOWN AND TRAINING
After commissioning, the Cepheus was given an availability at the New York Navy Yard for organizational, fueling and provisioning purposes. On January 1, 1944, she began her shakedown cruise and training period. Proceeding to Chesapeake Bay the boat group having undergone extensive training the landing boats at New River, North Carolina, reported aboard. This subsequent training consisted of drilling and practicing the debarkation and maneuvering of landing barges, ships emergency drills and actual landing operations with Army combat teams. After the shakedown and training period the ship went into the Norfolk Navy Yard for final alterations, then returned to Staten Island for loading and her first voyage.

MAIDEN VOYAGE
The maiden voyage of the Cepheus began on February 27, 1944, when the ship became part of a large convoy bound for England. There were a number of submarine contacts during the voyage but no casualties among the ships. A general cargo of material essential to the forthcoming D-day landing and operations on the continent was unloaded at Liverpool, while the crew enjoyed its first liberty on foreign soil.

TO ORAN
The Cepheus proceeded to Loch Long, Scotland, and reported to Transport Division 311, Amphibious Force. On March 24, 1944, the ship was ordered to temporary duty with the 8th Amphibious Force and proceeded down the Firth of Clyde to join convoy KFM-30. The convoy headed northwest above Ireland, thence south on a great circle and passed through the Straits of Gibraltar to Mers-el-Kebir, near Oran, Algeria. Here the Cepheus reported to Commander, Eighth Amphibious Force and was assigned to temporary duty with Transport Division 99. She proceeded to Arzew, Algeria, to join this division. Extensive amphibious maneuvers, both day and night landings, were held with Army Combat Teams and equipment of the 96th Division and at their completion the Cepheus returned to Oran. Here vehicles and troops bound for Naples were loaded. On June 16, 1944, Captain R. B. Hall, USCG, departed for the U.S. Naval Hospital, Oran, and Commander R. C. Sarratt, USCG, assumed command. The vessel put out to sea for Naples the same day.

AT NAPLES AND SALERNO
After unloading vehicles and troops at Naples, the ship was ordered to Palermo, Sicily, where courses of instruction were attended by ship's personnel. From Palermo she proceeded to the Bay of Naples. Here she was ordered to Salerno, Italy, to take part in amphibious operational exercises. She then proceeded to Castellammare Bay, Italy, where various inspections and drills were held. On July 31, 1944, she returned to Naples. July was uneventful except for a few alerts brought about by the presence of German reconnaissance planes, but the Cepheus took none under fire. Moving to the dock at Naples, she began unloading combat vehicles and on August 4th returned to her anchorage in Castellammare Bay, where 139 U.S. Army troops reported aboard from the 143rd Infantry Regimental Headquarters of the 36th Division. All personnel concerned were indoctrinated thoroughly in pre-invasion details.

AT INVASION OF SOUTHERN FRANCE
On August 13, 1944, the Cepheus, as part of Task Unit 81.7, Transport Division THREE, sailed in convoy for the coast of Southern France. She proceeded through the Tyrrhenian Sea and Straits of Bonifacio, between Sardinia and Corsica, and arrived on station in the transport area at 0420 on the morning of August 15, 1944. All boats were in the water at 1115 and debarkation of vehicles began. Unloading continued until 2015 when a red alert was received with orders to make smoke. At 2115 a loud explosion occurred close by and anti-aircraft fire appeared to be coming from many ships. Unloading ceased because of the dense smoke. A nearby LST was hit and burned fiercely, exploding from time to time during the night. Unloading was continued after the alert and continued until 2300. The vessel stood out to the return convoy routing area, awaiting escorts and orders to return in convoy to the Bay of Naples. Four more trips were made to Southern France, two from Naples to San Raphael and two from Oran to Marseilles. French and Italian, as well as American troops were carried on these turn around trips, with all unloading being accomplished by the ship's landing boats.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
From Oran the Cepheus returned to the United States in a large convoy via the southern route, arriving at Norfolk on November 8, 1944, having being overseas slightly over eight months. After two weeks availability at the Norfolk Navy Yard, the Cepheus returned to

--63--


Naval Operating Base and began loading general cargo and ship's stores.

TO THE PACIFIC
On December 18, 1944, the Cepheus, in company with the USS Archernar (AKA-53), got underway for Pearl Harbor. Christmas was celebrated by the Cepheus at Balboa, Canal Zone, while awaiting sailing orders. Proceeding direct to Pearl Harbor she discharged all cargo. After a period of training and maneuvers, off Maui Island, T.H., she returned to Honolulu where she loaded for Okinawa invasion, with high octane gasoline and ammunition, in addition to Army, Navy and Marine Corps personnel.

AT OKINAWA
The Cepheus sailed to Guadalcanal and spent seven days there replenishing supplies and fuel and then left for the final staging point at Ulithi, Caroline Islands. On March 27, 1945, she departed for Okinawa as part of Task Unit 53.2.1 of Transport Group BAKER of the Northern Attack Force. Taking her position in the transport area on April 1, 1945, at about 0530, two of the Cepheus' bowser boats were lowered and dispatched to their destination off beach Yellow Three. At 0600 all boats were put over and sent to the rendezvous areas, the Cepheus' boats being used to unload other vessels, as her cargo was "on call" and no part of it was called for on "L" day. The transport division withdrew from the transport area for the night of April 1st and on entering it on the morning of April 2nd, an enemy plane was observed off the port beam and taken under fire by the Cepheus and other vessels. The plane was splashed. Altogether seven enemy planes were fired upon by the Cepheus and her fire was believed to have contributed to the destruction of three of them. Cepheus boat crews assisted in unloading other vessels, all without casualty.

TO NEW ZEALAND AND RETURN TO OKINAWA
The Cepheus departed Okinawa on April 16, 1945, and arrived at Saipan on the 20th to replenish stores. She sailed for Auckland, New Zealand via the Admiralty Islands on May 9th. In Auckland she was loaded with equipment and sailed for Guam. En route she was diverted to New Caledonia to pick up Captain (then Commander) D. E. McKay, USCG, who was to relieve Captain Sarratt as commanding officer. He took command on June 11, 1945. Due to lack of anchorage at Guam, when she arrived, she was sent on to Saipan to await unloading at Guam later. Returning after unloading at Guam to Saipan she was loaded with equipment and 175 colored troops of the 24th Infantry and departed for Ulithi. At Ulithi a convoy was formed and left for Okinawa on July 20th. Arriving on the 24th she anchored at Hagushi. While there she underwent several air attacks. She was unloaded at Kerama Rhetto, just west of Okinawa, by the crew, and on to a difficult beach. On August 1st, while anchored off Hagushi Beach, a storm warning was received, and the Cepheus put out to sea in convoy to avoid the dangers of the approaching typhoon. She cruised three days before returning to Okinawa and shortly after sailed for Ulithi.

TO PHILIPPINES
One night was spent at Ulithi before sailing for Noumea, New Caledonia, where equipment for the first section, First Construction Battalion (special) was loaded. She then proceeded to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, where equipment of the second section was loaded. She departed September 4th for Lingayen Gulf, Luzon. Here the first contingent of her men eligible for discharge, under the point system, were detached to await transportation to the United States. On September 20, 1945, the Cepheus, in company with the USS Barnwell (APA-132) departed Lingayen for Sasebo-Ko, Japan, where she arrived September 23, 1945, and anchored to await further orders. Her Coast Guard crew removed May 22, 1946, on her return to the United States.


USS SHELIAK (AKA-62)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND DESCRIPTION
The USS Sheliak (AKA-62) was built by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Kearney, New Jersey, and was commissioned December 1, 1944. She was a standard U.S. Maritime Commission C2-S-B1 hull, arranged for naval use as a combat loaded cargo vessel. Her first and only commanding officer was Commander Searcy J. Lowrey, USCG. She left New York December 13, 1944, for Norfolk where, after two weeks of amphibious training at Solomons Island, she underwent post shakedown availability.

OKINAWA LANDING
Returning to Bayonne, New Jersey on December 28, 1944, she departed for Pearl Harbor, via the Canal Zone on January 5, 1945, arriving January 25, 1945. Proceeding to Guadalcanal on February 15, 1945, she arrived there on the 24th and began loading cargo and troops for the Okinawa invasion. She arrived off Okinawa April 1, 1945, and after unloading cargo and personnel under constant threat of Kamikazi attack, departed nine days later for Ulithi. She left Ulithi. April 25, 1945, and arrived at San Francisco, via Pearl Harbor, May 14, 1945.

SHUTTLE SERVICE TO PEARL HARBOR
The Sheliak now began a series of three shuttle voyages, carrying troops and cargo between San Francisco and Pearl Harbor. The first began on June 4th and saw her back in San Francisco on June 24th, after 8 days at Pearl Harbor. The second began July 5, 1945, with the transport back in San Francisco July 25, 1945, after 9 days at Pearl Harbor. The last of these shuttle voyages between San Francisco and Pearl Harbor began on August 6, 1945, and ended on her return to San Francisco August 27, 1945, after a 9 day stop in Pearl Harbor.

TO THE PHILIPPINES
A day out of Pearl Harbor on the last return voyage the Japanese surrendered and on her arrival at San Francisco the Sheliak remained in the San Francisco area until October 15, 1945, except for a two day visit to Monterey, California, on October 2nd. On October 15, 1945, she departed San Francisco for Subic Bay, Philippine Islands via Manus and Samar, arriving there December 18, 1945. She left Subic Bay January 26, 1946, and returned to San Francisco via Guam on February 22, 1946. She left San Francisco and arrived in San Diego March 16, 1946, leaving on the 20th for Norfolk, via the Canal Zone, where she arrived April 3, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONING
She was decommissioned May 10, 1946, at Norfolk where her Coast Guard crew was removed.


--64--


USS THEENIM (AKA-63)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The USS Theenim (AKA-63) was built by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company of Kearney, New Jersey, and commissioned December 23, 1944. She was a standard U.S. Maritime Commission C2-S-B1 hull, arranged for naval use as a combat loaded cargo vessel. Her first commanding officer was Captain Gordon A. Littlefield, USCG, who was relieved on October 15, 1945, by Captain Karl K. Rhodes, USCG. The Theenim proceeded to Norfolk on January 7, 1945, and after undergoing alterations until January 15, 1945, proceeded into Chesapeake Bay for a concentrated shakedown cruise. Returning to Norfolk on the 21st she took aboard a capacity load and on January 27, 1945, set out for the Pacific via the Canal Zone.

OKINAWA LANDING
The Theenim arrived at Pearl Harbor on February 17, 1945, and began discharging cargo. Loading began soon afterwards and was completed February 22, 1945. The Theenim sailed for Guadalcanal February 24, 1945, with 412 Coast Guard and Marine personnel aboard. Appropriate ceremonies were held as she crossed the equator. Guadalcanal was reached March 5, 1945. By the 15th the Theenim was combat loaded and, with her Marine personnel aboard, was en route Okinawa. Saipan was reached on March 24, 1945, and after three days of final logistics she departed for Okinawa on the 27th. Okinawa was approached before dawn on Easter Sunday, April 1, 1945, and the first indication of the presence of enemy forces came with a "Flash Red" warning from the Task Group Commander, followed by anti-aircraft fire dead ahead and a burst of flame as an APA two ships ahead in column was crash-dived by a Japanese suicider. Soon afterwards an LST, ammunition loaded, belched fire from a second hit. Our forces were ordered to make two successive diversionary feints at landings to confuse the enemy as to the main body of the assault. Japanese broadcasts picked up at this time surprised the Theenim's personnel by announcing that they had been sunk and that the remains of our battered fleet were "sneaking back to Pearl Harbor." The first chance the Theenim's crew had to fire at the enemy came later in the still early hours of April 1st when a Japanese "Val" broke suddenly from the clouds directly overhead, and though fired on, apparently escaped. On the third day, after two night retirements, the Theenim hit the Hagushi beaches and from then until the 15th it was work and fight. Air raids became a nuisance. "Flash Red" bringing all hands to their battle stations while unloading was delayed. Guns were at least partially manned 24 hours per day and the 42 air raids in 16 days were never at convenient hours. On the evening of the 15th of April, one evidently suicide-bound "Oscar," from a group of three incoming targets, was claimed by the Theenim crew as a splash. By the 17th, with all cargo finally ashore, the Theenim was back in convoy and bound for Saipan which was reached April 20, 1945.

PACIFIC "ROLL-UP"
Upon arrival at Saipan on April 20, 1945, a new phase known as the "Pacific Roll Up" began. This was a series of cargo movements from Guadalcanal to the Guam area which continued until V-J Day, followed by trips from Leyte to Hokkaido and Leyte to Yokohama. After more than a month in Saipan Harbor the Theenim reached Guadalcanal on June 13, 1945. Steaming back to Guam from Guadalcanal on June 28, 1945, a flimsy twelve foot skiff was spotted bobbing listlessly on a calm sea. Closer investigation disclosed the occupants to be too timid and badly frightened Japanese. Both were in bad shape from malnutrition and were covered with salt water sores on legs and arms. Taken aboard, their craft was used for target practice, and they were first shaved, disinfected and fed. Then they were questioned and placed in the ship's brig. Driven in desperation to escape starvation and ill-treatment on their Japanese-held island, they had attempted to make the port of Truk, 900 miles distant. They were already 285 miles on their course when the Theenim picked them up and it is doubted if they would ever have survived the trip. Guam was reached July 2, 1945, and by the 15th the Theenim was on her way back to Guadalcanal, via Saipan and Manus but diverted to Espiritu Santo and arrived there July 27, 1945. Here they picked up a heavy load and sailed for Guam on August 7, 1945.

POST WAR OPERATIONS
Coming up to Guam from Espiritu Santo, hot news emanated from the radio shack on board the Theenim. First the dropping of the atomic bomb, then Russia's entry into the war and finally Japan's unconditional acceptance of the surrender terms as she steamed into Guam Harbor on August 14, 1945. The transport sailed for Leyte on the 31st to participate in the final phase of the Pacific war--the occupation of Japan's home empire on Honshu. Stopping at both Samar and Leyte for loading, the Philippine waters were found full of wrecked ships, with the villages rubble-strewn, dirty and congested. Inflation was running wild with the Filipinos charging amazing prices for souvenirs. Many fishermen coursed up and down the coast in water-logged skiffs and picturesque sloops. Native girls, the first women most of the crew had seen since leaving the States, were on the whole timid and shy but made excellent sight-seeing material. Departing Leyte September 18, 1945, the Theenim set course for Aomori, Hokkaido, Japan. Here on the 25th a full scale amphibious operation was executed, complete to assault landing on the beach with supporting ships and aircraft. No chances were being taken with the only recently capitulated Japanese. However, not a shot was fired. The Japanese had apparently learned their lesson. After the cargo was discharged all hands were given shore leave. The B-29's had dealt harshly with the city and whole sections of this once thriving industrial center were burnt to the ground, leaving little but twisted metal and concrete blocks Japanese women in faded kimonos and with children strapped to their backs, worked with the men building lean-to shacks of corrugated metal and wood. By the 30th operations had been completed and the Theenim headed back to the Philippines. Here she loaded more supplies for the occupation forces and cutting through the edge of a typhoon, returned to Yokohama on October 30, 1945, moving to Tokyo a few days later. The transport left Tokyo November 5, 1945, and took the great circle route to Portland, Oregon where she arrived November 16, 1945. The Theenim reached San Francisco December 9, 1945, and after a short layover, departed again for the Orient on December 27, 1945. She reached Subic Bay, January 17, 1946. After discharging cargo she departed March 19th, 1946, for Norfolk, via the Panama Canal. Norfolk was reached April 16, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONING
The Theenim was decommissioned May 10, 1946, at Norfolk and her Coast Guard crew removed.


USS CALAMUS (AOG-25)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

Placed in commission 17 July, 1944, at Tompkinsville, Staten Island, New York, Lt. William Hord, USCGR, commanding, the Coast Guard manned USS Calamus

--65--


(AOG-25) sailed from New York on 25 August, 1944. Arriving at Naval Operating Base, Norfolk, she sailed for a two week shakedown cruise up Chesapeake Bay. On September 18, 1944, she departed Norfolk and joined a convoy for Guantanamo, Cuba. Sailing from Guantanamo on the 26th, she arrived at Colon, Panama on the 29th and at San Diego on 16 October, 1944. From San Diego she proceeded to San Pedro, and sailed from there 27 October, 1944, for Pearl Harbor.

Sailing from Pearl Harbor on 14 November, 1944, she arrived at Eniwetok on the 29th. On 2 December, 1944, she sailed for Apra Harbor, Guam, arriving on the 8th. Departing from Ulithi Islands on December 14th, the crew were kept busy, after arrival, loading cargo.

In January 1945, she sailed back to Guam and set out next day for Eniwetok, arriving there on the 30th. Here she serviced 43 ships in one day. These ships were getting ready for the Iwo Jima invasion and a three day job was finished in two days.

On 3 February, 1945, the Calamus sailed for Saipan arriving there on 11 February.

The Calamus took part in the invasion of Okinawa on April 1, 1945, where her guns downed at least one Japanese plane.


USS KANAWHA (AOG-31)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

Placed in commission on 23 November, 1944, at the Marine Basin, Brooklyn, New York, with Lt. C. J. Byrne, USCGR, commanding, the Kanawha remained in New York Harbor until 21 December, 1944, for fitting out, and then proceeded to Norfolk arriving on the 23rd. On the 25th she was underway in Chesapeake Bay on her shakedown cruise, returning to her anchorage on 2 January, 1945. She was moored at Norfolk Navy Yard until 14 January, and departed for Aruba, N. W. I., on the 15th, arriving on the 23rd. Here she received 177,150 gallons of Diesel Fuel Oil and 157,523 gallons of Aviation Gasoline and set out for the Canal Zone. Proceeding through the Canal on 27 January, 1945, she was proceeding to San Pedro, California, when on 2 February, she suffered a main engine casualty and effected emergency repairs. She remained in San Pedro until 10 March, 1945, awaiting the arrival of main engine parts, and then got underway for Pearl Harbor, where she arrived on the 20th. Here she discharged her cargo. On April 3rd, Lt. Byrne was relieved by Lt. F. T. Frost, USCGR, as commanding officer. A cargo of lubricating oil was received on board and on the 6th she stood out for Eniwetok via Johnston Islands, as C.T.U. of Task Unit 16.8.1. Arriving at Eniwetok on 20 April, she departed on the 23rd for Apra, Guam, where she arrived on the 29th. On May 12th she left Apra for Saipan arriving next day, and on the 18th departed Saipan for Ulithi where she arrived on the 21st. Here from 1 to 6 June, 1945, she was engaged in shifting lube oil within the harbor and departed Ulithi for Leyte, P.I., with a full cargo of lube oil, arriving on June 11, 1945.

From June 12, 1945, to September 25, 1945, the Kanawha was engaged in servicing naval vessels with lube oil in San Pedro Bay, P.I. On September 27th the commanding officer, Lt. Comdr. G. T. Frost, USCGR, was relieved by Lt. (jg) L. A. Philipps, USCGR. On the 28th of September, 1945, she was stripped of cargo and next day was underway bound for Okinawa, under ballast.

The Coast Guard crew was removed 15 May, 1946.


USS OGEECHEE (AOG-35)

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

Built at the East Coast Shipyard, Inc., Bayonne, New Jersey, and accepted by the Navy on 1 September, 1944, the conversion and outfitting was accomplished at Marine Basin, Inc. Brooklyn, and the Ogeechee was commissioned on 6 September, 1944, Lt. Wm. E. Peterson, USCGR, commanding. The vessel proceeded to Norfolk and reported to COTCLANT 3 October, 1944, for shakedown in Chesapeake Bay and post shakedown availability at the Norfolk Navy Yard. Returning to New York on 27 October, she was ordered to proceed in convoy to Aruba, N. W. I., where she arrived on 6 November, 1944, and took on board a full cargo of diesel oil. She departed for Panama, under orders to report to Commandant, 17th Naval District (Alaska). She arrived in Seattle on 6 December, where she discharged her cargo and underwent an extended availability at the Puget Sound Bridge and Dredge Shipyard, effecting minor alterations and repairs to adapt her for operations in the Aleutians.

She departed Seattle on 17 January, 1945, with the first cargo of gasoline, proceeding via the inside Alaskan passage, Kodiak Harbor and Dutch Harbor, and arrived at Adak, Alaska, on 8 February, 1945, reporting for duty. She departed Adak next day to deliver the cargo of gasoline to Attu. From then on her primary function was shuttling aviation and motor gasoline from the major tank farm facilities at Sand Bay, Great Sitkin Island, Alaska, to the Army and Navy bases west of Dutch Harbor. These bases included Otter Point, Umnak Island, Atka Island, Adak Island, Constantine Harbor, Amchitka Island, Shemya Island and Attu Island. As the war ended, the carriers of North Pacific were supplied by the Ogeechee with aviation gasoline prior to their departure for the occupation of the Japanese mainland.

The Coast Guard crew was removed 18 February, 1946.


LST-16
FLOTILLA 18 - GROUP 53 - DIVISION 105

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-16 was commissioned March 17, 1943. Her commanding officer on March 31, 1944, was Lt. Rufus W. L. Horton, USCGR.

AT SICILY INVASION
The Coast Guard manned LST-16 departed Tunis on July 8, 1943, and arrived at Transport Area 1, Woods Hole Beach on July 10, 1943, carrying LST-336. While engaged in unloading operations the LST-16 discovered that an enemy shore battery, four miles away, had her range. The battery was located and 3"/50 calibre shells were fired at a range of 8700 yards were apparently hits. The LST ceased firing as a U.S. destroyer opened fire on the same target putting it out of action. Crew members on LST-16 observed small arms fire on the beach with our troops and the enemy separated by small ridges 6 or 8 feet high about 100 feet from the water line. Ordered to proceed to Bailey's Beach, four miles south of Scoglitti she discharged DUKWs before beaching. Both ramp chains parted while discharging DUKWs and a jury rig of wire pennants was installed. The Beachmaster advised that no pontoons were available. The vessel was beached on the 11th and the commanding officer went ashore to arrange for a causeway. While awaiting the causeway, then in use by another LST, several enemy aircraft attempted to attack the beach and the LST-16 opened fire. At 1700 the causeway was

--66--


LST-16 WITH AN ELEVATED DECK, BUILT FROM BOW TO BRIDGE USED FOR LAUNCHING PIPER CUB PLANES
LST-16 with an elevated deck, built from bow to bridge used for launching Piper Cub planes

THE BEACH AT CAPE SANSAPOR, DUTCH NEW GUINEA, WAS NOT MADE TO ORDER FOR THE AMERICAN INVADERS, SO TROOPS 'TURNED TO' TO BUILD A RAMP OUT TO THE YAWNING BOW DOORS OF THE COAST GUARD MANNED LST-18
The beach at Cape Sansapor, Dutch New Guinea, was not made to order for the American invaders,
so troops "turned to" to build a ramp out to the yawning bow doors of the Coast Guard manned LST-18

--67--


received and all vehicles and Army personnel were off by 1900. The ship's company unloaded 470 tons of supplies by hand completing the task by 1400 on the 12th. At 1700 she proceeded to a newly marked beach north of Scoglitti and on the 13th loaded 300 tons of ammunition and supplies from P-76 and proceeded to anchorage. Fired on enemy aircraft at 2150 on the 14th began discharging ammunition and supplies via DUKWs and on the 15th was underway anchoring in Tunis Bay on the 16th. The LST-16 returned to Gela, Sicily, on July 19, 1943, with 7 officers and 142 enlisted men of the U.S. Army and returned to Tunis Bay with 62 Italian officers and 408 Italian soldiers as prisoners of war on July 22, 1943. Again loading 35 vehicles, 2 officers and 44 enlisted men of the U.S. Army the LST anchored off Gela on the 24th and was back in Tunis Bay next day. On July 28, 1943, she made her final trip to Gela with 13 officers, 153 enlisted men and 63 vehicles. She returned to Bizerte on August 4, 1943, towing two sections of pontoon causeway in tandem. In 4 trips and one shuttle trip 48 officers, 537 enlisted men, 894 tons of cargo and 167 vehicles were transported to Sicily. 36 U.S. military personnel and 471 prisoners of war were returned to North Africa. (No further reports of the activities of LST-16 in World War II are available until March 31, 1944.)

NORMANDY BEACH LANDING
On March 31, 1944, the LST-16 departed Naples for Plymouth, England, via Oran, to make preparations for the invasion and bombardment of the coast of France from June 6-25, 1944. The LST-16 arrived at Plymouth April 25, 1944, and after participating in the invasion was ordered on September 25, 1944, to return to the United States in the first wave. She actually left Plymouth January 26, 1945, and after arriving at Norfolk on February 17, 1945, proceeded to Davisville, Rhode Island, to unload.

TO THE PACIFIC
The LST-16 proceeded to Galveston, Texas via Boston and New Orleans for an availability from March 11, 1945, to April 17, 1945. Returning to New Orleans she proceeded on April 27, 1945, via Theodore, Mobile, Canal Zone, Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Saipan, Leyte, Luzon and Batangas to Tokyo, where she arrived September 15, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONING
She remained in Tokyo for more than two months and on November 26, 1945, arrived at Saipan on her homeward voyage, which included stops at Pearl Harbor, San Francisco and Canal Zone before Charleston was reached February 10, 1946. She was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed March 8, 1946.


LST-17
FLOTILLA 17 - GROUP 51 - DIVISION 101

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned LST-17 was commissioned April 19, 1943, at New Orleans, Louisiana, having been floated down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers from the Dravo Yard, Pittsburg where she had been built. She had left Pittsburgh on April 7, 1943, and arrived at New Orleans April 18, 1943. After shakedown at Panama City, Florida, late in April 1943, she acted as a training ship in Chesapeake Bay during May, June and July.

TO CALCUTTA
Departing Little Creek, Virginia, on July 27, 1541, the LST-17 headed for Oran, Algeria, arriving thereon August 14th. She proceeded to Bizerte on the 19th returning to Oran on September 2, 1943. Leaving Oran on September 11th she proceeded via Algiers and Catania, Sicily to Taranto, Italy returning to Algiers, via Port Augusta, Sicily on October 3, 1943. On October 14, 1943, she left Algiers for Calcutta, India proceeding via Port Said, Suez, Aden and Bombay, and arriving November 25, 1943. She left Calcutta December 22, 1943, returning to Bizerte via Colombo, Ceylon, Aden, Suez and Port Said on January 23, 1944.

1944

IN NORMANDY INVASION
The LST-17 arrived at Milford Haven, Wales, on March 3, 1944. Leaving Milford Haven on March 3, 1944, she proceeded to Portland and returned to Milford Haven March 15, 1944. On the 31st she left for Lough Foyle and then visited in turn Londonderry, Rosneath, Plymouth, Senny Cliff Bay, Weymouth, Solent and Southampton, returning to Solent May 28, 1944, to prepare for the Normandy beach, towing Rhino barges on which were railway equipment for use in France, detaching the Rhino barges to the beach at 1615 on June 6, 1944. At 2010 she received the first group of casualties via DUKWs and returned to Solent June 7, 1944. She left Solent for her second trip to France on June 9, 1944, anchoring two miles off Normandy beach at 0335 on the 10th, moving pontoons ashore and returned to Solent June 11, 1944, proceeding to Southampton next day. On June 15, 1944, she left Southampton and anchored off France. Next day she beached at JIG GREEN at 1108 with British and Canadian troops. She left the beach on the 17th and returned to Tilbury, England, proceeding to Solent on the 20th. She left Solent on June 23, 1944, and beached at Normandy, France at 1639 that day, returning to Solent on the 24th. Again on June 27, 1944, she left Solent and beached in Normandy, France at 1848, leaving Normandy on the 28th and arriving at Tilbury on the 29th. She left Tilbury on June 30, 1944, and again arrived at Normandy July 1st returning to London on July 4th. Her next trip was on July 14, 1944, when she left Thames Dry Dock and arrived at Normandy on the same day, returning to Southampton on the 16th. Again on the 18th she left Southampton, this time for UTAH Beach, Normandy, France, leaving there on the 19th and arriving at Weymouth, England on the 20th. She left Weymouth July 21st arrived OMAHA Beach same day and returned to Portland. From this time, September 1944, she made continuous trips to UTAH Beach and return. Arriving at Cornwall on September 17, 1944, she departed for Norfolk, Virginia, on October 5, 1944, and taking on fuel and provisions there on the 24th arrived at Boston on October 26, 1944, for overhaul.

TURNED OVER TO NAVY
On November 10, 1944, the LST-17 was turned over to the Navy and her Coast Guard crew was removed.


LST-18
FLOTILLA 7 - GROUP 21 - DIVISION 41

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING AND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned LST-18 was built by the Dravo Corp., Neville Island, Pennsylvania and after being floated down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers from April 19, 1943, to April 25, 1943, was commissioned at New Orleans on April 26, 1943, with Lieutenant John Lence, USCG, as her first commanding officer. He was relieved by Lieutenant C. W. Radke, USCG on April 4, 1944, who was relieved by Lt. G. W. Yeoman, USCGR, on July 7, 1944. Successive commanding officers were Lieutenant

--68--


F.C. Merriam, USCGR, (October 4, 1944), Lieutenant G.R. Denny, USCGR, (August 14, 1945), Lt. G. H. Bird, USCGR, (November 12, 1945). There were 7 officers and 67 enlisted men in the original crew. After tests and maneuvers at St. Andrews, Florida, she returned to New Orleans on May 14th for post shakedown availability.

TO THE PACIFIC
On June 1, 1943, she got underway for the Canal Zone. Arriving at Coca Sola, Canal Zone on June 14, 1943, Commander Clarence H. Peterson, USCG, with 2 officers and 13 enlisted men reported aboard for duty to the Staff of Group 21, LST Flotilla 7 and the ship was designated flagship for the Group. He was relieved March 12, 1944, by Commander F. D. Higbee, USCG, who in turn yielded to Commander N. M. Nelson on October 4, 1944. She now proceeded to Milne Bay, New Guinea, arriving on September 2, 1943, for ten days of beaching operations and loading for the first trip in the forward areas.

IN FOURTEEN INVASIONS
During the time that the ship was in the forward areas she participated in fourteen invasions, six of which were initial invasions:19

Finschaven September 22, 1943
Cape Gloucester December 26, 1943
Wakde Island May 17, 1944
Cape Sansapor July 30, 1944
Leyte, P.I. October 20, 1944
Cebu, P.I. March 26, 1945

The LST also participated in eight support landings:

Lae September 21, 1943
Manus Island March 30, 1944
Tanah Meran. D.N.G. April 27, 1944
Biak Island June 28, 1944
Noemfoor Island July 4, 1944
Morotai September 15, 1944
Lingayen Gulf January 9, 1945
Palawan, P.I. March 1, 1945

After the cessation of hostilities on August 14, 1945, the ship made one support landing at Brunei Bay, Borneo on August 25, 1945, and then completed her tour of duty by taking a load of occupation troops to Taku, China.

NIGHT ATTACKS
In carrying out these invasions the LST-18 was under attack eight times by enemy planes, shore installations and torpedo. No casualties were suffered by the ship's crew, but one Army passenger was killed aboard, the result of an enemy strafing run.

CARRIED 16,000 MEN
The ship carried approximately 19,000 tons of equipment in all these trips and about 16,000 Army and Navy personnel. She also evacuated 617 ambulatory eases and 179 stretcher cases from the various beachheads. There were three deaths aboard; one Army enlisted who had been brought on board for treatment; one Army passenger who died of wounds during an air attack and one prisoner of war who was brought on board for treatment. Up to the time of the ship's return te San Francisco on December 16, 1945, 291 enlisted men and 33 officers had served aboard at various intervals.

DECOMMISSIONING
Proceeding to Galveston, Texas, via the Canal Zone she arrived on February 1, 1946, and was decommissioned at Houston, Texas, April 3, 1946.


LST-19
FLOTILLA 13 - GROUP 37 - DIVISION 73

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

1943

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-19 was commissioned on May 15, 1943. Her commanding officers have been the following: Lt. Comdr. Chas. M. Blackford III, USCGR, Lt. Howard K. Heath, USCGR, Lt. Q. Oakley, Jr, USCGR, and Lt. (jg) D. S. Williams, USCGR.

IN ALASKA
From July 1 - 17, 1943, the LST-19 was on the California coast en route to Alaska.20 She stopped at San Diego, Mare Island Navy Yard and San Francisco, loading cargo and embarking Army personnel at the latter place. On July 17, 1943, she was underway out of San Francisco Bay arriving at the Naval Air Station, Woman's Bay, Kodiak, Alaska on July 25, 1943. On the 27th she was underway in convoy with three Navy escorts and in company with LST's 169, 20, 23, 69, 205 and 479 for Adak Island (Aleutians) where she arrived August 1, 1943. Here Army personnel was disembarked and LCT-81 launched. Beaching exercises were carried out. Practice operations were continued, some in Great Sitkin Island area and cargo was unloaded at Sweeper's Cove. Departing Adak on August 14, 1943, the LST-19 took position in a convoy operating with Task Force 16.10. On the 16th she broke convoy and proceeded independently anchoring off Kiska Island (Aleutians). She entered Kiska Harbor on the 19th and began unloading Army equipment. Getting underway on the 19th in convoy with LST-69 and LCI's 77, 78, 79, 80, 81 and 82, escorted by the USS Courlan, she began proceeding independently on the 22nd and anchored at Adak Island. She departed for San Francisco August 31, 1943, but turned back to Adak as engine trouble developed.

1944

(No further records of the movements of LST-19 in World War II are available until April 4, 1944).

TO THE PACIFIC
The LST-19 was at San Pedro, California on April 4, 1944. Proceeding to San Diego and San Francisco, she departed for Pearl Harbor on May 3, 1944.

AT PELELIU
Proceeding by way of Saipan and Eniwetok the LST-19 arrived at Peleliu on D-1 day September 14, 1944, and was also engaged in the raids on Volocano-Bonin and Yap.21 She returned to Peleliu and Angaur on December 24, 1944. On the 31st she was at Fais Island returning to Peleliu on January 15, 1945.

1945

TO JAPAN
The LST-19 arrived at Kossol on February 4, 1945, and Ulithi February 11th. She departed Ulithi March 5, 1945, for San Francisco via Eniwetok, Pearl Harbor, San Pedro and San Diego, arriving on July 28, 1945. On August 5, 1945, she departed San Francisco for Pearl Harbor returning on September 3, 1945. Again departing San Francisco on September 25, 1945, she proceeded to Wakayama, Japan via Pearl Harbor and Buckner Bay, Okinawa, arriving there on November 5, 1945. She returned to San Francisco January 1946 via Saipan and Pearl Harbor.


--69--


LST-20
FLOTILLA 3 - GROUP 9 - DIVISION 17

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-20 was commissioned on May 14, 1943. Her various commanding officers were Lt. Charles W. Smith, USCG, Lt. Edgard Duprey, USCGR, Lt. Raymond F. Garrity, USCGR, Lt. (jg) Stanley J. Cieslinski, USCGR, Lt. William L. E. Sinkler, USCGR, and Lt. (jg) Warren B. Eib, USCGR.

TO ALASKA
During early July 1943 the LST-20 was proceeding up the West Coast of the United States from San Diego to San Francisco where cargo and troops were loaded. She departed San Francisco July 17, 1943, with five other LST's escorted by the USS Hutchins for Woman's Bay, Kodiak Island, Alaska, arriving on July 25, 1943. On the 27th she departed with 6 other LST's escorted by the USS Oracle and USS Charleston and USS Hutchins for Adak Island (Aleutians).22 (No further reports on the movements of LST-20 in World War II are available until April 4, 1944).

AT LEYTE
On April 4, 1944, the LST-20 was at Kwajalein, Marshall Islands. She arrived at Pearl Harbor April 27, 1944. On October 20, 1944, the LST-20 took part in the landings at Leyte, Philippine Islands on D-day.23

AT LINGAYEN BAY
On January 9, 1945, the LST-20 was one of the landing force that arrived on D-day. She arrived at Okinawa April 6, 1945, and remained there until she left for Ulithi. On May 18, 1945, she departed Ulithi for San Francisco where she arrived June 14, 1945, for 60 days availability.

TO IWO JIMA
The LST-20 left San Francisco August 26, 1945, for Iwo Jima, via Pearl Harbor, Guam and Saipan, arriving October 30, 1945. She returned to San Diego December 23, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONING
She left San Diego January 11, 1946, for Galveston, Texas, via the Canal Zone. Here she was decommissioned April 3, 1946.


LST-21
FLOTILLA 17 - GROUP 51 - DIVISION 101

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-21 was commissioned April 14, 1943. Her first and only commanding officer was Lt. Charles M. Brookfield, USCGR. During June 1943 the LST was engaged in various training exercises in Chesapeake Bay and also loaded tanks. At the beginning of July 1943 aha was anchored off Little Creek, Virginia, and she continued exercises in the Chesapeake Bay area when she proceeded to Portsmouth, Virginia. Between the 17th and 24th she was at Newport News, Virginia, loading tanks and supplies. On the 27th she departed Little Creek as flagship of Group 10 Flotilla 4, to proceed in convoy USG-31 for African waters, the group consisting of nine other LST's. She arrived at Oran early in August.

IN ITALY
The LST-21 set sail from Oran, Algeria, on September 11, 1943, in company with nine other United States LST's and seven British LST's for rendezvous with convoy KMS-25. This group carried LCT's on deck for delivery at destination. After passing Algiers the entire contingent was ordered to return to Algiers. On the 14th the LST-21 entered Algiers Harbor where the LCT was removed and she set sail with six other LST's for Syracuse, Sicily, as flagship. Off the Gulf of Tunis the group was ordered to return to Bizerte arriving on the 16th. Proceeding to the docks, 63 British trucks were loaded on board with officers and men of a transportation unit of the British Eighth Army. On September 17, 1943, she departed Bizerte for Taranto, Italy, with 4 United States and 1 British LST's, under British escort, arriving and discharging cargo on the 20th. Proceeding to Crotone, Italy, on the 21st she sailed for Catania, Sicily, same day arriving with an additional LST unit on the 22nd. All units began loading vehicles, the LST-21 taking 11 vehicles, with officers and man. At 1930 departed for Bizerte arriving on the 24th and discharging cargo. At 1230 on the same day she began loading 71 vehicles and 178 officers and men of the King's Royal Rifles, proceeding to Catania with the LST-214 without escort and anchoring there on the 27th, proceeding to Taranto where she arrived and unloaded on the 28th. On the 29th 27 tanks, 18 vehicles and 184 officers and men (British and Canadian) were taken to Barletta, Italy, arriving on the 30th, with three other LST's under escort. Arriving October 1, 1943,she was instructed to proceed to Manfredonia to discharge cargo. She was the first ship to land tanks on the Adriatic Coast. On October 2, 1943, she proceeded to Brindisi, to Taranto on the 3rd, and departed for Algiers same day arriving on October 8, 1943.

FIRST OFFENSIVE--WESTERN BURMA
On December 1, 1943, the LST-21 was at Calcutta, India, on detached duty, attached to British Eastern Fleet. Embarking officers and men of the 15th Indian Corps as well as 13 "General Lee" medium tanks she was underway on the 3rd rendezvousing with the LST-25 on the 4th and under escort of 2 R.I.N. launches, with one Liberator and 4 Spitfires as escorts. On the 5th an air raid was reported but she beached at destination without attack. At 2230 on the 5th disembarked tanks at Regu Beach, Burma, and returned to Calcutta December 8, 1943. This was the first American vessel to take the offensive in these waters in World War II. (No further reports on LST-21 are available until April 16, 1944).

NORMANDY INVASION
On April 16, 1944, the LST-21 was transferred with other ships of LST Division 101, Group 51, Flotilla 17, from detached duty with the 11th Amphibious Force to British Operational Control. LST Division 101, consisting of LST's 21 (flagship) 17, 25, 72, 73, 176 and 520, was assigned to Force G, Group "Able." On June 1, 1944,she proceeded to Southampton, England, where she loaded 20 officers, 205 men and 73 vehicles of the British Army and after being sealed proceeded to anchorage off the Isle of Wight. Rhino ferry, F 100 and Rhino tug reported on June 4, 1944, and were secured to stern cable to be towed to Normandy Beach. On June 5, 1944, the LST-21 get underway at 1618 in company with LST Group 33, Group 51 of Division 101 and 10 craft of the Rescue Flotilla One and escorts and proceeded to the Normandy Coast of France near Le Hamel and Arromanches. In route the Rhino tug broke loose and drifted off. At 1210 on June 6, 1944, the LST-21 arrived in the assault area and cast off the Rhino ferry. At 1350 she discharged six DUKWs from the ramp. Considerable activity was observed on the

--70--


FLAT CARS OF THE ARMY TRANSPORTATION CORPS ROLL INTO THE TRACK-EQUIPPED TANK DECK OF THE COAST GUARD MANNED <i>LST-21</i> TO BE FERRIED TO THE COAST OF FRANCE
Flat cars of the Army Transportation Corps roll into the track-equipped tank deck of the Coast Guard manned LST-21 to be ferried to the coast of France

FROM THE GAPING BOW OF THE <i>LST-21</i> RESTING ON THE FRENCH BEACH FREIGHT CARS OF THE ARMY TRANSPORTATION CORPS ROLL INLAND FOR THE TRIP TO THE WESTERN FRONT WITH SUPPLIES FOR ALLIED ARMIES
From the gaping bow of the LST-21 resting on the French beach, freight cars of the Army Transportation Corps roll inland for the trip to the western front with supplies for Allied armies

--71--


beaches and "JIG GREEN" beach was under fire from a German 88 MM situated west of Arromanches Les Bains. Naval bombardment was carried out by British cruisers lying about two miles off shore. At 1446 shells from a German 88 MM gun began falling near ships in the area and a British destroyer north of the LST-21 engaged the shore battery. The first load was taken into the beach at 1540 by Rhino ferry and at 1915 the LST-21 got underway toward the beach to meet the Rhino ferry which was laboring through tidal current setting due east. The seas were choppy and the wind freshening. The LST took on 13 casualties from a DUKW and the Rhino ferry returned at 2145 and departed at 2240 with the remaining vehicles after which the LST got underway for her assigned anchorage. Ten minutes later ships began making smoke on a red alert, followed nine minutes later by a second red alert. Two minutes later, amidst anti-aircraft fire from the west, three bombs successively hit the water on the port beam, a fourth hitting 150 feet off the starboard bow. At 2230 a stick of four bombs hit the water from broad on port bow to dead ahead, 300 feet and at 2342 a stick of four bombs, hit the water 300 yards off the port bow. No damage to the LST-21 resulted from any of these attacks. There were intermittent alerts and anti-aircraft fire during the morning of June 7, 1944, and, in the dive bombing attack which followed, HMS Bololo, 1000 yards north of the LST-21 received a bomb hit on the forecastle. At 1120 on June 7, 1944, the LST got underway in convoy for Southampton arriving at East Solent at 2055.

BACK TO NORMANDY
Mooring at Southampton on June 8, 1944, the LST-21 discharged casualties and loaded 40 vehicles and 146 Army personnel. At 1445 on June 9, 1944, she was underway in convoy for GOLD assault area arriving off the Normandy coast June 10, 1944, and underway to JIG GREEN beach at 1649. Made smoke on red alert and observed considerable anti-aircraft fire and bomb bursts. At 2334 she retracted from the beach and proceeded to the outbound area awaiting anchorage. Enemy aircraft were active intermittently during the early morning of June 11, 1944, and at 0935 on that date the LST-21 joined a northbound convoy for the Thames River.

THIRD TRIP TO FRANCE
Arriving on the 12th she proceeded to King George Fifth Docks in London and moored to take aboard 31 English ammunition trucks and 131 Army personnel. On the 13th she moved to convoy anchorage area due south of Southend, England, and at 2135 was underway in convoy EWT-8, arriving at GOLD assault area at 2130 on the 14th and proceeding to JIG GREEN beach. At 2206 she struck a submerged wreck but passed clear and beached at 2213. The LST-338, however, stranded in the same wreck. Red alerts, smoke making and antiaircraft fire, along with explosions on the beach followed, there being a large fire off the port quarter. Unloading was completed at 0037 on June 15, 1944, and the LST retracted from the beach and proceeded to the outbound sailing anchorage. A serious vibration on the starboard shaft became apparent. She took LCT(K) 514 (British) in tow at 0710 and took station in outbound convoy but the vibration cut her speed and she was unable to keep up with the convoy. She proceeded alone at best speed and arrived off Calshot, England, reporting damage and remained anchored from 16 to 18 June awaiting availability at Southampton Repair Docks. (Further reports on LST-21 are not available until February 13, 1945.)

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
The LST-21 was in the United Kingdom on February 13, 1945. She proceeded to Belfast and on May 11, 1945, sailed from there for Norfolk arriving May 31, 1945. She proceeded to New York on June 1, 1945, for availability. Departing New York August 13, 1945, she proceeded to Little Creek, where she remained until August 23, 1945. On the 25th she arrived at Casco Bay, Maine, and remained there until October 4, 1945, returning to Boston on the 6th. On November 1, 1945, she departed for Hampton Roads, Virginia, with a load of ammunition. She returned to New York December 14, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONING
The LST-21 was decommissioned at Norfolk January 25, 1946.


LST-22
FLOTILLA 7 - GROUP 21 - DIVISION 41

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-22 was built by the Dravo Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and arrived at Naval Section Base, Algiers, Louisiana in May 1943, after being brought down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers by a Navy ferry crew. Lt. L. N. Ditlefsen, USCG, assumed command on May 29, 1943. The ship was formally commissioned June 16, 1943, as she departed for Panama City, Florida, on her shakedown cruise and various tests. Succeeding commanding officers were Lt. Willie A. Moore, USCG, Lt. Howard N. Rogers, USCGR, Lt. S. F. Rogers, USCG, and Lt. F. G. Markle, USCG.

CAPE CRETIN--CAPE GLOUCESTER--SAIDOR LANDINGS
The LST-22 joined a convoy to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and the Panama Canal toward the end of July 1943, on the first leg of the cruise to the Southwest Pacific. Stopping at Bora Bora, Tutula, Viti Levu and Noumea the LST reached Brisbane, Australia, late in September 1943. November 1943 passed with voyages from Townsville, Australia to Milne Bay, Oro Bay, Lae, Buna and back to Milne Bay. Early December saw the LST in Port Moresby thence to Lae in Task Unit 76.3.6 with RAAF equipment and personnel on board. At Goodenough Island a marine cargo was loaded consisting of combat vehicles and gear of the First Marine Division to be landed at Cape Cretin and on December 13, 1943, a task unit of 6 Coast Guard manned and two Navy manned LST's departed for Cape Cretin, returning to Buna and Oro Bay on December 15th to pick up another load of gear to be delivered at Cape Cretin on December 19, 1943. On December 25, 1943,the LST-22 completed loading Marine Corps personnel and joined Task Force 76.2.2 consisting of 2 Coast Guard manned and 5 Navy manned LST's with 3 destroyers and HMAS Reserve for Cape Gloucester, New Britain. After beaching at Cape Gloucester on December 26th, 1943, the ship underwent its first enemy air raid.24 Returning to Goodenough Island another combat load was taken to Saidor, New Guinea, beaching there on January 2, 1944. Thus a new ship and a green crew had quickly become veterans during the last two months of 1943.

LOS NEGROS LANDING
The next two months were occupied in resupply echelons. A second trip to Saidor on January 8, 1944, was followed by a second trip to Cape Gloucester on January 14, 1944. On February 1, 1944, a third trip was made to Cape Gloucester. On the 4th a second trip to Saidor so underwent four "red" alerts during loading operations. On February 15, the LST again departed Cape Sudest for Cape Gloucester, returning to Buna Roads to take an LCM in tow on the 27th for Cape Cretin together with two other LST's, departing on the 29th for the Admiralty Islands with the LCM still in tow. She arrived at Hyane Harbor, Los Negros on March 2, 1944,

--72--


in a support landing during the initial phase of the operation. While on the assignment, the ship came under enemy mortar fire and, on orders of the Task Group Commander, opened fire with the 3"/50 caliber gun on the mortar fire area. During the afternoon she underwent an enemy attack, no casualties resulting from enemy action but three men being injured from an exploding 20 MM shell which hit the guard rail. Arriving at Cape Sudest on March 4, 1944, the LST commenced loading cargo for a resupply run to Seeadler Harbor on the 9th and returned to Cape Sudest on the 12th. Trips to Buna Roads, Cape Cretin, Lae, Seeadler Harbor and Buna Roads with cargo consumed the rest of March 1944.

TANAHMERAH BAY LANDING
After 14 days at Buna Roads for anchor upkeep and training the LST-22 proceeded to load cargo at Goodenough Island and departing for Cape Cretin on the 18th, formed Task Group 77.4 for Tanahmerah Bay, Dutch New Guinea, arriving there April 23, 1944. There they participated in the initial operation on D-day plus one and underwent several "red" alerts but no enemy action, departing next day for Cape Cretin.

WAKDE ISLAND LANDING
The first half of May 1944 was occupied with runs carrying cargo for Aitape, from Seeadler Harbor, and to Hollandia. On May 18, 1944, the ship was underway for Wakde Island, Dutch New Guinea with an LCT in tow, beaching there under enemy fire on the 19th. One man was wounded from enemy fire, and cargo was discharged under sporadic fire from enemy emplacements on the beach. A second trip to Wakde was made oh May 23rd. This was followed by a trip with cargo for Biak on the 28th, after which SC-699 was taken in tow for Hollandia. June was taken up with two more trips to Biak and another to Arare, Wakde Island, where she beached July 6, 1944. On the 9th she proceeded to Noemfoor, four days after the surprise landing there on July 2, 1944, and after unloading returned to Humboldt Bay. Trips to Maffin Bay, Sansapor and Alexishafen, New Guinea, consumed the rest of July and August 1944.

MOROTAI LANDING
Following drydocking and overhaul at Alexishafen, preparations were made for the Morotai operation. With echelon of LST's, LCI's and LCT's in tow, she departed Hollandia September 11, 1944, with cargo and personnel discharged at Morotai September 16, 1944. Just before beaching at Morotai an enemy plane was fired upon by the LST-22 and was thought to be damaged by her guns. Returning to Hollandia the LST moved again to Alexishafen for overhaul and installation of more antiaircraft guns, returning to Hollandia on October 7, 1944.

LEYTE OPERATION
The Love 6 echelon with destination Leyte, Philippine Islands was formed and departed Hollandia on October 23, 1944. Unloading was carried out October 30, 1944, (D+10 day) following a typhoon which the ship rode out at anchor. Returning to Hollandia on November 5, 1944, a trip to Milne Bay followed and on the 19th of December she departed for Aitape for practice exercises with elements of the 43rd Infantry.

LINGAYEN GULF
On December 28, 1944, George 1 echelon of Task Group 78 was formed with ultimate destination Lingayen Gulf, Luzon. Various elements joined until the entire task group was formed before entering the Philippines. Several enemy planes were seen attacking en route but only one came within range and this was destroyed by the fire from several LST's, with partial credit to the crew of LST-22. One casualty resulted when a strafing bullet from the plane went through the thigh of an Army photographer on board. On January 9, 1945, two hours before "H" hour, LVT's were launched to carry the first assault wave to San Fabian Beach. The ship discharged the balance of its cargo at "H" hour plus one, with the aid of the pontoons carried from Milne Bay. The balance of the 9th and that night were spent at anchor with occasional airraids. Next day the LST departed for Leyte, focal point for future movements replacing Hollandia, and remained there until January 22, 1945. On the 27th she began a resupply run to Lingayen Gulf discharging cargo and personnel and departing February 8th for Mindoro Island to take on a load for Leyte Gulf.

PHILIPPINE AND NEW GUINEA OPERATIONS
From February 15, 1945 to March 16, 1945, was spent in the Leyte Gulf area, the LST-22 departing for Manila on March 16, 1945, and returning to Leyte on March 26, 1945. Two shuttle trips to Manila were made in April. During May 1945, short trips were made to Guiuan, Samar, for freight and then to Hollandia. From Hollandia she went to Madang, New Guinea, to pick up an Australian Tank Company to be transported to Cape Torokina, Bougainville. From there she went to Green Island to load equipment for the Royal New Zealand Air and Ground Forces for Jacquinot Bay, New Britain, and reloaded there with Australian Ground Forces for Wide Bay, New Britain. From Wide Bay she proceeded to Manus Island for availability for cleaning and painting bottom. Arriving at Subic Bay July 10, 1945, she unloaded for a limited availability after which she departed for Manila. Here she loaded cargo for Palawan, where she unloaded early in August, 1945, and from there proceeded to Zamboanga, Mindanao. Here she loaded a full cargo and personnel for Leyte. The war was now over. After unloading at Leyte she departed for Manican Island for a 30 day availability beginning August 20, 1945. On September 23, 1945, she was ordered to Leyte and departed for Wakde Island to load, as part of operations of lifting troops from rear areas. Loading at Wakde with cargo and personnel for Zamboanga, she reloaded there for Agusan, Mindanao and from there proceeded to Bacolod, Negros, Philippine Islands to pick up an amphibious truck company and Philippine Army personnel. Proceeding to Dumaguette, Negros, the Philippine Army personnel were debarked and the LST proceeded to Mactan Island unloading the rest of her cargo and personnel at Cebu City, Cebu, Loading at Mactan she departed for Guiuan, Samar, and after unloading proceeded to San Pedro Bay, Leyte.

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
On November 9, 1945, she was released from Philippine Sea Frontier duty and proceeded to Guiuan, Samar, to pick up cargo for the United States. She departed November 11, 1945, for the United States via Pearl Harbor.

DECOMMISSIONING
She arrived in San Diego December 12, 1945, and was decommissioned April 1, 1946.


LST-23
FLOTILLA 13 - GROUP 37 - DIVISION 73

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-23 was put in commission at Algiers, Louisiana, on May 22, 1943, and remained at that place until the 10th of June, 1943. Her commanding officer on April 4, 1944, was Lt. (jg) Maynard C. Darnall, Jr, USCGR.

--73--


TO ALASKA
On June 10, 1943, she departed Algiers in convoy for San Francisco via the Panama Canal. She arrived at San Diego July 1, 1943, and at Mare Island Navy Yard July 3, 1943. She left San Francisco July 17, 1943, with the destroyer USS Hutchins escorting six LST's and moored at Woman's Bay, Kodiak, Alaska, July 25, 1943. The convoy and escort departed on the 27th with an additional LST and two more escorts for Kuluk Harbor, Aleutian Islands, arriving August 1, 1943. Here she disembarked troops at Bay of Islands, Adak Island, and conducted beaching drills at Great Sitkin Island, Proceeding to Kiska Island she disembarked troops and equipment and beached to unload army equipment. With two escorts and 3 other LST's and a Navy tug she departed Kiska on August 27, 1943, for Kuluk Harbor, Adak. On the 31st the LST-23 and 5 other LST's departed Adak for San Francisco, with two escorts, one of which left the group to escort the LST-19 suffering engine trouble back to Adak Island. (No further reports are available on the LST-23 until April 4, 1944).

PELELIU LANDING
On April 4, 1944, the LST-23 was in the Marshall Islands en route Pearl Harbor which she reached April 24th, remaining there until June 15, 1944. On May 23, 1944, the officers and men were recommended for consideration for awards for bravery and meritorious performance of duty. Proceeding to Eniwetok on July 3, 1944, the LST participated in the Peleliu landing on September 15, 1944. On October 12, 1944, she was at Espiritu Santo. On December 5, 1944, while returning from a supply trip the LST-23 while in North Surigao Straits was hit a glancing blow by a plane causing a fire and extensive damage.

LINGAYEN GULF
The LST-23 participated in the landings at Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, on January 9, 1945, after which she returned to San Diego, California.

PACIFIC OPERATIONS
Departing San Diego February 17, 1945, she proceeded to Guam via Pearl Harbor, arriving April 2, 1945, and returning to San Francisco May 6, 1945. Her next trip took her to Sasebo, Japan. Leaving Pearl Harbor September 3, 1945, after the war was over, she arrived in Sasebo Japan, and left there on September 28, 1945, for Lingayen and Manila. She left Manila October 10, 1945, for Wakayama, Japan, via Lingayen, arriving October 22, 1945. She returned to San Francisco February 2, 1946, via Okinawa, Sasebo, Saipan and Pearl Harbor.

DECOMMISSIONING
The LST-23 was decommissioned May 5, 1946.


LST-24
FLOTILLA 5 - GROUP 15 - DIVISION 30

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-24 was commissioned on June 14, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. Arnol I. Sabel, USCGR, Lt. D. J. Ellsworth, USCGR, and Lt. (jg) R. A. Ekblom, USCG. (Reports on movements until February 1, 1944 are not available).

SOUTHWESTPACIFIC
The LST-24 operated in the New Georgia area from February 1-6, 1944, and in the Guadalcanal area from February 7-28, 1944. In the latter area she was engaged in transporting cargo and personnel in the Russell Islands and Solomon Islands. On April 4, 1944, she was at Tutuila, Samoa, and from there proceeded to Saipan and Guam, arriving there August 31, 1944. She returned to Finschhafen on September 11, 1944, and was at Hollandia on October 1, 1944. Proceeding by way of Russell Islands and Guadalcanal she reached Ulithi February 25, 1944, and then Manila. She left Manila March 21, 1944, stopping at Tacloban and arrived at Hollandia.

WEST PACIFIC
She was at Hollandia and Okinawa until June 24, 1945, when she departed for San Francisco via Pearl Harbor, arriving December 9, 1945. From there she proceeded to Galveston via San Diego and the Canal Zone.

DECOMMISSIONING
The LST-24 was decommissioned at Galveston, Texas, February 26, 1946.


LST-25
FLOTILLA 17 - GROUP 51 - DIVISION 101

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-25 was built at Wilmington, Delaware, in the spring of 1943 by the Dravo Shipbuilding Company. She was commissioned on May 3, 1943, and a Coast Guard crew under command of Lt. J. B. Holmes, USCGR, was placed aboard. Outfitted in the Philadelphia Navy Yard during the next two weeks, she received her shakedown in the Chesapeake Bay and there operated as a training ship for new crews. On July 7, 1943, Lt. J. P. Houlihan, USCGR, became commanding officer. In mid-July she proceeded to Davisville, Rhode Island, to load for overseas duty.

IN THE MEDITERRANEAN
Returning to Norfolk she embarked 21 U.S. Navy officers and 165 enlisted personnel and on July 27, 1943, sailed for North African waters arriving at Oran on August 14, 1943, where she disembarked her passengers and unloaded her cargo. A week later she proceeded to Bizerte, Tunisia, and here the Coast Guard crew of the LST-25 and the Navy crew of the USS LST-381 relieved each other. The Coast Guard crew took over the LST-381 and the Navy crew was placed on the LST-25. The exchange was effected on August 25, 1943.


LST-26
FLOTILLA 7 - GROUP 21 - DIVISION 41

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-26 was commissioned June 7, 1943. Her various commanding officers have been Lt. Raymond B. Newell, USCG, Lt. Frederick R. Ketcham, USCGR, Ensign E. W. Dahl, USCGR, and Lt. Comdr. Leroy Howell, USCG.

MOROTAI AND LEYTE LANDINGS
Proceeding to the Pacific the LST-26 was at Towneville, Australia, on October 29, 1943. From there she proceeded to Naples, Italy, arriving on June 5, 1944. On July 30, 1944 she was back in New Guinea. On September 15, 1944, she participated in the landings at Morotai, in the Halamheras.25 She also participated in the

--74--


landings at Leyte, Philippines on October 20, 1944. she left Leyte April 3, 1945, for Manila and after proceeding to Subic Bay returned to Leyte May 2, 1945. Departing Leyte August 8, 1945, she proceeded to Manus, Torokina and Hollandia. Leaving Hollandia on August 29, 1945, she arrived at Zamboanga, Mindanao on September 3, 1945. From there she went to Okinawa and returned to San Francisco, via Leyte and Pearl Harbor, arriving on December 6, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONING
She was decommissioned April 1, 1946, at San Francisco.


LST-27
FLOTILLA 11 - GROUP 31 - DIVISION 61

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-27 was commissioned on June 16, 1943. Her various commanding officers have been Lt. Alfred Valton, USCG, and Lt. C. J. Qilleran, USCG. (No reports on the operations of the LST-27 are available until April 4, 1944).

NORMANDY LANDINGS
On April 4, 1944, the LST-27 was in the Mediterranean area reaching Tunisia on April 13, 1944. On May 3, 1944, she arrived in the United Kingdom and on June 5, 1944, departed for Normandy Beach.26 The LST remained in the British waters until July 2, 1944, when she departed for Norfolk, arriving July 17, 1944, New York (July 20) and Boston (July 22). She arrived at Portsmouth Navy Yard the same day for disposition.

DECOMMISSIONED
The LST-27 was decommissioned at Boston November 9, 1945.


LST-66
FLOTILLA 7 - GROUP 21 - DIVISION 41

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-66 was built at Jeffersonville, Indiana, by the Jeffersonville Boat and Machine Company and commissioned April 12, 1943, with a complement of 8 officers and 66 enlisted men of the U.S. Coast Guard and Coast Guard Reserve, Lt. H. A. White, USCG, commanding. Succeeding commanding officers have been Lt. (jg) William H. McCowan, USCGR, Lt. (jg) B. C. Reed, USCGR, Lt. Wendell J. Holbert, USCGR, Lt. George E. Wagley, USCGR, and Lt. Kenneth P. Howard, USCGR. In April 1943 she proceeded down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers and drydocked May 18, 1943, at New Orleans for final inspection, painting and repairs.

FINSCHHAFEN, LAE, CAPE GLOUCESTER LANDINGS
On May 21, 1943, she sailed from New Orleans for Brisbane, Australia via the Panama Canal, arriving there August 1, 1943, and being assigned to LST Flotilla 7, Seventh Fleet on October 10, 1943. Her first mission was the support landing at Finschhafen, New Guinea, on October 25, 1943.26 She was in the landing at Lae, New Guinea, on December 7, 1943, and at Cape Gloucester, New Britain on December 26, 1943. In this engagement two men were killed and seven wounded from near miss bombs during an air raid. The LST-66 was officially credited with shooting down three Japanese planes.

SAIDOR AND SEVEN OTHERLANDINGS
On January 19, 1944, the LST-66 was engaged in landing first support forces at Saidor, New Guinea. On completion of this mission she was ordered to join Group 21, Division 41, Flotilla 7 as of February 1, 1944. From then until August 1944 she was engaged in the following operations:

March 9, 1944     First Assault Landing Seeadler Harbor Admiralty Islands
April 23, 1944     First Support Landing Tanah Merah Bay New Guinea
May 4, 1944     First Support Landing Aitape New Guinea
May 19, 1944     First Support landing Wakde Island Dutch New Guinea
June 8, 1944     First Reinforcement Landing Biak Island Schouten Islands
July 4, 1944     First Reinforcement Landing Noemfoor Island
July 30, 1944     First Assault Landing Cape Sansapor Dutch New Guinea

MOROTAI AND LEYTE
After the Sansapor Landing and returning with reinforcements, the LST-66 was drydocked at Alexishafen, New Guinea, from August 20-23, 1944, and on completion of repairs participated in the first reinforcement landing on the south coast of Morotai, in the Moluccas. On October 20, 1945, she participated in the assault landing on Leyte, Philippine Islands. On November 12, 1943, following the landing a Japanese suicide plane crashed on the boat deck, starboard side aft, killing 8 men and wounding 14 of the gun crews.

LINGAYEN GULF, ZAMBOANGA, BALIKPAPAN
On January 11, 1945, the LST landed a part of the first reinforcements at Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, P.I., one of the Army troops being wounded during the landing by artillery fire. On March 5, 1945, an Army enlisted man fell overboard from an LCM being towed by the LST-66 and was lost at sea. On March 10, 1945, she participated in the first assault landing at Zamboanga, Mindanao, and on completion of the mission, returned to Leyte, being drydocked for repairs on March 19-20, 1945. From March to June 1945 she was employed in transporting troops, equipment and supplies from rear bases being evacuated in the Solomons and New Guinea to the forward areas in the Philippines. In July 1945 she participated in the first support landing at Balikpapan, Borneo, Netherland East Indies, the last engagement of the war.

TROOP TRANSPORT RETURN TO UNITED STATES
During August and September, 1945, she was again employed in transporting troops, equipment and supplies from rear areas in the New Guinea to forward areas in the Philippines, being drydocked from September 15 - 18, 1945, for hull repairs and returning to transport troops and equipment from Morotai to Leyte. On October 30, 1945, she was detached from Flotilla 7, Group 21,

--75--


and sailed from Manila November 7, 1945, for San Francisco, via Guam, Eniwetok, and Pearl Harbor, arriving at San Francisco December 19, 1945, reporting to Commandant, 12th Naval District for disposal.

DECOMMISSIONING
She was decommissioned at Mare Island, California on March 26, 1946.


LST-67
FLOTILLA 7 - GROUP 21 - DIVISION 41

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-67 was built at Jeffersonville, Indiana, and commissioned April 19, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Lt. William E. Paulsen, USCG. On April 4, 1944, Lt. John Lence, USCG, became her commanding officer. She was manned by a Coast Guard crew and assigned to the Southwest Pacific theater of operations.

LANDINGS AT FINSCHHAFEN AND CAPE GLOUCESTER
Urged on by the need for combat transportation in the Southwest Pacific, the LST-67 departed the United States a little over a month after commissioning and on June 14, 1943, heading south, she first crossed the equator. Early in August 1943 she reached her destination and reported to the Commander, Seventh Amphibious Force. Later in the month she joined Flotilla Seven then participating in the early phase of the New Guinea campaign. Her first landing, a support operation was at Milne Bay on August 31, 1943. This was followed by other support landings at Morobe, Buna and Lae on September 8, 19th and 21st. The real baptism of fire came on September 22, 1943, when the LST-67 hit "Scarlet" Beach on D-day at Finschhafen, New Guinea. The remainder of 1943 saw re-supply operations on the New Guinea mainland, to be broken on December 27, 1943, in the assault landing at Cape Gloucester, New Britain. Here the landing ships were attacked by a formation of enemy dive bombers. Bombs fell within 100 yards of the LST-67 but the planes were driven off or downed, a Val falling victim to the LST-67's 40 MM fire.27 Altogether three combat landings were made at Cape Gloucester, on December 30, 1943, and January 5 and 13th, 1944, enemy opposition being encountered on each occasion.

SAIDOR, LOS NEGROS AND MANUS
The Saidor occupation followed with landings made under combat conditions at Dekags Bay on January 16, 19 and 21. The rapid pace and ever shifting scene of the war in the Pacific next brought the LST-67 in the Admiralty Islands operation. March 9, 1944, saw her beaching at Los Negros in support of the original assault. Another landing here was made on March 12th again under an harassing air attack. On the 15th she departed for the invasion of Manus Island, being command ship and sola LST participating in this invasion. Army "Alligators" were discharged while the vessel was underway and the attack forces landed at Hyane Harbor. General MacArthur's commendation, which was shared by the LST-67 was: "The highest traditions of the Naval Service were reflected by the officers and men who took part in the Admiralty Operations. Please extend to them my entire satisfaction at their splendid conduct."

TANAH MERAH BAY WAKDE AND BIAK
The remainder of March 1944 and most of April was taken up with supply landings in the southwest area. On April 23, 1944, the LST participated in another D-day at Tanah Merah Bay, in Dutch New Guinea as part of the Hollandia Operation. A support landing on May 4th at Aitape followed. Then on May 18, 1944, she took part in the initial invasion of Wakde Island off the New Guinea coast. Casualties were evacuated to the Humboldt Bay area and a re-supply trip made to Wakde on the 22nd. The initial invasion of Biak, in the Schouten Island Group followed on May 30, 1944, the convoy being attacked by enemy dive bombers. Heavy anti-aircraft fire drove off the raiders. Two additional combat landings in the area followed on June 5th and 14th, the latter convoy also falling prey to air attack. The LST-67 was. commended for these operations by the Commander in Chief, Southwest Pacific area for "brilliant success attained" and a "deserved will done" was added by the Commander, Seventh Fleet.

CAFE SANSAPOR AND MOROTAI
As a unit of the first reinforcement group at Noemfoor on July 4, 1944, the LST-67, while on her way to Arare to pick up another cargo, again came under enemy fire. Enemy fighters straffed and bombed her but her luck held and she beached at Noemfoor a second time on July 11th, carrying a load of Japanese prisoners back to Hollandia. At Cape Sansapor, Dutch New Guinea, the vessel made three landings under combat conditions beginning July 30, 1944. In the initial assault, combat troops were carried from Moffin Bay. A second reinforcement landing was made on August 3, 1944, returning from which the convoy was attacked by a single enemy bomber which dropped a string of bombs just astern of the LST-67. She beached from a third trip on August 11, 1944. Supply runs followed for the balance of August. On September 15, 1944, she was part of the attack force besieging Morotai in the Halmaheras, experiencing a sub attack on the trip from Hollandia and an air attack on the 16th which was driven off. After 22 combat landings in 12 months the LST now sailed for Alexishafen, New Guinea, for a brief overhaul period.

LEYTE AND THE PHILIPPINES
On October 13, 1944, the LST-67 was again in action, loaded with assault forces and en route from Hollandia for the original Philippine invasion. The LST-67 hit "White" Beach on "D" day, October 20, 1944. Early that morning a lone Jap fighter had attacked but was repulsed. Troops and cargo wars discharged overnight to the accompaniment of tracer fire from ships in Leyte Gulf under heavy siege by Jap aircraft. Returning to Aitape, the LST picked up another load and returned to Leyte November 15, 1944, in a support landing. The LST continued moving supplies and men from New Guinea to the new battle area disembarking on the third trip at Guiuan, Samar and departing for Hollandia December 19, 1944. Guinan Harbor was reached again on December 28, 1944, after enemy planes had been driven off en route on Christmas 1944, and the cargo unloaded amidst incessant air raid alerts. Returning to Leyte she took on a cargo for Mindoro in a resupply echelon and was beached there on January 7, 1945.

SUB ATTACK EN ROUTE LINGAYEN GULF
Late in January 1945, the LST-67 left the Philippines for Hollandia to take on troops and equipment as a resupply echelon of the Lingayen Gulf Operation (January 9, 1945). Departing Hollandia February 6, 1945, the convoy was attacked by a Japanese submarine on February 11, 1945, which scored a torpedo hit on an LST three columns to port. The stricken vessel was blasted in half and the after section sank within a minute. A sequence of emergency turns as

--76--


contacts were reported from various bearings, brought the convoy through a complete circle, with crews at General Quarters station for hi hours. On February 18, 1945, the LST-67 beached at St. Fabian, Luzon on Lingayen Gulf and went alongside two merchant vessels in a difficult maneuver in heavy swells to load U.S. Marine Corps personnel and equipment. The load was discharged at Mindoro on February 25, 1944, and the LST-67 sailed for Subic Bay to await further orders.

TIGBAUAN, NEGROS, TARAKAN AND BALIKPAPAN
Another convoy was formed at Lingayen Gulf, March 15th, 1945, and on the 18th of March the LST-67 beached at Tigbauan, Panay in the original landing. Returning to Lingayen Gulf she again came under air attack, made smoke, and while shore installations were struck, the ships escaped unscathed. On March 24th, she lay at anchor off Negros Island with the first resupply echelon in support of the invasion. Returning to Morotai on April 16, 1945, she loaded a capacity supply of shells, fuzes and rockets and left Morotai on the 27th with an LCT in tow. On May 1, 1945, she was anchored off Tarakan Island, Borneo, with the original assault forces on the first day of the invasion. Destroyers, gunboats, rocket ships and mine sweeps came alongside to replenish their magazines and resume the devastating fire which made possible the steady advance of the attacking Australian Forces. The LST-67 also acted as general logistics ship during this operation. She returned to Morotai on May 13, 1945, and ammunition was again taken aboard and on June 17, 1945, she departed to drop anchor on June 20, 1945, at Tawi-tawi Bay off the southernmost of the Philippines. Here she awaited the call from the naval forces engaged in the preinvasion bombardment of Balikpapan. She headed south on June 22nd with a destroyer as escort, passing through Macassa Straits on the 23rd a full week before the invasion forces, being the first vessel of her type through this historic passage. She anchored in Balikpapan Bay on D minus seven days, June 24, 1945, rapidly transferring ammunition to cruisers and destroyers who were reducing enemy defenses to rubble. On the 25th, Japanese torpedo planes evaded the air patrol, but accurate fire routed the attackers, one plane crashing after being hit repeatedly by the LST-67's guns and finally crashing in flames a hundred yards off the beam. Returning to Tawi-tawi for more ammunition the LST-67 rendezvoused with the main convoy bound for the Balikpapan landing on July 1, 1945. This was the last major amphibious landing of the war. On July 15, 1945, she sailed for Morotai and on August 3, 1945, left for the Philippines to discharge the balance of the ammunition and await further assignment. While at anchor in Subic Bay, word came of the Japanese surrender on August 14, 1945. The LST discharged her ammunition and departed for overhaul at Manicani Island, off Samar. She was thus occupied until September 23, 1945.

POST WAR OPERATIONS
Combat was at an end but the work of the LST-67 was not finished. Departing Leyte September 25, 1945, she proceeded to Biak, returning to Agusan, October 7, 1945. Again on October 13, 1945, a trip was made to Morotai returning to Leyte October 27, 1945. Then proceeding to Puerto Princessa, Palawan, she returned to Manila November 12, 1945. She left Manila November 13, 1945, for the long trek home via Guam, Truk, Eniwetok, Kwajalein, Pearl Harbor, San Diego, Canal Zone and Charleston, South Carolina, where she arrived February 24, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONING
The LST-67 was decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina, on March 28, 1946.


LST-68
FLOTILLA 7 - GROUP 21 - DIVISION 41

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-68 was built by the Jeffersonville Machine and Boat Company of Jeffersonville, Indiana, and was commissioned on May 26, 1943. Her Coast Guard crew reported aboard at Jeffersonville, May 27, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Karl A. F. Lindquist, USCG.

CAPE GLOUCESTER AND SUPPORT LANDINGS
Departing the continental United States on July 20, 1943, she reported in the Southwest Pacific on September 28, 1943, and to LST Flotilla SEVEN on October 28, 1943. She remained with the Seventh Fleet until August 25, 1945, when she was attached to ComSeaFron, Philippines. After participating in three support landings, those at Lae on November 23 and December 5, 1943, and at Cape Cretin on December 16, 1943, the LST-68 was at the initial landing at Cape Gloucester, New Britain on December 26, 1943, where she was under enemy air attack and destroyed one enemy plane.

SUPPORT LANDINGS AND INITIAL LANDINGS
Two support landings at Cape Gloucester on January 5 and 13 were followed by three support landings at Saidor on January 16, 19 and 29. During February, on the 15th, a return to Cape Gloucester was followed by three more trips to Saidor on the 18th, 22nd and 26th. These were followed by two initial landings--one at Los Negros Island, Admiralty Islands on March 6, 1944, and one at Tanah Merah Bay, New Guinea, on April 23, 1944. During June and July two more support landings were made, one on June 12, 1944, at Biak Island, under enemy air attack, and one on July 12, 1944, at Noemfoor Island. An initial landing at Cape Sansapor, Dutch New Guinea, followed on July 20, 1944, followed by three support landings on the same island on August 7, 15 and 23. After another support landing on September 16, 1944, at Morotai where she came under enemy air attack, the LST-68 proceeded to Alexishafen, New Guinea on September 29, 1944, to undergo major overhaul.

LEYTE AND LINGAYEN GULF
On October 20, 1944, the LST 68 was at the initial Landing on Leyte Island, Philippines under air attack. In a subsequent support landing at Leyte on November 12, 1944, under air attack, she destroyed one enemy plane and probably a second. Following the initial landing at Lingayen Gulf on January 9, 1945, the LST-68 arrived under enemy air attack and shore artillery fire for a support landing on January 11, 1945. This was followed by a second support landing there on February 18, 1945.

PANAY AND NEGROS IN PHILIPPINES
The LST was in the initial landing at Panay Island, Philippines, on March 18, 1945, followed by a support landing on the 25th. On the 29th she was at the initial landing at Negros Island, Philippine Islands. After supply runs from Leyte Gulf to Manila and Subic Bay, Luzon from April to June 1945 she arrived at Manus, Admiralty Islands July 17, 1945, for major overhaul. She departed Manus September 17, 1945, for supply runs to Subic Bay, Morotai, Mindanao and Guinan, Samar, Philippine Islands.

DECOMMISSIONING
Departing there November 7, 1945, she reached Galveston, Texas, where she was decommissioned March 7, 1946.


--77--


LST-69
FLOTILLA 13 - GROUP 37 - DIVISION 73

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-69 was commissioned on May 20, 1943. Her first and only commanding officer was Lieutenant Robert T. Leary, USCGR. (Records of movements of the LST-69 are not available between May 20, 1943 and April 4, 1944.).

A FIRE AT PEARL HARBOR
The LST-69 was at Funafuti on April 4, 1944, and arrived at Pearl Harbor on April 6, 1944.29 On May 21, 1944, she was still at Pearl Harbor, lying inboard of four LST's in a nest of eight such vessels at Tare 6, West Loch, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Having returned to Pearl Harbor in a broken down condition, she had no power available, her main engines having been secured on entering port so that repairs could be effected. The Commanding, Executive and Gunnery Officers were off ship on various duties, but all other officers were aboard, including the Officer-of-the-Deck, who was alert and on deck. Also present were two thirds of the crew. Various watches were being stood. At about 1505 an explosion occurred on one of the outboard ships of the nest, the LST-353, where ammunition was being handled. This explosion brought all hands of the LST-69 on deck and they then reported to their moving stations to cut away the outboard ship. Repeated explosions followed and the LST-69 caught fire in several places. The original fire was brought under control, but the crew was unable to get all the mooring lines off and the ship to starboard would not drift clear. Fires again started on the deck and bridge deck and hoses were manned. There being no power on the LST-69, request was made of the LST-274, inboard of the LST-69 to tow the 69 clear, but all lines could not be severed to the outboard ship because of the fire's rapid spread and the repeated explosions.

CREW ABANDONS SHIP
As the LST-274 managed to break clear of the nest, the order to abandon ship was passed by word of mouth on the LST-69, there being no other means available. The 69 was then aflame from the break in the foredeck to the deck house, the five inch projectiles on the main hatch also being aflame and out of control. Earlier a clear-thinking signalman had doused the ammunition with a boat deck hose. As the fire and explosion carried from one ship to another, the gunnery department personnel had flooded magazines on the LST-69. There was no means of flooding the cargo ammunition and demolition outfits in the after end of the tank deck. When the men could no longer stand on deck, having been driven from their stations several times, many of them injured, and after the fire was beyond control, due to the intolerable heat, explosions and flaming high octane gasoline from the ship next outboard, all hands, who had not been blown clear or already driven off by fire, abandoned ship as an organized unit and went ashore by small boat or swimming. Here they were hospitalized or sent to Pier 11 for housing. The ship's log, bridge book and signal book ware saved.

RESCUE WORK
Many of the LST-69's crew were engrossed in the saving of life. Both the LST-69's boats rescued men from the water and ferried them ashore, the boat crews continuing their rescue work in spite of being repeatedly blown down by explosions and hit by flying debris. None of the LST-69 crew was lost, though many were injured fighting fires on their own and adjacent ships. Two officers and 11 men were seriously injured and two officers and 25 men received minor injuries. Besides the ship's crew, about 200 Marines were on board the LST-69 at the time of the explosion and also a 13 man crew of naval reserve personnel for the LCT-963, which was lashed to the ship's main deck. Less than five minutes had elapsed from the first explosion until the LST-69 was engulfed in flames. She was a total loss. Survivors of the 7 vessels involved in the disaster were brought to the receiving ship where all Coast Guard personnel were collected and brought to the Captain of the Port barracks in Honolulu, put through the sick bay for examination for possible injuries given showers and food, then issued clean bedding and clothes. The oldest man in the crew were returned to the mainland for leave and reassignment.


LST-70
FLOTILLA 5 - GROUP 15 - DIVISION 30

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-70 was commissioned May 28, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lieutenant Commander Augustus Pollack, USCGR, Lieutenant Bernard P. Devins, USCGR, and Lieutenant William J. Shallow, USCGR. (Reports of movements between May 28, 1943 and November 6, 1943, and November 17, 1943 and February 13, 1944 are not available.)

ATTACKED AT BOUGAINVILLE
On November 6, 1943, the LST-70 departed from Puruata Island at 0200 after taking part in the invasion of Bougainville at Empress Augusta Bay.30 At 0230 the ship was taken under fire by shore batteries at Puruata. Numerous shrapnel fragments fell on or near the ship and several near misses were observed astern. At 0240 a plane was reported overhead at 3000 feet which five minutes later dropped two parachute flares along the course about 1500 yards apart and 100 yards to port. At 0247 a near bomb miss was observed 100 yards astern with the plane flying along the line of flares in a glide releasing bombs at 500 feet altitude. At 0250 the LST-70 changed course as the flares burned out. At 0300 a plane passed astern firing machine guns with no hits on the ship. Five minutes la ter two planes passed astern, abreast, both firing on nearest ship but were Still short at an altitude of 60 feet with still no hits on the LST-70. At 0316 a plane dropped flares along the course on the port side 2000 yards ahead. The LST changed course four times in 15 minutes. At 0355 a plane was on the starboard quarter and swung right with the ship firing and then left across the deck, low, strafing. A man on the starboard 40MM gun was struck in the right leg. At 0337 a plane on the port quarter, as the ship swung left strafed at 50 feet. At 0341 a plane on the port quarter passed astern firing, coming back twice on the starboard quarter at nine minutes intervals. No hits were registered on the ship which changed course constantly.

SECOND ATTACK--SHOOTS TOWN TWO PLANES
While on a second trip to Bougainville on November 17, 1943, in convoy the LST-70 at 0258 received a report of enemy planes in the immediate vicinity. At 0323, the USS Pringle (DD) reported an enemy plane crashed in the water along its starboard side. At 0340 a "Betty" crossed the stern of the LST-70 from starboard to port close to, but was out of sight before the stem guns could fire. Three minutes later, steaming 300 yards ahead, the LST engaged and shot down an enemy plane in flames. The plane fell on the port side of the columns,

--78--


burning intensively for 15 minutes. Seven minutes later the LST opened fire on another "Betty" flying from astern between two port columns, escaped in heavy AA fire from all ships in the formation. At 0355 the APD McLean was struck by an enemy torpedo 2000 yards astern of the LST-70 and set afire. At 0700, five minutes after beaching on Puruata Island a bomb was dropped in the bay about 1500 yards on the port quarter, but without observable damage to the snail craft in the vicinity. The plane was not visible to lookouts on LST-70. At 0805, seven enemy "Zekes" and "Vals" appeared in broken formation over Puruata Beach. All AA guns of the 4 LST's beached there engaged these planes as long as they were within range. Four minutes later one "Val" flew directly into two 3"/50 bursts from the LST-70, immediately lost altitude in a long glide and reportedly crashed several miles inland. No further enemy planes were engaged.

GREEN ISLAND, NISSAN ISLANDS
The LST-70 was part of Task Force 31.4.3 which left Munda on February 13, 1944, for the invasion of the Green Island, Nissan Islands, Solomon Group. There were six other LST's and a Navy Tug in the Task Group, LST-207 being the only other Coast Guard manned. Screened by six destroyers, anti-aircraft firing and flares were observed during the night of 14-15 February, 1944 and at 0650 on February 15th convoy escorts were in action against enemy planes. Barrage balloons proved valuable in deflecting enemy bombers from LST's At 0649 the convoy passed into Nissan Island Lagoon and then unloading began. The convoy was dissolved at 2033 on February 17, 1944. On March 3, 1944, the LST-70 was part of a convoy of eight LST's and the K-25 screened by four destroyers (Task Unit 31-5.1) proceeding from Tillotson Cove, Russell Islands on a resupply mission to Nissan Islands. Another LST and an APD joined on the 4th and on the 5th four other vessels joined. On the 6th she beached at Green Island to unload. The convoy dissolved at 2325 on March 6, 1944.

TO KWAJALEIN AND ENIWETOK
On May 31, 1944, Tractor Group Three of Task Group 53.16 composed of LST-70 and 15 other LST's, 9 LCI's, 6 SC's, 6 YM's, 3 PC's, 2 AK's, and one ARL with USS Stembel (DD-644) as Flag, departed Hutchinson Creek, Florida Island, for Kwajalein in a resupply convoy. It arrived at Geo Pass, Kwajalein, Marshall Islands on June 6, 1944. After unloading and loading men and supplies the convoy departed on June 9, 1944, for Guam. En route at 13°33'N, 148°10'E on June 15, 1944, three enemy planes identified as "Kate" (Nakajima) enemy torpedo bombers were sighted on the starboard beam less than 5 miles distant. The planes separated and two attacked forward and one the after part of the convoy. A torpedo launched from one of the planes, hit the LCI-468 but two of the planes were shot down. On the 26th the convoy was directed to proceed to Eniwetok and entered the South Channel, Eniwetok Atoll on the 30th.

TO GUAM
On July 15, 1944, the Task Group departed Eniwetok for Guam, arriving July 21, 1944, D-day, disembarking troops and landing equipment under enemy fire. On the 28th the convoy was en route returning to Eniwetok, arriving August 3, 1944. The LST-70 arrived at San Pedro August 21, 1944, and San Diego, August 31st.

IWO JIMA
The LST-70 remained on the West Coast until November 23, 1944, when she left again for the Pacific. Proceeding via Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Saipan and Guam, she returned to Saipan February 11, 1945. She was present on D-day at the invasion of Iwo Jima. Returning to Guam, she proceeded to Leyte and then to Okinawa. A series of resupply and troop transport movements took her from Okinawa on April 15, 1945, to Ulithi, Manus, Leyte, Subic Bay and back to Okinawa. She was here on VJ-day August 14, 1945.

TO JAPAN
Proceeding to Subic Bay, Leyte and Batanga, she left Lingayen Gulf October 15, 1945, for Wakayama, Otaru, Aomori, returning to Wakayama, November 17, 1945. By November 26, 1945, she was leaving Saipan on her way home, arriving at San Francisco on Christmas Day 1945.

DECOMMISSIONING
She was decommissioned April 1, 1946.


LST-71
FLOTILLA 5 - GROUP 15 - DIVISION 30

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-71 was commissioned on June 6, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lieutenant Commander Frank E, Miner, USCGR, Lieutenant Commander Thomas A. Ruddy, USCGR, Lieutenant (jg) Edward J. Rooney, USCGR, Lieutenant John Dalin, USCG and Lieutenant E. E. Taylor, USCG. (Reports of movements of LST-71 between June 6, 1943 and April 4, 1944, are not available).

GUAM INVASION
On April 4, 1944, the LST-71 was at Noumea. She reached Pearl Harbor April 29, 1944, where slight damage was sustained at Alenuihaha Channel. On July 3, 1944, she was in the Saipan assault area, 19 days after the invasion and took part in the invasion of Guam between July 21, and August 5, 1944.31

OKINAWA INVASION--DOWNS PLANE
Returning to Pearl Harbor August 23, 1944, the LST-71 was engaged in re-supply runs to Saipan and Gaum, arriving at Saipan November 20, 1944, and at Guam December 24, 1944. Returning to Pearl Harbor she left for Tulagi and the Russell Island arriving there February 25, 1945, in preparation for the invasion of Okinawa where she arrived on D-day, April 1, 1945. Here on April 6, 1945, she shot down an enemy plane engaged in a suicide dive on her. She departed Kerama Rhetto on April 14, 1945, for Guam, Ulithi and Leyte, returning to Okinawa on July 3, 1945, for a 10 days stay. Proceeding via Leyte and Pearl Harbor, she reached Seattle September 7, 1945, for 4 months availability.

DECOMMISSIONED
Proceeding to San Diego on January 4, 1946, she arrived at San Francisco and was decommissioned March 25, 1946.


LST-166
FLOTILLA 5 - GROUP 14 - DIVISION 26

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-166 was commissioned April 22, 1943, at Evansville, Indiana. Her commanding officers have been Fred B. Bradley, USCG, Lieutenant (jg) H.J. Berry, USCGR, Lieutenant (jg) John A. Frauenheim, USCGR, and Lieutenant Lloyd L. Anderson, USCGR. She went ashore on her first trip down the Mississippi and had to be pulled Off by a tug. At New Orleans more new men came aboard and commenced their training. From New Orleans she

--79--


proceeded to Panama City, Florida, for an extensive test and training program, then started for Guantanamo, Cuba, and through the Caribbean Sea to Coco Solo, Panama, Canal Zone.

IN SOUTHWEST PACIFIC
On June 21, 1943, the LST-166 passed through the Panama Canal into the Pacific and proceeded to Guadalcanal via Bora Bora, Society Islands, Suva, Noumea and Bougainville. For the next eight months the LST was busy plying between different islands of the Solomons and Fijis, carrying capacity loads of cargo and personnel, interspersed with typhoons and occasional air raids.

SAIPAN LANDING
In May 1944, the LST-166 arrived at Pearl Harbor and commenced preparations for the Saipan invasion. Luckily she escaped damage in the West Loch explosion and fire there on May 21, 1944. After loading and much drilling she departed Pearl Harbor late in Kay for Saipan. The last stop en route was Eniwetok in the Marshalls, where last minute details were checked and ships fueled and watered. The LST arrived off Saipan June 15, 1944, (D-day) and lay off the beach a short way unloading her LVT's filled with assault troops. For the next few days there was little sleep for any one, unloading by day and retiring to sea at night. After a week at Saipan, the LST-166 proceeded to Tarawa and then to San Pedro via Pearl Harbor, arriving August 7, 1944, for a long availability which extended until December 29, 1944. Then she proceeded to San Francisco.

OKINAWA LANDING
On January 8, 1945, the LST-166 was again heading East with an almost entirely new ship's company, a new paint job and repairs. Proceeding by way of Pearl Harbor, Kwajalein, Eniwetok and Guam she reached Saipan on February 16, 1945, where she unloaded and stood by for some time during the invasion of Iwo Jima. Late in March she found herself in a large convoy heading for Okinawa. The initial landings on April 1, 1945, were practically unopposed but about April 5, 1945, suicide planes began coming over and General Quarters ensued night and day. After two weeks she left for Ulithi for repairs, having run on a coral head hitting the beach at Okinawa and stove a large hole in her bottom. She was back at Saipan on June 9, 1945.

TO JAPAN
Proceeding to Okinawa again on June 20, 1945, she returned to Saipan July 15, 1945. Short trips to Gaum and Iwo Jima followed before the war ended on August 14, 1945, while the LST was one day out of Saipan on her return trip. After another trip to Guam, she was off to Nagasaki where she arrived September 25, 1945, then to Leyte, Bogo and San Fernando before landing at Hirowan, Japan, with occupation troops. Returning to Saipan November 15, 1945, she sailed for United States November 26, 1945, arriving at San Pedro December 18, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at San Pedro May 3, 1946.


LST-167

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

BOMBED AND BURNED
The Coast Guard manned LST-167 was bombed during the occupation of Vella La Vella Island, New Georgia Group, at Ruravai Beach, on August 15, 1943. The ship caugh fire and was abandoned after ammunition began exploding aboard. 2 officers and 5 enlisted men were killed in action End 3 enlisted men died of wounds. 5 enlisted men were missing in action and 1 officer and 19 men were wounded. The LST was unbeached and towed to Rendova.32


LST-168
FLOTILLA 7 - GROUP 21 - DIVISION 42

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-168 was commissioned at Evansville, Indiana on April 27, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Lieutenant Arthur S. Moreau, USCGR. On April 4, 1944, Lieutenant H. Twiford, USCG, was commanding officer and remained in command until she was decommissioned.

TO SOUTHWEST PACIFIC
After trial runs at Gulfport, Mississippi, the LST-168 departed New Orleans, Louisiana, in convoy under Commander, Flotilla 7 and on June 10, 1943, and reached Cleveland Bay, Townsville, Australia, on August 30, 1943, after stopping at Lemon Bay, Panama Canal, Balboa, Bora Bora, Pango Suva, Noumea and Brisbane, Australia.

FINSCHHAFEN AND CAPE GLOUCESTER INVASIONS
After transporting supplies and ammunition between Milne Bay, Buna and Lae, New Guinea, the LST-168 departing Lae on September 21, 1943, in convoy. Next day she was lying off shore from Finschhafen, New Guinea, awaiting for the dawn attack.33 At dawn she beached and unloaded and the wounded were brought aboard for transportation to Buna. The LST was attacked by enemy planes while retracting and she fired on them, being credited with donning one plane and in two assists. There were no casualties. On the second attack the LST-168 did not open fire and there were again no casualties. She departed Finschhafen on September 22, 1943, for the next 3 months was engaged as part of various re-supply echelons that plied between Buna, Lae, Milne Bay, Ora Bay, Goodenough Island, Port Moresby, Woodlark Islands, Finschhafen and Cape Sudest. Once on October 23, 1943, while beached at Goodenough Island the LST was attacked by enemy planes and opened fire with no damage or casualties. On December 25, 1943, she departed Cape Sudest, New Guinea with cargo and troops and on December 27, 1943, beached at Cape Gloucester, New Britain with the first invasion forces.

SAIDOR, LOS NEGROS, HOLLANDIA, MOROTAI AND LEYTE
During 1944, the LST-168 participated in five invasions in the Southwest Pacific and Philippines. These were at Saidor on January 3, 1944, Los Negros Island on March 16, 1944, Hollandia, Humboldt Bay, April 24, 1944, Morotai on September 19, 1944, and Leyte on October 20, 1944. At Saidor the American shore batteries at Cape Sudest opened up on the invasion bound echelon thinking they were enemy ships but no casualties resulted and only slight damage to the ship. At Hollandia the LST-168 tried to beach on White Beach but a munitions dump caught fire and she had to retract since she was in line of artillery fire. Enemy planes attacked, dropping flares, but no damage was done and no casualties resulted. At Leyte she was attacked by an enemy bomber and shelled from the beach by the enemy, with no damage or casualties. On a re-supply trip two enemy planes were downed with two assists. Periods between invasions were occupied in re-supply trips and repairs in June and July.

--80--


COAST GUARD MANNED LST's UNLOAD AT MANILA
Coast Guard manned LST's unload at Manila

GIANT SEAGOING 'FREIGHT CARS' UNLOAD WAR CARGOES ON LEYTE
Giant seagoing "Freight Cars" unload war cargoes on Leyte

--81--


LINGAYEN GULF, MALABANG AND BALIKPAPAN
During 1945 the LST-168 made up part of the attacking force that landed troops at Lingayen Gulf on January 11, 1945, Malabang, Mindanao, P.I., on April 17, 1945, and Balikpapan on July 1, 1945. At Lingayen Gulf on Luzon she was shelled by heavy guns from the hills with no damage or casualties. On March 15, 1945, the LST-168 had the distinction of being the first USS ship to enter Manila Main Harbor since the Japanese occupation. At Balikpapan, the last invasion of the war, she was shelled by enemy mortars. Departing Balikpapan on July 5, 1945, she returned from Morotai on July 16, 1945, in a support landing with Australian troops and cargo. The end of the war came on August 14, 1945, and on September 15, 1945, the LST-168 arrived at Yokohama, Japan, unloading troops and cargo for the occupation forces. After further duty in the Philippine area she departed Subic Bay November 18, 1945, for Oakland, California via Pearl Harbor, arriving on December 21, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Oakland, California, March 14, 1946.


LST-169
FLOTILLA 13 - GROUP 39 - DIVISION 77

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned LST-169 was commissioned on May 22, 1943. Beginning with April 4, 1944, before which no records are available, she had three commanding officers, Lieutenant L. Kittredge, USCGR; Lt. David L. Gershon, Jr. USCGR, and Lt. Robert Sanderson, USCG.

TARAWA, SAIPAN AND LEYTE
The LST-169 was present at three major invasions in the Pacific, those at Tarawa (November 21-December 8, 1943), Saipan (June 15-July 3, 1944) and Leyte (October 20, 1944). At Leyte she reported firing on a friendly plane on October 25, 1944. Next day she was in action with enemy aircraft. Leaving San Pedro, California, on April 4, 1944, she proceeded to San Diego and Pearl Harbor and was actually in the Saipan Assault Area on July 3, 1944. She returned to Pearl Harbor to prepare for the Leyte assault, after which she returned to San Diego, California via Russell Islands, Eniwetok, Guam and Pearl Harbor. She left San Diego, August 9, 1945, after an availability and proceeding via Hueneme, San Pedro, Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok and Saipan reached Okinawa September 25, 1945. Here she was damaged in a typhoon in the Okinawa area on October 9, 1945. She proceeded to Jinsen, Korea, and then returned to Galveston on March 2, 1946, via Saipan, San Pedro, San Diego and Canal Zone.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Galveston, Texas on April 12, 1946.


LST-170
FLOTILLA 7 - GROUP 21 - DIVISION 42

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS

LST-170 was built by the Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Company, Shipbuilding Division, Evansville, Indiana. She was commissioned at Algiers, Louisiana, on May 31, 1943, and manned by a Coast Guard crew of 7 officers and 76 enlisted men. Her first commanding officer was Lt. T.N. Kelley, USCGR, and he has been succeeded by Lt. J. C. Baquie, USCGR, Lt. Comdr. D. W. Gardiner, USCGR, Lt. Tyson Dines, Jr. USCGR, Lt. (jg) Willard M. Hammer, USCGR, and Lt. (jg) Byington F. Colvig, USCGR. Her shakedown cruise in St. Andrews Bay, Florida, began June 7, 1943, and extended through the 27th, with further drills and exercises at other Gulf points.

TO SOUTHWEST PACIFIC
On July 6, 1943, the LST-170 joined a convoy en route from Pilot Town, Louisiana to Australia and arrived at her destination early on September, 1943. From her arrival in the Southwest Pacific, the LST operated without interruption in forward area from Southern New Guinea through the Philippines.

ELEVEN INVASIONS
The LST-170 participated in eleven invasion landings in the Pacific as follows:34

1. Cape Gloucester 26 December, 1943
2. Saidor, D.N.G. 2 January, 1544
3. Admiralty Islands 29 February, 1944
4. Hollandia, D.N.G. 21 April, 1944
5. Toem, Wadke, D.N.G. 17 May, 1944
6. Biak Island, N.E.I. 27 May, 1944 (under enemy air attack)
7. Cape Sansapor, D.N.G. 30 July, 1944
8. Morotai Island, N.E.I. 15 September, 1544 (under enemy air attack)
9. Leyte, Philippine Island 22 October, 1544 (enemy sub action)
10. Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, Philippine Islands 11 January, 1945 (under enemy air bombardment
and artillery fire from shore)
11. Malabang, Mindanao, Philippine Islands 17 April, 1945


LST-175
FLOTILLA 4 - GROUP 10

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned LST-175 was built by the Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Company, Evansville, Indiana, and commissioned on May 18, 1943, at Algiers, Louisiana. After shakedown exercises in St. Andrews Bay, Florida, the LST proceeded to Little Creek, Virginia.

TO ALGERIA
After loading army vehicles and equipment she departed Norfolk on July 15, 1943, as part of Task Group 20.19 and moored at Davisville, Rhode Island, on the 17th to load cargo. Returning to Norfolk July 22, 1943, she got underway with convoy UGS-13 on July 26, 1943, arriving at Oran, Algeria on August 14, 1943. On August 20, 1943, she proceeded in convoy KMS-23 and in company with LST GROUP 10, Flotilla 4, for Bizerte, arriving on August 23, 1943.

TRANSFERRED TO NAVY
On August 24, 1943, the entire ship's company was transferred to LST-336 and the commanding officers of the two vessels exchanged duties.


LST-176
FLOTILLA 17 - GROUP 51 - DIVISION 102

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-176 was commissioned May 12, 1943. Her first and only Coast Guard commanding

--82--


officer was Lt. J. S. Salt, USCGR. She was under Coast Guard command until November 3, 1944, when she was transferred to Navy command. (Record of movements between May 12, 1943 and November 1, 1943 are not available).

IN INDIA
On November 1, 1943, the LST-176 was in convoy with Commander, LST Group 25 heading east passing through the Gulf of Aden. Stopping at Aden she was underway in three hours for Bombay, India, where she dropped anchor on the 9th. On the 11th she got underway for Calcutta where she moored on November 25, 1943.

UNDER ATTACK AT CALCUTTA
While in drydock at Calcutta on December 5, 1943, the LST was attacked by 8 enemy bombers going to General Quarters at 1145. At 1215 she opened up at the enemy air squadron. A bomb dropped near by wounding a seaman aboard. At 1335 she secured from General Quarters. The LST moved up the Hoogly River and on the 22nd was underway for Colombo, Ceylon, where she anchored on the 27th. On the 28th she was underway for Aden. Passing through the Suez Canal she arrived at Milford Haven, England on February 12, 1944.

NORMANDY INVASION
On March 5, 1944, she proceeded to Portland, England, where she loaded Army gear and personnel for Slapton Sands, proceeding to Roseneath, Scotland via Barry Roads and Milford Haven on the 12th, she arrived there on the 27th. On April 19, she proceeded to For Bay, South England, and on the 20th anchored at Mother Bank, Isle of Wight, proceeding to Harwich on the 21st. On May 15, 1944, she moved to Nore, Deptford, England, proceeding to Harwich on June 1st. Here on the 3rd she loaded Army equipment and British troops proceeding to Area Zebra, off Isle of Wight on the 5th. On the 6th at 0035 en route to Beach King, Area GOLD, Normandy, France she heard a heavy underwater explosion.35 She anchored in the unloading area off Beach King at 2010 on the 6th, sounding General Quarters when enemy aircraft were sighted but secured without further incident at 2345. Again on the 7th, at 0605, 6 enemy planes began to strafe the ships at anchor. At 1005 the British troops departed in HMS LST-3627, and the LST-176 beached at King Beach, unloading vehicles. At 0955 on the 8th she was underway for the English coast, mooring at Tilbury, England, in the Thames River on the 9th and again loading cargo for France.

IN COLLISION--SECOND TRIP TO FRANCE
On June 12, 1943, while proceeding to anchorage HMS Empire Pitt struck the LST-176 abeam of forward booby hatch, sheering along toward the stern for about 75 feet and causing considerable damage to the port side, but no human casualties. At 1820 she again beached at Area GOLD, King Beach, Normandy, France, and unloaded Army equipment. On the 13th she was underway for England and moored at Selbury for repairs on the 14th.

MANY MORE TRIPS TO FRANCE
From June 17, 1944, to August 13, 1944, the LST-176 made numerous trips from England to France with Army vehicles and men. Twice in June she beached at Area GOLD. The account of her operations in July is missing, but she made three trips to UTAH Beach, France on the 1st, 5th and 11th of August, 1944, and then proceeded to Plymouth, England, on the 16th, and into drydock at Southyard, Devonport, England on August 30, 1944. Here she remained during September, 1944.

TO USA--TRANSFERRED TO NAVY COMMAND
Returning to Plymouth she was underway for the USA on October 5, 1944, arriving at Hampton Roads, Virginia on the 24th and thence to Norfolk that evening to unload ammunition. On the 28th she proceeded to Boston, arriving on the 31st and tying up at Atlantic Yard for overhaul and repairs. She went into drydock October 28, 1944, and on November 3, 1944, the Coast Guard was relieved of its command of this ship by the Navy.


LST-202
FLOTILLA 7 - GROUP 21 - DIVISION 42

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-202 was built at the Chicago Bridge and Iron Works, Seneca, Illinois, and completed in March, 1943. Brought down the Mississippi by a U.S. Navy ferry crew to Algiers, Louisiana, she was placed in full commission on April 9, 1943, with Lt. Benjamin Ayesa, USCGR, as first commanding officer and a crew of 8 officers and 66 men. He was succeeded in turn by Lt. R. R. Edge, USCGR, Lt. Comdr. T. N. Kelly, USCGR, Lt. H. H. Gaillard, USCGR, and Lt. R. B. Elliott, USCGR. During the end of April and early May, she underwent shakedown exercises at St. Andrews and St. Joseph Bay areas, Florida.

TO SOUTHWEST PACIFIC
On May 13, 1943, she was underway for the Pinkenba, Queensland, Australia via Panama Canal, Bora Bora, Tutuila, Samoa, Suva, Fiji Islands and Noumea, New Caledonia. She arrived at Pinkenba August 16, 1943, and reported to Commander, 7th Amphibious Force. After a brief stay in Australia she proceeded to Milne Bay, New Guinea, where she reported to Commander LST, Flotilla 7. From then on throughout her career in the Pacific she was in Group 21, Flotilla 7 under the 7th Fleet. As a member of Task Force 76 she took part in the various landings that finally carried MacArthur to the Philippines on October 20, 1944.

NINE INVASIONS
Altogether the LST-202 made nine invasion landings in the Pacific area.36 These were as follows:

Cape Gloucester     December 25, 1943
Saidor     January 16, 1944
The Admiralties     March 2, 1944
Humboldt Bay     April 19, 1944
Noemfoor     July 9, 1944
Sansapor     July 27, 1944
Morotai     September 16, 1944
Leyte     October 20, 1944
Lingayen Gulf     January 9, 1945

BAPTISM OF FIRE AT CAPE GLOUCESTER
Between invasions the LST was engaged in resupply runs. At Cape Gloucester she was standing off the beach in company with two other LSTs when 9 enemy dive bombers attacked from dead ahead. The 202 was strafed with machine gun fire and several bombs landed within 20 to 40 feet from the ship. Although the gun crews were showered with water from the explosions, and the ship was spattered with bomb fragments, no damage or casualties were sustained. In this and other attacks that day

--83--


the gun crews shot down 2 enemy planes and got one possible," for which the ship was later commended.

SILENCES JAP POSITIONS AT HYANE
On March 2, 1944, while beached at Hyane Harbor, Los Negros Island, she underwent heavy mortar and machine gun fire from the Jap-held peninsula on the right hand side of the entrance. Her gun crews returned the fire during the afternoon with 3"/50 and 40 MM gunfire and finally silenced the Jap positions. She was credited with knocking out several gun emplacements, with no damage to the ship.

STRADDLED BY BOMBS AT LEYTE
The Leyte trip proved uneventful until the convoy entered Leyte Gulf on the morning of D-day, October 20, 1944. The task unit to which the ship was attached was attacked by enemy bombers and the 202 was straddled by bombs. They landed close aboard but she suffered no damage and went on to beach, unload and retract without further incident. The next run to Leyte proved more eventful than the invasion trip, however. Leaving Owi Island on November 19th, torpedo planes attacked on the evening of the 24th. One plane loosed its torpedoes just outside the convoy columns and one of these passed directly across the bow of the 202 and right across the middle of the convoy without hitting a ship. The plane was shot down by a frigate before it could penetrate the screen.

STRANGE ATTACKS AT MINDORO AND LINGAYEN
On January 7, 1945, while at San Jose, Mindoro Island, en route Lingayen Gulf, the red alert was in effect but was secured as all planes in the area were announced to be friendly. With the 202 secured from General Quarters, a plane suddenly came out of the sun on the starboard beam, flying at about a 50° angle over the ships in the columns to starboard. General Quarters was sounded and as the sen ran to their stations, the plane identified as a "Nick" passed across the conn and tilted her left wing to avoid hitting the mast of the LST-202. It happened so fast that no crew had a chance to fire a shot but why the "Nick" never strafed, bombed or crashed the 202 will remain an enigma. Again on a resupply run to Lingayen Gulf area on January 27, 1945, Japanese planes circled the convoy but made no direct attacks.

IN TYPHOON
After picking up partial loads at Samar and Mactan Islands, Cebu, the LST-202 loaded an "acorn" group at Puerto Princessa, Palawan, P.I., and departed thence for Kure, Japan on September 30, 1945. With almost 1000 tons of cargo and a full main deck load of 193 passengers, the route to Japan lay across the long stretch of water particularly subject to typhoons at that season of the year. After turning back for one day to avoid one typhoon, the LST went ahead at her best speed trying to outrun a second one of great intensity coming NW from Guam. Had this storm continued west the LST would have cleared, but it recurved on October 7, 1945, and headed for Okinawa and Kyushu at a speed which indicated that it would catch the 202 at the entrance to the Inland Sea of Japan. Reaching the entrance to Bungo Suido on the 9th, the 202 managed to anchor in a narrow rockbound cove off Shikoku in 45 fathoms, on a 105 fathom chain. It was none too soon. Next morning the typhoon set in and reached its full force at midnight. The anchorage was in more or less of a lee, but even so the 100 knot winds and tremendous swells made it seem doubtful that the anchor would hold on such a small scope of chain. However, she rode it out well with the aid of 1/3 to 2/3 ahead on the main engines. By daylight of October 11th the typhoon had spent its force and the ship proceeded to Hiro Wan anchorage through the Inland Sea swept channel.

RETURN TO U.S.
Proceeding to Truk via Guam on November 3rd she arrived on the 25th and landed the initial occupation force. On the 30th she started for the U.S.A. via Eniwetok and Pearl Harbor, arriving at San Francisco on January 9, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at San Francisco April 11, 1946.


LST-203

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-203 was commissioned on April 29, 1943. (Reports of movement between commissioning date and September 30, 1943, are not available).37

STRANDED ON CORAL REEF
At 0836 on September 30,1943, the LST-203 beached at Nanomea Island and started to unload cargo. At 0115 on October 1, 1943, having completed unloading she began maneuvering to get off the beach. With her ramp raised, her starboard door did not close fully, being slightly sprung, and the LST attempted to retract without success. She was apparently held fast by a coral reef which caused her to pivot on the bow. A 6 to 8 foot surf pounded her against the fingers of the reef. At 0600 water was entering the shaft alley and engineroom which pumps were unable to handle. The USS Manley (APD-1) assisted with boats and line but by 0725 the deck plates on the port side of the main engineroom were reported breaking through. At 0815 the Manley's cable snapped and further unloading began, with lowered ramp, awaiting next high tide. At 1632 new attempts were made to pull the vessel off but at 1950 the Manley's cable parted a second time. Unloading continued and at 1900 on the 2nd new attempts to float her by both the Manley and YMS-53 were unsuccessful. Other unsuccessful attempts on the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 13th were hampered by lack of power, heavy swells and water entering engineroom faster than pumps could handle it. Attempts to float her were thereupon abandoned and she was stripped of all material and equipment as a stranded vessel.


LST-204
FLOTILLA 7 - GROUP 21 - DIVISION 42

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-204 was commissioned April 27, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. Arthur I. Roberts, USCG, Lt. Charles W. Radke, USCG, and Lt. Richard D. Irvin, USCGR. (Reports of operations between date of commissioning and September 21, 1943, are not available).

DOWNS PLANE AT FINSCHHAFEN
On September 21, 1943, the LST-204 departed Lae, New Guinea, with a combat load of 500 Australian troops of the 9th Division and their equipment. On the 22nd she beached at Scarlet Beach several miles above Finschhafen38 at 0656 and began unloading cargo and

--84--


disembarking personnel under a protective air cover. The operation was completed without incident by 0925. Five minutes later the 204 began retracting from the beach. She had not moved off more than 25 yards when a lone Japanese "Zeke" (zero fighter) sneaking in unobserved over the hills swooped down to masthead level and dropped two small bombs, both falling wide of their mark and landing on the beach off the starboard bow, 40 yards away. No casualties resulted and the 204 Joined the formation and headed south to Buna. At 1230 escorts signalled approaching planes and ten minutes later 6 Japanese "Sallys" (medium bombers) were sighted on the horizon approaching the formation on the port quarter at very low altitude. They were in two groups of 3 planes each. Two "Zeros" spotted high above were immediately engaged by our planes. All ships broke formation and began weaving at emergency speed, according to plan. The main batteries of escorting destroyers opened fire at 5000 yards and 2 bombers crashed into the sea, one exploding in midair, apparently as a result of a direct hit. The remaining bombers broke formation but continued coming in. The 204 had wheeled to port when the bombers came within range. Two were approaching on the port quarter when the order was given to fire. Hits were scored almost immediately by the 20 MM guns of the 204. One torpedo launched by the bomber passed astern missing the LST-204 by several hundred yards. The bomber then fell into the water, bounced back again and burst into flames. The other "Sally" kept coming at deck level, 400 yards astern and to port. Fire was concentrated on her and she passed to starboard not more than 25 yards abeam with direct hits seen to be peppering her cockpit. She began to leave a trail of dark smoke and seemed out of control. When about 100 yards off the port bow of the LST-204 she crashed into the sea. Firing ceased. The remaining planes were engaged by "Lightning" P-38's. Two more "Sallys" crashed to starboard 5000 yards distant. One "Zero" plummeted seaward in flames and a P-38 fell, the pilot bailing out and being eventually picked up by escorts. By 1305 "all clear" was sounded and the ships rested formation. No casualties or damage was suffered by the LST-204.

SHOOTS DOWN PLANE AT CAPE GLOUCESTER
On December 26, 1943, the LST-204 was off Cape Gloucester when the convoy was attacked by enemy dive bombers at 1435. Three bombers attacked the 204 on a shallow dive at 1000 feet. Three bombs were dropped within 75 to 200 feet of the ship. With all guns firing, a fatal hit was scored on a "Val" which subsequently crashed into the sea. Damaging hits were observed on two other "Vals" and one crashed into the sea as a result. A third "Val" crashed but not as the sole result of the 204's fire. The attack ceased at 1540 with no casualties or damage, except cracked pipes in the engine room from bomb explosions. The Shaw (DD-373) was hit. She listed but continued fire. A near miss was made on LST-66, 800 yards off the port bow. A P-38 crashed 2 miles away but the pilot baled out and was rescued. A "Thunderbolt" crashed but the pilot bailed out and landed on a reef 3 miles off the port beam. Nine other unidentified planes were seen crashing into the water within a radius of 3000 yards. The escort destroyer received the brunt of the attack and held off a number of planes. The LST-204 suffered several near misses. At 1700 the attacks were renewed for about 10 minutes but the planes were out of range and no hits were scored or damage or casualties incurred. Three bombers were shot down. A third air battle at 20,000 feet ensued in which 6 enemy planes crashed and burned.

EIGHT MORE INVASION LANDINGS
The LST-204, following these two experiences, was engaged in eight more invasion landings in the Pacific area as follows:

Saidor       January 15, 1944
Humboldt Bay       April 19, 1944
Biak       June 9, 1944
Noemfoor       July 9, 1944
Sansapor       July 31, 1944
Morotai       September 15, 1944
Leyte       October 20, 1944
Lingayen Gulf       January 9, 1945

RETURN TO UNITED STATES
Between these invasion landings, the LST-204 made many resupply runs in the Southwest Pacific area, and after the Lingayen Gulf invasion was engaged in supply runs between the Philippine area and Southwest Pacific ports. The LST returned to San Diego on December 10, 1945, and then proceeded to Charleston via the Panama Canal.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina on February 23, 1946.


LST-205
FLOTILLA 13 - GROUP 39 - DIVISION 7B

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-205 was commissioned May 15, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. R. J. Buchar, USCG, Lt. (jg) P. L. Bean, USCGR, and Lt. S. F. Regard, USCGR.

TARAWA
The 205 participated in the Tarawa landing on November 21, 1943, and remained in the area until December 8, 1943. Following this strike she returned to the United States.

AFIRE AT PEARL HARBOR
On April 4, 1944, the LST-205 was at San Pedro, California. From here she proceeded to Pearl Harbor, via San Diego, arriving on May 12, 1944. She was one of the LST's at Tare 8, West Loch, Pearl Harbor which caught fire as a result of the explosion on May 21, 1944. (For further detail see "LST-69" supra.) She pulled away from the group and was beached. The fire was extinguished by her personnel. The only Coast Guard death on this occasion occurred in the crew of the LST-205, when a steward's mate apparently abandoned ship and was burned to death in the water. The LST proceeded to Lake Washington Shipyard, Seattle, where she was repaired.

AT BIAK SAIPAN AND LEYTE--DOWNS 9 PLANES
The 205 took part in the invasion of Biak Island on June 9, 1944. Proceeding to the Saipan assault area on D+2 day, June 17, 1944, the LST unloaded and remained in the area until July 3, 1944. She proceeded to Eniwetok and Pearl Harbor and on October 20, 1944, she took part in the Leyte invasion on D-day. Following this invasion the vessel made shuttle runs in "Suicide Gulch" from Leyte to Mindoro through narrow areas surrounded by Japanese held islands and airfields. She shot down eight suicide planes, then fought a ninth to a "dead heat." The ninth reached the 205 through a blistering curtain of ack-ack and crashed on her deck but its bombs ripped loose and skidded overside into the water before going up in a shattering concussion. "That doggone slant-eye went right over our mount" said Leonard D. Adams, (For further detail see "LST-69" supra.).

--85--


Electrician's Mate, 3/c, USCGR, "it felt like inches, but he must have missed us by 20 or 30 feet. Then he crashed and broke up. I'll never know how he stayed together long enough to reach us. He was shot up so bad that pieces of the plane were falling for some time after he hit. Most of the men who got hurt were hit by falling steel or shrapnel."

HIS HEART IN HIS MOUTH
When this ninth suicide plane crashed into the 205, it passed close enough to the gun mount, where Robert H. Banks, Steward 3/c was stationed, to leave part of one wing hanging within arm's reach. Noticing the negro boy's long face when he went below Chief Machinist A. M. Elmore, USCG, said; "Come on, son, give us a little smile like you always do." Mr. Elmore, Sir," Banks replied "'til my heart backs down out of my mouth, I don't think I'll ever smile again!"

TO U.S.A. AND TOKYO AND HOME
The LST-205 left the Philippine area in March 1945 and returned to Seattle on May 8, 1945, for availability until July 18th. Then she was off for Japan, via Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Saipan and Okinawa reaching Hagushi September 29th and Tokyo October 2, 1945. Proceeding to Aomori on November 8th she returned to Yokohama November 21st and left on December 28, 1945 for home. She arrived in San Pedro January 7, 1946, and arrived at Charleston, via Panama Canal February 25, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Charleston April 2, 1946.


LST-206
FLOTILLA 7 - GROUP 21 - DIVISION 42

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-206 was commissioned June 7, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. Karl A. E. Linquist, USCG, Lt. S. F. Regard, USCGR, and Lt. T. L. Becton, USCGR.

IN NINE INVASIONS
The LST-206 participated in nine invasions in the Pacific area and was then engaged in resupply runs in the areas until dates indicated as follows:39

Cape Gloucester       December 25, 1943 - March 1, 1944
Saidor       January 1, 1944 - February 14, 1944
Admiralties (Manus)       March 2, 1944 - March 16, 1944
Humboldt Bay       April 19, 1944 - May 7, 1944
Wakde       May 16, 1944 - May 23, 1944
Biak       June 6, 1944 - June 20, 1944
Sansapor       July 27, 1944 - August 26, 1944
Morotai       September 15, 1944 - September 17, 1944
Leyte (D+9)       October 29, 1944 - November 12, 1944

RETURN TO U.S.A.
Departing Leyte on November 12, 1944, she stopped at Subic Bay and Pearl Harbor and reached San Diego December 29, 1945, proceeding to San Francisco January 4, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at San Francisco May 6, 1946.


LST-207
FLOTILLA 5 - GROUP 15 - DIVISION 29

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-207 was commissioned June 9, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. (jg) John C. Salter, USCG, Lt. (jg) Andrew R. Lockhart, USCGR, Lt. Thomas F. O'Neil, USCGR, Lt. Howard S. Ingalls, USCGR, and Lt. Roy R. Charles, USCGR.

BOUGAINVILLE INVASION
The LST-207 on August 16, 1943, left Coco Solo, Canal Zone and after traversing the Panama Canal departed Balboa next day for Bora Bora anchoring there on September 7, 1943. Departing for Pago Pago, Tutuila on the 11th she arrived on the 16th. On the 22nd she proceeded to Suva and returned to Pago Pago on the 30th. On October 3, 1943, she left for Noumea, New Caledonia, with Navy CB's and equipment. On the 17th she sailed for Guadalcanal arriving on the 22nd, disembarking Army and Navy personnel and cargo. A trip to Florida Island and return followed. As November 1943 began the LST began preparing for the invasion of Bougainville.40 Loading Marine Corps supplies she departed on November 4th and reached Purvata Island, Bougainville November 6, 1943.

RESUPPLY ECHELONS--DOWNS PLANE
She returned to Guadalcanal on the 8th and on the 15th started again for Bougainville. On the 17th a large column of black smoke was observed off her bow after two explosions were felt and an APD in the convoy was found to have been torpedoed. At 0337 enemy aircraft were sighted about 400 yards distant slightly abaft the starboard beam and low. The 207 opened fire and after 300 rounds the plane, identified as a "Betty" burst into flames, passed over the vessel, veered off to the right and crashed into the water two points off the LST's port bow, a distance of 300 yards. The Commanding Officer of another LST saw a torpedo wake cross the LST-207's bow just previous to her opening fire. At 0342 a second plane crossed the stem from starboard to port about 800 yards distant then veered to left away from, but parallel to the LST's track. The 207 opened fire. Other ships astern also opened fire and the plane crashed into the water, burned and exploded. At 0345 the ship fired at another plane with unknown results. At 0356 a plane coming in low passed the length of the ship, distant 300 yards, and all guns, including those of nearby vessels fired with unknown results. Later that morning the LST beached at Puruata and began unloading U.S. Army personnel. At 0751 there was a bomb splash in the bay and an explosion off the port quarter about 1000 yards distant but no plane was sighted. Six minutes later the LST together with 4 other LST's and shore batteries opened fire on 11 enemy planes at medium high altitude and two were shot down. Unloading was completed on the 17th and the LST-207 returned to Guadalcanal. On the 22nd the LST's boat departed to rescue the survivors of an Army bomber which crashed in the water 250 yards off her starboard quarter. Most of the rest of November was employed in transporting CB equipment in the

--86--


Guadalcanal area with an enemy plane attack on November 27th while again approaching Puruata Beach, Bougainville, which was reached on the 28th. 107 casualties were taken aboard replacing the Navy and Marine personnel brought to the scene. The 207 beached at Kukum, Guadalcanal on the 30th and then stood into Tulagi harbor and moored.

RESUPPLY ECHELONS TO BOUGAINVILLE
Two more round trips fromGuadalcanal to Bougainville were made during December, 1943, with Marine Corps personnel and equipment and at the year's end the 207 was at Hutchinson Creek, Guadalcanal.

GREEN ISLANDS INVASION
After three more resupplyechelons had been sent to Bougainville from Guadalcanal in which LST-207 participated, she departed on the 11th of February, 1944, for the invasion of the Green Islands. Stopping at Ondonga Island, New Georgia Islands she loaded personnel and cargo of the 37th Special Battalion, Navy CB's while enemy planes were bombing an airstrip half a mile away and departed with 250 Navy CB's in convoy for the Green Islands invasion. At 0849 on the 15th she passed into Nissan Island Lagoon and put bulldozers ashore for roadwork. At 0650, two bombers were observed attacking one of the screening destroyers on the 207's port bow. Two near misses were observed. After dropping bombs one of the planes circled and headed toward the convoy and the LST-207 opened fire with no perceivable damage. Again at 0705 a plane approached astern 3 miles distant at 12,000 feet and when 3000 feet and abeam the LST opened fire. The plane dropped two small bombs about 200 yards out and forward of the vessel and then veered up and away beyond range. Barrage balloons flown at 2000 feet during the attack were believed to have caused the bombs to fall too far to starboard, thus missing the vessel. Returning to the Guadalcanal area on the 17th the LST-207 remained there for the rest of February, transporting troops and equipment within the area.

GUAM INVASION
Until May 31, 1944, the LST-207 was engaged in transporting troops and equipment in the Guadalcanal area, making two additional trips to Green Island with troops and supplies, one on March 3, 1944, and another on the 12th, stopping at Vella La Vella on the return trip to Guadalcanal from the latter. On April 1, 1944, she proceeded to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, for an availability for alterations and repairs returning to Guadalcanal on the 19th. After more than a month of local service in the Guadalcanal area she embarked Marine personnel, with vehicles and supplies at Guadalcanal on May 31, 1944, for the invasion of Guam. She arrived at Kwajalein on June 6th in convoy and departed June 9th in the same convoy for the Mariannas. On June 17, 1944, while under attack by enemy bombers at 13°33'N, 148°10'E, she evaded a torpedo from one of them. After concentrated fire from a number of vessels in the convoy a second plane burst into flames. LCI-468 was hit by enemy bombs and a friendly TBF Avenger Plane shot down by mistake. The convoy proceeded to Eniwetok on June 30, 1944. On July 15, 1944, she departed with Task Group 53.16 for Guam where on the 21st she discharged all 17 of her LVT's including 1 amphibious tank as a repair tractor and wrecker, 4 armored amphibious tanks assigned to cover Adelup Point, and 12 carrying 20 Marine assault troops of the Third Battalion, Third Marines, 6 for the first assault on Beach Red One, three in the second assault wave and three in the third. All Marine troops were disembarked under cover of heavy naval bombardment. No enemy air resistance was encountered. On the 23rd she stood off Asan Beach while the CG unit launched four pontoon barges to report to the USS Crescent City for duty. The LST beached at Asan Beach on the 24th to unload v ehicles. On the 26th four bursts of Japanese mortar fire landed in the water 800 yards distant doing no damage to ship or injury to personnel. On the 28th she proceeded to Eniwetok and thence to Pearl Harbor arriving on August 18, 1944.

LEYTE INVASION
She remained at Pearl Harbor until September 11, 1944, when she took position in convoy as Task Group 33.7 eventual destination Leyte. Stopping at Eniwetok and Manus, she proceeded to Leyte and beached at Violet Beach #2 on October 21, 1944, to unload cargo and disembark troops. Retracting from the beach she moored beside the President Hayes to load cargo, proceeding to Yellow Beach to unload and retract, mooring to AK-42 in the harbor. She made smoke at regular intervals. On the 25th she was bombed by an enemy plane, the bomb landing 100 yards to the starboard beam. Later while anchored off Dulag a second plane dived on the LST. All guns bore on the plane which disappeared into the clouds smoking. Later another a "Val" enemy dive bomber dropped a bomb 300 yards on the port beam. A third attack occurred at 1810. The LST's fire brought down the "Sally" bomber which crashed on the beach. Next morning came an attack by 12 "Sallys," "Tonys" and "Vals," one of whom was brought down by the 207. Later at 1009 three more planes attacked and dropped three bombs, two of which were brought down in flames. On the 31st of October, 1944, the LST-207 joined Task Group 79.14.9 en route for Humboldt Bay, New Guinea. On the 9th of November 1944 she was again on her way to Leyte where resupply echelons were disembarked on the 16th. At 1800 while underway in Task Group 78. 2.34 an enemy plane came in low and strafed a destroyer on her starboard quarter, but approaching darkness made the plane difficult for LST-207's gunners to find. Arriving at Manus November 23, 1944, she went into drydock as Lt. (jg) Lockhart relieved Lt. Salter.

TO OKINAWA--RETURN TO UNITED STATES--AGAIN TO OKINAWA
Returning to the Philippines after availability the LST-207 remained there until April 27, 1945, when she proceeded to Okinawa arriving on May 1, 1945. She remained at Okinawa until May 11, 1945, and then returned to San Francisco via Saipan and Pearl Harbor arriving June 22, 1945 for availability until August 26th. A second trip to Okinawa began August 26, 1945, the LST arriving October 10, 1945, via Pearl Harbor and returning via Gaum, Saipan and Pearl Harbor to San Diego on December 30, 1945. She then proceeded to Charleston, South Carolina via San Pedro and Canal Zone arriving on February 19, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Charleston, South Carolina March 20, 1946.


LST-261
FLOTILLA 17 - GROUP 51 - DIVISION 102

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-261 was built by USS American Bridge Company, Ambridge, Pennsylvania, and commissioned on May 13, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. Comdr. L. I. Reilly, USCG (May 1943-August 1944) who received the Distinguished Service Cross for operations off Normandy, Lt. Joseph V. Ferguson, USCGR,

--87--


(August-October, 1944), Lt. W. S. Parrish, USCGR, (October 1944-July 1945) and Lt. D. G. Olney, USCGR, (July 1945-February 1946).

UNDER BRITISH IN ITALIAN INVASION
She sailed from Norfolk on July 27, 1943, en route Oran, Algeria, arriving August 14, 1943. She departed August. 20, 1943, with LST Group 10 for Bizerte, Tunisia, arriving August 23, 1943. On the 31st she got underway to join convoy MKS-23. On September 9, 1943, she carried tanks and troops from Sicily to Taranto and the Bast Coast of Italy, making the farthest north landing on that coast at Manfredonia, near Foggia, Italy, in company of mixed British and American LST's.

TO CEYLON
Subsequently in November, 1943, with nine other LST's she proceeded through the Suez Canal, being the first American man-of-war to enter the canal since the outbreak of the war. Carrying U.S. Army units and the LCT-449 and crew to India to participate in the invasion of Burma, the LST-261 was held up at Ceylon due to main engine trouble. She was the first American ship of war to enter Colombo, Ceylon, in World War II. Upon completion of repairs she retraced her track through the Suez Canal, still with LCT-449 on her deck and proceeded to England.

NORMANDY INVASION
Arriving in England on February 24, 1944, she proceeded to various Irish, Scotch and South England ports readying for the Normandy Invasion, ending up at Harwich on the East Coast, again under the British in a mixed group of LST's, half American and half British. Sailing from Harwich on June 5, 1944, for the invasion of Normandy, she arrived off Arromanches on D-day, carrying between five and six hundred men, including "Montgomery's Desert Rats," and tankers of British 8th Army fame. From then on she made altogether 52 channel crossings carrying all types of equipment and men, British, Belgian, French and American to France. She was bombed without damage; took a mine close aboard on the port quarter, necessitating some hand steering to get back to England; had some casualties on her main deck who later got their Purple Hearts; and was rammed by a British merchantman in a dense fog. This laid her up 19 days for repairs just outside London.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
Departing Falmouth, England, on June 7, 1945, one year and a day after the Normandy invasion, she arrived at Norfolk June 20, 1945, and New York of the 28th. She remained at New York until September 20, 1945, for availability, after which she proceeded to sail for New Orleans. She took part in the Navy Day Celebration at Louisville, Kentucky. On November 2, 1945, she departed Louisville for New Orleans, having been visited by 41,000 people.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at New Orleans February 22, 1946.


LST-262
FLOTILLA 12-GROUP 65-DIVISION 69

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-262 was commissioned June 16, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. Herman W. Klotz, USCGR, Lt. Victor M. Hill, USCGR, Lt (jg) K. V. Lawrence, USCGR, and Lt. F. G. Stoye, USCGR. (Reports of operations from date of commissioning to April 4, 1944, are not available).

RAMMED IN ENGLAND
The LST-262 was operating in the Mediterranean area on April 4, 1944, and arrived in England on May 3, 1944. She was in service in the United Kingdom until July 1, 1944, when she was rammed by the LST-373 resulting in a hole just forward of the port booby hatch. The compartment was dogged off and operations continued. On July 4, 1944, a temporary patch was placed over the hole, replaced by a permanent repair later. She continued operations in England until June 14, 1945, when she left for Norfolk.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On July 1, 1945, she arrived at Norfolk and on July 6, 1945 at New York. Proceeding to New Orleans she arrived there July 18, 1945, and went to Orange, Texas, on availability until October 17, 1945, when she returned to Norfolk arriving November 15, 1945. On December 8, 1945, she went to Poole's Island but returned to Norfolk for disposal.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Norfolk on January 14, 1946.


LST-326
FLOTILLA 11-GROUP 32

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-326 was commissioned February 26, 1943, as a Navy manned LST. On August 25, 1943, the officers and crew of the LST-175 exchanged places with the Navy officers and crew of LST-326 and she became a Coast Guard manned vessel. Lt. J. C. Saussy, USCGR, was her first commanding officer.

ANZIO-NETTUNO LANDINGS
On January 27, 1944, she took part in the Anzio-Nettuno landings on the coast of Italy41 operating with Task Force "Shingle Peter" she anchored at 0010-A. All troops and DUKWs were discharged according to schedule and the small boats returned reporting that troops had landed with no casualties. Throughout D-day the LST-326 was under fire from enemy batteries with shells falling as close as 30 feet. At 1324, at the height of the attack, batteries were spotted and estimated within range of her 3"/50 gun. LST-326 and 351 requested permission to fire but the request was denied, so the 326 was moored to the outer anchorage as the shelling continued. At 1600 she was ordered to proceed to Sector X-ray where she arrived at 1830 and anchored. Next day she was signalled to discharge remainder of her vehicles via pontoons causeway. She was beached at 1130 and by 1340 all vehicles were safely ashore. At 1430 she proceeded to convoy assembly area off Anzio and at 2335A formed astern of LST-320. Early on the 24th she returned to Naples and moved to Bara, Italy, on the 25th where she loaded 6 officers and 168 enlisted men of the 1st Armored Division with tanks and vehicles and again proceeded toward Anzio in convoy. On the 26th she opened fire on a German plane flying low up sun, but the plane did not come in. At Green Beach, Anzio, on the 27th she unloaded vehicles and sent in 4 LCVP's to assist in salvage work, beaching at Red Beach at 1610. Seven red alerts ensued but no action was taken toward the enemy. On the 28th at 0728 there was a red alert and the LST expended 14 rounds of 40 MM ammunition. A stern lookout at 1639 reported a squadron of P-40's coming in from the south at 3000 feet and a

--88--


minute later the LST was dive-bombed in a surprise attack, three bombs landing from 50 to 100 feet away, starboard and port. The decks were strafed and the barrage balloon carried away with no effective damage. No red alert was received and no ammunition expended.

BRITISH CRUISER AND LIBERTY SHIP
At 1740 there was a red alert and the 326 began making smoke and ten minutes later there was an attack by four DO-217's coming in from the north at 3000 feet. The 3"/50 guns opened fire. A red glow was observed under one plane followed by streaks of sparks. This was later believed to be jet propulsion. Seconds later HMS cruiser Spartan received a direct hit on the after gun turret and there was a terrific explosion. Small boats of the 326 were ordered away to rescue survivors. Another red glow was now observed approaching the 326 all of whose guns were firing the 20 MM at the bomb and the 3"/50 at the planes. This second bomb went forward of the bow and seconds later an explosion was heard believed to be a Liberty ship. Two more bombs were released under continuous fire from all ships but the red glow ceased under fire and it was not known where these bombs fell. Planes circling the area came in on the port side and two more bombs were released but it was not known where they landed. The 326 was secured from general quarters at 1817. Meanwhile at 1305 the LST's small boats returned from the Spartan carrying wounded survivors and a Navy officer departed with them for HMS Delphi. At 1940 another small boat returned with two seriously wounded officers and five survivors suffering from exposure. The latter were brought aboard for dry clothing and a ration of brandy while the two wounded officers were dispatched to the Delphi. At 2100 a Liberty ship 3/4 mile off the port bow burst into flames and began to drift on the 326, who got underway for a new anchorage. Ten minutes later there was a red alert and anchors aweigh she began to make smoke which because of wind direction did not cover her. Anchoring again she maneuvered the stern into the wind to receive the benefit of the smoke. A plane was heard diving on the LST at 2223 and its bomb struck 200 feet off the port bow. All clear at 2243 no ammunition expended.

TO BIZERTE AND ALGERIA
On February 1, 1944, the LST-326 proceeded to Naples and picking up LCT-198 prepared to tow her to Bizerte, but due to unfavorable weather conditions the order was cancelled and on the 6th she joined a convoy for Bizerte towing the LCT-198. Heavy seas en route caused the LCT-193 to lose her ramp and midship railings. The LST-326 anchored in the lee of Cape Guardia at 1630 on the 9th and soon afterwards the LCT-198 departed for Bizerte. The LST-326 followed on the 10th. She began loading cargo on the 13th and with 8 officers and 67 enlisted men departed in convoy on the 15th for Arzew, Algeria. En route she was ordered to Philippville, Algeria, and anchored on the 16th in the lee of Cape Stora. She proceeded on the 18th with 3 other LST's escorted by the SC-978. There were continuous rain squalls on the 19th but on the 20th weather conditions moderated as she moored at Arzew. Here she participated in night assault maneuvers until March 3, 1944, attached to Group 3, Flotilla 1.

ANZIO FERRY SERVICE
On March 3, 1944, the LST-326 joined convoy UGS-33 for Naples, via Bizerte. Detached from the convoy at Bizerte she proceeded with LST-351 and escorts to Nisida, Italy, arriving March 8, 1944. From 8 to 23 March, 1944, she was operating on the Anzio Ferry Service. She detached on the 24th for a trip to Ajaccio, Corsica, and returned to rejoin the Ferry Service on the 27th where she operated until April 14, 1944. From April 15 to 30 she was at Palermo, Sicily, for installation of new armament and necessary repairs. She arrived at Oran May 15, 1944, attached to 11th Amphibious Force and on May 19, 1944, joined convoy MKS-49, which on the 22nd Joined convoy SL-158 until May 31, 1944, where with two other LST's she detached and proceeded to Port Talbot, Wales, under escort of HMS K-420 and H-22.

NORMANDY--RESCUES 260 FROM H. G. BLASDEL
The LST-326 participated in the invasion of Normandy on D-day and, while detailed reports of her operations during the period June 6-29 are not available she appears to have made a number of trips from England to France. On the afternoon of June 29, 1944, while returning to England in a northbound convoy from the beachhead in France the LST-326 passed the southbound convoy in mid-channel. Four ships in this southbound convoy had just been hit by undetermined agents and the LST-326 was detached to aid one of them, the Liberty ship H. G. Blasdel, who had already settled considerably by the stern. A small boat with a doctor was lowered by the LST and dispatched to the Blasdel. A corvette and another smaller craft were taking off casualties but their facilities were limited. There was a No. 4 sea and the LST small boats could not get the men off the sinking Liberty ship soon enough as their number was too great. It was therefore decided to moor the LST alongside the stricken vessel, even though there was no way of knowing whether or not the Blasdel would sink shortly or if explosions were imminent. The mooring was accomplished with difficulty because the roll and pitch of the LST were so much greater than that of the Liberty ship that the distance between the two changed quickly from a sharp damaging impact to a distance of 9 or 10 feet. Two breast lines were formed at the only point possible, though even here the upward surge of the LST under the Liberty ships overhanging small boat and other projections made the job of the men in the breastline a hazardous one. With the breastline holding the vessel to an average distance of 4 or 5 feet, nine dead, 60 wounded and about 200 other survivors were brought aboard the LST-326, all of them U.S. Army personnel bound for the French beachhead. The entire operation took 1½ hours. The wounded were placed on the tank deck where already there were already some 900 German prisoners of war and the LST's crew assisted doctors and hospital corpsmen in attending the wounded. The LST-326 proceeded unescorted to an English port arriving at 0200 on June 30, 1944, and discharging dead, wounded, survivors and prisoners by 0600. (Further reports of operations of LST-326 are not available).

TRANSFERRED TO UNITED KINGDOM
On December 18, 1944, the LST-326 was transferred to the United Kingdom.


LST-327
FLOTILLA 18-GROUP 52-DIVISION 104

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-327 was commissioned at Philadelphia March 6, 1943. The commanding officers have been Lt. A. Volton, USCG and Lt. Ludwig Wedemeyer, USCG. Proceeding to New York on March 28, 1943, she sailed April 14, 1943, for the Mediterranean via Bermuda. By early May, preparatory for the assault on Sicily, she was shuttling war material between Arzew and Bizerte.

INVASION OF SICILY
Anchored at Bizerte, Tunisia on June 8, 1943, the LST-327

--89--


took her position is convoy as part of the Western Naval Task Force for securing the beach between Licata and Gela, Sicily, in the invasion of Sicily.42 She anchored off Licata Beach at 0125 on the 10th and lowered small boats with the first wave of assault troops. At 0500 fired on enemy aircraft. At 0800 commenced unloading men and. vehicles via LCT's completing unloading at 1340. Stood out of Licata Bay and at 1808 was underway forming convoy to Bizerte, Six more resupply echelons that followed from Bizerte to Licata and Palermo and return included the 327 in the convoys, and on each journey the LST carried men and vehicles to the front lines and brought back many prisoners and wounded. The last of these trips was not completed until August 28, 1943.

SALERNO INVASION
On September 3, 1943, the LST-327 began loading men and vehicles for the Salerno invasion and on the 7th was underway forming part of FSS-3. On the 9th she proceeded to be beaching area of Green Beach and anchored in the Gulf of Salerno. Here 1/2 miles from the beach she encountered shell fire from enemy shore batteries and got underway to get out of range. After a red alert and heavy anti-aircraft fire at 2117 she got underway and stood into Red Beach, beaching at 0249 on the 10th. By 0619 all personnel and vehicles were ashore and the 327 retracted and at 0840 joined convoy SBM-2. Meanwhile the crew had fired on enemy planes without casualties or damage. Underway on the 11th she moored at Bizerte. Seven more resupply echelons with vehicles and men were subsequently dispatched from Bizerte and Tripoli Harbor to Salerno and Palermo. On the 6th of these trips on October 8, 1943, the LST was in collision with another unidentified vessel presumably in the same convoy resulting in a temporary bulkhead between crew's quarters and crew's head being twisted and torn and in other damage. Proceeding under her own power she reached Palermo on October 8, 1943, for 10 days availability for repairs. After the 7th round trip the LST started from Palermo on her 8th trip on Octobe but returned to Palermo after two hours with a broken oil pump. She remained at Palermo undergoing repairs to her generator until January 8, 1944.

ANZIO LANDING
The LST-327 having completed repairs departed Palermo for Karouba, Tunisia, on January 8, 1944. There she loaded British Officers and men as well as vehicles for the invasion of Anzio. Departing on January 21, 1944, she anchored off Peter Beach at 0025 on the 22nd, as rocket ships began shelling the beach. At 0226 the first wave of LCVP's landed troops on the beach. She moved to the unloading anchorage early in the afternoon but enemy shell fire from the beach became so heavy that she returned to her previous anchorage. Several red alerts followed and at 1627 the 327 departed for X-ray sector and anchored. At 0100 on the 23rd enemy boats were being engaged by support craft. At 0740 with low doors and ramps opened she unloaded to LCT-212 moored thwartship. Unloading to 3 other LCT's followed and at 0934 all LCT's were loaded and away. Taking on LCVP crews after moving closer to the beach five enemy planes were fired upon at 1123. At 1420 she departed for Naples.

DIFFICULTY IN STORM
Two other trips were made with vehicles and men between Naples and Anzio and on February 4, 1944, she began towing LCT-205 for Bizerte but had to return because of bad weather. Generator repairs were made and she started again in convoy toward the LCT-205 on the 5th. On the 8th the LCT-205 was so damaged by the sea that the LST-327 was unable to remain in convoy and SC-770 was detailed as escort. Both bulkheads of the LCT-205 were washed overboard at 2045 and half an hour later the LST's engines stopped and she began drifting, with the LCT riding nicely on this starboard quarter. On the 10th she anchored in the lee of Pantelleria, getting underway again on the 11th attempting to make Bizerte. At 2015 she had lost three miles and she anchored head to wind. At 0920 on the 13th with anchor aweigh she made only 2 knots overground when at 1005 with the LCT-205's list to starboard increasing she took shelter anchoring in the lee of the Island of Zenbria, Men were lowered to inspect the LCT-205 and assist in bringing her alongside. At 1940 the LCT's personnel was removed to the LST-327 and reported that all tanks, engine room and living quarters on the LCT were flooded. The LCS that had made the trip to the LCT could not be hoisted aboard because of heavy seas and at 2210 the bridle to the LCT-205 parted setting her adrift. The LCS was taken in tow but at 0330 on the 14th appeared to be shipping large quantities of water. Attempting to bring her alongside for pumping, the line parted and the LCS went adrift, having been holed in the starboard bow by the LST's propeller guard. It was decided to abandon the LCS. At 1000 the LST-327 moored at Karouba, Tunisia.

MOTHER SHIP AT ANZIO
She shifted to Bizerte on February 15th, 1944, and than on the 25th proceeded to Palermo with vehicles and men. Proceeding to Naples on March 4, 1944, she left for Anzio on March 6, 1944. Returning to Naples on the 11th she was back at Anzio on the 13th where she remained as a mother ship until early in May 1944.

NORMANDY INVASION
The LST-327 arrived in the United Kingdom on May 11, 1914, and on June 11, 1944, was moored in Tilbury Basin. On the 2nd she loaded vehicles and men for the Normandy invasion departing for Southend until the 5th when she got underway for the French coast. On the 7th at 0002 she anchored in the Nan Rhino area and at 1316 stood into the unloading area close to the beach, where she unloaded into HMS LCT-2004 and six small boats officers and men for Neptune Beach. She returned to London on the 9th. A second trip to France was made on the 11th. On the 13th the 327 was rammed by the LST-534 causing a gash 8 feet long in the first compartment forward of frame 22 and 24. She stood into Roger Green Beach on the 13th to unload and beached, and at 2235 took aboard 76 German PW's for transportation to the United Kingdo, returning to Southampton on the 15th. Four other round trips to France with vehicles and men ensued and following the sixth trip she was at Jig Green Beach, Normandy, France on June 30, 1944.

STRIKES MINE
While working out of English Channel ports, building supply dumps in Northern France, she struck an enemy mine on August 27, 1944, in position 50°20'N, 01°42'W and put into Plymouth with extensive damage.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
The LST-327 departed Plymouth December 11, 1944, for Falmouth and on June 23, 1945 departed Falmouth for Norfolk, arriving July 19, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned November 19, 1945 at Norfolk.


--90--


LST-331
FLOTILLA 12-GROUP 35-DIVISION 70

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-331 was commissioned on March 11, 1943. (Reports of operations between date of commissioning and July 8, 1943, as well as names of commanding officer or officers are not available).

SICILY INVASION
The LST-331 departed from La Goulette, Tunisia at 0600 on July 8, 1943 (D+2 day) operating as flagships of Group 10, Flotilla 4, Task Force 86.43 The ship was loaded with RAF personnel, trucks and other vehicles together with 100 tons of ammunition, 240 tons of aviation gasoline and aviation equipment to be used in servicing aircraft on Comiso Airport, after its capture. At 1015 she entered Tunisian war channel, 10 miles west of Zembria Island falling in astern of a convoy of LST's. That evening the convoy proceeded for Gozo Island continuing on that course all that night and the following day, the size of the seas, on the beam, making it exceedingly rough going for LST's and smaller craft. On the 9th at 1500 Gozo was sighted and 1/2 hours later the course was changed for Sicily, running on dead reckoning. At 2300 on July 9th, 1943, initial Transport Area One was reached and on the 10th at 0530 visual contact was established with a destroyer and the course verified, the LST-331 arriving at assigned area, the first LST to arrive at 0700 on July 10, 1943. Ordered to anchor and await further orders, waves of small landing craft were observed proceeding shoreward and there was considerable gunfire from the destroyers and cruisers further out at sea, directed at shore installations still showing signs of resistance. A very heavy surf was running under a moderate wind and considerable skill was necessary to prevent broaching of small boats, a number of which lay abandoned on the beach.

PONTOONS BREAK AWAY
At 1400 on the 10th the 331 was ordered to take two pontoons from alongside the Navy Tug Nauset in tow and beach them at a point 5 or 6 miles north west of the transport area. The lines to the pontoons parted in the heavy seas and they drifted toward the beach, finally drifting into the surf. A nearby LCT got a line fast and started towing them to deeper water. The lines parted several times and chains and links holding the pontoons together started breaking in the heavy swells. Finally towed into deep water the 331 made them secure and started back to the landing beach. The pontoons broke away again and after maneuvering in very shallow water a 7 inch hawser was finally made fast very close to the breakers and they were towed to the landing beach in an abating wind. When the 331 grounded at 0915 on the 11th the pontoons surged forward and grounded in the proper location. The last vehicle was off at 1400 and finally the entire cargo was unloaded by the 12th.

PLANES SHOT DOWN
Meanwhile enemy planes were overhead most of the time, being kept fairly high by anti-aircraft fire but general quarters was sounded on an average of once an hour. On the morning of the 11th an Axis medium bomber approached the 331's port quarter at 3000 feet and dropped a stick of bombs 200 yards off the port bow, under fire from the LST's guns. At twilight enemy planes were again dropping flares near the transports astern, the moon to seaward silhouetting the transports for planes approaching the island. The LST's were at right angles to the shore under high sand dunes and surprised several enemy pilots too intent on getting the transports. Holding her fire until two light bombers passed 100 feet above the water on the port side, the LST opened with all available guns and when last seen one bomber was on fire and losing altitude. Another plane flew past the starboard side at about 40 feet as all the LST's guns opened and sparks started flying from the plane as it crashed into the sea. Another approaching the bow at a 45 degree angle received 90% hits and burst into flames crashing ashore. On the 12th 4 enemy bombers were observed, 2 being brought down by nearby destroyers, one in flames and one smoking heavily. By 1830 all cargo was unloaded and the LST backed off the beach anchoring for the night off Scoglitti.

NARROW ESCAPE
Loading shells and ammunition from the USS Procyon on the 13th the 331 proceeded to various beaches and at 1730 beached at an army ammunition dump a mile north of Scoglitti. At 2100 they were ordered to anchorage and 5 minutes after clearing the beach a low flying plane approached and dropped 4 bombs in the water exactly where the LST had been beached. After another day of running from beach to beach the 331 finally discharged all her cargo and on the 15th at 1730 assumed guide for convoy of LST's bound for Tunisia.

SALERNO INVASION
On September 7, 1943, the LST-331 departed Bizerte in convoy FSS-3 en route to the invasion of Salerno. On the 9th enemy aircraft attacked the convoy against heavy anti-aircraft fire. She entered the Bay of Salerno at 1200. Enemy aircraft dropped bombs on the beach, three shells from an enemy gun emplacement hitting nearby at 1430, as she shelled the area from which the shells came. At 1740 two ME-109's came in low over the hills, one being immediately shot down. At 1800 the 331 made for the beach, as an air battle raged overhead. The first vehicle was off at 1830. The LST-332 beached on the port side 50 feet away and the 376 to starboard, shell fire from the hills bursting in the air 1 mile distant. At 1930 the last vehicle was off and the 331 was heading for the anchorage. At 2130 flares dropped all around the harbor and 12 JU-88's attacked, one being shot down. On the 10th general quarters at 0430 with planes heard but not seen, and flares dropping all around but bombs failing to hit any ship. At 0827 anchors aweigh out of Bay of Salerno with our fighters circling overhead. At 1100 three dive bombers came out of the sun one being shot down. At 1115 the 331 was underway out of the Bay of Salerno and entered Bizerte Harbor on September 12th, 1943. (Reports of movement between September 12, 1943, and June 6, 1944, not available).

NORMANDY INVASION
The 331 took part in the invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, but reports of her operations are not available. She was damaged by gunfire on June 15, 1944.

TRANSFERRED TO BRITISH
On November 20, 1944, the LST-331 was transferred to the British Royal Navy.


LST-381
FLOTILLA 11-GROUP 32-DIVISION 64

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-381 was turned over to the Coast Guard by the Navy on August 25, 1943. Names of her commanding officers are not available. She had previously taken part in Sicily Invasion on July 9, 1943, as a Navy manned vessel.

--91--


ANZIO AND NORMANDY LANDINGS
As a Coast Guard manned vessel LST-381 having received the Coast Guard crew from the LST-25 on August 25, 1943, while in Mediterranean waters, took part in the Anzio landings on January 22, 1944.44 Proceeding to England she also took part in the Normandy Invasion on June 6, 1944. Details of operations in these two invasions are not available.


LST-758
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 85 - DIVISION 169

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-758 was commissioned on August 19, 1944. Her commanding officer was Lt. Felix J. Molenda, USCG.

IWO JIMA AND OKINAWA LANDINGS
Departing Gulfport, Mississippi, on September 11, 1944, the LST-758 proceeded to Pearl Harbor via the Canal Zone arriving there on October 21, 1944. Early in February she left for the invasion of Iwo Jima, proceeding by way of Saipan and arriving off Iwo Jima on February 19, 1945.45 She returned to Saipan on March 4, 1945, and made preparations for the Okinawa invasion, arriving off Okinawa on D+1 day, April 2, 1945. She remained in the Okinawa area until April 11, 1945, and then returned to S aipan. Resupply runs to Okinawa brought her back there on April 29, 1945 and June 5, 1945. Returning to Saipan on July 21, 1945, she next called at the Russell Islands and then at Leyte on September 4, 1945, Manila on September 15, 1945 and Lingayen on September 2b, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On December 12, 1945, she left Samar for return to the United States arriving in San Francisco via Pearl Harbor and San Diego on January 20, 1946.

TURNED OVER TO NAVY IN RRESERVE
She was turned over to the Navy on March 29, 1946, and placed out of commission and in reserve by the Navy on July 13, 1946.


LST-759
FLOTILLA 29-GROUP 65-DIVISION 169

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONINGAND SHAKEDOWN
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-759 was built at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and placed in commission at New Orleans, Louisiana, on August 25, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. John A. Baybutt, USCGR. He was succeeded on February 21, 1946, by Ensign R. C. Kindred, USCG. After alterations and drydocking to replace propellers damaged en route to New Orleans from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, she proceeded to Panama City, Florida, for a 14 day shakedown on September 1, 1944. Returning to New Orleans for further minor alterations and logistics her cargo was loaded aboard.

TRANSPORTATION SERVICE IN PACIFIC
On September 26, 1944, she sailed for Pearl Harbor via Panama Canal and San Diego, California, arriving on November 7, 1944. She spent six weeks at Pearl Harbor and then on December 16, 1944, departed for Tinian in the Mariannas with a cargo of engineering heavy equipment and 200 personnel of the Navy CB's. She arrived January 1, 1945, and after ferrying some U.S. Marine rolling stock to Saipan returned to Pearl Harbor arriving on January 24, 1945.

OKINAWA INVASION
Here pontoon causeways, an LCT, an LCM and 3 LCVP's were loaded aboard and she proceeded to Tulagi, Solomon Islands, a mounting and rehearsal area for the coming invasion of Okinawa. With the exception of the LCT, all smaller landing craft carried as cargo were removed at Tulagi two days following her arrival on February 18, 1945. A side trip to Russell Islands was made on the 24th. Training and logistics followed and the ship sailed on March 12, 1945, for Ulithi with 400 U.S. Marine assault troops, 17 LVT's, ammunition, K rations, CB personnel, LCT personnel and other items, arriving at Ulithi March 21, 1945, where four days were spent on the final staging before leaving on March 25, 1945, for Okinawa. The ship arrived at Okinawa on April 1, 1945, and launched its LVT's, causeways, and LCT, spending the following 12 days in unloading, fueling small craft and anti-aircraft defense, including a sure assist in the destruction of a Japanese "Jill" credited by the Task Group commander.

TRANSPORTATION SERVICE
On April 12, 1945, she sailed for Saipan and thence to Guam arriving May 6, 1945, for 6 reeks of availability. A resupply call at Okinawa was made July 4, 1945, with Army Engineer personnel. Two ferrying trips were then made to Motobu Peninsula from Naha with U.S. Marine gear and personnel and then personnel of the 3rd Navy Mobile Hospital Corps were received aboard and the LST sailed for Guam, Saipan and Russell Islands, arriving at final destination at Guadalcanal on August 18, 1945. Here she received Navy CB stevedoring personnel for Noumea, New Caledonia, where she arrived August 27, 1945, departing thence for Espiritu Santo and arriving there on the 31st. Here she loaded housing equipment and rolling stock for the Russell Islands arriving there September 14, 1945. She sailed next day with 200 Navy CB personnel for Leyte via Guam, arriving October 25, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She left Tacloban November 20, 1945, and arrived at San Francisco January 22, 1946, via Pearl Harbor and San Pedro.

TURNED OVER TO NAVY AMD DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was turned over to the Navy on March 29, 1946, and finally decommissioned by the Navy July 16, 1946.


LST-760
FLOTILLA 29-GROUP 85-DIVISION 760

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-760 was built by the American Bridge Company of Ambridge, Pennsylvania, and was completed early in 1944. She was ferried down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers by a newly organized Coast Guard crew to New Orleans, Louisiana, where she was commissioned on August 28, 1944. Her commanding officers have been Lt. R. T. A. McKenzie, USCGR, (August 28, 1944-

--92--


COAST GUARDSMEN ON LST-760> WATCH AMERICAN AMMUNITION DUMP GO UP ON IWO<
Coast Guardsmen on LST-760 watch American ammunition dump go up on Iwo

LST-771 at IWO JIMA
LST-771 at Iwo Jima

--93--


November 5, 1945), Lt. Littleton W. Parks, USCGR, (November 5, 1945-March 11, 1946), Lt. (jg) Fred R. Hough, USN, (March 11, 1946-March 27, 1946) and Lt. Martin L. Jackson, USCG, (March 27, 1946-May 24, 1946). After proceeding to Panama City, Florida, for a two week shakedown cruise the LST returned to New Orleans for final alterations and provisioning prior to departure for duty in the Pacific theatre.

IWO JIMA INVASION
The LST-760 departed New Orleans on 30 September, 1944, and arrived at Pearl Harbor November 7, 1944, via Pearl Harbor and San Diego. On January 7, 1944, she proceeded to Hilo, Hawaii, to receive her first combat load of Marine Corps Artillery scheduled for the invasion of Iwo Jima.46 Pre-invasion maneuvers in Maaleae Bay on the Island of Maui followed and the ship departed Kanehoe, Oahu, on January 21, 1945, for Saipan, via Eniwetok, the point of rendezvous with the invasion fleet. The LST's cleared Saipan late in the afternoon of February 15, 1944, and after a four day passage enlivened by submarine alerts arrived off Iwo Jima in the early hours of D-day, February 19, 1945. From midnight to dawn, the horizon skies were illumined with the criss-cross pattern of bright tracer and fiery phosphorous shells poured into the island stronghold by the offshore naval support force. By 0800, the 760 had taken up position in the rendezvous area a few thousand yards from the beach. "H" hour came at 0900 with small, heavily-loaded landing craft churning by the ship like a plague of water bugs on a stagnant back woods pond. The offshore shelling force, combined with dive bombers, continued to claw and tear at the enemy installations, concentrating particularly heavy fire on Suribachi, a small volcano commanding one end of the island and honeycombed with caves and recesses housing all variety of artillery. During the first three days of the assault, save for one night of retirement, and several runs close in to the beach to launch and retrieve DUKWs manned by reconnaissance parties, the ship remained in the LST area. On D+3 she beached on Green Beach a littered waste of black volcano ash at the foot of Mt. Suribachi and began unloading despite a heavy rain. Unloading continued steadily for two days. During the first night 16 casualties, an overflow from a nearby crowded field hospital unit, were taken aboard and treated by the ship's pharmacist's mates. Occasional mortar shells burst on the beach close to the bow. On the morning of the 23rd those on the beach watched the sealing of Mt. Suribachi and the raising of the first American flag on its summit. The following day the ship retracted from the beach to receive a second load from a transport. Unable to remain safely alongside the transport in the rough, open sea, the 760 returned early next morning to Black Beach with only a partial load. During midmorning the ship received its only serious hit, a heavy mortar shell which crashed on the main deck forward, scattering shrapnel and wounding two men in the compartment beneath. That afternoon, February 25, 1945, the ship retracted from the beach and joined a convoy bound for Saipan.

OKINAWA INVASION
After a one night layover at Saipan the 760 proceeded to Leyte in the Philippines arriving on March 9, 1945, and the following two weeks were spent preparing the ship for the invasion of Okinawa. Against six days of rain and heavy weather the convoy reached Okinawa April 1, 1945. At 0530 while proceeding against the southwest side of the island, the ship went to general quarters and at 0300 arrived in the LST area in the vicinity of Hagushi. Late next day she nosed up on the coral reef at Purple Beach and commenced unloading. Seven hectic days and nights followed, four on the beach and three at Kerama Rhetto, a small group of islands off the southwest coast of Okinawa. They were exhausting days and nights of standing almost a continuous general quarters on guard against fanatical suicide air attacks, sleeping barely an hour at a time, eating cold chow, tensely watching and firing on the deadly planes winging in, some to crash headlong into nearby ships, others to go down in withering fire or careen harmlessly into the sea. At last the welcome end of this phase of operations came for the 760 on April 9, 1945, when she departed Okinawa for Guam.

FERRY SERVICE TO OKINAWA AND TOKYO AND HOME
A day out of Guam the destination of the LST was changed ed to Ulithi. After a brief layover there she returned by way of Palau to Leyte to begin a time table schedule of runs transporting troops and material from the Philippines to Okinawa. This continued until VJ-Day which found the LST en route Subic Bay from a third trip to Okinawa. She arrived at Leyte on August 21, 1945, and on the 28th set out for Tokyo, via Lemery and Batangas, Philippine Islands, where she loaded garrison forces for the occupation of Japan. Two other runs from the Philippines to Yokohama and Tokyo followed and on December 7, 1945, the 4th anniversary of Pearl Harbor she departed on the first leg of the homeward voyage.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at San Francisco on May 24, 1946.


LST-761
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 85 - DIVISION 170

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-761 was commissioned on September 2, 1944, at Algiers, Louisiana. On the 8th she departed for two weeks of shakedown at St. Andrews Bay, Florida. On the 25th she received 12 Navy men and 1 officer to man LCT-1116 and next day a similar group to man LCT-803. Her first and only commanding officer was Lt. H.A. Swagart, USCGR.

IWO JIMA INVASION
The 761 remained at New Orleans until October 2, 1944, when she departed for Gulfport, Mississippi, to take on cargo. By the 6th she was underway to Coco Solo Naval Base, Colon, Canal Zone where 129 Army personnel came aboard for transportation to San Diego on the 12th and 3 Navy men on the 14th. Due to illness of a crew member she put into Corinto, Nicaragua on the 18th where she g rounded on Saya Bank as all navigational aids had been extinguished. She was able to retract, however, and moored at the Grace Line pier. Departing next day she entered San Diego harbor on the 28th and proceeded immediately to San Pedro where she disembarked passengers and went into drydock on the 31st. She remained in drydock and in repair status until November 7th when 100 Navy personnel came aboard for transportation to Pearl Harbor and she departed in company with LST-784 and YMS's 407, 193 and 374. Reaching Pearl Harbor on the 18th she disembarked passengers and completed unloading by the 24th. She remained at Pearl Harbor through December 1944 and January 1945, part of that time being spent in repair status. Departing Pearl Harbor47 early in February 1945 she arrived at Saipan February 11, 1945, and on February 19,

--94--


1945, reached Iwo Jima where she took part in the invasion. A second run to Iwo Jima was made arriving March 25, 1945. She then returned to Saipan April 15, 1945, and to San Francisco via Pearl Harbor, May 27, 1945, for two months availability. One more trip was made to Pearl Harbor arriving September 7, 1945, and she then returned to San Pedro via San Diego on October 6, 1945.

NAVY MANNED--DECOMMISSIONED
She proceeded to San Francisco arriving on February 14, 1946, and on March 29, 1946, was manned by Navy personnel. She was decommissioned July 16, 1946.


LST-762
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 85 - DIVISION 170

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-762 was commissioned at Algiers, Louisiana, on September 5, 1944, her first commanding officer being Lt. Franklin Ewers, USCGR. He was succeeded September 3, 1945, by Lt. C. C. Pearson, USCG. On the 17th she departed for two weeks shakedown at Panama City, Florida, and returned to New Orleans for post shakedown availability until October 12, 1944, when she departed for Gulfport, Mississippi for loading tank deck cargo.

OKINAWA INVASION
On October 14, 1944, she departed for Coco Solo, Canal Zone unescorted but hove to in heavy seas on the 16th when a hurricane overtook her, and proceeded to New Orleans under great difficulty. She arrived at New Orleans October 20, 1944, and on the 27th departed again for Coco Solo, Canal Zone, where she arrived November 3rd, 1944. Transiting the Canal she proceeded to San Diego in company with the USS LST's 766 and 939 unescorted and arrived there November 18, 1944. She departed San Diego unescorted as commander of a task unit consisting of YMS-412, YTB-387 and LST-939, the YTB-387 breaking down en route and being towed 2 days by the 762. She arrived at Pearl Harbor on December 2, 1944, and after visiting Kahaliu, Maui, returned to Pearl Harbor on December 10, 1944. She departed Pearl Harbor December 27, 1944, and arrived at Leyte, Philippine Islands, February 11, 1945, via Eniwetok and Palau. She departed Leyte February 8, 1945, for Guadalcanal, arriving on the 19th. Proceeding Russell Islands she took on ammunition and 400 Marines, 17 LVT's, trucks, etc., and after training operations in the Guadalcanal area departed for the staging area at Ulithi, preparatory to the invasion of Okinawa.48 She departed for Okinawa on March 25, 1945, and on April 1, 1945, approached the west coast of Okinawa as part of Task Unit 51.12.2, launching LVT's with 400 Marines aboard on Blue Beach and pontoons from four sides. On the 2nd she launched the LCT from her main deck and continued operating in the area until April 13, 1945, discharging ammunition while beached at Blue Beach One, where serious hull damage and buckled starboard propeller were received while beached. On April 5, 1945, she was credited with knocking down one Japanese plane during an air attack. On the 13th, she proceeded to Keramo Rhetto to join Task Unit 51.15.21, a cripple convoy, and departed on the 14th in a convoy of 19 ships and 4 escorts for Ulithi. On the 18th she took the completely crippled LST-884 in tow arriving with her at Ulithi on the 23rd. She departed for Pearl Harbor independently on May 5 arriving May 22, 1945.

TO U.S.A.
Loading 5 LCT sections she departed Pearl Harbor in convoy June 1, 1945, for Seattle for repairs and overhaul due to damage sustained at Okinawa. Arriving at Seattle June 12, 1945, she was drydocked until July 26, 1945, and on August 5, 1945, proceeded to San Diego for refresher training operations. On August 20, 1945, she departed for Pearl Harbor where she arrived on the 30th. On September 13, 1945, 167 Marine troops reported aboard and she departed for Sasebo, Japan, via Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok and Okinawa, arriving October 8, 1945. She returned to San Francisco December 27, 1945.

NAVY MANNED AND DECOMMISSIONED
After a trip to San Pedro she returned to San Francisco January 20, 1946, and was Navy manned on March 29, 1946, being decommissioned July 22, 1946.


LST-763
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 85 - DIVISION

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-763 was commissioned at Algiers, Louisiana on September 8, 1944, with Lt. Alton W. Meekins, USCG, her first and only commanding officer. On September 19, 1944, she arrived at Panama City, Florida, for two weeks of shakedown exercises, proceeding via Mobile, Alabama, where she drydocked for a day. Returning to New Orleans on the 30th she received 5 sections of LCT's and on October 12, 1944, proceeded to Gulfport, Mississippi, to take on tank deck load of general cargo for Pearl Harbor. She arrived there December 5, 1944, via Panama Canal, San Diego and Port Hueneme, California and proceeded to load combat cargo at Honolulu and Kehuliu, Maui, with 12 officers and 227 enlisted men of the 4th Marine Division for the invasion of Iwo Jima.49

IWO JIMA INVASION
After five days of maneuvers off Maui she joined a convoy on January 27, 1945, for Eniwetok and Saipan arriving February 14, 1945. On the 11th 6 officers and 68 enlisted men of the 4th Marine Division reported on board and on the 15th sailed for Iwo Jima arriving on the 19th. Unloading amphibious vehicles on the 20th and 21st she made two beachings on the 22nd and three on the 23rd. By the 24th all cargo and personnel was unloaded. She transported personnel, ammunition, vehicles and supplies from transports to the beach until March 3, 1945, receiving considerable structure damage while alongside transports due to heavy seas. She sailed for Saipan on the 3rd arriving on the 27th and was drydocked until April 6, 1945. She arrived at Okinawa on April 27, 1945, with 6 officers and 224 enlisted men and after unloading proceeded to Saipan on May 7, 1945, arriving on the 13th.

IHEYA SHIMA INVASION
On May 21, 1945, she loaded ammunition, LVT's, vehicles, supplies and 19 officers and 367 enlisted men of the 8th Marine Division, and Company A, 726th Amphibious Tractor Battalion, U.S. Army for the invasion of Iheya Shima, near Okinawa, arriving at Okinawa Kay 30, 1945, and at Iheya Shima June 4, 1945. The ship was completely unloaded by the 5th and sailed next morning for Okinawa, thence departing for Leyte on the 10th arriving on the 15th.

--95--


RETURN TO OKINAWA
On the 24th she loaded cargo and personnel of the 59th Air Service Group, U.S. Army Air Corps for transportation to Okinawa sailing on June 29, 1945, and arriving on July 5, 1945. On the 6th she loaded cargo and personnel of the 77th Infantry Division, U.S. Army for Leyte, sailing on the 8th and arriving on the 13th.

AT TALISAY CEBU
On the 15th she proceeded to Cebu, Philippine Islands arriving at Talisay Point next day to unload cargo and personnel at Danao Point on the 17th. She returned to Subic Bay on July 26, 1945, and taking on personnel and cargo of the 5th Air Force proceeded to Ie Shima near Okinawa. She returned to Subic Bay August 22, 1945, and Leyte on the 26th. Here she loaded personnel and cargo of the 8th Army for Batangas Bay, Luzon, arriving on 5 September, 1945, and at Yokohama on the 15th. She returned to Okinawa September 24th, 1945, and then proceeded to Sendai, Japan, arriving on October 23, 1945. She returned to San Francisco December 23, 1945, via Tokyo, Saipan and Pearl Harbor and then proceeded to Lake Charles, Louisiana via Balboa, New Orleans and Orange, Texas, arriving April 3, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Lake Charles, Louisiana, April 29, 1946.


LST-764
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 85 - DIVISION 170

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONING
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-764 was built by the. American Bridge Company at Ambridge, Pennsylvania, and on September 2, 1944, was ferried down the inland waterways to New Orleans, where she was placed in full commission September 15, 1944. Her commanding officer was Lt. R. F. Nichols, USCGR. After a shakedown period at St. Andrew Bay, Florida, she departed New Orleans for Gulfport, Mississippi to load cargo.

INVASION OF IWO JIMA
Arriving at San Pedro, California on November 11, 1944, via the Panama Canal, the LST-764 loaded pontoon causeways, side carry, at Port Hueneme, California, and departed for Pearl Harbor, arriving December 2, 1944. Discharging cargo here she participated in combat maneuvers at Maalaca Bay, Maui, returning to Pearl Harbor just before Christmas 1944 to load cargo and just before New Year 1945 to embark the 14th Artillery, 4th Marine Division at Kahului, Maui, to be followed by a final invasion rehearsal at Maalaca Bay, Maui. Departing for the forward area on January 22, 1945, she stopped briefly at Eniwetok and Saipan and at daybreak on D-day 19 February, 1945, anchored off the eastern shore of Iwo Jima.50 By 0900 the invasion of Iwo Jima was on and on the afternoon of D-day the artillery was needed to support the Marine infantry as it forced its bloody way up the sloping beaches and across the primary objective, the southern airfield on Iwo Jima. The LST-764 was consequently moved in to the line of departure and began discharging her troops and their equipment and ammunition into amphibious tractors and DUKWs. Long gruelling hours of work followed as urgently needed ammunition was loaded into the amtracks and DUKWs which were continuously being taken aboard and discharged over the bow-ramp. At the same time the crew maintained an ever alert vigil for enemy aircraft attacks. After D-day a moderately heavy sea kicked up, greatly increasing the hazards and difficulties of the task. On the morning of D+4 the entire crew, still engaged in unloading operations, was witness to the famous flag-raising atop Mt. Suribachi, then still shrouded in the smoke of the bloodiest amphibious assault of the entire Pacific campaign. That night the first combat beaching was made to discharge the remainder of the cargo. The beaches were strewn with scores of wrecked landing boats, DUKWs, amtracks, and tanks eloquent witnesses in the eerie light of star shells and mortar fired flares of deadly Japanese artillery fire. These obstacles, many of which were partially or wholly submerged, made beaching, an ever difficult operation at night, doubly hazardous. However the beaching was made and the cargo promptly discharged, a sample of the many day and night beachings to follow. On the morning of D+5, the 764 retracted from the beach and began the second phase of operation, that of lightering loads of vehicles, stores and personnel from the transports and cargo vessels offshore to the beaches. This work was seriously hampered by high seas and winds which made both mooring alongside the larger vessels and beaching each risky and difficult maneuvers. Even after the end of actual hostilities on Iwo, the LST continued the tedious work, completing over 30 beachings in 81 days before retiring to Guam on May 10, 1945, for much needed repairs. After dry-docking at Guam for hull painting and overall repair work the LST made a return visit to Iwo Jima via Saipan on June 28, 1945.

TRANSPORTATION SERVICE
After returning to Saipan she departed for Leyte on July 23, 1945, designated to effect an aviation augmentation left from the Philippines to the newly captured Okinawa. Routed to Lingayen Gulf from Leyte the LST embarked the 154th Ordnance Service and Maintenance Company and the 96th Air Service Squadron, USAAF and departed early in August for Okinawa. The uneventful trip to Okinawa was destined to be the LST's last wartime cruise. On the day of her arrival, August 10, 1945, the Japanese Government made its formal peace proposal to the Allies. Every night during the peace negotiations, however, and on the very night of the Japanese acceptance on August 15, 1945, the island was subjected to Japanese air raids, both orthodox and the "kamikaze" variety. The 764, discharging cargo and personnel, departed for Subic Bay and Leyte on August 22, 1945.

TO KOREA, JAPAN AND CHINA-RETURN TO U.S.A.
Proceeding to Iloilo, Panay, early in September 1945, the LST-764 embarked the cannon company, 106th Infantry, and 74th Ordnance Company, 40th Division, U.S. Army and departed for Jinsen, Korea, where she arrived on September 17, 1945. From there she was routed to Fusan, Korea to disembark troops and cargo. Returning to Jinsen she embarked a thousand Japanese Army prisoners of war, together with their U.S. Army guards and departed for Sasebo, Kyushu, Japan, once the site of a mighty Japanese naval base. After discharging personnel at Sasebo, the LST sailed southward to Manila on October 16, 1945. Once more proceeding to Lingayen Gulf on October 29, 1945, she embarked elements of the 56th Fighter Control Squadron and 308th Bomber Wing, USAAF, for transportation to Jinsen, Korea, and upon discharge of these occupation troops there with their cargo, departing for Tsingtao, China, on November 20, 1945, arriving the following day. Here she underwent another availability period. Departing Tsingtao on December 15, 1945, she was released from repatriation duties and proceeded to New Orleans, Louisiana, via Guam, Pearl Harbor and the Panama Canal, arriving there February 18, 1946.

--96--


DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Lake Charles, Louisiana, on April 30, 1946.


LST-765
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 86 - DIVISION 171

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-765 was built at Cleveland, Ohio, and commissioned at New Orleans on September 18, 1944. Her commanding officers have been Lt. J. B. Coffin, USCGR, Lt. Coleman L. Diamond, USCGR, and Lt. F. H. Schonewolf, USCG. After a shakedown period she departed Mobile, Alabama, October 22, 1944, for the Pacific.

TRANSPORTATION SERVICE--PACIFIC AREA
The LST-765 arrived at Pearl Harbor, November 27, 1944, via Canal Zone and San Diego. There she loaded troops and cargo for Saipan and arrived there via Eniwetok January 2, 1945, returning to Pearl Harbor January 30, 1945. She remained in the Hawaiian area until March 20, 1945, when she departed for Okinawa, via Samar and San Pedro Bay, Philippine Islands, arriving May 14, 1945. She remained at Okinawa until June 22, 1945, and returning to Leyte for more troops and equipment, again arrived at Okinawa on July 28, 1945. She departed Okinawa on August 8, 1945, arriving at Leyte, via Manila, Mindoro and Subic Bay on August 21, 1945.

TO JAPAN
Here she remained until September 4, 1945, when she departed for Nagoya, Japan, via San Fernando and Lingayen Gulf, with occupation troops and their equipment arriving on September 19, 1945. She proceeded to Wakayama, Japan, on the 25th and returned to Lingayen October 8, 1945. Proceeding to Sasebo, Japan, via Okinawa, she arrived there November 18, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Sasebo December 8, 1945, for the long Journey home, arriving at New Orleans February 5, 1946, via Saipan, Pearl Harbor, San Pedro and Balboa.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Lake Charles, Louisiana on 29 April, 1946,


LST-766
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 86 - DIVISION 171

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-766 was commissioned on September 25, 1944. Her commanding officers have been Lt. Lester W. Newton, USCGR, Lt. W. H. Clay, USCGR and Lt. W. W. Lyon, USCGR. After shakedown exercises in St. Andrews Bay, Florida, she proceeded to Gulfport, Mississippi for loading and departed for Pearl Harbor October 28, 1944, via Canal Zone and San Diego, arriving on December 10, 1944.

IWO JIMA INVASION
She engaged in amphibious training in the Hawaiian area and on February 19, 1945, appeared off Iwo Jima with the invasion forces. After completing operations at Iwo Jima she returned to the Hawaiian area where she engaged in training activities until April 26, 1945.

TRANSPORTATION SERVICE-PACIFIC AREA
She proceeded to Okinawa late in April, 1955, via Eniwetok, Guam and Saipan, arriving there July 14, 1945, for a two week's stay. Returning to Saipan August 4, 1945, she engaged in transportation activities between Saipan and Guam, making two trips to Guam and proceeding from there on the second trip to Hagushi and Okinawa on September 22, 1945, arriving at the latter point on the 27th. From Okinawa she went to Tsingtao China, returning to Guam for a three weeks layover on October 26, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She returned to San Francisco December 16, 1945, by way of Guam and Pearl Harbor.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned on March 19, 1946.


LST-767
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP-86 - DIVISION 171

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-767 was commissioned on September 30, 1944 at New Orleans, Louisiana with Lt. R. B. Seidman, USCGR, her first and only commanding officer. She arrived at St. Andrews Bay October 12, 1944, for a two week's shakedown. After loading three sections of LCT-1236 and two sections of LCT-1237 on her main deck, with officers and men to man them, she completed provisioning, fueling and ammunition loading at New Orleans and arrived at Gulfport where her first cargo of vehicles and drums of asphalt were loaded.

TRANSPORTATION DUTIES IN THE PACIFIC AREA
The LST-767 completed loading operations on November 5, 1944, and departed for Pearl Harbor, via Canal Zone, arriving there on December 5, 1944. Unloading cargo and the LCT sections, she loaded on December 10, 1945, the LCT-749 with crew. On the 14th stringer pontoons were placed on each side of the ship and an officer and 21 men of the Causeway Platoon C-19 reported aboard. At Kiwalo Basin officers and men of the 711th Tank Battalion U.S. Army were embarked as well as officers and men of the staff of LCT Group 61. On December 28, 1944, the 767 departed Pearl Harbor for Leyte via Eniwetok and Kossol Passage of the Palau Group. She arrived in San Pedro Bay on February 1, 1945, where the tank battalion was disembarked on the 4th at Dulag.

AT OKINAWA
Departing Leyte on the 11th she set a course for Guadalcanal on February 23, 1945. On March 5, 1945, she embarked officers, men and equipment of the 3rd 155 MM Howitzer Battalion of the U.S. Marine Corps, consisting of 10 officers and 222 enlisted men and departed for Ulithi with Commander LST Flotilla 73 on March 15, 1945. She arrived at Ulithi on March 24, 1945, as part of the invasion force formed for the assault on Okinawa,51 and departing on the 27th arrived off Okinawa on L+1 day, April 2, 1945, beaching at Red Beach, No. 3 same day. Due to rough condition of the beach she was ordered to retract and launch pontoon causeways which was done on that night. On April 3, 1947, LCT-749 was launched from the main deck and the staff of LCT Group No. 6, were disembarked the same afternoon. Beaching on Green No. 2 Beach on the same afternoon she commenced discharging equipment of the 3rd 155 MM Howitzer Battalion but due to an approaching storm was forced to retract again that sane evening after sustaining damage to her hull while beached between LCT's 817 and 815. On April 6, 1945, she took LST-698 in tow and proceeded with her to beaching site at Green

--97--


Beach No. 2 where unloading was completed on the 5th. Additional hull damage was received while beached alongside LST-698 and shoring was placed in all starboard messing compartments to strengthen that side.

TRANSPORTATION DUTY
She departed Okinawa April 9, 1945, for Guam, being rerouted en route to Ulithi where after lying at anchor 1? days, she was ordered to Manus which she reached May 3, 1945. She was routed on to Noumea, New Caledonia, on the 4th and arrived there Mary 13, 1945. Or. the 16th she commenced loading equipment of the 539th Amphibious Tractor Battalion, U.S. Army with officers and men of that outfit embarking on the 26th. She departed for Leyte, via Manus and Ulithi on June 2, 1945, arriving on the 27th. She departed Leyte on July 12, 1945, under orders of Commander LST Group 85, for Guadalcanal and arrived at Tulagi on July 25, 1945. She proceeded to Noumea on the 26th arriving on August 2, 1945, where loading was completed on the 7th as she departed for Guadalcanal arriving there on August 12, 1945. Here loading was resumed and, on the 15th, officers and men of the CBMU No. 533 reported aboard for transportation to Okinawa. Proceeding to Russell Islands where pontoon stringers were loaded on each side of the ship she departed on the 16th, reaching Ulithi on the 27th and laying over there until September 16, 1945. Arriving at Hagushi September 22, 1945, and Buckner Bay, Okinawa, on the 23rd she beached and commenced unloading cargo.

DAMAGED IN TYPHOON, STRIPPED, DECOMMISSIONED AND DESTROYED
Cargo unloading was interrupted when the Port Director at Okinawa executed Typhoon Plan Xray on September 28, 1945, and all ships were ordered to proceed to sea to ride out the coming hurricane. The LST-767 was beached at Kanawan, Okinawa on November 30, 1945, where she was stripped and decommissioned on March 7, 1946.


LST-768
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 86 - DIVISION 172

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-768 was built at Ambridge, Pennsylvania, by the American Bridge Company and completed September 23, 1944. Proceeding down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers she reached New Orleans on October 4, 1944, where she was commissioned. Her commanding officers have been Lt. B. R. Andrews, USCGR, Lt. Andrew J. Haire, Jr., USCGR, and Lt. Neale O. Westfall, USCGR. After commissioning she was docked at Todd-Johnson Drydock on 11 October, 1944, where her port propeller was straightened and proceeded to Panama City, Florida, on the 12th for shakedown exercises. Final outfitting began at New Orleans on October 27, 1944, and after minor alterations and repairs the LCT-1264 was placed on the main deck on October 30, 1944, and she was underway to Gulfport on November 4, 1944, to take aboard her first cargo. She was tank deck loaded with creosoted pilings and on November 8, 1944, proceeded to Mobile for repairs to her starboard engine. These were completely on the 14th and she got underway for the Pacific area.

TRANSPORTATION DUTY
She arrived at Pearl Harbor via Canal Zone, San Pedro and Port Hueneme, California, January 2, 1945, and arrived at Guam, via Eniwetok on January 26, 1945. She remained there until March 7, 1945, and then proceeded to Saipan. Here she loaded ammunition and left for Iwo Jima on March 10, 1945, arriving on the 13th, unloading under very heavy surf conditions finally resorting to DUKWs while anchored in the harbor to complete unloading. She left Iwo Jima on March 20, 1945, and returned to Saipan March 25, 1945, where she was again loaded, this time with U.S. Coast Artillery and again departed on the 8th of April for Iwo Jima. She arrived on the 11th, unloaded and was on her way back on April 16, 1945, where she arrived on the 19th. Again loading ammunition she got underway on the 24th this time for Okinawa where she anchored off Hagushi on May 1, 1945, launched the LCT-1264 on the 4th and completed unloading on the 11th returning to Saipan on the 18th. Here she was loaded with rations, gasoline and elements of the Marine Corps and departed again for Okinawa, May 23, 1945, arriving on the 30th.

OCCUPATION OF IHEYA JIMA
The LST lay at anchor at Okinawa until June 5, 1945, and then proceeded to Iheya Shima, Ryukyu Islands for the initial occupation. Off Iheya Shima on 6 June, 1945, she unloaded to LVT's while at anchor, damaging her ramp gear during the operation but being repaired on the return trip to Okinawa, June 7, 1945, by ship's company. On June 10, 1945, she was en route Leyte arriving on the 15th and on the 23rd she proceeded to Morotai arriving on the 26th to load personnel and vehicles of the 5th Air Echelon. She left Morotai for Leyte, 4 July, 1945, arriving there on the 7th and departing on the 9th for Okinawa arriving on the 14th. She unloaded at Ie Shima, Ryukyu Islands, and at Seoko Bay by 17 July, 1945, and then went to Buckner Bay to load for a return trip to Leyte.

IN TYPHOON
Partially loaded with men and vehicles of the 96th Infantry Division on 19 July, 1945, she was forced to put to sea to ride out a typhoon, returning to Buckner Bay on the 20th to complete loading by the 21st.

TRANSPORTATION SERVICE
Departing Okinawa on the 22nd she returned to Leyte losing one escort when attacked by an enemy submarine en route, the 768 taking casualties and survivors aboard and act as hospital ship until reaching the Philippines on July 25, 1945. Casualties were delivered to Guiuan on July 27, 1945, and returning to Leyte, the 768 proceeded to Mindoro on the 31st where she unloaded and reloaded the 89th Chemical Company for Subic Bay departing on the 2nd. Underway again for Okinawa on August 6, 1945, she arrived on the 11th and was unloaded by the 14th, returning to Subic Bay on the 22nd. She proceeded to Leyte on the 26th for an annual military inspection of LST Group 61 on the 28th. She proceeded to Guiuan on Sept. 3rd to procure a new LCVP and returned to Leyte same day. On September 4th she got underway for Lingayen Gulf and returned to Manila on the 7th. On the 14th she had completed loading vehicles and personnel of Company B, 16th Signal Service Battalion for Lingayen Gulf where she arrived on September 15, 1945.

TO JAPAN
On September 18, 1945, she departed Lingayen Bay for Wakayama, Japan, arriving on September 25, 1945, and completed unloading on the 27th departing for Lingayen Gulf but diverted to Subic Bay because of bad weather where she arrived October 6, 1945. She proceeded to Lingayen Gulf on the 8th arriving on the 9th to beach and take aboard the 384th Quartermaster Truck Company, U.S. Army. She was unable to retract after being loaded and two LSMs were sent to assist her. She cleared the beach with their assistance on October 12, 1945, and was underway for Sasebo, Japan in convoy. She arrived on the 19th and beached and unloaded on the 22nd anchoring in Sasebo Ko.

--98--


"GUINEA PIG" RUNS
Here she was assigned to "Guinea Pig" operations on first runs over newly swept channels and transferred her excess fuel and all ammunition to LST-1053. On the 29th her main engine room controls were moved to the wheelhouse to make unnecessary keeping anyone below during the "Guinea Pig" runs. On the 23rd, 42 men were transferred to skeletonize the crew for the runs and loading lube oil and muriatic acid aboard she sailed for Iki Shima. She remained there until the 28th and then got underway for Tukuoka for the runs. Here on the 28th the runs were made with an 18 man crew and CTG 52.17 aboard the LST-553 being in company. No men were allowed below and all hands wore life jackets. On the 29th the No. 1 auxiliary engine lost all lube oil feed and was damaged beyond repair before anyone could reach it leaving the ship with only two auxiliary engines. The runs were completed December 4, 1945, the fortitude, cooperation and cheerfulness of the crews during this hazardous duty being a credit to the men of the ship and service.

TO U.S.A.
Returning to Sasebo on December 6, 1945, the LST was released from COMINPAC on December 10, 1945, and proceeded to Pearl Harbor in December 14, 1945, where she arrived January 2, 1946. She departed for New Orleans January 10, 1946, via San Pedro and Canal Zone arriving on March 16, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned April 15, 1946.


LST-769
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 86 - DIVISION 172

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-769 was built by the American Bridge Company at Ambridge, Pennsylvania, and completed in September, 1944. Floated down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans it was placed in full commission on arrival on October 9, 1944, with Lt. E. B. Bertini, USCG, as commanding officer, five other officers and 113 enlisted men of the U.S. Coast Guard. Lt. M. K. Vignes, USCGR, became commanding officer on December 6, 1945. The shakedown at Panama City, Florida extended from October 18th to 31st, when the LST returned to New Orleans for loading LCT-1265. She departed for Gulfport on November 9, 1944, to load a cargo of heavy vehicles.

OKINAWA INVASION
Departing Gulfport, Mississippi, on November 11, 1944, the LST reached Pearl Harbor, via Panama Canal on December 7, 1944. From December 7th to 27th the time was spent in logistics and loading of causeways and the 711th Tank Battalion. Departing for Leyte on the latter date, she arrived, via Eniwetok and Kossol Roads, on February 1, 1945, and unloaded at Dulag, Leyte. She departed for Guadalcanal area on February 8, and arrived on the 19th for logistics, training, loading and rehearsals for the Okinawa invasion which occupied the crew until March 12, 1945.52 On that date she departed for Ulithi as part of Task Unit 53.3.1 under Commander, Amphibious Group Five of the Fifth Fleet. On March 30, 1945, she lost the starboard causeway in heavy seas. At dawn on April 1, 1945, while approaching Okinawa the convoy came under attack by unidentified enemy bomber which was shot down by escorts. On April 1, 1945, the LST landed. Headquarters and "I" Company, Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, Sixth Marine Division and Ninth Amphibious Tractor Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps in initial assault on Red Beach One, off the town of Hagushi, Okinawa. The 769 remained off Hagushi's beaches discharging cargo until April 8, 1945, the port causeway and LCT-1265 being launched on the 2nd. The area was under enemy attack on numerous occasions, a Japanese "Val" making approach on the Unit on April 6, 1945, being shot down by concerted fire of the LST's in the vicinity. The 769 departed Okinawa on April 8, 1945, and arrived at Leyte April 14, 1945. A resupply run to Okinawa on April 27, 1945, brought elements of the 96th Infantry Division, cargo being discharged over coral reef on May 2, 1945.

IHEYA SHIMA STRIKE
Arriving Saipan on the 18th she loaded for the invasion of Iheya Shima, departing on May 24th as part of Task Unit 51.25.14 with Shore Party "A", Second Marine Division and 41st Replacement Draft, U.S. Marine Corps. Arriving at Iheya Shima June 6, 1945, (D+1 day) she unloaded vehicles and bulk cargo offshore and departed area without enemy opposition of any kind and without incident. She departed Okinawa June 10, 1945, and arrived Leyte June 15, 1945, where she was assigned to Task Unit 72.10.6 under Commander, Service Force, 7th Fleet, for purpose of lifting Fifth Air Force personnel and equipment from Philippines to Okinawa. Subsequently the 1ST made two round trips to Okinawa from Subic Bay, returning to Batangas Bay the 728th Tank Battalion which was withdrawn from Okinawa. The Photo Reconnaissance force carried to Okinawa by this unit on the first trip subsequently took the first pictures of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

TO JAPAN
On September 17, 1945, the 769 departed Lingayen Gulf with Headquarters and Service Company, 27th Engineer Construction Battalion for the occupation of Wakayama, Japan, arriving on September 25, 1945, to discharge cargo and personnel without incident and departed for Lingayen Gulf on October 1, 1945, where she was re-routed to Manila to arrive October 9, 1945. She departed for Lingayen Gulf on the 19th arriving at Wakayama October 27, 1945, discharging cargo and passengers the following day. She arrived at Okinawa November 2, 1945, where she loaded personnel and equipment of 1536th Ordnance Supply and Maintenance Company of the 187th Ordnance Supply and Maintenance Company of the 98th Portable Hospital and departed for Sasebo, Japan, on the 18th where cargo and passengers were discharged 21 November, without mishap.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On November 24, 1945, the LST-769 began her long trek homeward with the first stop at Saipan where she arrived December 1, 1945, after passing through the northeast quadrant of a medium intensely tropical typhoon on the evening of November 28-29, 1945. Winds up to 50 knots, mountainous seas and all of the violent phenomena of these storms were experienced. She departed Saipan on December 8, 1945, for Pearl Harbor which was reached December 23, 1945. San Francisco was next on June 1 14, 1946, and after a trip through the canal the LST finally reached New Orleans February 13, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED AT NEW ORLEANS
She was decommissioned at New Orleans April 29, 1946.


--99--


LST-770
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 87 - DIVISION 173

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-770 was commissioned on October 13, 1944, at Algiers, Louisiana, with Lt. John H. Judge, USCGR, her first commanding officer. He was succeeded on March 5, 1945, by Lt. Hamilton F. Moore, USCGR, who was in turn succeeded on December 31, 1945, by Lt. Kenneth R. Vaughan, USCG. The crew consisted of 8 officers and 109 enlisted men. She proceeded to Panama City, Florida, on October 21, 1944, where she remained until November 3, 1944, engaged in shakedown exercises. Returning to New Orleans on the 5th she engaged in logistics, alterations and repairs until the 12th, hoisting aboard the LCT-1266 and embarking one officer and 12 enlisted men of that vessel. On the 13th she was underway for Gulfport, Mississippi, to take aboard Army vehicles and asphalt for Pearl Harbor, departing on November 15, 1944.

INVASION OF AKA SHIMA AND JAKAN JIMA--KERAMA RHETTO
The LST arrived at Pearl Harbor, January 2, 1945, via Panama Canal, San Diego, Port Hueneme and San Pedro, California. Unloading her cargo on the 7th she received on the 25th Army personnel (3 officers and 92 men) and 17 LVT's of the 715th Amphibious Tractor Battalion and was underway on the 27th for Leyte, Philippine Islands, via Eniwetok and Kassol Roads, arriving February 25, 1945. On March 12, 1945, after logistics and training exercises, she took aboard 16 officers and 326 enlisted men of the 305th Infantry Battalion and on the 19th was underway for Kerama Rhetto as part of Task Unit 51.1.2.53 She arrived on the 26th and participated in the invasions of Aka Shima and Yakan Jima, landing both battalions and supplying Army units ashore until the 31st. On the 31st she reloaded men and equipment of the two battalions and was underway in retirement action until the 14th when she arrived at Okinawa.

IE SHIMA INVASION
On April 16, 1945, she participated in the invasion of Ie Shima, landing the 305th Infantry Battalion, 77th Division and on the 17th landing the 307th Infantry Battalion, 77th Division. On the 25th, she unloaded the 715th Amphibious Tractor Battalion on Okinawa. From May 1 to 6, 1945, she loaded empty shell cases and powder tanks from various combatant units and on the 7th was underway for Ulithi arriving on the 13th. She remained at Ulithi engaged in logistics and repairs through the 27th and on the 28th of May departed for Leyte, Philippine Islands, arriving on May 31st, 1945. Here she loaded the 1906th Engineering Aviation Battalion for Okinawa, departing Leyte on the 7th of June, 1945, and arriving on the 12th. She unloaded on the 15th and was underway for Leyte on the 22nd, arriving on the 27th.

TRAINING EXERCISES
The LST-770 was transferred to the 7th Fleet for training exercises on July 8th, 1945, and departed for Cebu same day, where she was so engaged until the 21st. She departed for Lucena, Luzon, on the 22nd, where she engaged in training exercises until August 14, 1945. On the 15th she proceeded to Subic Bay and on the 25th from there to Manila. On the 28th she was underway for Batangas, Luzon, Philippine Islands, where on September 4, 1945, she loaded various Army units for transport to Yokohama, Japan.

TO JAPAN
She was underway for Yokohama on the 12th of September, 1945, and arrived at Yokohama on the 23rd. She returned to Okinawa on the 30th and on October 5, 1945, loaded personnel and equipment of the 1344th U.S. Army Engineer Battalion, getting underway from the 8th to 11th on typhoon retirement plan riding out a typhoon east of Okinawa. She returned on October 12, 1945, to anchor at Hagushi, Okinawa, until the 16th when she departed for Yokohama arriving on the 20th. She returned to Leyte, Philippine Islands on November 2, 1945, and on the 8th loaded vehicles, equipment and personnel of various U.S. Army engineer units for transport to Yokohama, Japan, arriving on the 17th.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On November 24, 1945, the 770 left Yokohama for the United States, arriving at New Orleans on January 27, 1946, via Guam, Pearl Harbor, San Diego and Canal Zone. On April 3, 1946, she reached Lake Charles, Louisiana via Orange, Texas.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Lake Charles, Louisiana, April 29, 1946.


LST-771
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 87 - DIVISION 173

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-771 was built at Pittsburgh, and brought down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans where she was commissioned on October 18, 1944, her first and only commanding officer being Lt. Robert Bracken, USCG. After a week of shakedown at Panama City, Florida, she returned to New Orleans to take aboard LCT-1276 and a Navy LCT crew and after loading asphalt and road building machinery at Gulfport, Mississippi, departed for Pearl Harbor via Panama Canal and San Pedro, California, on November 24, 1944.

INVASION OF AKA SHIMA KERAMA RHETTO
She arrived at Pearl Harbor January 2, 1945, and after unloading began taking aboard personnel and equipment of B Company, 715th Army Amphibious Tractor Battalion and men of the 93rd Anti-Aircraft Battalion, as well as 17 LVT's. She departed Pearl Harbor on January 27, 1945, and arrived at Leyte, Philippine Islands, February 25, 1945, via Eniwetok, Ulithi and Kossol Passage, Palau. Here the 93rd Anti-Aircraft Group unloaded and new passengers to come aboard were 400 men of the 305th Battalion of the 77th Infantry Division. After nearly a month of amphibious exercises in Leyte Gulf she departed for the invasion of Kerama Rhetto.54 Here she landed troops on the tiny island of Aka Shima on March 26, 1945, 20 miles south of Okinawa. It was there that invading troops discovered nearly 00 small suicide boats the Japanese had carefully hidden in coves and caves ready to use at the moment of invasion. Not one was successfully used that day. For two days following, the 771 lay close in shore of one of the many Kerama Islands as a hospital ship receiving aboard for emergency treatment wounded troops brought out from the beach. Later these wounded were carried to outlying hospital ships and transports where they were flown to rear area base hospitals. Each night the ships on the Bay of Kerama Rhetto steamed out to sea to avoid the new and constant threat of suicide boats and planes. On March 30, 1945 the LCT was launched. On April 1, 1945, the LST loaded troops and amphtracs aboard and set out for sea for 15 days of "retirement cruising" southeast of Okinawa,

--100--


IE SHIMA INVASION
On April 16, 1945, the second assault landing was made this time on the tiny fortress like island of Ie Shima off the western shore of Okinawa. Again the 305th Battalion was landed by amphtracs of the 715th. The shore and air offensive was heavier than on previous landings. The 771 was back for a second day of the attack with reserve troops from a transport off Okinawa, 550 men of the 307th Battalion of the 77th Infantry Division. Sniper fire from the beach, directed at the 771, was ineffective. It was here that Ernie Pyle lost his life. That same night the 715th Tractor Battalion was landed on Okinawa. The LST's participating in the initial assaults were almost all retiring to rear areas but the 771 was ordered to load aboard all cargo ammunition from the departing LST's and serve as ammunition distribution ship in the Okinawa area. She commenced a shuttle service between Okinawa anchorages and Kerama Rhetto. Battleships, cruisers and destroyers were supplied with ammunition during a time when more ammunition was being expended than in any other naval operation in history.

UNDER CONSTANT ATTACK
Lying in Kerama Rhetto anchorage at night with 3 other ammunition ships, the 771 was kept segregated at a safe distance from the other vessels. Nightly air attacks offered little sleep for crew members those weeks when general quarters sounded 4 or 5 time in one night. With the sound of general quarters alarm would come the familiar order over the public address system "Make smoke!" and a heavy blanket of fog would be laid over the anchorage, hiding ships from aircraft, provided the wind was light. Occasionally the 771, laying in the protective lee of Tokashiki Shima, would find herself bared to the night sky by a perverse wind and gun crews tightened and swore at their stations until the smoke drifted overhead again. Her ammunition all unloaded, the 771 now turned to a new task, this time gasoline distribution and fog oil for smoke generators and chemical smoke pots, loaded from an AKA. Ammunition may have been an uncomfortable load but this combination of gasoline and easily ignited smoke flares set an even sharper edge on the uneasiness of the ship's company. By the end of May, 1945, the men, most of whom had not walked on solid ground for 120 days, set up a whimsical "real estate agency" for titles to land and attractive promontories on the islands, on the islands they had looked at but never set foot upon for the past two months. Occasionally two or three Japanese who had been hiding in the caves and brush of the islands would come down to the shore line waving white rags to ships lying offshore. At times they would surrender in parties of ten. Once a couple of Japanese waited two days on the beach for a ship to send a boat in to shore so they could surrender. Eluding U.S. Army patrols were still Japanese soldiers on the islands, grubbing food from the ground and confident, as one prisoner expressed it, of the islands being retaken shortly. The 771 became the target one warm May afternoon for one such character who was loose with a 3" mortar and shells he had apparently stored in the hills of Okkashiki in a hidden cave. His aim and angle were bad, however, but several shells landed just off the beach a hundred yards away. More landed short in the hills. The 771 was just lipping anchor to move to a more comfortable berth when the well hidden mortarman bracketed the ship, but with yards to spare. He never bothered anyone after that. Finally at the end of May orders came to get underway to a rear area, after loading the entire deck with empty brass shell casings and powder cans, picked up from every battlewagon that entered the anchorage. They finally departed on June 7, 1945, for Saipan after almost two and a half months after the initial assaults on Kerama Rhetto.

TO JAPAN
A resupply trip to Okinawa was made on July 14, 1945, with equipment and personnel of the 1112th Naval Construction Battalion. Okinawa was not yet secure but there was less of the strain which marked the previous visit. Returning to Saipan a heavy typhoon was encountered. Arriving at Saipan August 4, 1945, she was routed back to Pearl Harbor, arriving on August 25, 1945. Here she loaded company "B" of the U.S. Marine Corps, 8th Field Service Regiment and set forth for Sasebo, Japan on September 2, 1945. The war was over but work for LST's in Japan was just beginning. From Sasebo to Manila and thence to Lingayen Gulf went the 771 to load Army Ordnance personnel and equipment for the occupation troops in Japan. She reached Wakayama October 22, 1945. After unloading she returned to Manila on November 3, 1945, and once more loaded a last remnant of occupation troops at Lingayen Gulf, the 47th General Hospital of the U.S. Army. With tank and main decks loaded with ambulances, trucks and hospital equipment the 771 departed Lingayen Gulf on November 11th for Kure, Japan, once foremost of Japan's naval bases. The Inland Sea, a picture book part of Japan was now treacherous with mines. Thanksgiving Dinner at anchor off Hirowan, Japan, and then orders came to proceed to Saipan.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
This could mean but one thing--Stateside! Departing Saipan flying the "going home" pennant a second Christmas was spent at sea before Pearl Harbor was reached. But by January 3, 1946, the LST-771 was leaving Pearl Harbor and she arrived at San Pedro January 14, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONEDHere she was decommission ed on May 14, 1946.


LST-782
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 85 - DIVISION 169

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-782 was commissioned on August 22, 1944. Her commanding officer was Lt. Henry C. Stack, USCGR. After shakedown exercises at Panama City, Florida, she departed New Orleans for four days of loading at Gulfport, Mississippi.

IWO JIMA INVASION
Departing South Pass, Louisiana, on September 25, 1944, she arrived at Pearl Harbor November 7, 1944, via Canal Zone and San Diego. Here she underwent amphibious training for the Iwo Jima invasion.55 She departed Pearl Harbor January 4, 1945, and after stops at Eniwetok and Saipan reached Iwo Jima on D-day, February 19, 1945. After unloading at Iwo Jima and ferrying supplies and personnel ashore from transports and cargo vessels anchored off the island she proceeded to Guam and thence to Leyte where she arrived March 9, 1945, to prepare for the Okinawa strike.

OKINAWA INVASION
She reached Okinawa on D-day, April 1, 1945, and remained there until April 16, 1945, performing various transportation duties. She proceeded to Ulithi and arrived there April 22, 1945.

TRANSPORTATION SERVICE
During the balance of her stay in the Pacific area

--101--


the LST was engaged in transporting cargo and personnel from various points in the rear areas. She reached Manus on May 3, 1945; Ulithi June 17, 1945; Leyte June 22, 1945; Noumea July 30, 1945; Tulagi August 11, 1945; Guadalcanal August 12, 1945; Russell Islands August 15, 1945; Ulithi August 27, 1945; Hagushi, Okinawa, September 23, 1945; Okinawa September 30, 1945 and Tacloban, Philippine Islands.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Tacloban November 20, 1945, for Pearl Harbor and San Pedro arriving there on December 19, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at San Pedro, May 14, 1946.


LST-784
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 85 - DIVISION 169

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-784 was built by the Dravo Corporation at Neville Island, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and launched on July 5, 1944. After proceeding down the Monongahela, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans she was commissioned on arrival on September 1, 1944, with Lt. Daniel H. Miner, USCG, as her first commanding officer. He continued to command the LST until January 15, 1946, when he was succeeded by Lt. M. L. Jackson, USCG. She departed September 8, 1944, for Panama City, for shakedown exercises in St. Andrews Bay, Florida, until September 21, 1944. After post shakedown availability at New Orleans she took on 5 sections of LCT and then proceeded to Theodore, Alabama, for cargo.

IWO JIMA INVASION
The 784 departed Theodore, Alabama, on October 4, 1944, loaded with ammunition and vehicles and arrived at Pearl Harbor November 18, 1944, via Canal Zone and San Diego, where she was unloaded. From December 4th to 23rd the LST was on maneuvers in the Hawaiian area. Then at Kewalo Basin she loaded 155 howitzer ammunition and sailed for Hilo where on January 6, 1945, she took aboard 215 men and 14 officers of the 2nd 155MM Howitzer Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, and one officer and 24 men of the 473rd Amphibious Track Company, U.S. Army, together with howitzers, vehicles and supplies and departing January 22, 1945, for the invasion of Iwo Jima.56 Early on the dark morning of February 19, 1945, having stopped at Eniwetok and Saipan, the crew, at general quarters, saw the roman candle display of star shells being dropped over Iwo Jima by the bombarding fighting ships. At 0800 the 784 swung into position off the beach of the island. She stayed at general quarters all day, maneuvering to hold position and to avoid the 20 or 37 MM projectiles detonating in the water in the tractor area and at night retired from the area with "Tractor Group Charlie" and avoided air attack by lying dead in the water when planes were nearby so as to show no wake. On the 20th she moved into position 500 yards off Blue Beach and released five Army DUKWs. Though she waited most of the night they did not come back to the line of departure as planned, and it was later discovered that all had been hit or capsized in the heavy surf, though none of the drivers was killed. On the 21st the remaining three DUKWs were sent in with a Marine reconnaissance party as the CB's proceeded to launch off of the pontoon barges. In a strong off shore wind two of the barges, which refused to start, could be towed only by proceeding at 1/3 on one engine and all had to be serviced. By the time the 784 started back to the line of departure she was 22 miles off shore. Two barges started under their own power but after parting cable after cable and fouling a wire in the starboard screw, the 784 managed to tow one of the remaining barges to the line of departure and was forced to abandon the other. She arrived at the line of departure again on the 22nd. On the 23rd two boat loads of Marines were sent to the beach and that night, during an air raid, the 784 opened fire on planes only fleetingly seen. A seaman was wounded in the leg with shrapnel. Divers cleared the starboard screw on the 24th and the 784 beached on "Red One" Beach an air raid interrupting unloading that night. She was finally unloaded by 1630 on the 25th and on the 26th moored alongside KA-91 to take cargo to the beach, where slight damage resulted from the rolling sea. After unloading at the beach the 784 took on board office personnel, set up a post office on the tank deck and became Fleet Post Office IWOJIMA. This duty lasted until the 5th of March, 1945, with the ship moving out and maneuvering in the transport area each night, there being air raids on the 1st and 2nd of March. On the 5th the 784 began to take more cargo from a transport to the beach. This was not discharged until the 10th, there being air raids on the 7th and 9th. On March 15, 1945, with 7 officers and 117 men of Company B, Amphibious Reconnaissance Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, aboard the 784, got underway for Saipan, arriving on the 18th. She unloaded and was drydocked until the 7th of April. Then on the 15th and 16th, with repairs still incomplete, she loaded cargo and 6 officers and 235 men of the 7th Naval Construction battalion and completing repairs on the 19th, was underway on the 20th for Okinawa. Arriving on the 27th, cargo was unloaded by May 2, 1945. During the unloading air raids were numerous, one plane flying directly overhead on the night of April 27, 1945, but being visible only after it was overhead, the 784 did not fire on it. The crew was at general quarters 9 hours on the 28th and on the 29th there were 3 bomb hits 1/2 mile inshore on Okinawa abeam of the anchorage. One suicide craft, swimmer or guided torpedo managed to detonate a charge near the hull of an AK, 500 yards from the 784, but the AK did not sink. Departing from Okinawa on the 7th of May she returned to Saipan on the 13th.

IHEYA SHIMA INVASION
Loading vehicles, gasoline, organizational gear and rations of the 2nd Marine Division on May 23, 1945, and embarking one officer and 18 men of the 2nd Marines she was underway on the 24th anchoring in Hagushi Anchorage, Okinawa on the 30th. On the 5th of June she departed for the invasion of Iheya Shima arriving at dawn on the morning of the 6th to complete unloading of Amtracks and LCM's at 1458, being the first ship to complete unloading. She returned to Okinawa, every day during this period, except June 2, 1945, there being air raids.

"MILK RUNS" PHILIPPINES TO OKINAWA
From the 10th of June to September 1, 1945, the 784 was engaged in "milk runs" from the Philippines to Okinawa. In three trips to Okinawa she carried officers, men, vehicles and supplies of the 324th Airdrome Squadron, the 77th Infantry Division and the 90th Bomb Group (H), 5th AAF. On each trip to Okinawa there was enemy activity but no opportunity to fire on any enemy plane presented itself.

TO JAPAN
As soon as the war had ended on August 14, 1945, the 784 found herself occupied in the roll-up movement of men and supplies from the Philippines to Japan. The first units carried were Counter-intelligence Corps, Metropolitan Unit, No. 80, and men of the

--102--


196th Ordnance Company, 7 officers and 84 men in all with 363 tons of gear, rations and vehicles. The LST left Batangas, Philippine Islands on September 6, 1945, and anchored on Tokyo Bay on the 15th. After unloading on the 17th a 70 knot wind of typhoon intensity built up during the morning of the 18th and a number of small boats broke free and were wrecked, with one LST being driven into the sea wall. To hold the ship in position it was necessary to veer to 90 fathoms of chain, steam at anchor, and shift anchorage three times. The blow lasted all day. On the 20th she was underway for Manila. Loading 6 officers and 128 men of the 1896th Engineer Aviation Battalion on the 3rd of October, 1945, with 2 officers and 70 men of the 166th Ordnance Tire Repair Company, she arrived at Tokyo Bay on the 19th and next day discharged her Army personnel. Both at Manila before departure and at Tokyo officers and crew members with necessary "points" were being sent home for discharge, being replaced by new officers and crew members. On October 29th the 784 was ordered to Saipan and on arrival on November 2, 1945, was loaded with trucks, clothing and gear of the U.S. Marine Corps for Guam where she arrived on the 12th.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
From Guam the 784 was prepared for the voyage home and departed on November 16, 1945, for San Francisco, via Pearl Harbor, arriving at the west coast port on December 21, 1945.

NAVY MANNED
Here on March 29, 1946, she was fully manned by Navy personnel.


LST-785
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 85 - DIVISION 170

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-785 was built at the Dravo Shipbuilding Corporation, Neville Island, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and departed August 26, 1944, via the Monongahela, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers for New Orleans, Louisiana, where she was placed in full commission on September 4, 1944, with Lt. Myron E. Nichol, USCG, her first and only commanding officer. After repairs and alterations she departed on 14 September, 1944, for St. Andrews Bay, Florida, for shakedown until the 28th. Returning to New Orleans for post shakedown availability she took aboard 5 LCT sections (LCT(6)-691 and LCT(6)-1121) and departed for Gulfport, Mississippi on October 8, 1944, for cargo loading.

IWO JIMA INVASION
Departing Gulfport on October 11, 1944, she reached Pearl Harbor on December 5, 1944, via Canal Zone, San Pedro, Port Hueneme, San Diego and again Port Hueneme. After unloading trucks and asphalt she proceeded to Maalaea Bay, Maui, T.H. for training exercises, returning to Pearl Harbor on December 3, 1944. Departing for Hilo, T.H. on January 4, 1945, she began combat loading of 21 DUKWs, 105 MM Howitzers, with ammunition and 19 officers and 353 enlisted men of the 2nd Battalion, 13th Marine Regiment, 5th Marine Division for the invasion of Iwo Jima.57 After further training she departed Kaneohe Bay on January 22, 1945, and, proceeding via Eniwetok and Saipan, reached Iwo Jima on D-day, February 19, 1945, with Task Group 51.15. By 0730 all plans had been completed for launching DUKWs, bow doors and ramp undogged, hove to in prearranged area. The battle was on but the LST's had not been called to the Line of Departure. At 1200 the 785 eased up to the Line of Departure and commenced fueling LVT's alongside. At 1300 lowered two LCVP's to expedite landing troops since there was not room for them in the loaded DUKWs. At 1354 LCVP's departed for beach through mortar and machine-gun fire. A minute later the first DUKWs departed and the LST continued sending DUKWs and taking LVT's and DUKWs on board for loading doing so as rapidly as possible, fueling alongside. By 1527 all troops of the 2nd Battalion, 13th Regiment, 5th Marine Division on board has disembarked with the exception of a loading detail but the 785 continued unloading ammunition into LVT's and DUKWs throughout the night and on through the 23rd of February, with several air raid alerts and smoke making for mutual protection whenever ordered. An enemy twin engine airplane, taken under fire on the night of the 23rd, may have been shot down in the dense smoke. All DUKWs and LVT's were taken on board that night to prevent swamping in the swells and mortar and machine-gun fire came close on several occasions but no casualties resulted. While beached on the 25th the 3/4" cable fouled in the port propeller and requests for a diver with underwater cutting torch brought no immediate results. With a heavy swell running on the 26th unloading of the USS Thurston began. After taking troops and equipment aboard alongside, arrival of tug to help beach had to be awaited as an LST under one engine could not remain beached on the volcanic ash. All fenders were lost overboard and several hawsers parted during unloading and after retracting three holes were found in two compartments four feet above the water line. The holes were patched and later a diver cut the cable from the propeller which remained badly damaged. The LST joined a Task Unit at 1230 proceeding to Saipan.

OKINAWA INVASION
Anchoring at Saipan on March 5, 1945, the 785 entered drydock ARD-25 for repairs on the 9th. On the 24th, all repairs completed, she took on 11 officers and 260 enlisted men of Company B, 1398th Engineering Construction Battalion and 1 officer and 21 enlisted men of the 70th Navy Construction Battalion, with their equipment, and on March 25, 1945, was underway with Task Unit 51.13.4 for the invasion of Okinawa. She arrived at Kerama Rhetto at midday April 2, 1945, and anchored awaiting further orders. Air raids were constant and smoke made as appropriate. At 0 615 on April 3, 1945, the 785 identified and took one Japanese "TONY" under fire with other vessels in the vicinity. The LST-599 took a suicide fighter through its main deck and almost burned and sank but was pumped out. On the 5th the 785 proceeded to the Okinawa, West Beaches and on the 6th beached at Orange Beach and commenced unloading. Damage was being done to the hull by coral heads and at low water a hole was found in Void A-401-V, but requests to dock and repair were all returned cancelled. Enemy aircraft dived on ships but no hits were seen. General quarters was almost continuous with smoke made whenever necessary. On the 7th the LST retracted and anchoring in vicinity, manned guns in red alerts through the 10th. On the 11th weighed anchor and joined T.U. 51.29.13 for Saipan, anchoring there on April 17, 1945.

AGUNI SHIMA INVASION
Two resupply echelons from Saipan to Okinawa followed in which the LST-785 joined, one departing April 23, 1945, with 8 officers and 243 enlisted men with their equipment and supplies of the 79th U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, and one on May 24, 1945, with 1 officer and 19 enlisted men of the 8th RCT, 2nd Marine Division, with their equipment and supplies. After unloading at Okinawa on May 31st, 1945, the 785 embarked 3 officers and 60 enlisted men of Company B, 373rd Engineer

--103--


Combat Battalion. During these trips the LST was at general quarters during numerous red alerts but without enemy contact. On June 9, 1945, she weighed anchor and joined T.U. 31.25.1 en route to capture the enemy held island of Aguni Shima. Arriving at Line of Departure at 0453 she lowered 2 LCVP's, one to act as wave guide for LCM's for the assault landing and the other to act as Bowser boat. The initial landing was made without opposition and at 0833 she departed the area. She anchored off Green Beach where unloading into LCM's and LVT's alongside commenced, both LCVP's acting as Bowsers boats fueling LVT's. An unidentified plane was taken under fire at twilight on approach but was driven off, later being identified as friendly. Unloaded by 1200 on June 10, 1945, she weighed anchor and joined T.U. 31.25.1 for Okinawa at 1345, anchoring there at 1700. On June 13, 1945, she proceeded to Iheya Shima to evacuate the 8th Reinforced Combat Team, 2nd Marine Division, with equipment and supplies, anchoring at Hagushi Anchorage, Okinawa on the 14th. A trip to Naha, Okinawa and return to Hagushi anchorage followed on the 15th and on the 18th she joined T.U. 31.29.12 returning to Saipan where she anchored June 24, 1945. Lack of contact with enemy units marked this period as well.

TO NAGASAKI JAPAN
Two trips, one to Iwo Jima on July 4, 1945, where equipment of the 23rd Navy CB's was loaded for Saipan, and one on July 28, 1945 to Okinawa, followed. From August 1 to 3, 1945, she rode out a typhoon off Okinawa without damage and the unloaded and disembarked troops until the 10th during many air raid alerts and much smoke making. On 13 August, 1945, she departed Okinawa for Saipan in convoy, the war ending next day with Japan's unconditional surrender. On September 17, 1945, she departed Saipan in convoy for Nagasaki, Japan, with 12 officers and 288 enlisted men of the 1st Battalion, 10th Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, with their equipment and supplies. Anchoring off Nagasaki September 24, 1945, she beached on the seawall in front of the customhouse on the 25th and commenced disembarking troops and unloading equipment. Departing Nagasaki September 26, 1945, she returned to Okinawa on the 28th, leaving next day to ride out another typhoon at sea until October 1, 1945, when she proceeded to Leyte where she anchored October 7, 1945.

TO DAVAO, MINDANAO, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS AND MATSUYAMA, JAPAN
Here she loaded 4 officers and 32 enlisted men of the 24th Army Group for transportation to Davao Gulf and departed on October 13, 1945, arriving on the 15th. Here she loaded more equipment and on the 16th proceeded to Matsuyama, Shikoku, Japan, with officers and men, with supplies and equipment, of the 24th Army Division, 13th Field Artillery, Third Engineers, and 19th Infantry Cannon Company. She arrived at Matsuyama on October 25, 1945, and after unloading proceeded to Okinawa.

TO SASEBO, JAPAN
She remained at Okinawa until November 18, 1945, when she again departed for Japan with occupation troops, this time arriving at Sasebo on November 22, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
The time had now come for the LST-765 to return to the United States and she began the long trek homeward late in November 1945, stopping at Iwo Jima, Saipan, and Pearl Harbor before arriving at San Francisco on January 12, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned on May 3, 1946.


LST-786
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 85 - DIVISION 169

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-786 was commissioned at New Orleans on August 28, 1944. Her first and only commanding officer was Lt. Eli T. Ringler, USCG. After shakedown exercises in St. Andrews Bay, Florida, she was loaded with cargo at Mobile, Alabama, and departed for Pearl Harbor, reaching there on November 3, 1944, via Canal Zone and San Diego.

TRANSPORTATION SERVICE
The LST-786 took part in none of the invasions in the Pacific Area.58 Departing Pearl Harbor on December 16, 1944, with 3 officers and 178 enlisted men of the 112th Navy CB's she reached Saipan January 3, 1945, via Eniwetok and returned to Pearl Harbor, January 24, 1945, via Tinian and Eniwetok. While at Saipan she was forced to stay at sea on January 3, 1945, due to an air attack. She departed Pearl Harbor February 10, 1945, for a run to Guam via Eniwetok, with enlisted personnel of U.S. Pacific Fleet Staff and FFT Fleet Hospital No. 111, with equipment, arriving on February 25, 1945. Proceeded to Iwo Jima on March 17, 1945, with dredging equipment and MSB-1 barge in tow. Forced into Saipan on the 20th in heavy seas. Proceeded again on the 27th arriving Iwo Jima on April 2, 1945, she returned to Saipan via Guam on April 30, 1945, taking on 114 Jap POW's at Iwo Jima for Guam. A trip to Okinawa returning to Saipan May 26, 1945, followed, during which she was under sub attack a nd TB-404 was taken in tow for 2 days due to engine trouble. While at Okinawa she underwent many air raids. On June 4, 1945, she departed Saipan for Leyte and on the 12th proceeded to San Fabian, Luzon to load cargo for Okinawa. She arrived Okinawa June 24, 1945, and departed June 29, 1945, with units of the 77th Army Division and cargo for Leyte. On July 5, 1945, she departed for Cebu in convoy and after loading personnel and cargo of the 77th Division proceeded to Subic Bay and thence to Ie Shima arriving on the 23rd. Proceeding to Buckner Bay on the 25th she loaded units of the 96th Artillery Battalion for Leyte, standing out on August 1 to avoid a typhoon. En route Leyte on the 4th the convoy was under submarine attack. She arrived Leyte on August 7, 1945.

TO JAPAN
Leaving Leyte on August 9, 1945, she stopped at Mindoro to unload on the 12th and reached Batangas on the 13th where she loaded jeeps until the 19th, returning to Subic Bay on that day and to Okinawa on August 29, 1945. By September 9, 1945, she had completed loading cargo and personnel of the 308th Bomb Wing arriving at Jinsen, Korea on September 17, 1945. Completing unloading on the 22nd she was underway for Hagushi, Okinawa on the 23rd arriving on the 27th. She stood out to Hagushi on September 29 to avoid a typhoon. She next proceeded to Sasebo and remained there until October 22, 1945, returning to Okinawa on the 24th. She again arrived at Sasebo on November 21, 1945, via Taku, North China, and again early in December 1945, via Taku, North China. There operations involved repatriation of Japanese prisoners of war from the China Theatre.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Sasebo, Japan, December 16, 1945, and reached San Francisco January 14, 1946.

--104--


TO NAVY
On March 29, 1946, the 786 was fully manned by Navy personnel.


LST-787
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 85 - DIVISION 170

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
Built at Pittsburgh by the Dravo Corporation, the CG Guard manned USS LST-787 left the shipyard on September 4, 1944, and proceeded down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans where she was commissioned on September 13, 1944. Her commanding officers have been Lt. W. S. Lawrence, USCGR (August 9, 1944-January 29, 1946) and Lt. Andrew C. Ramstad, USCG, (January 29, 1946-May 27, 1946). After shakedown at Panama City, Florida, she was loaded with 5 LCT sections and departed for Mobile, Alabama, to take on a tank deck cargo of ammunition. She waited out a gulf hurricane from October 14 to 19, 1944.

IWO JIMA INVASION
Arriving Pearl Harbor December 6, 1944, via Canal Zone, San Pedro and Port Hueneme. Cargo, ammunition and LCT sections were unloaded at Pearl Harbor and a preload taken aboard, and after rehearsals and embarkation of the 4th Marine elements and equipment in the Maui-Hawaii-Kaloolae, T.H. area, from January 4th to 20th 1945,for the invasion of Iwo Jima.59 She reached Saipan via Eniwetok on February 10, 1945, where amphibian tractors and additional Marines were loaded and after a rehearsal off Tinian on February 12th and 13th departed Saipan on the 15th arriving off Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands on 19 February, 1945, (D-day). Here she launched her amphibian tractors with Marines embarked and was then occupied with amtrack supply and maintenance. On February 23, and 24, 1945, she beached and unloaded "hot cargo" of trailers, ammunition, gasoline, maintenance amtracks and crews. Ferrying troops and equipment from transports on February 26th and 27th she departed Iwo Jima February 28, 1945, arriving Saipan March 5, 1945.

OKINAWA INVASION
From March 9th to 13th, 1945, a Fleet Marine Force of heavy AAA elements and equipment was loaded at Tinian and the 787 departed Saipan March 26, 1945, arriving off Okinawa on D+1 day, April 2, 1945. The Marines were debarked at Hagushi from the 9th to the 14th of April and pontoon causeways launched at Ie Shima on April 20, 1945, miscellaneous Army units being ferried from Okinawa to Ie Shima on the 28th and 29th. At Kerama Rhetto from May 3rd to 15th a tank deck cargo of empty shell cases and brass was loaded from combatant ships. In a raid on the 13th the 787 claimed destruction of an enemy plane and on the 20th she departed Okinawa reaching Saipan on May 26, 1945.

OKINAWA TURN AROUND
Departing Saipan June 5, 1945, the 767 joined a convoy on the 7th and arrived at Leyte on the 10th. Departing on the 12th she arrived at Lingayen Gulf on the 15th where she loaded elements of the 306th Bomb Wing, 5th Air Force, with equipment and on the 20th departed for Okinawa, arriving on the 24th. On the 26th she loaded elements and equipment of the 307th Regiment, 77th Army Division at Hagushi and on the 29th departed Okinawa arriving on July 4th at Leyte. Proceeding to Cebu on the 5th she unloaded at Davao on the 7th and returned to Subic Bay on the 11th. Here she loaded a 5th Air Force Service Squadron and equipment and departed on the 16th towing an Army crash boat, anchoring at Lingayen Gulf July 17, 1945, at a typhoon alert. Underway on the 18th she beat up and down the Luzon coast, casting off her tow on the 19th in rough sea and high wind and resuming her course on the 20th. On the 21st and 22nd escorts reported submarine contacts but she reached Okinawa on July 23rd. On the 26th she took aboard elements and equipment of the 382nd Regiment, 96th Army Division and sortied and returned to anchor on the 30th with a typhoon threatening. She departed August 1, 1945, executing a typhoon avoidance plan and making a wide swing to the east August 4th after contacts which suggested a submarine wolf pack arrived at Leyte, August 7, 1945. She departed on the 10th to unload at Mindoro on the 12th. She returned to Subic Bay on the 13th and next day VJ-day was celebrated. Proceeding to Leyte on the 19th she went into drydock from September 5th to 7th for stem tube bearing overhaul and bottom painting.

TO JAPAN
The 787 left Leyte September 15th for Zamboanga, Mindanao, Philippine Islands where on the 18th and 19th elements and equipment of the 116th Engineer Combat Battalion, 41st Army Division were loaded, departing for Honshu, Japan on the 19th. She changed course on the 26th. On the 26th she stood out on a typhoon avoiding retirement, circling west and north and east in the China Sea and returning to Okinawa on October 1, 1945. On October 2, 1945, she departed Okinawa, passing through the Bungo Strait and Inland Sea, Japan on the 6th where 3 mines were sighted and anchorage made off Tsuru Island. Hirowan was reached and the ship beached and unloaded October 7, 1945, at Hiro, Honshu, Japan. A typhoon to the south delayed departure until October 11, 1945, and the 787 arrived at Manila October 18, 1945, leaving on the 23rd for Lingayen Gulf. There, on the 24th and 25th, casual 25th Division officers and elements and equipment of the 66th Signal Battalion and the 1292nd Engineer Combat Battalion were loaded and the 787 departed on October 26th, 1945, for Nagoya, Japan.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
Departing Nagoya November 8, 1945, the LST-787 began her last journey towards home. She reached Saipan on November 14, 1945, Pearl Harbor December 9th, San Diego December 27th, San Pedro January 4, 1946, and San Francisco January 17, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned on May 27, 1946.


--105--


LST-788
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 06 - DIVISION 171

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-788 was built by the Dravo Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and arrived at New Orleans, Louisiana, via the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers on September 18, 1954, when she was commissioned. Her first commanding officer Lt. W. R. Benson, USCGR, was succeeded by Lt. Bernard J. Kearns, USCGR, on November 9, 1945, who commanded her until Lt. Bradley A. Kondis, USCGR, took over on January 30, 1946. Finally Lt. (jg) Russell D. Erickson, USCG, took command from March 8, 1946. After five days availability for outfitting the 788 departed for St. Andrews Bay, Florida, where she underwent shakedown exercises from September 27th to October 9, 1944. Returning to New Orleans on October 11, 1944, minor alterations were completed and five sections of LCT's were loaded on the main deck, while 800 tons of miscellaneous cargo went on the tank deck and she departed New Orleans for the Pacific on October 20, 1944.

IWO JIMA INVASION
The 788 reached Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1944, after stops at Panama Canal, San Pedro and Port Hueneme, where pontoon causeways were loaded for side carry. The LST remained in the Hawaiian area until January 24, 1945, engaged in freight runs and training, when she departed in Task Group 51.5 for the invasion of Iwo Jima,60 with troops and equipment of Battalion C, 4th 155 MM Battalion, First Provisional Field Artillery Corps, U.S. Marine Corps, aboard. Routed via Eniwetok and Guam for logistics the LST reached Iwo Jima at daybreak February 20, 1945, (D+1 day). DUKWs were launched on the 22nd, 1000 yards off the beaches and the ship made three beachings from February 22nd to 28th. One cargo of troops and equipment was trans-loaded from an APA. The ship suffered no battle damage though there was heavy enemy mortar fire at night on the beaches. However, a port rudder jammed by an LCT attempting to retract and considerable damage was done to port side plates and frames as a result of lying alongside the APA in a heavy sea. On February 28, 1945, the 788 departed the area and proceeded to Saipan, arriving March 5, 1945, where she was drydocked for repairs to the rudder and underwent other emergency repairs.

OKINAWA INVASION
From March 20th to 22nd the LST loaded troops and equipment of the Headquarters 1398 Engineer Construction Battalion, 24th Corps, U.S. Army and departed on the 22nd for Okinawa as a unit of T.U. 51.13.4. She arrived at Okinawa on April 2, 1945, and proceeded to anchor at Kerama Retto until April 5, 1945. On that date she proceeded to the Western Beaches at Okinawa where she unloaded troops and equipment on April 7th and 8th. Beaching was difficult due to the coral reefs and the ship took considerable pounding but without serious damage. Due to high seas pontoon barges were not launched until the 12th. There was considerable air activity during this period, the ship manning battle stations 47 times during the 15 days in the area, the longest period at general quarters being 7 hours and 35 minutes during one 12 hour period. Hits were scored on seven enemy planes and the ship was directly responsible for the downing of two planes, one being splashed 250 yards off the port beam and another 50 feet off the starboard quarter, missing the ship's conn by only 20 feet. Slight underwater damage was done to the ship by the latter plane. The ship remained in the transport area, for smoke-making, until April 16, 1945, when she departed for Ulithi arriving on the 22nd. Here she was drydocked for inspection of bottom and all necessary repairs were made including repairs to port side plates and frames.

TO JAPAN
The 780 departed Ulithi for Manus on May 20, 1945, arriving on the 24th, departing next day for Russell Islands to arrive on the 31st. On the same day she departed for Noumea, stopping overnight at Tulagi and reached Noumea on June 8, 1945, where miscellaneous cargo and 25 passengers were loaded, the 788 departing June 16, 1945, for Guam. Arriving there on June 30, 1945, the port shaft was found to be out of alignment and repairs were not effected until August 20, 1945. On the 23rd pontoon causeways were loaded and she proceeded to Saipan. On September 10th and 11th she loaded troops and equipment of Headquarters and Service Company, Second Motor Transport Battalion, Second Marine Corps and as a unit of the Southern Occupation Force departed Saipan on September 17, 1945, for Nagasaki, Japan, which was reached on September 24, 1945. She departed Nagasaki on the 26th for Leyte but put into Hagushi, Okinawa, on the 28th due to an approaching typhoon. After executing Typhoon Plan X-ray on the 29th and 30th she detached from convoy and proceeded to Leyte arriving October 7, 1945. On the 13th she proceeded to Davao, Mindanao, where elements of the 34th Infantry Division and 63rd Field Artillery of the U.S. Army were loaded and she departed October 16, 1945, for Mitsuhama where she beached October 26-27, 1945, launching pontoon causeways to unload. She departed October 29, 1945, for Manila, arriving there on November 6, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.
The LST-788 departed Manila November 12, 1945, for return to the U.S. reaching San Pedro on December 18, 1945, via Leyte, Tacloban and Pearl Harbor.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at San Pedro on April 16, 1946.


LST-789
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 86 - DIVISION 171

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-789 was launched at the yards of the Dravo Corporation on the Ohio River at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on August 5, 1944, and on August 31, 1944, departed for New Orleans, via the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers where she was commissioned September 11, 1944. Her commanding officers have been Lt. Harold M. Mulvey, USCGR, Lt. (jg) Lothrop M. Forbush, USCGR, and Ensign W. M. Seehorn, USCG. She was commissioned with a crew of 8 officers and 104 men of the U.S. Coast Guard. On September 20, 1944, she departed for shakedown exercises at St. Andrews Bay, Florida, which were completed in 12 days. The ship had been designated flagship of LST Group 36. Returning to New Orleans on October 5th for completion of alterations and loading 5 sections of LCT on the main deck she proceeded to Gulfport, Mississippi, for a load of heavy road building equipment.

IWO JIMA INVASION
The 789 departed Gulfport for Pearl Harbor about the middle of October, arriving there on November 26, 1944, via Canal Zone and San Pedro. The next two months were spent in the Hawaiian area on logistics and training maneuvers including a dress rehearsal for the assault on Iwo Jima.61 On January 18, 1945, with 7 officers

--106--


and 229 men of Company C, 1st Battalion, 4th Division 25th Marines and a cargo of Marine vehicles she departed Pearl Harbor for Iwo Jima via Eniwetok and Saipan, under operational command of LST Flotilla 21 (CTU 51.13.2). She loaded 17 LVT's at Saipan with 5 officers and 75 men of the tractor crews and took on two wave guides and men, a beach party of 1 officer and 12 men and 3 officers and 77 men of the staff of Company C, 4th Division, 25th Marines. On the 12th and 13th a final rehearsal had been held off Tinian Island. Arriving off the southeastern shore of Iwo Jima at 0735 on D-day, 19 February, 1945, they immediately disembarked their LVT's loaded with Marines with small boats acting as wave guides and after they were landed, some of the LVT's returned and then commenced unloading cargo, continuing to do so for the next three days whenever any LVT's were available. About half the cargo was unloaded by this method as well as 1000 rounds of 5" ammunition to two destroyers, 800 rounds being passed while underway and 200 rounds being transferred by small boat. On D+3 day they beached and unloaded the remainder of their cargo and on D+4 day rendezvoused with Commander LST Group 61 (CTU 51.16.3) and departed for Guam, arriving there on the 28th. While at Iwo Jima they were alerted 8 times for air raids and operated their smoke generators as ordered.

OKINAWA INVASION
Proceeding to Leyte on March 3, 1945, they loaded 17 LVT's and assorted Army vehicles and cargoes and took aboard 24 officers and 440 men of the 383rd Regimental Combat Team and after extensive maneuvers and dress rehearsals departed on March 25, 1945, for the assault on Okinawa. They arrived at Okinawa on D-day, April 1, 1945, and immediately launched their LVT's loaded with Army assault forces, with small boats acting as wave guides. At 1300 they launched LCT-901 from the main deck and during the ensuing week unloaded all the Army vehicles and a small amount of bulk cargo by LVT. On the 9th they beached and unloaded some cargo but approaching bad weather necessitated retraction of all LST's from the beach after about 5 hours. They beached again on the 12th and had completed unloading cargo by 0700 on the 14th. While beached, Commander LST Group 86 and staff care aboard while Commander LST 85 and staff departed. On the 15th they shot down one enemy "Oscar" and next day departed Okinawa for Ulithi with other units under operational command of LST Flotilla 14 (CTU 51.29.15). While at Okinawa they had experienced about 28 air alerts lasting from 1 to 7 hours each with the smoke generator in operation in most of them. Depending on anchorage, small boats acted as ship patrol during the night as a protection against enemy swimmers and small enemy boats.

TO JAPAN
Arriving at Ulithi on April 22, 1945, they remained there until May 26, 1945, undergoing repairs, bottom holes suffered while beached being temporarily patched as there was no drydock available. They departed for Noumea on the 28th stopping at Manus, Russell Islands and Tulagi and arriving there on June 13, 1945. Here a cargo of heavy vehicles was taken aboard and on the 20th of June they departed for Guam with other units under command of LST Group 86. Arriving at Guam on July 6, 1945, their cargo was discharged and a drydocking obtained, where the bottom was properly repaired and a tail-shaft and screw replaced. Availability for overhaul of main engines followed and the 789 left Guam for Saipan on the 20th arriving on the 22nd. After another main engine overhaul they picked up a load of gasoline for Guam arriving August 8, 1945. The surrender of Japan on the 14th came just as they finished unloading. They were next assigned to carry one half of the 602nd CBMU and NAB, with their equipment and gear to Yokosuku, Japan, and departed on the 20th. On the 26th operational command of Commander LST Group 86 was dissolved and the ship reported to CTG 35.80, reaching Miyata Wan, Sagami Wan off Yahagi, Honshu, Japan on the 28th. They proceeded to Tokyo Bay on the 30th and beached on the seaplane ramp at the airport of Yokosuka Naval Base where unloading commenced immediately and was completed September 2, 1945. Anchoring off Yokosuka on the 2nd and during the next 8 days picked up 203 seamen and 4 officers for transportation to the United States released under the point system. They departed for Guam on the 10th, arriving on the 16th and remained moored there until the 27th acting as barrack ship until all passengers were taken off, and on that date departed for Leyte. They arrived there on October 2nd and on the 12th departed for Agoo, Luzon, Lingayen Gulf, Philippine Islands to pick up a load of 6th Army elements (4 officers and 145 men of the 731st Engineers) with a cargo of motorized equipment. They arrived at Kure, Japan, November 2nd and beached next day at Hiro Airport, completing unloading by nightfall and retracting with the morning tide. They remained at anchor off Hiro Airport until November 9, 1945, when they departed for Saipan arriving on the 16th.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
The 789 left Saipan on November 26, 1945, and arrived at Orange, Texas, January 25, 1946, via Pearl Harbor, San Francisco, Canal Zone and New Orleans.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Lake Charles, Louisiana on April 29, 1946.


LST-790
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 86 - DIVISION 171

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-790 was built at the Dravo Shipbuilding Corporation, Neville Island, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and arrived at Algiers, Louisiana, via the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers on September 22, 1944, on which day she was placed in full commission. Lt. P. 0. Ritter, USCGR, was her first commanding officer (August 9, 1944-October 27, 1945) being succeeded by Lt. (jg) W. Hammer, USCGR, (October 27, 1945-May 27, 1946). After 7 days availability for outfitting she proceeded on September 29, 1944, to Mobile for a day in drydock and then went on to St. Andrews Bay, Florida, for shakedown exercises between October 2nd and 15th, 1944. She returned to New Orleans on the 17th and after an availability for repairs loaded 5 sections of LCT, with crews, and departed for Gulfport, Mississippi to load a naval cargo for the Pacific area.

IWO JIMA INVASION
The 790 left Gulfport on October 26, 1944, and arrived at Pearl Harbor December 7, 1944, via Canal Zone, San Diego and Port Hueneme, California. Here she unloaded the five sections of LCT and took aboard LCT-860 and crew and after a training cruise to Maui, T.H., returned to Pearl Harbor on January 7, 1945, to complete repairs and load troops and equipment of the 8th Field Depot, U.S. Marine Corps for the invasion of Iwo Jima.62 She arrived at Iwo Jima on D+1 day (February 20, 1945), Here the LST was under numerous air alerts and underwent two attacks by Japanese planes, in one of which she shot down 2 suicide planes and assisted in splashing two more.

--107--


Her starboard bow door was badly damaged in striking a sunken LVT during a beaching under darkness and her port side was badly damaged while attempting towing operations with LST-42 alongside. She launched LCT-860 and unloaded the U.S. Marine Corps equipment and disembarked the troops and on February 28, 1945, was en route Saipan with Task Unit 51.16.8, arriving March 4, 1945.

OKINAWA INVASION
On March 6, 1945, she was en route Leyte where she made repairs, changed the starboard screw and held rehearsals with the 96th Division, U.S. Army and Tractor Group E for the Okinawa Invasion. On the 25th she was en route Okinawa with the tractor group aboard in Task Group 51.14.2 (T.U. 51.14.11) loaded with 663 tons, including 16 LVT's and 444 Army personnel and naval ammunition. She arrived at Okinawa on April 1, 1945, and disembarked 4th and 5th wave troops in LVT's unloading cargo and ammunition. She was under daily attacks from the air while at Okinawa and the ship suffered damage to the bottom while unloading at the reef at White Beach No. 1.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On the 11th she was en route Saipan where she remained anchored from the 17th to 28th and then stood out for Pearl Harbor en route San Francisco. Here she was granted 30 days availability for repairs and alterations. On July 3rd she was en route Seattle where she loaded vehicles and 136 Army personnel and stood out for Pearl Harbor on the 16th arriving on the 27th.

TO JAPAN
She left Pearl Harbor July 31, 1945, en route Okinawa via Eniwetok and Saipan, arriving on September 4, 1945. Here she disembarked the troops from Seattle and loaded 5th Air Force equipment and personnel for the occupation of Japan. She arrived at Tokyo Bay September 15, 1945, disembarking troops and unloading equipment and returned to Okinawa on the 23rd. Here at Ie Shima she embarked troops of the 5th Air Force and departed again for Tokyo Bay on the 29th arriving on October 4 to disembark troops and leave for Leyte on October 12, 1945. Arriving at Leyte on October 20, 1945, she proceeded to Samar and then to Umalag, Mindanao, returning to Leyte on November 5, 1945, and proceeding to Manila on the 10th where she once more embarked troops and loaded equipment for Japan, this time reaching Tokyo Bay on the 13th.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
After disembarking troops and unloading equipment she departed Tokyo November 29, 1945, for San Francisco via Saipan and Pearl Harbor, arriving on June 14, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned May 27, 1946.


LST-791
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP - DIVISION 172

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned LST-791 was commissioned at New Orleans on September 27, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. A.W. Duncan, Jr., USCGR, who was succeeded December 5, 1945, by Lt. Edward M. Horton, USCGR. Lt. M. E. Katona, USCGR, became her commanding officer March 27, 1946. After commissioning she proceeded to St. Andrews Bay, Florida for two weeks of shakedown exercises returning to Theodore, Alabama, November 1,1944, for loading.

OKINAWA INVASION
The LST-791 left Mobile, Alabama, November 3, 1944, for Pearl Harbor, via Canal Zone and San Diego, arriving December 10, 1944. On December 29, 1944, she left Pearl Harbor for Leyte via Eniwetok and Kossol Passage, Palau. She departed Leyte March 25, 1945, for the invasion of Okinawa arriving on D-day and remaining until April 11, 1945. Another call was made at Okinawa on May 19, 1945, after returning to Saipan and Guam, and from Okinawa she proceeded on June 22, 1945, for Leyte and thence to Subic Bay and Manila where she arrived August 25, 1945.

TO JAPAN
She left Manila September 3, 1945, and arrived in Tokyo, September 15, 1945, and after unloading returned to Leyte September 26, 1945. She proceeded to Cebu on the 29th and from there to Tacloban on October 3rd, returning to Tokyo Bay on October 30, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Tokyo Bay early in November, 1945, and arrived at San Francisco, December 16, 1945, via Saipan and Pearl Harbor.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned May 28, 1946.


LST-792
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 86 - DIVISION 172

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-792 was commissioned at New Orleans on October 2, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. C. M. Garrett, USCGR, who was succeeded on December 14, 1945, by Lt. (jg) T. C. Pennock, USCG. Her shakedown exercises at St. Andrews Bay, Florida, were completed on October 27, 1944, after which she proceeded to Gulfport, Mississippi for loading.

IWO JIMA INVASION
The 792 departed Gulfport, Mississippi for pearl Harbor via Canal Zone and San Diego on November 7, 1944, arriving at destination December 13, 1944, where cargo was unloaded. On Christmas Eve, 1944, she commenced embarking personnel and loading equipment of the 70th Army and 360th Marines for the Iwo Jima invasion.63 After a few days of maneuvers off Maui, T.H., she entered Kaneohe, Oahu, for logistics and sortied for Iwo Jima via Eniwetok and Saipan, where she arrived February 7, 1945. On February 19, 1945, (D-day) after an uneventful trip she arrived off Iwo Jima to watch the tremendous bombardment and the landing of the first waves. On February 24, 1945, she beached at dusk to unload cargo and shortly after dark underwent one of the first enemy air raids on the island. She opened fire and was shortly thereafter plastered with 13 mortar hits and had to retract from the beach to prevent further damage to ship and personnel. Five men were wounded and two were recommended for the Purple Heart. It was while beached at Iwo Jima that Mr. Rosenthal, the AP photographer who snapped the now immortal picture of the flag raising on Mount Suribachi, and Mr. Hibble, Newsweek correspondent begged and received a meal on the 792, both of them being a little worse for wear having been on the beach since early in the landing. The 792 returned to Saipan on March 4, 1945, where battle damage was repaired and then were readied for

--108--


the invasion of Okinawa.

OKINAWA INVASION
The 792 loaded the 1397th and 1176th Army Engineers and sortied from Saipan the end of March for Okinawa. Arriving here on D-day, April 1, 1945, they were able to get some revenge for the damage done at Iwo Jima by shooting down a Japanese plane at Kerama Rhetto where they were awaiting orders to unload. After unloading the Army Engineers at Hagushi, Okinawa, they departed Okinawa on April 15, 1945, for Ulithi, where they arrived on the 20th. Proceeding to Leyte on the 25th they arrived on May 3, 1945, where they loaded the XXIV Corps Headquarters personnel for Okinawa. They arrived at Okinawa the second time on May 28, 1945, and remained there on garrison duty until October 28, 1945, when they departed for Guam.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
At Guam they loaded 600 Marine Corps personnel under the "Magic Carpet" operations for return to Pearl Harbor, on November 25, 1945. One day out of Guam the starboard screw vibrated off and they were towed to Pearl Harbor by another LST. In the 13 months after their commissioning they had made 90 beachings, 60 on the coral beaches at Okinawa without mishap. However, on the return trip to Guam the general wear had begun to tell in excessive vibrations at high speed due to bent screws. They reached New Orleans via San Diego and the Canal Zone January 15, 1946, Orange, Texas January 27, 1946, and Lake Charles Louisiana April 22, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned April 29, 1946.


LST-793
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 86 - DIVISION 172

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-793 was built by the Dravo Corporation, Neville Island, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and ferried down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans where she was commissioned October 5, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. G. A. Miller, USCG, who was relieved by Lt. R. R. Emric, USCGR on February 6, 1946. After shakedown exercises in St. Andrews Bay, Florida, and post shakedown repairs at New Orleans, she took on board LCT-1275 and crew and departed for Gulfport, Mississippi for loading. Here she received a tank load of barreled asphalt and U.S. Army trucks and departed for Pearl Harbor, T.H., November 13, 1944.

IE SHIMA (OKINAWA) INVASION
The 793 arrived at Pearl Harbor December 13, 1944, via Canal Zone, where she remained until January 27, 1945, unloading tank cargo and being granted two week availability at the Navy Yard. She then took on two pontoon causeways, 2 LCM's, 4 LCVP's and 17 LVT's of the 715th Amtrack Tractor Battalion AUS, plus 79 operating personnel. Also 58 officers and men of the 58th AA Gun Battery AUS and departed Pearl Harbor January 27, 1945, for Leyte where she arrived via Eniwetok, Ulithi and Kossol Roads on February 25, 1945. She remained at San Pedro Bay, Philippine Islands until March 13, 1945, where all LVT's and personnel of the 93rd AA Gun Battery were disembarked. Logistics were carried out and she beached and took aboard 208 men of the 77th Infantry, 305th Battalion AUS, also 17 LVT's of 715th Amphibian Tractor Battalion plus operating personnel and departed for the Okinawa (Ie Shima) invasion on March 19, 1945.64 She arrived at Ie Shima on March 26, 1945, and launched LVT's without difficulty, as well as picking them up again. The LCT-1275 was launched during this period without difficulty. One LSM rammed the 792's stern while anchored off Point Solo causing damage to No. 6 40 MM and gun tub also carrying away stern anchor billboard necessitating jury rig to house same during rest of the operations. Departing the area for Ulithi on April 27, 1945, she arrived May 5, 1945 for logistics and repairs until May 30, 1945. On that date she departed for Leyte arriving June 4, 1945. Here further repairs were completed and from July 1, 1945 to September 1, 1945, she was engaged in carrying aviation units to the Okinawa area from Luzon, Philippine Islands, some typhoon winds being encountered toward the end of the period.

TO OKINAWA AND RETURN TO JAPAN
She returned to Leyte August 26, 1945, and proceeded to Batangas, Luzon, Philippine Islands, where she loaded troops and equipment for Tokyo arriving there on September 16, 1945, encountering two typhoons en route during which the vessel took a slight beating. She returned to Manila September 28, 1945, and loaded more troops and equipment reaching Yokohama October 19, 1945, via Manila and Subic Bay and departed October 27, 1945 returning to Saipan November 3, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
Departing Saipan November 11, 1945, she loaded 210 U.S. Navy personnel and reached Pearl Harbor November 26, 1945, where she discharged personnel. She arrived New Orleans, via San Diego January 15, 1946, and Orange, Texas January 21, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
She arrived Lake Charles, Louisiana, April 3, 1946, and was decommissioned there April 29, 1946.


LST-794
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 87 - DIVISION 173

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-794 was built at Neville Island Shipyard, Coropolis, Pennsylvania, by the Dravo Corporation and after passage down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans was commissioned on October 16, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. W. C. Cain, USCGR. He was succeeded by George C. Gross, Jr., USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. (jg) George E. Goodman, USCGR, on 20 February, 1946. After alterations she proceeded on her shakedown cruise and exercises in St. Andrews Bay, Florida, from October 24, 1944, until she returned to New Orleans on November 9, 1944. She departed for Gulfport, Mississippi on November 15, 1944, for heavy equipment loading.

OKINAWA INVASION
The 794 arrived at Pearl Harbor, via Canal Zone, San Pedro and Port Hueneme, California, on December 23, 1944,and after unloading heavy equipment, commenced loading personnel as passengers for Espiritu Santo and for the Russell Islands. She departed Pearl Harbor January 2, 1945, in company with LSM-75 and without escort. Arriving at Espiritu Santo on January 16, 1945, she debarked passengers and in company with LST-945 proceeded to Banika, Russell Islands without escort. Arriving on the 20th she proceeded to Pavuvu, Russell Islands without escort. Between January 22, 1943 and February 23, 1945, operating under Commanding General, 1st Marine Division she transported troops and cargo between Russell Islands and Guadalcanal.

--109--


Between 24th and 26th of February she loaded personnel and cargo at Tulagi and Guadalcanal in preparation for forthcoming practice exercises for the invasion of Okinawa.65 On March 9, 1945, she re-embarked combat personnel and vehicles (17 LVT's) of 9th Amphibious Tractor Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, and on the 11th re-embarked combat personnel of the 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division, FMF, Pacific and on March 12, 1945, departed Florida Island for Ulithi staging area where she arrived 21 March, 1945. Here on March 23, 1945, more combat personnel of the 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division and two Coast Guard Public Relations men were embarked and on the 25th she departed for Okinawa in convoy, escorted. Arriving at Okinawa April 1, 1945 (D-day) she launched small boats and LVT's in assault waves and put combat personnel ashore in vehicles. On the 2nd she launched LCT-1392 from the main deck and pontoon causeways from the side carry and then started unloading priority cargo. On April 6, 1946, four of the ships company were wounded by shell splinters in firing on an enemy plane, unloading was completed April 8, 1945, and the remaining passengers disembarked and on April 11, 1945, she departed Okinawa en route Saipan, empty and unescorted in convoy arriving April 17, 1945. She departed Saipan May 7, 1945, with another load for Okinawa arriving May 14, 1945, and returning to Saipan May 26, 1945.

OKINAWA-LEYTE RUN
Detached from the 5th Fleet and assigned to the 7th Fleet she departed Saipan unescorted on June 4, 1945, en route Leyte, Philippine Islands, arriving on June 10, 1945, Proceeding to Subic Bay on June 12, 1945, she embarked personnel and equipment of the 1st Radio Squadron Mobile, 5th USAAF for transportation to Okinawa. Proceeding to Lingayen Gulf she joined a convoy there for Okinawa where she arrived June 24, 1945. On the 27th she embarked personnel and equipment of Headquarters Company and companies A & B, 77th Infantry Division U.S. Army, and returned to Leyte arriving on July 4, 1945. On July 5, 1945, she departed Tacloban, Philippine Islands for Cebu, Philippine Islands where she discharged cargo and disembarked troops and returned to Subic Bay in convoy unescorted arriving on July 13, 1945. Here she embarked personnel of the 6th Emergency Rescue Squadron and 421st Night Fighter Squadron, 5th USAAF, with equipment for transportation to Okinawa, arriving via Lingayen Bay, July 23, 1945. Here she detached from convoy and proceeded to Ie Shima to discharge cargo and disembark passengers, returning to Okinawa on the 26th to embark personnel and equipment of the 321st Medical Battalion, 15th Portable Surgical Hospital, 6th Portable Surgical Hospital and 96th Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop (mechanized) all U.S. Army. Departing Okinawa on August 1 she arrived Leyte on the 7th and departed on the 10th for Panducaran, Philippine Islands unescorted, en route Batangas, where she arrived on the 12th. Here equipment of the 27th Infantry Division was loaded and she departed on the 19th for Subic Bay in convoy, unescorted, arriving on the 20th and departing on the 25th for Okinawa, arriving on the 30th. Unloading cargo she embarked personnel and equipment of the 241st Replacement Company, 24th Army Corps COA, the 3rd Signal Battalion DCO, 472nd Amphibious Truck Company and the 29th General Hospital, all U.S. Army for transportation to Jinsen, Korea.

TO JINSEN, KOREA
She departed Okinawa on September 13, 1945, and arrived at Jinsen, Korea, on the 17th, disembarking passengers and unloading cargo and deported on the 23rd for Okinawa, arriving on September 27, 1945. She departed Okinawa on September 29, 1945, to evade a typhoon returning on October 11, 1945, and embarking personnel and equipment of the 377th Station Hospital 3119th Engineers, SV Detachment (fp) and the 31st Station Hospital, all U.S. Army, and departed Okinawa on October 19, 1945, for Jinsen, Korea, where after debarking passengers and unloading she departed October 27, 1945. She arrived at Saishu To on October 28, 1945, and embarked Japanese prisoners of war and U.S. Army Guard Detail for transportation to Sasebo, arriving on October 31, 1945. On November 2, 1945, she departed Sasebo for Okinawa.

SHUTTLE TO TAKU, CHINA
Arriving Okinawa November 4, 1945, she departed on the 10th for Taku, China, arriving on the 16th and taking on Japanese prisoners of war for delivery at Sasebo, Japan, where she arrived December 1, 1945. A second trip to Taku ensued as she left Okinawa on December 3, 1945, and arrived December 7th proceeding to Tsingtao and departing there for Guam December 15, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She returned to Guam December 27, 1945, and proceeded to return to United States, arriving at San Francisco via Pearl Harbor on January 28, 1946.

TO NAVY--DECOMMISSIONED
She was fully manned by Navy personnel on March 29, 1946, and on July 9, 1946, was placed out of commission in reserve.


LST-795
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 86 - DIVISION 172

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-795 was commissioned at New Orleans, Louisiana, on October 9, 1944, with Lt. M. H. Jackson, USCGR, her first commanding officer. He was followed by Lt. Thomas H. Shevlin, USCGR, on September 1, 1945, Lt. Stanley B. Walker, USCGR, on December 31, 1945 and Lt. (jg) James A. Hadley, USCG, on February 4, 1946. After a shakedown cruise and training at St. Andrews Bay, Florida, from October 19, 1944 to November 3, 1944, the 795 spent a week at New Orleans on post-shakedown availability as LCT 1391 was secured to her main deck and then loaded a cargo of jeeps at Gulfport, Mississippi on November 12, 1945.

IWO JIMA INVASION
Departing Gulfport on November 13, 1945, the LST-795 arrived at Pearl Harbor December 13, 1945, via Canal Zone, and on January 3, 1945, departed for Hilo, T.H., to load personnel, vehicles and equipment of the 5th Marines Division (A, B, C, H & S Batteries) after which she departed for Maui, T.H., for maneuvers and landing exercises. These were completed on January 17, 1945, when she left for Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, T.H. On January 22, 1945, she departed for the invasion of Iwo Jima, via Eniwetok and Saipan.66 She arrived off Iwo Jima February 19, 1945, and began disembarking Marine personnel and unloading their equipment for the assault. Lt. (jg) Donald A. Graff was wounded in action and transferred to a hospital ship. On February 24, 1945, she departed for Guam, arriving on the 28th.

OKINAWA INVASION
On March 3, 1945, the 795 departed for Leyte arriving

--110--


on the 8th and by the 14th had completed loading personnel of the 17th Infantry Division and 718th Amphibious Truck Battalion along with 15 LVT's and 3 DUKWs. After rehearsals and anti-air practice she departed for the invasion of Okinawa where as a unit of T.U. 55.3.4 she arrived April 1, 1945, and landed troops and equipment on Yellow Beach using LVTs and DUKWs. She also launched the LCT-1391. Then she beached on Orange Beach to unload ammunition. Two enemy planes were claimed as destroyed by the 795's gun crew during the day. On April 3, 1945, she retracted and anchored off "Orange One". On April 11, 1945, she was attached to Task Group 55.3. On the 12th one enlisted man was wounded by shrapnel during an air attack and on the 15th seven enlisted men were wounded in the same manner. On April 18, 1945, she was attached to T.U. 51.22.3 as Phibs Pac Reserve Ship and from then until September 12, 1945, remained at Okinawa acting successively as Fleet Freight Ship and as part of LST Garrison Group. From July 19 to 21st, 1945, she executed the Typhoon Plan. From April 1, 1945, to August 15, 1945, there were 235 "Flash Red" warnings received aboard the LST-795.

TO JAPAN
On September 12, 1945, the 795 departed Okinawa for Nagasaki, Japan, arriving on the 14th. She departed Nagasaki for Okinawa on September 20, 1545, arriving on the 23rd. Here she executed the Typhoon Plan from September 29th to October 3rd, and from October 8th to 11th, and then departed for Saipan towing LST-890 on October 19, 1545. arriving there on October 27th for 10 days availability.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On November 11, 1545, she departed for Pearl Harbor carrying 205 Naval personnel as passengers, arriving at Orange, Texas, January 28, 1546 via San Pedro, Canal Zone and New Orleans, Louisiana.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Lake Charles, Louisiana, April 29, 1946.


LST-796

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-796 was commissioned at New Orleans on October 19, 1944. Her first and only commanding officer was Lt. Edward A. Dunton, USCGR. After shakedown exercises at St. Andrews Bay, Florida, through November 11, 1944, she proceeded to Gulfport, Mississippi to load for operations in the Pacific Area.

AT OKINAWA
The 796 departed Gulfport for Pearl Harbor, via Canal Zone, San Diego and San Pedro on November 21, 1944, arriving at destination December 21, 1944, where, after unloading she took on troops and equipment and conducted maneuvers preparatory to proceeding to Okinawa.67 She arrived at Leyte February 25, 1945, via Eniwetok, Ulithi and Kossol Passage. She proceeded from Leyte to Okinawa. (Records do not indicate that the 796 took part in the invasion on D-day 1 April, 1945). She departed Okinawa on April 25, 1945, for Saipan where she remained until June 4, 1945. From June 10, 1945, until October 12, 1945, she completed four round trips one between Saipan and Leyte, two between Okinawa and Leyte and one between Okinawa and Manila.

TO KOREA, JAPAN AND CHINA
Leaving Manila on October 12, 1945, the 796 proceeded to Lingayen Gulf where occupation troops and their equipment were loaded for Jinsen, Korea. Departing Jinsen on November 14, 1945, she reached Taku, China on November 16, 1945, to load Japanese prisoners of war and return them to Sasebo, Japan on December 1, 1945. She next went to Tsingtao, China, leaving there December 15, 1945, for Guam.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On December 29, 1945, she left Guam for home, arriving at New Orleans March 22, 1946, via Pearl Harbor, San Pedro and Canal Zone.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned on April 17, 1946.


LST-829
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 87 - DIVISION 173

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-829 was built by the American Bridge Company at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and sailed down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans where on October 23, 1944, she was placed in full commission with Lt. Harry A. Friedenberg, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded on March 7, 1945, by Lt. J. H. Judge, USCGR. Off Panama City, Florida, the ship next went through two weeks of shakedown exercises and when this was completed returned to New Orleans where LCT-1406 was loaded bn her main deck. A general cargo of telephone poles and heavy equipment for Pearl Harbor was taken aboard at Gulfport, Mississippi, from November 22, 1944, and on the 26th she sailed for Pearl Harbor, via Canal Zone, San Diego and San Pedro arriving on January 5, 1945.

KERAMA RHETTO
Here combat preparations were completed, four warping tugs being loaded on the ship's sides at Pearl Harbor; 200 drums of gasoline and 100 tons operational gear being taken aboard at Kewale Basin, Honolulu and off Koko Head a tank deck load of amphibious tractors manned by the 773rd amphibious tractor battalion. She sailed for Leyte, Philippine Islands on January 27, 1945, arriving February 25, 1945, via Eniwetok, Ulithi and Kossol Passage. Here on March 7th elements of Battalion 1, 306th Infantry Regiment, 77th Division, came aboard. Staging operations were concluded in mid-March and on March 18, 1945, sailed for the invasion of Okinawa.68 Her mission was to capture and secure the Kerama Rhetto, a small group of islands 15 miles to the southwest of Okinawa. During the early morning of March 26, 1945, as the islands loomed through the mist, two Japanese Zekes attacked and were promptly knocked down by escorting destroyers. At 0627, 30 minutes before H hour, the 829 launched its LVT's, packed to the gunnel with infantry, just off Geruma Beach and under the protective fire of shells, rockets and bombs from destroyers, LSM's and Navy planes, attacked beach Yellow Tare Two, followed close astern by two gasoline "bowsers" LCVP's. Thus the Coast Guard manned LST landed the first troops in World War II to invade and secure Japanese colonial soil, Iwo Jima being a Japanese Mandate. [NOT! Iwo Jima was Japanese territory, annexed in 1861, and governed as part of the Tokyo Prefecture.] The 306th quickly overran the island, wiping out Japanese resistance and raised the 829's ensign over the first Ryukyu Island to be taken in World War II. Meanwhile the Army Artillery Battery was landed from the 829 and made preparations for shelling Okinawa whose invasion was not scheduled until April 1, 1945. Next day the troops, reloaded, were sent against Purple Zebra Two Beach on Tokashiki Shima. First 25 waves of Corsairs,

--111--


Helldivers and TBF's from Navy carriers fired their rockets at possible machine gun and mortar emplacements on the beach and in the surrounding cliffs and straffed the hills. Simultaneously, three destroyers threw hundreds of rounds of 5"/38 into the beach and back country, and LSM rocket ships and LCI mortar ships added their punch. As the waves of LVT's slowly rumbled toward the beach, LCI's, LCS's and LST's opened with 40 MM to cover their approach. Though only a few hundred yards from the scene, it became increasingly difficult to see what was going on ashore due to the clouds of thick, black and gray smoke lying over the assault area. Once ashore the 77th met stubborn opposition on the hills. Fanatic Japanese civilians, frightened by Japanese soldiers' stories of American torture and rape, killed their families and committed suicide. Troops from the 829 uncovered and destroyed scores of Japanese suicide boats, hidden in caves and underbrush all over the island, and captured charts and intelligence papers which showed the proposed use of these craft to combat the invasion of Okinawa. The attack route to the probable American anchorages had been carefully planned. During the first night of the invasion the LST's retired to sea in convoy to avoid possible Japanese suicide boat or midget submarine attacks in the confined waters of the Rhetto. A major Japanese air raid on shipping occurred on March 31, 1945. On April 2, 1945, the LCT-1400 was launched. That night the 829 joined a retirement convoy that steamed for 11 days about 250 miles southeast of Okinawa as a reserve force. Arriving at Hagushi on April 14, 1945, the 829 experienced her first air raid that night in eleven days. On the 15th the 829 rated an assist in downing one Japanese Zeke.

IE SHIMA INVASION
On April 16, 1945, the 829 upped anchor to take part in the initial assault on Ie Shima, a small island near the tip of Okinawa and of importance for its fine air field. The 773 amtracks and Battalion 1, 306th Infantry were landed on Blue Beach One and though swiftly overrunning the western slopes and capturing the field were soon up against tough opposition around the base of "sugar loaf" hill where the Japanese had constructed a strong line and were holding out in tombs and caves. It was here that Ernie Pyle, beloved Scripps-Howard columnist, met his death by Japanese machine gun fire. The Japanese attacked shipping lying off Ie Shima that morning with a force of 35 planes most of which were unable to pierce the destroyer and cruiser ring protecting the transports and landing operations. It appeared, however, that 12 got through, five being splashed within a mile or so of the 829 by 5"/38 fire from cruisers and destroyers. For a week after this the 829 went to Ie Shima early each morning and retired to Naga Wan or off Hagushi every evening. On April 26th the troops were reloaded from Ie Shima and landed for the fighting on the southern tip of Okinawa. Two nights, the 27th and 28th of April, were spent at Okinawa subject to almost constant red air alerts, making smoke and sounding general quarters. On April 29th the 829 left Okinawa for Ulithi arriving on May 5th and remaining there until June 7, 1945, for repairs. Then proceeding to Saipan she loaded elements of the 101st Sea Bees and on June 26, 1945, again arrived at Okinawa. Here on July 10th, having loaded elements of the 6th Marines she departed for Guam arriving on the 16th. Here she took Army airborne squadrons, Marine truck and tractor companies and See Bee units to Saipan and Tinian returning to Guam August 30, 1945.

TO JAPAN
Proceeding to Tinian on the 31st and loading occupation troops the 829 proceeded to Nagasaki on September 17, 1945, arriving on September 28, 1945. En route several floating mines were narrowly missed. Unloaded she departed same day but returned when 100 miles out at sea to avoid an approaching typhoon. She set out again October 1, 1945, playing tag with three separate typhoons on her way to Manila which was reached on October 14, 1945. On October 17, 1945, she left for Lingayen Gulf to load service elements of the 6th Army Division for Nagoya which she reached October 28, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
Leaving Nagoya on November 4, 1945, she proceeded on the long Journey home via Saipan and Pearl Harbor. She reached San Francisco December 16, 1945, and then proceeded through the Canal to New Orleans, Sabine Pass and Orange, Texas, which was reached January 27, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Lake Charles, Louisiana on April 29, 1946.


LST-830
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 87 - DIVISION 174

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-830 was built by the American Bridge Company of Ambridge, Pennsylvania, and after being ferried down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans was commissioned there on October 28, 1944. Lt. Gordon Rowe, USCGR, was her first commanding officer. He was succeeded on August 13, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Joseph V. Wiebert, USCGR. From November 6, 1944, to November 19, 1944, she was engaged in shakedown exercises at St. Andrews Bay, Florida. Returning to New Orleans the LCT-1411 was placed aboard and she proceeded to Gulfport, Mississippi, to load a cargo of Quonset huts for Pearl Harbor, via Canal Zone, San Diego and San Francisco.

AT OKINAWA
She arrived at Pearl Harbor February 22, 1945, and after conferences by her officers and briefings in connection with the invasion of Okinawa, departed March 4, 1945.69 Stopping at Eniwetok and Saipan she was detached from T.U. 54.13.4 on April 2, 1945, and proceeded to Kerama Rhetto. On April 7, 1945, she departed for the western beaches of Okinawa. En route four enlisted men were seriously wounded from enemy action and transferred to a hospital ship. On April 9, 1945, she launched the LCT-1411 off the Okinawa beaches and on the 11th beached at Orange Beach to unload cargo. On the 19th she retracted from the beach and anchored off Hagushi and returned to Kerama Rhetto on the 21st to take aboard a cargo of empty cartridge and shell cases, departing on the 29th for Ulithi, where she arrived on May 5, 1945. During her stay in the Okinawa area she went to general quarters 64 tines for a total of 70 hours and 16 minutes.

TRANSPORTATION IN REAR AREAS
Departing Ulithi on May 31, 1945, she beached at Manus on June 4, 1945, to take on general cargo, part of which she discharged at Nissan Atoll, Green Islands on June 9, 1945, and part of which was discharged at Cape Torokina, Bougainville on June 14, 1945, where general cargo was also loaded for the Australian Army to be unloaded same day at Gazelle Harbor, Bougainville. Here remaining cargo was discharged at Russell Islands on June 18, 1945, and she then proceeded to Lunga Point, Guadalcanal being thence routed on to Espiritu

--112--


Santo where she arrived on June 24, 1945, to load a cargo of vehicles for Guam. She arrived at Guam, July 9, 1945, and after discharging cargo proceeded to Saipan where she joined a convoy for Ie-Shima on August 1, 1945, discharging cargo and personnel on Red Beach T-4 on August 7, 1945, and departing for Hagushi, Okinawa on the 10th. She returned to Saipan August 19, 1945, and proceeded to Tinian, and Guam where on September 3, 1945, she took aboard cargo and personnel attached to Headquarters, Second Separate Engineer Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in the Field. Arriving at Saipan on September 11th she received instructions for the occupation of Sasebo, Japan.

TO JAPAN
Departing Saipan on September 14, 1945, she arrived at Sasebo on September 22, 1945. Here she beached and unloaded cargo and personnel departing on the 25th for San Pedro Bay, Leyte, where she arrived October 2, 1945. From Leyte she went to Bugo, Mindanao, Philippine Islands to load cargo and personnel of the 477th Engineer Maintenance Company, returning to Leyte October 12, 1945. She next proceeded to Okayama, Japan, via San Fernando, Philippine Islands, and then returned to Saipan.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
Leaving Saipan November 19, 1945, she returned to San Francisco December 20, 1945, via Pearl Harbor. Then, proceeding through the Panama Canal, she reached New Orleans February 5, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
She arrived Lake Charles, Louisiana on February 11, 1946, and was decommissioned there on April 29, 1946.


LST-831
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 67 - DIVISION 174

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-831 was built by the American Bridge Company, Ambridge, Pennsylvania, and after being ferried down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers was commissioned at New Orleans on November 6, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Robert T. Leary, USCGR, who was succeeded by Lt. D. H. Treadwell and then by Lt. C.C. Tomshack, USCG, on March 11, 1946. From November 17, 1944, to November 30, 1944, she was at St. Andrews Bay, Florida, on shakedown training and exercises, after which she was loaded at Theodore, Alabama, with 1000 tons of ammunition for Ulithi and departed Mobile on December 17, 1944.

AT OKINAWA
The 631 reached Ulithi via Canal Zone, San Diego, Pearl Harbor and Eniwetok on February 16, 1945, and after discharging cargo departed on March 1, 1945, for Guam and Saipan. There on March 11, 1945, she loaded 326 officers and men of "L" Company, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, and after a three day rehearsal she got underway for Okinawa on March 25, 1945, as part of the Demonstration Tractor Group that made feints at the southeastern coast of Okinawa on the morning of Love Day and Love Plus 1 (April 1st and 2nd, 1945).70 No damage was suffered though suicide attacks were made on LST's to port, one (LST-884) being completely gutted by fire after being so hit. On the morning of Love Day (April 1, 1945) 148 officers and men of the 2nd Marines were taken aboard from the USS Hinsdale which had received a suicide plane in the engine room. No troops were disembarked at this time and after laying off Okinawa until April 11, 1945, the 831 returned to Saipan and disembarked the troops except for small maintenance details for equipment which remained on board. On May 22, 1945, 350 officers and men of "K" Company, 3rd Battalion, 8th Regiment, 2nd Marine Division were embarked with additional equipment.

IHEYE SHIMA INVASION
Departing for Okinawa on May 24, 1945, the troops aboard were landed in the assault of Iheya Shima from June 3rd to June 5th, 1945, operations being held up somewhat by threatened bad weather. Departing Okinawa June 10, 1945, she arrived at Leyte on the 15th and after 6 days availability departed June 29, 1945, again for Okinawa. During the next two months two trips were made to Okinawa carrying Fifth Air Force personnel and equipment from Southern Luzon and returning with units of the 706th Tank Battalion. During these stays at Okinawa considerable fog oil was expended in making smoke but no ammunition in repulsing enemy planes attacks. No personnel casualties were suffered.

TO JAPAN
As news of Japan's surrender was received on August 15, 1945, she was steaming into Leyte Gulf with a cargo consigned for Iloilo, Panay, Philippine Islands, where she arrived on the 20th. From there she went to Tacloban, Lemery and Batangas where she took aboard half of the 760th Field Artillery Battalion for transportation to Yokohama. She arrived there September 17, 1945, and returned to Batangas, via Manila, October 3, 1945, where elements of the 3075th QM Baking Company, 43rd Engineer CB and 1180th Construction Group embarked for Yokohama via Manila and Subic Bays. She left Yokohama October 25, 1945 for Manila via Okinawa arriving November 3, 1945. From there she went to Saipan.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
Departing Saipan December 13, 1945, she reached New Orleans on February 24, 1946, via Pearl Harbor, San Francisco and Canal Zone.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned April 15, 1946.


LST-832
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 87 - DIVISION 174

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-832 was built by the American Bridge Company at Ambridge, Pennsylvania and was ferried down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans where she was placed in full commission on November 4, 1944, with Lt. W. H. Young, USCGR, as her first commanding officer. On the morning of November 15, 1944, she reported for shakedown exercises at Panama City, Florida, which continued until November 27, 1944. Returning to New Orleans she took aboard the LCT-1412 and departed New Orleans December 5, 1944, for Mobile, Alabama, where she loaded 1400 tons of ammunition at Theodore, Alabama, and departed Mobile on December 14, 1944, for the Pacific.

AT OKINAWA
Proceeding alone unescorted to the Panama Canal she arrived at San Diego, January 3, 1945, and at Pearl Harbor, January 17, 1945. She departed Pearl Harbor January 24, 1945, for Ulithi stopping at Eniwetok on February 4, 1945, and arriving at destination while unloading alongside into a Victory ship and had to be drydocked for repairs until the 18th when she departed for Guam. She arrived there March 6,

--113--


1945, and at Saipan March 10, 1945. Here from March 10th until April 12th she acted as harbor water barge. She was not to be in the invasion at Okinawa on April 1, 1945, but did leave Saipan April 12th combat loaded with Navy Sea Bees for the east side of Okinawa.71 She arrived April 17, 1945, being in the first task force to enter Chimu Wan. She beached at 0200 next morning and was unloaded and retracted 8 hours later. She remained in Chimu Wan four days and nights, the crew beat condition one almost the entire time, with nightly small raids by enemy planes but none directly attacking the ships at Chimu. The land fighting several miles inland, provided quite a show with tracers, mortars and flares. On the 20th she launched her LCT and then departed Okinawa on the 21st.

TRANSPORTATION SERVICE--PHILIPPINES--OKINAWA
She arrived at Saipan on the 27th for 3 days availability. On May 7th, after a short trip to Tinian where she embarked 2 officers and 83 men together with equipment of the First Separate Engineer Battalion, U.S. Marines, she departed Saipan in convoy for a second trip to Okinawa arriving on the 13th riding at anchor amid constant "red alerts" after unloading at Hagushi until the 19th. She returned in convoy to Saipan on May 26th, 1945. On June 4th she departed for Leyte arriving on the 10th. Loaded with construction equipment she again reached Okinawa on June 26th. After unloading she took aboard the 13 officers and 243 men of the war-weary 77th Division scheduled for a rest in the Philippines and sailed in convoy for Leyte on July 1, 1945. After three days at Leyte the 632 reached Danao, Cebu, on the 10th where she unloaded her troops and returned to Subic Bay on the 14th. Here she embarked pilots and ground crews of the 499th Bombardment Squadron, Fifth Air Force (47 officers and 231 men) and proceeded in convoy on the 20th to Ie Shima arriving on the 24th. She beached on the 25th and retracted next morning proceeding to Hagushi to load 18 officers and 246 men of the war-weary 303rd Field Artillery Battalion of the 96th Division for rest in the Philippines. She left August 2, 1945, for Leyte departing early to avoid and ride out a threatened typhoon. She was attacked by an enemy sub en route and three torpedoes narrowly missed her. After a two day stop at Leyte she proceeded to Mindoro to unload on the 12th and proceed to Batangas on the 13th. Here she loaded Jeeps and jeep trailers of the 11th Airborne Division, returning to Subic Bay on the 20th for five days of logistics. She departed on the 25th for Okinawa in convoy arriving on the 30th, anchoring at Hagushi for seven days during a typhoon alert. Then she beached and unloaded and proceeded to Naga Wan to load equipment of the 27th Division. This it appears was a mistake. When 75% loaded she was ordered to unload and report to the 5th Amphibious Group. After a week's negotiation she was permitted to retain her load of equipment.

TO JAPAN
Departing Okinawa on the 21st of September, 1945, she anchored off Yokohama, Japan on the 25th and on October 1, 1945, left in convoy under escort for Senamu, Japan, a little fishing village to the north. Here she arrived on the 7th and unloaded. She departed for Yokohama on the 9th but en route put into Ominato, Japan on the 10th to avoid a typhoon, leaving there on the 12th and finally reaching Yokohama on the 10th. After 8 days availability here she departed for Subic Bay arriving November 1, 1945. Proceeding to Manila she loaded more occupation equipment and troops for Tokyo arriving there on November 19, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
From Tokyo she returned to the United States via Saipan Pearl Harbor, San Pedro, Canal Zone, New Orleans and Orange, Texas, where she finally arrived March 3, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned April 30, 1946.


LST-884
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 87 - DIVISION 174

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-884 was commissioned at New Orleans on October 30, 1944, her first and only commanding officer being Lt. C. C. Pearson, USCG. After shakedown exercises in St. Andrews Bay, Florida, she proceeded on November 21, 1944 to Belle Chasse, Louisiana and thence to Gulfport, Mississippi, where she loaded for Pearl Harbor and departed November 30, 1944.

IWO JIMA INVASION
Arriving at Pearl Harbor via Canal Zone and San Diego she immediately loaded and prepared for the invasion of Iwo Jima.72 She arrived off Iwo Imma on D-day, February 19, 1945, and after beaching to land her troops and equipment remained in the area unloading transports to the beach until early in March. She arrived at Saipan March 11, 1945, to prepare for the Okinawa Invasion.

OKINAWA INVASION
The 884 arrived off Okinawa on D-day, April 1, 1945, and after unloading proceeded to Kerama Rhetto where she remained until April 14, 1945. She returned to Guam April 23rd and then proceeded to Pearl Harbor via Ulithi and Eniwetok arriving there on June 14, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned on February 15, 1946.


LST-885
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 87 - DIVISION 173

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-885 was commissioned on October 26, 1944, at New Orleans, Louisiana. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Oliver McIntosh, USCGR. He was succeeded on August 13, 1945, by Lt. Caldwell Davis, USCG. After two weeks of shakedown exercises at St. Andrews Bay, Florida, she arrived at Belle Chaise, Louisiana on November 17, 1944, for post shakedown availability, proceeding to Gulfport, Mississippi on November 23, 1944, for loading for the Pacific. She departed for Pearl Harbor on November 28, 1944.

AT OKINAWA
The 885 arrived at Pearl Harbor on January 5, 1945, via Canal Zone, San Diego and San Pedro and after unloading remained in the Hawaiian area loading for the forward area until January 27, 1945, when she departed for Leyte via Eniwetok, Ulithi and Kossol Passage. She arrived at Leyte February 25, 1945. Here preparations were made for the invasion of Okinawa.73 She arrived off Okinawa April 14, 1945, and after unloading remained in the area until April 29, 1945, when she returned to Ulithi on May 5, 1945, for availability until the 30th.

--114--


TRANSPORTATION DUTIES
From June 4th when she arrived at Manila, the 885 visited Espiritu Santo, Guam, Saipan, Okinawa, Guam, Saipan and Okinawa in the order named.

TO JAPAN
At Manila she took aboard occupation troops for Japan arriving at Tokyo, via Okinawa, October 2, 1946.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
From Tokyo she returned to the United States via Saipan, Pearl Harbor, San Pedro, Canal Zone, New Orleans and Orange, Texas, where she arrived February 9, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
On February 22, 1946, she arrived at Lake Charles, Louisiana, where she was decommissioned April 29, 1946.


LST-886
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 87 - DIVISION 174

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-886 was commissioned at New Orleans on November 2, 1944.Her first commanding officer was Lt. W. P. Fitzpatrick, USCGR, who was succeeded on November 1, 1945, by Lt. W. P. Johnson, USCGR. After shakedown exercises at St. Andrews Bay, Florida, she proceeded on November 25th to Belle Chaise for post shakedown availability and thence to Theodore, Alabama to load ammunition, departing Mobile on December 10, 1944, for Pearl Harbor.

AT OKINAWA
She arrived at Pearl Harbor on January 14, 1945, and after four days proceeded to Guam via Eniwetok and Ulithi arriving February 19, 1945. From Guam she returned to San Diego, California, She left San Diego on February 28 for Pearl Harbor arriving there on March 11, 1945. From there she proceeded to Saipan and then to Okinawa where she arrived on 17 April, 1945. She returned to Saipan on May 2, 1945.

TRANSPORTATION SAIPAN--TINIAN--GUAM
From May 2, 1945, until she departed Saipan for home on November 20, 1945, the 885 engaged in various transportation duties which kept her running between Saipan, Tinian and Guam.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She left Saipan November 20, 1945, for San Francisco, via Pearl Harbor, arriving December 15, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned May 10, 1946.


LST-887
FLOTILLA 29 - GROUP 87 - DIVISION 174

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-887 was built by the Dravo Corporation Shipyard, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania and ferried down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans, where she was fully commissioned on November 7, 1944. Her first ccmmanding officer was Lt. Loring Chandler, USCGR, who was succeeded by Lt. Robert A. Orr, USCGR, on November 11, 1945. After loading supplies, provisions, fuel and ammunition she departed for two weeks shakedown exercises at Panama City, Florida, (St. Andrews Bay) on November 7, 1944. From there she proceeded to Gulfport, Mississippi, where she loaded Quonset huts, plywood, glass and jeeps for Pearl Harbor, departing on December 3, 1944.

AT OKINAWA
She reached Pearl Harbor on February 24, 1945, via New Orleans, Canal Zone, San Diego and Puget Sound, at which latter port she loaded 129 officers and men, with vehicles and equipment of the 1901st Engineers Aviation Battalion and the 135th Engineer A Regiment. At Pearl Harbor on March 3, 1945 282 additional troops of the above units were brought aboard including one officer and 22 men of the 128th Causeway Battalion, USNCB. Departing Pearl Harbor March 4, 1945, as part of Task Group 51.13.4 she stopped one day each at Eniwetok and Saipan and reached Okinawa on the morning of April 2, 1945, proceeding to Hagushi Beaches on the west side of Okinawa.74 Here she beached on Orange Beach and commenced unloading to pontoons from the coral reef 150 yards to seaward. Unloading was completed on the 4th and the 887 anchored in the Okinawa area until April 16, 1945, amid daily air alerts but with no plane coming close enough to attack until the 6th of April. From the 6th there were several raids each day doing damage to nearby ships. Loading 60 personnel and DUKWs of the 726th Infantry Tractor Battalion on the 9th, the 887 proceeded to Kerama Rhetto for a day returning to Okinawa on the 10th. 8 members of the crew were wounded while at anchor during the next ten days and were later awarded the Purple Heart. On the 12th the 887 took credit for shooting down a Japanese plane which had approached at a low altitude with no ships intervening. The plane burst into flames and sunk 600 yards off the port quarter. There were two severe storms during the period and many boats broached, with the smaller ones being lost. She departed Okinawa on April 16, 1945, for Ulithi in convoy arriving there on the 22nd for repairs and remaining until May 10, 1945.

TRANSPORT DUTIES
She departed Ulithi for Guadalcanal on May 10, 1945, via Manus and Russell Islands, and there embarked 77 members of the 11th Motor Transport Battalion and 4th Amphibious Tractor Battalion of the 3rd U.S. Marine Corps, departing for Guam, via Eniwetok on May 26, 1945. Arriving at Guam June 9, 1945, she unloaded and proceeded to Saipan arriving on the 16th to load 4400 drums of 80 octane gasoline for Okinawa, where she arrived on the 26th. After unloading at Nago Wan she proceeded to Naha to take aboard 220 men of the 6th Assault Tractor Battalion, 9th Amphibious Tractor Battalion and the 6th Assault Signal Company of the U.S. Marine Corps who were veterans of many campaigns ultimately bound for the United States. They were disembarked at Guam, July 11, 1945, and the ship returned to Saipan July 12, 1945. Here she underwent logistics until July 29, 1945, when she departed for Agrihan, Marianas loaded with 350 men and equipment of the 3rd Battalion, 2nd Division, 10th U.S. Marine Corps. The same troops were returned to Saipan on August 12th. On August 27th the 887 departed for Peleliu where she arrived on August 31, 1945, to embark 227 men and equipment of the 10th Service Battalion, U.S. Marine Corps and the 8th AAF Radio Squadron. Departing Peleliu on September 2, 1945, she arrived at Saipan on the 6th and after unloading the Marines, took on more cargo and the Army unit to Guam, returning to Saipan on the 14th.

--115--


TO JAPAN
Here she was attached to the 5th Amphibious Force and loaded with 286 men of the 43rd U.S. Navy See Bees and 2nd Assault Signal Corps, U.S. Marine Corps, for Japan. She left Saipan on the 17th of September and arrived at Nagasaki on the 24th. Unloading was completed on the 27th and she proceeded to Sasebo to join a Task Group leaving for Manila on the 28th. Arriving at Manila on October 6, 1945, she departed for Lingayen Gulf on the 10th arriving next day to take aboard 225 personnel and cargo of the 75th Amphibious Tractor Company, 750th Quartermaster Railhead Battalion, 38th Post Surgical Hospital Battalion and 198th Signal Photograph Battalion, USA, and departing for Mitsuhama, Japan on the 18th. Beaching at Mitsuhama on October 25th, 1945, she unloaded and departed for Manila on the 29th. She heaved to at Hirowan for a day (30th October) in a severe tropical storm and she arrived at Manila November 6, 1945. On the 9th she proceeded to Subic Bay for drydocking. She left for Batangas following her availability and from there proceeded to Mindoro on November 30th returning to Batangas December 3rd and proceeding to Manila on the 8th. She arrived at Lingayen on December 15, 1945, and picking up troops to be returned home, sailed for the United States on December 16, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She arrived at San Francisco on January 30, 1946, via Guam and Pearl Harbor.

NAVY MANNED
By March 29, 1946, she was completely Navy manned.


LST-1148
FLOTILLA 34 - GROUP 102 - DIVISION 203

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-1148 was built by the Chicago Bridge and Iron Works at Seneca, Illinois, launched May 21, 1945, and ferried down the Mississippi River to New Orleans where she was commissioned June 9, 1945, with Lt. Richard Goodhart, USCGR, her first commanding officer. He was succeeded on July 7, 1944, by Lt. Ernest W. Payne, USCG. She proceeded to Galveston, Texas, on June 17, 1945, for two weeks of shakedown exercises and then returned to New Orleans on July 2, 1945. Here she took aboard supplies, PT boats and Navy personnel as passengers and departed July 13, 1945 for Pearl Harbor via Canal Zone, San Diego and Seattle, unloading her PT boats at the latter point. She arrived at Pearl Harbor August 27, 1945, and after unloading took aboard Naval personnel as passengers for Okinawa. Here she arrived October 26, 1945, and departed two days later for Sasebo, Japan where she arrived October 31, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On December 10, 1945, she arrived at Okinawa on her way home and arrived at San Pedro January 30, 1946, via Saipan and Pearl Harbor.

NAVY MANNED
Here she was completely Navy manned by April 19, 1946.


LST-1150
FLOTILLA 34 - GROUP 102 - DIVISION 203

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-1150 was built by the Chicago Bridge and Iron Works at Seneca, Illinois, and ferried down the Mississippi River to New Orleans where she was commissioned June 20, 1945. After being outfitted she got underway for Galveston where she underwent shakedown exercises from June 29 to July 11, 1945, returning to New Orleans July 12, 1945, for 7 days of post shakedown availability. She then proceeded to Gulfport on the 20th for loading 385 long tons of pontoons on main deck and as side carry. On July 23, 1945, she was underway for Mobile, Alabama, where from July 23rd to 29th she loaded 719 long tons of smoke pots on her tank deck, departing on July 29, 1945, for Pearl Harbor, via Canal Zone and San Francisco, arriving on October 9, 1945.

TO JAPAN
She departed Pearl Harbor October 17, 1945, for Wakayama, Japan, via Okinawa arriving on November 7, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
From Wakayama, after unloading, she returned home to the United States stopping at Osaka, Saipan, Pearl Harbor and San Francisco and arriving at San Diego on January 5, 1946.

NAVY MANNED
Here she was completely Navy manned on February 8, 1946.


LST-1152
FLOTILLA 34 - GROUP 102 - DIVISION

[See also Dictionary of American Fighting Ships]

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LST-1152 was commissioned at New Orleans on June 30, 1943, with Lt. Frank W. Kickson, Jr, USCGR, as her first commanding officer. He was succeeded on September 5, 1942, by Lt. Charles W. Rinaca, Jr. USCGR, and on September 22, 1945 by Lt. (jg) Herman W. Pettingill, Jr. USCG. Proceeding to Galveston via Mobile on July 6, 1945, she arrived there on July 10th and underwent shakedown exercises until July 22, 1945, when she returned to New Orleans for loading. She departed New Orleans August 3, 1945, for Pearl Harbor via Canal Zone and Seattle, arriving on September 20, 1945.

AT OKINAWA
Departing Pearl Harbor October 21, 1945, she arrived at Okinawa on November 7, 1945, and returned to Guam December 25, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Guam January 2, 1946, for San Francisco via Pearl Harbor arriving on February 3, 1946.

NAVY MANNED
She proceeded to Bremerton, Washington arriving there on March 14, 1946. By March 22, 1946, she was completely Navy manned.


--116--


LCI(L)-83
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 103 - DIVISION 205

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-83 was commissioned on January 23, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. George F. Hutchins son, Jr. USCGR, Lt. (jg) Lester Brauser, USCG (4 December, 1944) Ensign George W. Miller, USCG (2 February, 1946) and Lt. (jg) Warren D. Ayres, USCGR (9 March, 1946).

SICILY--ITALY--NORMANDY INVASION
She participated in the Sicilian assault of July 9, 1943 and Salerno landings on September 9, 1943.75 The LCI(L)-83 was damaged in the French invasion area on June 17, 1944.76 She left the United Kingdom on October 5, 1944, and arriving at Charleston Navy Yard October 24, 1944 remained there until December 1, 1944, when she left for the Pacific area via Key West, Canal Zone, San Diego and Pearl Harbor.

TO OKINAWA
Departing Pearl Harbor on April 20, 1945, she proceeded to Okinawa via Eniwetok, Guam and Ulithi, arriving on May 28, 1945.77 Here she was assigned to smoke screen duty for major war vessels bombarding the Naha area.

TO JAPAN
These duties continued until early September. On September 11, 1945, the LCI(L) reached Wakayama as part of the Mine Destruction Unit in Kii Suido. On October 25, 1945, she joined a Task Group engaged in destroying mines in the Korean Straits between Korea and Sentinel Island. A broken propeller shaft brought her back to Sasebo on November 1, 1945, where she remained until the 25th undergoing repairs.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Guam on December 5, 1945, for return to the United States and reached Galveston, Texas on March 2, 1946, via Pearl Harbor, San Diego and the Canal Zone.

DECOMMISSIONEDShe was decommissioned at Galveston April 9, 1946.


LCI(L)-84
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 103 - DIVISION 205

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-84 was commissioned on January 23, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. (jg) Everett Maina, USCGR, Lt. (jg) R. F. Treinen, USCGR, Lt. (jg) H. L. Read, USCGR, and Lt. (jg) Marshall S. Setman, USCGR.

SICILY-ITALY INVASION
She participated in the Sicilian assault on July 9, 1943, and Salerno landings on September 9, 1943.78 After participating in the invasion of France79 the LCI(L) left the United Kingdom October 4, 1944, for Charleston, South Carolina, where she remained undergoing overhaul and repair until December 15, 1944. On the day she departed for Pearl Harbor via Key West, Canal Zone and San Diego, arriving April 18, 1945, the LCI(L) being attached to a ship training group at Coronado, California, from January 23rd to April 4th, 1945.

AT OKINAWA
Proceeding to Okinawa via Eniwetok, Guam, Ulithi and Leyte she arrived there on May 28, 1945, and was assigned to carrying passengers and mail between nearby islands.

TO JAPAN
Departing Okinawa early in September 1945 she arrived at Wakayama September 11, 1945, where she joined a mine destruction unit operating in Kii Suido.80 On October 19, 1945, she proceeded to Sasebo where on October 26 she was designated a mine disposal vessel on the "Skagway" sweeping operation in the East China Sea. She returned to Sasebo from this duty on November 1, 1945, and remained there until the 12th when she proceeded to Nagoya. On November 27 she left Nagoya for Saipan, arriving December 3, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
Departing Saipan December 8, 1945, she arrived at Galveston, Texas, February 28, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Orange, Texas, April 13, 1946.


LCI(L)-85
FLOTILLA 10 - GROUP 29 - DIVISION 57

COMMISSIONED--SUNK
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-85 was commissioned on January 1, 1943. She participated in the Sicilian assault of July 9, 1943, and in the Salerno landing of September 9, 1943.81 She was sunk in the Normandy Invasion on June 6, 1944.82 There were no casualties.


LCI(L)-86

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-86 was commissioned January 29, 1943. Her commanding officer on April 2, 1944, was Lt. (jg) Harold A. Levin, USCGR.

SICILY ITALY INVASION--NORMANDY INVASION
She participated in the Sicilian occupation of July 9, 1943 and in the Salerno landings of September 9, 1943.83 The LCI(L)-86 was first reported to be at Falmouth on April 4, 1944. She subsequently took part in the invasion of Normandy.84

AT OKINAWA
She departed the United Kingdom on October 5, 1944, arriving at Charleston, South Carolina, where she remained for overhaul and repair until December 4, 1944. She arrived at Little Creek, Virginia on December 7, 1944. She underwent amphibious training at Solomons Islands on December 10th to 13th and underwent repairs, alterations and loading at Norfolk from the 15th until the 23rd. On the 23rd she departed for Pearl Harbor via Key West, Canal Zone and San Diego where she arrived April 13, 1945. She departed Pearl Harbor for Okinawa, April 20, 1945 via Eniwetok, Guam and Ulithi arriving on May 29, 1945. Here she was

--117--


anchored at Hagushi Anchorage and Nakagusuku Wan, Okinawa to make smoke to provide coverage for the USS New Orleans and the USS West Virginia, as well as to provide smoke coverage and AA fire for merchant ships off White and Brown Beaches.85 She opened fire on Japanese suicide planes on June 3rd and again on the 11th. Arriving at Kerama Rhetto anchorage on June 14 where she acted as smoker to cover ships present, making two trips to Hagushi and return. During June she made smoke 54 different times and went to general quarters 52 times on air alerts. On two occasions she directed 20 MM fire at Japanese soldiers on the beach with undetermined results. She continued to make smoke smoke and perform other duties at Kerama Rhetto, in Buckner Bay and at Chimu Wan, Okinawa during July 1945 going to general quarters 25 times on red alerts and making smoke 27 times to cover ships in the anchorages. During August she made smoke at Chimu Wan until the 12th carrying mail from Buckner Bay every fourth or fifth day. From the 12th to 31st she made smoke in Buckner Bay and carried liberty parties for the Fifth Fleet. She made smoke 21 times during August and went to general quarters on red alerts seven times. She continued operations at Buckner Bay through September 7, 1945.

AT WAKAYAMA JAPAN--MINE DESTRUCTION KII SUIDO
Departing Buckner Bay on September 8, 1945, as part of Task Group 52.6, designated the Wakayama Sweep Group, she proceeded to Wakayama, Japan, to destroy mines in Kii Suido cut by sweepers and to lay Dan buoys.1 She arrived on September 10th and was drydocked for repairs to her crew. Proceeding to Sasebo, Japan on October 19 she was assigned October 26, 1945, to destroy mines in operation SKAGWAY in Nansei Shoto until November 8, 1945. She returned to Sasebo on that date and on the 25th proceeded to Guam where she arrived on December 2, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Guam on December 5, 1945, for return to United States. She reached Galveston, Texas, via Pearl Harbor, San Diego and Canal Zone on 19 February, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONEDShe was decommissioned April 8, 1946 at Galveston, Texas.


LCI(L)-87
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 104 - DIVISION 207

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-87 was built by the Brown Shipbuilding Corporation of Orange, Texas, and placed in commission on February 2, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. John C. Whitbeck, USCG (February 2, 1943-November 30, 1944), Lt. Luther E. Smith, USCGR (November 30, 1944-January 13, 1945), Lt. (jg) Albert B. Vernon, USCGR (January 13, 1945-September 20, 1945), and Lt. (jg) Fred L. Wadleigh, USCGR, (September 20, 1945-March 20, 1946). Outfitted in Houston, Texas, she departed for Norfolk where she was further outfitted and provisioned prior to departure for North Africa on April 1, 1943. She proceeded to Tunisia.

SICILY--ITALY INVASION
As flagship for LCI(L) Flotilla Ten she arrived in North Africa in June 1943 and participated in the final stages of the North African campaign.86 During July and August 1943 she participated in the assault on Sicily and in September-October 1943 in the assault on Salerno, Italy.87

NORMANDY INVASION
In November 1943 she proceeded to England where from December 1943 to June 1944 she underwent training maneuvers off the southern coast of England preparing for the invasion of Normandy.88 Here she participated on OMAHA Beach, the LCI(L)-87 acting as flagship for Captain M. B. Imlay, USCG, commander of LCI(L) Flotilla Ten. From June 7 to July 4, 1944 she directed traffic of landing craft on OMAHA Beach and from July to October 1944 she was escorting landing craft from England to the northern coast of France.

TO THE PACIFIC
She left Falmouth on October 5, 1944, for Charleston, South Carolina, where from October 26, 1944 to December 14, 1944, she underwent repairs and alterations at Charleston Navy Yard, Flotilla Ten being designated Flotilla Thirty during this period. On December 14, 1944,she proceeded to Little Creek, Virginia. Here and at Solomons Island, Maryland she underwent amphibious training until December 18, 1944, when she proceeded to Lamberts Point, Norfolk, Virginia, for repairs and alterations prior to departure for San Diego on December 27, 1944. She proceeded via Key West and Canal Zone to San Diego where from January 27 to April 18, 1945, she was attached to Ship Training Group, Naval Repair Base, San Diego. On April 20, 1945, she departed San Diego for Pearl Harbor as flagship of LCI(L) Flotilla 35 in company with LCI(L) Group 104. After 5 days for repairs she departed Pearl Harbor May 6, 1945,for Eniwetok.

INTER ISLAND FERRY RUNS--ENIWETOK
Arriving at Eniwetok May 18, 1945, she proceeded to Guam on May 22, 1945. where until July 26, 1945, she was based while engaged in off shore patrol and training B-29 crews in ditching practice. Returning to Eniwetok on August 1, 1945. she was engaged in inter-island ferry trips until November 24, 1945, when she departed for home.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She arrived at San Pedro, California, February 6, 1946, via Pearl Harbor and San Diego.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned. On March 20, 1946.


LCI(L)-88

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-88 was commissioned February 2, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. William B. Cole, USCGR, (1 December, 1944), Lt. Henry K. Rigg, USCGR, Ens. William G. Marohl, USCG, and Lt. (jg) John R. Allums, (2 March, 1945). On February 27, 1946, Lt, (jg) William G. Marohl again took command.

SICILY-ITALY INVASION
The LCI(L)-88 participated in the Sicilian occupation on July 9, 1943, and in the Salerno Invasion on September 9, 1943.89

--118--


COAST GUARD MANNED LCI(L)-87 IS HOME FROM THREE INVASIONS IN THE EUROPEAN WAR THEATER
Coast Guard manned LCI(L)-87 is home from three invasions in the European war theater

TWENTY COAST GUARD MANNED LCI(L)'s MAKE AN EPOCHAL CROSSING OF THE ATLANTIC FROM THE EUROPEAN WAR THEATER AFTER LANDING AMERICAN FIGHTERS IN THE INVASIONS OF SICILY, SALERNO AND NORMANDY
Twenty Coast Guard manned LCI(L)'s make an epochal crossing of the Atlantic from the European war theater after
landing American fighters in the invasions of Aicily, Salerno and Normandy

--119--


NORMANDY INVASION
She arrived in England and took part in the invasion of Normandy where she was damaged off the coast of France on D-day, June 6, 1944. She was reported lost in the French Invasion area on September 18, 1944, but report was later cancelled.90

TO THE PACIFIC
She returned to Charleston, South Carolina on October 24, 1944, and after an availability for overhaul and repair at the Charleston Navy Yard until December 5, 1945, proceeded to Little Creek, Virginia, for amphibious training until the 13th and then to Lambert's Point, Norfolk, Virginia until December 26, 1945, when she departed for San Diego, via Key West and Canal Zone. She remained at San Diego attached to Ship Training Group, Naval Repair Base, San Diego, California, until April 3, 1945, when she departed for Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Guam, Ulithi, Leyte and Okinawa, where she finally arrived at Hagushi, May 29, 1945.91

AT OKINAWA
On May 31, 1945, she anchored at Yanabaru Wan, Okinawa, standing by to make smoke for the USS West Virginia, New Orleans and Portland. On June 6, 1945, she proceeded to Kerama Rhetto escorting LCI(L)-90 damaged by Japanese suicide planes. She returned on June 7, 1945, to Nagagusuki Wan to again make smoke, being at general quarters on numerous occasions as red alerts were sounded. On June 11, 1945, the LCT area was under attack by Japanese planes. She continued to make smoke and kept almost continually at general quarters until she departed for Wakayama, Japan on September 8, 1945.

MINE DESTRUCTION--WAKAYAMA, JAPAN
She arrived at Wakayama, Japan on mine destruction duty on September 11, 1945, and from then until October 19, 1946, when she departed for Sasebo arriving on the 21st. On October 25, 1945, she departed on operation KLONDIKE, Mine Destruction in the East China Sea area, returning to Sasebo on November 8, 1945. On November 25, 1945, she departed Sasebo for Guam, arriving there December 2, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On December 5, 1945, she departed Guam for home, arriving at Galveston, Texas, on February 19, 1946 via Pearl Harbor, San Diego and Canal Zone.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Orange, Texas, on April 9, 1946.


LCI(L)-89
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 104 - DIVISION 207

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-89 was built at the Brown Shipbuilding Company Yard, Orange, Texas and placed in commission on February 3, 1943. Her commanding officer was Lt. Edison M. Fabian, USCGR.

SICILY-ITALY INVASION
After outfitting at Houston, Texas, through April 1943 she proceeded to Norfolk for further outfitting and provisioning before departing for North Africa as flagship of LCI(L) Group 29. She arrived at Tunisia, North Africa in June 1943, in time to take part in the final stages of the North African campaign.92 On July 9, 1943, she took part in the assault on Sicily and on September 9, 1943, participated in the landings at Salerno.93

NORMANDY INVASION
Proceeding to England still as flagship LCI(L) Group 29 in November 1943, she underwent maneuvers off Southern England and on June 5, 1944, departed England to participate in the invasion of Normandy.94 From June 7 to July 20, 1944, she directed traffic of the coast of Normandy and from July 21, 1944 to August 15, 1944 was engaged in ferrying troops from Weymouth, England to the Normandy coast. Escort duty of landing craft from England to France continued through September 16, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On October 5, 1945, she departed Falmouth, England for Charleston, South Carolina, where from October 27 until December 21, 1944, she underwent overhaul and her crew training. Here she was redesigned as flagship of LCI(L) Group 104, Flotilla 35. On that date she proceeded to Little Creek, Virginia, for amphibious training here and at Solomons Island until January 1, 1945.

TO THE PACIFIC
On January 1, 1945, she arrived at Hampton Roads and on January 2, 1945, was underway for San Diego, California, via Key West and Canal Zone. Arriving there on February 1, 1945, she underwent amphibious training and ship's repair at the Naval Repair Base until April 20, 1945, when she departed for Pearl Harbor. From there on April 29th she departed for Eniwetok and thence on May 26th to Guam. She proceeded to Saipan on May 30, 1945 and from June 1, 1945 to July 2, 1945, she carried out submarine escort duties in the vicinity of Saipan.95 On that date she proceeded to Eniwetok for assignment to inter-island ferry duty. She continued on this duty until November 24, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Eniwetok on November 24, 1945, for San Pedro, California, arriving there via Pearl Harbor and San Diego on December 19, 1945.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here on March 7, 1946, she was decommissioned.


LCI(L)-90
FLOTILLA 35 GROUP 103 DIVISION 205

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-90 was commissioned February 6, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. (Jg) William E. Stevens, USCGR, and Lt. (Jg) William H. Nadon, USCGR.

SICILY-ITALY INVASION
She participated in the Sicilian occupation of July 6, 1943, and the Salerno landings of September 6, 1943.96

--120--


NORMANDY LANDING
On June 6, 1944, she participated in the landings in Normandy.97 After acting on ferry and escort duty between England and France, she left Falmouth October 5, 1944, for Charleston, South Carolina.

TO THE PACIFIC
Arriving at Charleston, South Carolina on October 24, 1944, she remained on availability until December 5, 1944, when she proceeded to Little Creek, Virginia and Solomon Islands, Maryland for amphibious training until December 13, 1945. From 14th to 23rd December she was at Lambert Point Pier, Norfolk for loading. She departed for San Diego, California, via Key West, Florida and Canal Zone on December 23, 1944, and was attached to Amphibious Training Group there until April 20, 1945, when she left for Pearl Harbor.

HIT BY SUICIDE PLANE
She arrived at Okinawa via Eniwetok, Guam, Ulithi and Leyte on June 3, 1945.98 Ten days later while engaged in making smoke, she was hit by a Japanese suicide plane and departed June 14, 1945, for Saipan and Leyte for repairs.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She remained at Leyte early in December 1945 when she returned to the United States arriving at Galveston on February 14, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned on April 8, 1946.


LCI(L)-91
FLOTILLA 10 - GROUP 29 - DIVISION 58

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-91 was commissioned February 6, 1943. Her commanding officer was Lt. (jg) Arend Vyn, Jr., USCGR. She participated in the Sicilian occupation on July 9, 1943, and the Salerno landings on September 9, 1943.99

SUNK
She was lost when mined in the Normandy invasion1 on June 5, 1944.100


LCI(L)-92
FLOTILLA 10 - GROUP 29 - DIVISION 58

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-92 was commissioned February 15, 1943. Her commanding officer was Lt. Robert M. Salmon, USCGR. She participated in the Sicilian occupation on July 9, 1943, and Salerno landings on September 9, 1943.101

SUNK
She was lost in the French Invasion1 area on June 17, 1944.102


LCI(L)-93
FLOTILLA 10 - GROUP 29 - DIVISION 58

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS

LCI(L)-93 was commissioned February 15, 1943. Her commanding officer was Lt. (jg) Budd B. Bornhoft, USCGR. She participated in the Sicilian invasion on July 9, 1943, and in the Salerno landings on September 9, 1943.103

SUNK
She was hit off the coast of France, Easy Red Beach, OMAHA area,104 on June 6, 1544 and lost.105


LCI(L)-94
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 103 - DIVISION 205

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned LCI(L)-94 was commissioned on February 15, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. Gene R. Gislason, USCGR, and Lt. (jg) Joel B. Beckwith, USCGR.

SICILY-ITALY INVASION
The LCI(L)-94 participated in the Sicilian occupation on July 9, 1943, and in the Salerno landings on September 9, 1943.106

NORMANDY INVASION
Proceeding to England she made preparations for the invasion of Normandy107 on June 6, 1944, and took part in the first landings, remaining in the area until October 5, 1944, directing trans-channel traffic or escorting landing craft.

TO THE PACIFIC
She departed England on October 5, 1944, for a two month availability at Charleston Navy Yard for overhaul and repair. From there on December 15th she proceeded to Little Creek, Virginia, and Solomons Island, Maryland, for amphibious training and departed for the Pacific on December 28, 1944. Arriving at San Diego California on January 23, 1945, she was detailed to the Ship Training Group, Naval Repair Base until April 8, 1945, when she departed for Pearl Harbor arriving on the 18th.

AT OKINAWA
Leaving Pearl Harbor April 20, 1945, she proceeded to Okinawa via Eniwetok, Guam and Ulithi arriving on May 30, 1945. Here she anchored at Nakagusuku Wan, making smoke for major war vessels and being almost constantly at general quarters in red alerts. On June 1, 1945, a Japanese dive bomber "Val" approached within range of her guns and after 269 rounds of 20 MM ammunition the plane crashed into the water. Many other ships fired on the plane, however, and the LCI(L)-94 did not claim any hits. Proceeding to Kerama Rhetto on the 14th of June, she again assumed smoke screen duties and on 23 June began carrying passengers between Kerama Rhetto and Hagushi Beach. On July 16, 1945, she proceeded to Chimu Wan for smoke making, undergoing numerous calls to general quarters

--121--


on red alerts all during July. Similar duty continued during August and early September.

TO WAKAYAMA, JAPAN MINE DESTRUCTION, KII SUIDO
On September 6, 1945, she departed for Wakayama, Japan to participate in mine destruction in Kii Suido. This work continued until October 19, 1945,1 when she departed for Sasebo, Japan. She departed Sasebo October 26, 1945 on Operation KLONDIKE, mine destruction in the East China Sea and remained on this detail until November 1, 1945, when she again returned to Sasebo.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Sasebo November 25, 1945, for Galveston, Texas, via Guam, Wake Island, Pearl Harbor, San Diego and Canal Zone.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned on April 19, 1946.


LCI(L)-95
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 104 - DIVISION 208

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-95 was commissioned at Orange, Texas, on February 15, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. (jg) Clinton E. McAuliffe, USCG (15 February. 1943), Lt. (jg) G. E. Bray, USCGR (November 15, 1944), Gerald E. Cork, USCG (9 February, 1946). She proceeded to Norfolk, Virginia, for a shakedown cruise and to take aboard additional equipment and supplies.

LICATA AND PALERMO LANDINGS
From Norfolk she proceeded to North Africa, via Bermuda, and arrived a few days after the Tunisian Invasion. She anchored near Lake Bizerte where the other 24 ships of the LCI(L) Flotilla all Coast Guard manned were anchored. Taking on troops at Lake Bizerte, the Flotilla transported them to Sicily where they participated in the original invasion of Licata on July 9, 1943, and the original invasion of Palermo a few days later.108

NORMANDY INVASION
She left Italy in December 1943. Early in January 1944 part of the Flotilla including the LCI(L)-95, went to Falmouth, England on maneuvers, landing troops in mock invasions on the beaches nearby. On January 15, 1944, she reached Dartmouth, England, flotilla headquarters for the pre-invasion months.109 On February 10, 1944, the first rehearsal for the French invasion was staged, mock landings being made at Slapton Sand, near Dartmouth. On February 20th another invasion was staged in which British rocket LCIs were used for the first time. Two other mock invasions followed the last one being three weeks before the actual "D" day. The final preparations then began for "D" day, June 6, 1944. The 95 beached at UTAH Beach that day near Cherbourgh, France, where she remained for nearly a month. Following this she made a dozen or more cross channel runs carrying troops and, on one occasion, nurses, into liberated France.

TO THE PACIFIC
On October 5, 1944, having suffered no casualties during her channel operations, she left Falmouth, England for Jacksonville, Florida, where she went into drydock for repairs. On December 7, 1944, she departed for Charleston, South Carolina, where she remained until the 13th when she left for Solomons Island, Maryland, by way of Little Creek, Virginia, breaking in a new crew in amphibious warfare. On December 26, 1944, she departed for Key West, Canal Zone and San Diego, California, where she arrived January 27, 1945. Here she remained, attached to Ship Training Group, Naval Repair Base until April 20, 1945, where she departed for Pearl Harbor. She reached Pearl Harbor, arriving on the 29th. She remained there until May 6th when she departed for Saipan via Eniwetok and Gaum, arriving on the 31st. Here based on Saipan Harbor she was assigned air-sea rescue patrol duty, transportation duty, and Japanese fishing escort duty until August 6, 1945. She proceeded to Eniwetok on that date and from August 10, 1945 to October 25th was on ferry duty between Runit and Eniwetok Islands, Marshall Islands. On October 25, 1945, she proceeded to Guam and Saipan.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On November 12, 1945, she started home reaching Long Beach February 1, 1946, via Guam, Pearl Harbor and San Diego.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at Terminal Island March 28, 1946.


LCI(L)-96
FLOTILLA 35 GROUP 103 DIVISION 206

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-96 was commissioned on February 15, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. Marshall L. Lee, USCGR and Lt. (jg) S. R. Underwood, USCGR.

SICILY--ITALY INVASION
Proceeding to North Africa she took part in the Sicilian occupation of July 9, 1943, and the Salerno landings of September 9, 1943.110

NORMANDY INVASION
Arriving in England on November 3, 1943, she engaged in a series of mock invasions near Dartmouth. On June 6, 1944, she participated in the Normandy invasion.111

TO THE PACIFIC
Departing Falmouth, England on October 5, 1944, she reached Charleston on the 24th and remained there for overhaul and repair until December 1, 1944. Then, after amphibious training at Little Creek, Virginia and Solomons Island, Maryland, she proceeded to Lambert Point, Virginia on December 9th and after loading there departed on December 19, 1944, for San Diego via Key West and Canal Zone. She remained at San Diego, attached to the Ship Training Group, Naval Repair Base, until April 3, 1945, when she departed for Pearl Harbor, arriving April 13, 1945.

--122--


AT OKINAWA
Leaving Pearl Harbor April 20, 1945, she arrived at Okinawa on May 28, 1945, via Eniwetok, Guam, Ulithi and Leyte.112 Here she made smoke for the protection of larger naval units and performed other logistics until September 9, 1945, when she departed for Japan.

TO JAPAN
Arriving at Wakayama, Japan, on September 11, 1945, she remained on duty with the Mine Destruction Group, Kii Suido, until October 19, 1945, when she proceeded to Sasebo, arriving on October 21, 1945. On October 26, 1945, she departed Sasebo on operation "SKAGWAY" with a Mine Destruction Group operating in Nansei Shoto until November 8, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
Proceeding to Nagoya, via Sasebo, on November 15, 1945, she remained there until 27 November when she departed for home via Saipan and Pearl Harbor arriving at San Pedro, California, February 2, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned on April 2, 1946.


LCI(L)-319
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 104 - DIVISION 207

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-319 was built at the Brown Shipyard, Galveston, Texas, and was commissioned February 3, 1943. The commanding officers have been Lt. (jg) Francis X. Riley, USCG, (February 3, 1943), Lt. W. A. Blum (December 1, 1944), Lt. (jg) Whitfield Connor (September 22, 1945) and Lt. (Jg) E. E. Eckenbeck. After a primary shakedown cruise she was ordered to Solomon Island, Maryland, for a month of training.

SICILY-ITALY LANDINGS
On April 1, 1943, she sailed for Bermuda and then for North Africa on the 13th. She arrived in French Morocco on the 29th and sailed for Lake Bizerte Tunis, May 10, 1943, arriving on the 25th. She sailed for Sicily July 8, 1943, hitting the beach before dawn on July 10, 1943.113 She returned to Lake Bizerte after unloading to pick up more troops. There were no casualties in these operations. On September 6, 1943, she sailed from Lake Bizerte for Salerno, Italy, arriving on the 8th. En route in convoy the ship was twice attacked by German planes but escaped unharmed. She hit the beach at Salerno early in the morning of September 9, 1943, and after unloading proceeded to operate as salvage ship around the beach despite heavy enemy fire. On the 11th she was straffed by a German plane with five men wounded and one killed. She sailed for Palermo on September 12, 1943 and there joined a convoy for Bizerte.

NORMANDY INVASION
She sailed for Falmouth, England on October 15, 1943, arriving on the 28th. The flotilla was transferred to Dartmouth for training until June 5, 1944, when she sailed from England for UTAH Beach, arriving early on the morning of the 6th.114 The LCI(L) was unloaded some thousand yards off the beach by an LCM, after which she anchored in the vicinity to act as salvage and fire fighting ready ship. During the night of June 10, 1944, she towed two ammunition barges out of mined waters during a storm, a feat for which the commanding officer later received the bronze star. On June 20, 1944, during a heavy storm the stern anchor parted allowing the ship to drift down upon another LCI(L) and punching a hole in troop compartment number two and in the engine room. For a time there was danger of losing the ship but officers and crew worked quickly, effectively shoring up the damage and she remained safely afloat. Later she spent 15 days in drydock in France leaving on the 23rd of June, 1944. From July 1 to October 1, 1944, she served as navigation guide for LCTs crossing the English Channel.

TO THE PACIFIC
On October 5, 1944, she sailed for Charleston, South Carolina, where she was routed to Savannah, Georgia, for extensive overhaul and repair. She remained in Savannah from October 28, 1944 to December 12, 1944, and then returned to Charleston until December 21, 1944, when she sailed for Norfolk arriving on the 22nd. Here she was routed to Solomon's Island for training and on January 7, 1945, sailed from Norfolk for Key West, Coco Solo, Canal Zone and San Diego, California, arriving on January 31, 1945. Here she underwent extensive training until April 20, 1945, when she sailed for Pearl Harbor.115 From May 6, 1945, to December 12, 1945, she was engaged in various transportation duties including ferrying passengers among the islands of Eniwetok Atoll.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She arrived home at Long Beach, California on February 6, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned March 26, 1946.


LCI(L)-320
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 103 - DIVISION 205

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-320 was commissioned February 8, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. (jg) William K. Scammel, Jr. USCG, Lt. (jg) G. H. Herrick, USCG, (December 4, 1944) and Lt. Samuel R. Underwood, USCGR (January 6, 1946).

SICILY-ITALY INVASION
Proceeding after shakedown and training to North Africa she took part in the Sicilian occupation on July 9, 1943, and the landings at Salerno on September 9, 1943.116

NORMANDY INVASION
Proceeding to England where she arrived November 3, 1943, she began training for the invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, in which she participated.117 After acting as channel guide for LCT's until October 5, 1944, she left Falmouth for Charleston, South Carolina.

TO THE PACIFIC
After undergoing repairs and alterations at Savannah, Georgia, she returned to Charleston for inspection and on the 15th departed for training at Little Creek, Virginia and Solomon's Island, Maryland. On the 28th she departed for San Diego, via Key West and Canal Zone. She remained at San Diego in training until April 3, 1945, when she departed for Pearl Harbor.118

--123--


AT OKINAWA
Departing Pearl Harbor April 20, 1945, she reached Okinawa May 28, 1945, via Eniwetok, Guam, Ulithi and Leyte. Anchoring at Kerama Rhetto she made smoke nightly, making eight trips in June to Hagushi, Okinawa to transfer freight. A trip to Nakagusuku Wan, Okinawa was made on June 15, 1945. This activity continued until July 10, 1945, when she departed for Buckner Bay to carry mail to Chimu Wan and return until September 8, 1945.

TO JAPAN
On September 8, 1945, she departed Okinawa for Wakayama, Japan, where she engaged in mine destruction in Kii Suido from September 11th until October 19th, 1945. Proceeding to Sasebo she was despatched on October 26, 1945, to the East China Sea on operation KLONDIKE, mine destruction, which duty continued until November 7, 1947, when she returned to Sasebo.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Sasebo November 25, 1945, for home, via Saipan, Pearl Harbor and San Diego, arriving January 17, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at San Pedro March 26, 1946.


LCI(L)-321
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 104 - DIVISION 206

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned LCI(L)-321 was built by the Brown Shipbuilding Company, Houston, Texas, where she was commissioned February 6, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Lt. (jg) G. P. Hammond, USCG. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) J. E. Hollis, Jr, USCGR, (February 14, 1943), Lt. (jg) D. H. Davis, USCGR, (September 11, 1944), Lt. (jg) W. W. Allen (November 22, 1944), Lt. W. P. Swift, USCGR, (December 2, 1944), Lt. (jg) J. J. Owens, USCGR, (January 1, 1946) and Boatswain G. G. Neal, USCG (17 March 1946). After outfitting at Galveston, she was underway on March 2, 1943, en route Little Creek, Virginia, via Key West, Florida, where she arrived March 12, 1943, for drydocking and amphibious training of crews at Solomons Island, Maryland.

SICILY-ITALY INVASION
On April 1, 1943, she got underway for Port Lyautey, French Morocco, North Africa via Bermuda, arriving there on the 29th where she remained until May 16, 1943. On that date she left for logistics and a series of beaching exercises that took her to Gibraltar, Port d'Arzew, Beni Saf Harbor, Nemours and Port d'Arzew, Algeria and Bizerte, Ferrysville and La Goutette, Tunisia finally mooring at Bizerte on June 19, 1943. On July 11, 1945, she embarked 127 troops and departed for Licata, Sicily arriving on the 12th and disembarking troops.119 Taking aboard Army Air Corps troops and casualties and Italian prisoners of war, she returned to Bizerte on the 13th. On August 7, 1943, 103 more troops were embarked at La Goulette, Tunisia and on August 8th she was underway en route Palermo via Tunis Bay mooring on the 9th and disembarking troops. On September 5th she embarked 183 British troops and departed for Castlellamare, Sicily, disembarking them same day and embarking troops from an LCT for Gulf of Salerno, Italy.1 Here, after disembarking troops she began embarking casualties which were taken to a hospital ship, two deceased casualties being buried at sea in the Gulf of Salerno. She returned to Salerno September 11, 1943, and on the 19th again embarked 155 U.S. troops for Salerno, disembarking them there on the 21st and carrying troops from British ships to the beach. She returned to Bizerte on the 24th and, effecting repairs, was underway on October 16, 1943, for Plymouth, Devonshire, England, via Oran, Algeria and Port Mers-el-Kebir, Oran and Gibraltar.

NORMANDY INVASION
She arrived at Plymouth on October 29, 1943, and on November 7, 1943, moved to Saltash, Devon, where she was drydocked for overhaul and repair. On December 19, 1943, she proceeded to Falmouth, Cornwall to embark troops for Dartmouth where maneuvers, drills and general training ensued. On February 13, 1944, 135 troops were embarked for Torguay Bay where she beached and disembarked troops, returning to Dartmouth same day. On the 16th she was en route Brixham, Devon for training operations and on March 2, 1944, returned to Southampton. Numerous other training operations took place along the South England coast until on June 5 1944, she left Salcombe, Devon for Baie de la Seine at 1519 laying off Green Beach UTAH Beach in the Transport Area at 0730 on June 6, 1944, disembarking troops in LCM's. Guiding LCM's to the beach, towing pontoons, causeways and LST's, watching for inbound vessels and convoys and as buoy off Star Point, Cherbourg Peninsula until June 17, 1944, she departed for Weymouth and Portland. Other trips to Normandy120 were made June 30, 1944, July 3, 1944, July 10, 1944, July 14, 1944, August 2, 1944, August 22, 1944 and September 5, 1944, carrying troops to the Normandy beaches.

TO THE PACIFIC
On October 5, 1944, she was underway en route Charleston, South Carolina, and then to Mayport, Florida and Jacksonville, Florida where she drydocked for repairs and overhaul. Returning to Charleston December 13, 1944, she proceeded to Norfolk on the 22nd and thence to Little Creek, Virginia and Solomon's Island, Maryland, for beaching operations with new crew. On January 4, 1945, she sailed for San Diego, California via Key West, Florida and Canal Zone, where she arrived February 3, 1945. From then to April 20, 1945, she was engaged in amphibious training at San Nichols Island, Coronado, California, San Clemente Island, California, Imperial Beach and Oceanside, California. On April 20, 1945, she departed for Pearl Harbor arriving April 29, 1945.121 On May 6, she was en route Guam via Eniwetok to engage in ditching drills with 315th Bomb Wing, U.S. Army Air Force until June 27th. After patrolling off Guam's north coast until July 9 she returned to Guam for drydocking and restocking and on August 3rd departed for Eniwetok where from August 7th to October 25th, 1945, she was engaged in making a ready duty ferry run between the islands of Eniwetok Atoll. Returning to Guam on November 1, 1945, she made runs to Saipan and back to Guam on the 3rd and then to Iwo Jima, Saipan and back to Guam on November 14, 1945, collecting personnel for transportation home.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Guam on the homeward journey early in December 1945 and arrived at Galveston, Texas, February 6, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONEDHere she was decommissioned on April 2, 1946.


--124--


LCI(L)-322
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 104 - DIVISION 209

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-322 was built by the Brown Shipbuilding Corporation at Houston, Texas, and was placed in commission on February 15, 1943. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Grant C. Kidston, USCG, who was succeeded on November 17, 1944, by Lt. (Jg) W. L. Brown, USCGR. After shakedown exercises at Galveston the LCI(L)-322 proceeded to Norfolk, Virginia, for amphibious training at Solomons Islands, Maryland.

SICILY-ITALY LANDINGS
She departed Norfolk in the latter part of March, 1943, and arrived at Robat, Morocco, North Africa, 18 days later, via Bermuda. Soon afterwards she sailed for Lake Bizerte, Tunisia, where as a member of LCI(L) Flotilla Four she conducted landing operations in preparation for the convoy invasion of Sicily.122 Arriving at Licata, Sicily on July 10, 1943, she successfully disembarked the troops on board. Two months later on September 9, 1943, she was part of the Green Reserve Section of Uncle Attack Group landing troops at Salerno.122

NORMANDY INVASION
Leaving Bizerte in the latter part of October, 1943, she arrived at Plymouth, England, November 3, 1943, via Gibraltar where she was assigned to LCI(L) Flotilla Ten, engaging in extensive beaching operations in Southern England during the next seven months in preparation for the invasion of Normandy.123 On June 5, 1944, she departed Salcombe, England for France, unloading troops on UTAH Beach on the morning of June 6, 1944, and making subsequent trips across the channel until July 12, 1944.

TO THE PACIFIC
She departed Dartmouth, England on October 5, 1944, and arrived at Jacksonville, Florida, 21 days later where she underwent a major overhaul at Merrill, Stevens Dry Dock and Repair Company. With a new crew of officers and men, she was assigned to LCI(L) Flotilla 35, and left Hampton Roads January 3, 1945. She arrived at San Diego, California, via Key West and Canal Zone on January 31, 1945, where she reported to Commander, Training Command, Amphibious Forces, Pacific Fleet, for training and final availability before eventual onward routing. After a visit to Port Hueneme, California she left San Diego April 20, 1945, for Pearl Harbor arriving April 30, 1945, and departing May 6, 1945 for Guam, via Eniwetok, arriving May 26, 1945.124 On the 31st she reported to C.T.U. 94.7.2 at Saipan for local patrol and escort duty in the Saipan-Tinian area. On August 6, 1945, she proceeded to Eniwetok where she was assigned to Commander, Service Division 102, for inter island ferry service until October 25, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
Departing Eniwetok October 25, 1945, she proceeded to Guam and Saipan, transporting troops from there back to Guam on November 2, 1945, and then departed for Ulithi and Peleliu on the sane mission, returning to Guam November 17, 1945. Shortly thereafter she left Guam for Long Beach, California, arriving February 1, 1946, via Pearl Harbor and San Diego.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned March 26, 1946.


LCI(L)-323
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 103 - DIVISION 205

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-323 was commissioned on February 10, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. William H. E. Schroeder, USCGR, Lt. Douglas B. Jones (December 16, 1944), Lt. (jg) Theodore J. Lempges, USCGR (February 9, 1945), Lt (jg) Edward J. Burns, USCGR (October 6, 1945), Lt. (jg) John D. Roche, Jr. USCGR, and Lt. Raymond M. Rosenbloom, USCGR (February 6, 1946).

SICILY-ITALY LANDINGS
After shakedown exercises she proceeded to Norfolk and thence to North Africa. She participated in the occupation of Sicily on July 9, 1943, and in the landings at Salerno on September 9, 1943.125

NORMANDY LANDINGS
Proceeding to the United Kingdom where she arrived November 3, 1943, she participated in a long period of amphibious training on the south England beaches. On June 6, 1944, she participated in the landings at UTAH beach, Normandy, France, and thereafter acted as guide for cross channel craft.126

TO THE PACIFIC
On October 5, 1944, she left Falmouth, England, for Charleston, South Carolina, where she remained for overhaul until December 14, 1944. With a new crew she then proceeded to Little Creek, Virginia and Solomons Island, Maryland for amphibious training, departing Norfolk, December 27, 1944, for San Diego, California via Key West and Canal Zone. Arriving at San Diego January 23, 1945, she remained there undergoing further training until April 3, 1945, when she departed for Pearl Harbor.

AT OKINAWA
Departing Pearl Harbor April 20, 1945, she proceeded to Okinawa via Eniwetok, Guam, Ulithi and Leyte arriving on May 28, 1945.127 Next day she departed for Kerama Rhetto to relieve LCI(R)-769 at the Harbor Entrance Control Post, North Net Entrance of Kerama Rhetto. This duty was continued until July 16, 1945, with occasional smoke-making in Kerama Rhetto Harbor. On that date she proceeded to Chimu Wan, returning to Kerama Rhetto on the 17th and next day proceeded to Hagushi Harbor, Okinawa and thence to Chimu Wan again. Here she lay a smoke coverage until the 23rd and then proceeded to Buckner Bay, Okinawa on the same mission.

TO JAPAN--DRYDOCKED FOR REPAIRS
She remained at Okinawa until September 8, 1945, when she sailed for Wakayama, Japan, arriving on the 11th. On the 12th she was drydocked by LSD-16 for hull repairs. She remained in repair status until November 25, 1945, when she departed Sasebo for Guam.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
Departing Guam on December 5, 1945, she returned to

--125--


New Orleans on March 8, 1946 via Pearl Harbor, San Diego and Canal Zone.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned April 15, 1946.


LCI(L)-324
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 104 - DIVISION 207

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard USS LCI(L)-324 was built by the Brown Shipbuilding Corporation of Orange, Texas, and placed in commission on February 10, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. (jg) Charles W. Rinaca, Jr., USCGR, Lt. (jg) Thomas L. Keane, USCG and Lt. (jg) Robert M. Hoffman (August 4, 1945).

SICILY-ITALY INVASION
Departing Orange, Texas, after outfitting for Norfolk, Virginia, late in March, 1943, she departed almost immediately for Robat, Morocco, North Africa, arriving April 18, 1943 and proceeded to Lake Bizerte, Tunisia, where in June 1943, she prepared for the coming invasion of Sicily.128 On July 10, 1943, as a member of LCI(L) Flotilla Four she landed troops on Sicily. Approximately two months later on September 9, 1943, she landed troops at Salerno.128

NORMANDY INVASION
Late in October 1943, she left Lake Bizerte for Plymouth, England, via Gibraltar and was assigned to LCI(L) Flotilla Ten. During the months that followed, prior to the invasion of France, the LCI(L)-324 engaged in intensive training for the forthcoming invasion of Normandy.129 On June 5, 1944, she departed Salcombe, England for Northern France and on June 6, 1944, unloaded troops on UTAH Beach. For some two weeks thereafter, she transported troops from England to the Northern Coast of France, after which she directed small boat operations in UTAH Beach. On July 21, 1944, and for 3½ months thereafter, the 324 resumed transportation of troops between England and France and escorted LCT's over the same route.

TO THE PACIFIC
On October 5, 1944, the 324 departed Dartmouth, England for the United States, arriving at Jacksonville, Florida 21 days later. Here she underwent major overhaul at the Gibbs Shipyard and a new crew and officers were placed aboard before her departure on December 8, 1944. She then proceeded to Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina, then to the Amphibious Training Base, Little Creek, Virginia, and from there to the Amphibious Training Base, Solomons Island, Maryland, for further overhaul, provisioning and training. Departing Norfolk, December 31, 1944, she proceeded to San Diego, California via Key West and the Canal Zone, and reported January 28, 1945 to Commander, Training Command, Amphibious Forces, Pacific Fleet for training and final availability at the Naval Repair Base, San Diego, California. Departing April 20, 1945, for Pearl Harbor she proceeded thence to Eniwetok and Guam, arriving May 29, 1945. She was shortly thereafter ordered to Saipan where she reported June 1, 1945, for local patrol duty, air-sea rescue work and escorting the Japanese fishing fleet in the Saipan-Tinian Area.130 This assignment terminated July 4, 1945, when she was ordered to Eniwetok. Here she reported July 8th and from then until November 9, 1945, she operated a ferry service between Eniwetok and surrounding atolls.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On that date she departed for home arriving at San Pedro December 19, 1945, via Kwajalein, Eniwetok, Pearl Harbor and San Diego.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned March 7, 1946.


LCI(L)-325
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 103 - DIVISION 205

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard USS LCI(L)-325 was commissioned at Orange, Texas on February 15, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. William V, Lorimer, USCGR, Lt. (jg) W. F. Wingman, USCGR (November 29, 1944, Lt. (jg) J. D. Gust, USN (January 7, 1946) and Ensign William H. Pardis, USCG, (March 8, 1946).

SICILY-ITALY INVASION
Proceeding to Norfolk she sailed for North Africa and made preparations at Bizerte for the Sicily invasion in which she participated on July 9, 1943.131 She also took part in the landings at Salerno on September 9, 1943.131

NORMANDY INVASION
Departing for England, she reached Plymouth on November 3, 1943, and was occupied from then until D-day in preparations for her participation in the invasion of Normandy.132 She landed troops at UTAH Beach on June 6, 1944,and then brought more troops to France in subsequent trips from England. After engaging in other duties incident to the invasion she departed Falmouth on October 5, 1944, for Charleston, South Carolina where she underwent overhaul and repair, taking on new officers and crew for her forthcoming duty in the Pacific.133 Proceeding to Little Creek, Virginia, and Solomons Island, Maryland for amphibious training she left Norfolk December 23, 1944, for San Diego, California, via Key West and Canal Zone arriving January 20, 1945,for a protracted period of training and availability at the Naval Repair Base there.

AT OKINAWA
She departed San Diego April 3, 1945, for Okinawa, via Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Guam and Ulithi, arriving on May 29, 1945. Here she was assigned to make smoke while acting as harbor entrance control vessel at Kerama Rhetto, undergoing numerous air raid alerts, both here and at Hagushi, Okinawa to which place she made frequent trips carrying passengers. Later she moved to Chimu Wan, Nakagusuku Wan and Buckner Bay for general logistics and smoke-making.

TO JAPAN--MINE DESTRUCTION
On September 8, 1945, she proceeded to Wakayama, Japan, as part of the Mine Destruction Unit which operated in Kii Suido until October 19, 1945, when she proceeded to Sasebo. On October 26, 1945, she departed for "Operation KLONDIKE" mine destruction in the East China Sea, returning to Sasebo on November 8, 1945, and departing for home November 25. 1945.

--126--


COAST GUARD MANNED LCI(L)-325
Coast Guard manned LCI(L)-325

BULLING ITS WAY THROUGH A HEAVY SEA IS THE COAST GUARD MANNED LCI(L)-350
Bulling its way through a heavy sea is the Coast Guard manned LCI(L)-350

--127--


RETURN TO U.S.A.
She returned to Mobile, Alabama on April 23, 1946, via Guam, Pearl Harbor, San Diego and Canal Zone.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned May 31, 1946.


LCI(L)-326
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 103 - DIVISION 206

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-326 was commissioned October 31, 1942, at Orange, Texas. Her commanding officers were Lt. Samuel W. Allison, USCG, and Lt. (jg) James Jones, USCGR (September 15, 1944).

SICILY-ITALY INVASIONS
After proceeding to Bizerte, North Africa from Norfolk, where she had arrived, after shakedown exercises, she made preparations for the invasion of Sicily on July 9, 1943.134 Two months later she landed troops at Salerno.134

NORMANDY INVASION
Proceeding to England late in October 1943 she arrived at Plymouth on November 3, 1943, and was engaged from then until D-day in amphibious training on the beaches of Southern England, for the invasion of Normandy.135 On June 6, 1944, she landed troops at UTAH Beach and from then until her departure from Falmouth on October 5, 1944, was engaged in transporting troops, acting as cross channel guide and in other operational and logistical duties.

TO THE PACIFIC
Arriving at Charleston, South Carolina on October 24, 1944, she proceeded to Jacksonville, Florida, where she was drydocked and underwent repairs and overhaul until December 12, 1944, when she returned to Charleston and then to Little Creek, Virginia and Solomon's Island, Maryland, where new officers and crew were given amphibious training. She departed Norfolk December 26, 1944, for San Diego, California, arriving via Key West and Canal Zone on January 22, 1945, for amphibious training at the Naval Repair Base until April 3, 1945.

AT OKINAWA
She departed San Diego on April 3, 1545, for Okinawa, via Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Guam and Ulithi arriving on May 29, 1945.136 Here she was detached for duty at Kerama Rhetto for harbor entrance control and making smoke, as well as carrying guard mail, light freight and staff officers. On July 16, 1945, she proceeded to Kenmu Wan returning to Kerama Rhetto next day to execute Typhoon Plan Xray, no LCIs suffering any damage anchored under the lee of Amuro Shima. Proceeding to Buckner Bay on July 22, 1545, she carried out screening duties by making smoke, again executing typhoon plan Xray on the 31st. On August 11, 1945, she went to Chimu Wan on similar duties. When the rest of Group 103, Flotilla 35, left for Japan on September 6, 1945, the LCI(L)-326 was awaiting drydocking at Okinawa for screw replacement and was replaced in the Japan mission by LCI(M)-810.

TO JAPAN
She did not reach Sasebo until November 1, 1945, via Nagasaki and on the 12th was assigned to C.T.G. 55.4 at Nagoya. She arrived there on the 15th and left on November 27, 1945 for home.

TO THE U.S.A.
She returned to New Orleans on March 15, 1946, via Saipan, Pearl Harbor, San Diego and Canal Zone.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned on May 7, 1946.


LCI(L)-349
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 104 - DIVISION 208

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-349 was built at the Brown Shipbuilding Corporation, Houston, Texas, was commissioned December 26, 1942, and became a unit of LCI(L) Flotilla 4. Her commanding officers have been Lt. (jg) Thomas A. Walsh, USCGR, Lt. (jg) W. W. Allen, USCGR, and Lt. (jg) Richard L. Scott, USCGR (September 26, 1945). After completion of preparations at Norfolk, Virginia, she departed late in March 1943 and arrived at Robat, Morocco, North Africa on April 19, 1943. Shortly afterwards she sailed for Lake Bizerte, Tunisia, where landing operations were conducted in preparation for the Sicilian invasion.137

SICILY-ITALY INVASION
On July 10, 1943, she carried troops to the beach at Licata, Sicily. On September 9, 1943, she proceeded to Salerno, Italy, landing troops under enemy shore bombardment and taking part in salvage operations until the 11th. During this period a Messerschmitt (ME-109) was shot down while attacking.

NORMANDY INVASION
In the latter part of October 1943, the 349 departed Lake Bizerte for Plymouth, England as a part of LCI(L) Flotilla where she arrived November 3, 1943. For the next several months extensive training was conducted in England. On June 5, 1944, she departed Salcombe, England for France and on the 6th (D-day) disembarked troops on UTAH Beach. She continued making cross channel trips carrying troops until July 12, 1944.138

TO THE PACIFIC
She departed Falmouth, England, October 5, 1944, and arrived at Jacksonville, Florida, October 26, 1944, via Charleston, South Carolina and Mayport, Florida, where she underwent a complete overhaul at the Merrill Stevens Dry Docking and Repair Company. Additional alterations and sailing preparations were made at Charleston, South Carolina, and Norfolk, Virginia and on January 2, 1945, she sailed for San Diego, California, via Key West and the Panama Canal. Here she completed nearly three months of amphibious training at the Naval Repair Base, San Diego, California and departed for Guam, via Pearl Harbor and Eniwetok on April 20, 1945.139 Arriving at Guam May 26, 1945, she engaged in salvage operations

--128--


ana was on air-sea rescue patrol off Northwest Guam until July 1, 1945, when she proceeded to Eniwetok. Arriving at Eniwetok July 7, 1945, she was engaged in inter-atoll ferry service until October 25, 1945, when she proceeded to Guam for engine repairs.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Guam November 26, 1945, for home, arriving at Galveston, Texas, via Pearl Harbor, San Diego and Canal Zone on February 3, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned on April 2, 1946.


LCI(L)-350
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 103 - DIVISION 206

COMMISSIONED
The Coast Guard manned USS LCI(L)-350 was commissioned at Orange, Texas on May 15, 1943. Her commanding officers have been Lt. Moise H. Weil, USCGR, Lt. (jg) Pierce B. Uzzell, USCGR, Lt. (jg) Albert H. Brodkin, USCGR, (December 1, 1944) and Lt. Ben E. Stone, USCGR (February 27, 1946). Proceeding to Norfolk, Virginia she went from there to North Africa.

SICILY-ITALY INVASION
On July 9, 1943, she took part in the occupation of Sicily and on September 9, 1943, participated in the landings at Salerno.140

NORMANDY INVASION
She left North Africa late in October and arrived at Plymouth, England on November 3, 1943, where for the next seven months she was engaged in amphibious training on the beaches of Southern England preparatory to the Normandy Invasion.141 She disembarked troops on UTAH Beach on D-day June 6, 1944, and for a month thereafter was engaged in transporting troops across the channel and in other duties.

TO THE PACIFIC
She departed Falmouth on October 5, 1944, arriving in Charleston, South Carolina on October 24, 1944, for a month and a half's availability for overhaul and repair. On December 26, 1944, after some days of amphibious training for a new crew of officers and men at Little Creek, Virginia and Solomons Island, Maryland. She departed Norfolk for San Diego, California via Key West and the Canal Zone. Here from January 24, 1945, to April 3, 1945, she underwent amphibious training at the Naval Repair Base. She departed San Diego April 3, 1945 and stopping at Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, Guam and Ulithi, reached Okinawa on May 29, 1945.142

AT OKINAWA
Departing for Kerama Rhetto she was on smoke station daily until July 14, 1945, when she departed for Kenmu Wan, Okinawa, for similar duty. On the 23rd she took up screening duty in Buckner Bay, Okinawa.

TO JAPAN--MINE DESTRUCTION--AGROUND IN TYPHOON
She left Okinawa on September 8, 1945, and reached Wakayama on September 11, 1945. Here she began destroying mines on Kii Suido but was damaged in a typhoon by going aground on September 17-18, 1945, and was laid up for repairs until December 21, 1945.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She departed Wakayama December 21, 1945, for home arriving at San Pedro on March 14, 1946, via Kagoshima, Saipan, Eniwetok and Pearl Harbor.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned May 3, 1946.


LCI(L)-520
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 104 - DIVISION 207

COMMISSIONED--NAVY MANNED
The USS LCI(L)-520 was built by the New Jersey Shipbuilding Company, Barber, New Jersey, and was first commissioned as a Navy manned vessel on December 18, 1943. Her first Navy commanding officer was Lt. (jg) Leon J. Joseph, USNR. After training cruises in Chesapeake Bay she proceeded to England where she under further amphibious training on the English beaches before participating in the invasion of Normandy on D-day, June 6, 1944. She was in a collision off the coast of France and after being repaired participated in the invasion of Southern France, landing Army personnel in Bougnam Bay, France, on August 15, 1944. She arrived in the United States early in December 1944, and after an availability at the Norfolk Navy Yard until January 1, 1945, her commanding and all other officers and entire Navy personnel were relieved by Coast Guard personnel on January 10, 1945. Her Coast Guard commanding officers have been Lt. (jg) John N. Taylor, USCGR, (January 17, 1945) and Lt, (jg) Elkin S. Mittleman, USCGR, (September 23, 1945).

TO THE PACIFIC
Assigned to LCI(L) Flotilla 35, the 520 sailed from Norfolk, Virginia on January 16, 1945, reaching San Diego California, via Key West and Canal Zone on February 14, 1945. Here her crew completed their training in the San Nichols Island area and the ship underwent repairs at the Naval Repair Base. On April 26, 1945, she departed for Guam, via Pearl Harbor and Eniwetok arriving there on May 28, 1945. Here she engaged in towing a target raft for submarines until July 1, 1945, when she departed for Eniwetok. Here from July 7, 1945, she ran as an inter-island passenger ferry. On September 1, 1945, she proceeded to Kwajalein bringing back naval passengers for separation and rotation. On September 12, 1945, she departed Eniwetok for Wake Island with U.S. Marines and gear and returned to Kwajalein on September 22, 1945, with Japanese Ordnance equipment samples. Other trips were made during October and November to Majuro, Kwajalein and Panape.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
On December 12, 1945, she arrived at Pearl Harbor en route San Diego and Long Beach which she reached on February 7, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned on March 26, 1946.


--129--


LCI(L)-562
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 104 - DIVISION 207

COMMISSIONED--NAVY MANNED--IN EUROPEAN THEATRE
The USS LCI(L)-562 was built at the New Jersey Shipbuilding Company of Barber, New Jersey, and was first commissioned on February 28, 1944, being in command first of Lt. (Jg) Sidney N. Ruffin, USNR, with a full Navy crew. He was succeeded on September 9, 1944, by Ensign R. E. Northrup, USNR, who remained in command until a Coast Guard crew and officer staff took command on January 16, 1945, when Lt. (jg) Henry E. Brubaker, USCGR, became commanding officer. While manned with her Navy crew the 562 saw duty at Pozzuole, Italy, from June 6, 1944 to July 31, 1944 when with British officers aboard she was convoy commodore of a convoy of 14 British LCT's and supervised all unloading in that area. She carried assault troops to the beaches near Marseilles, France from August 15 to 31, 1944, and moved prisoners and injured to Marseilles. Another contingent of French troops was landed at the Bay of Tropez from Oran on September 6, 1944. On December 11, 1944, she proceeded to England and thence to Portsmouth, Virginia and Lambert's Point, Norfolk, Virginia.

TO THE PACIFIC--COAST GUARD MANNED
On January 10, 1945, she was commissioned as a Coast Guard vessel and on January 16, 1945, all naval officers and enlisted personnel were replaced by Coast Guard officers and enlisted personnel. Two days later she was underway to San Diego, California, via Key West and the Canal Zone to report to Commander (LCI(L) Flotilla 35, with whom she trained there until April 20, 1945. On that date she departed for Guam, via Pearl Harbor and Eniwetok, arriving at Guam on May 26, 1945. She was on Air Sea Rescue duty under command of Commander, Task Unit, 94.7.1 at Guam until July 27, 1945, when she proceeded to Eniwetok to perform ferry boat duties for the Port Director there. On September 17, 1945, she proceeded to Kusaie in the Carolines, returning to Eniwetok on the 23rd. On the 29th she proceeded to Majuro, Marshall Islands with the LCI(L)-319 to load 123 passengers for transportation to Parry Island, Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands disembarking them there on October 6, 1945. On October 25, 1945, she proceeded to Guam for duty, proceeding to Saipan with two other LCI(L)s on November 1, and returning to Guam on the 4th. On the 5th she loaded 65 U.S. Army personnel for transportation to Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands and beached there on November 9, 1945. Here on the 9th she embarked 89 passengers for Saipan arriving there on the 12th. On the 14th she proceeded to Guam arriving there next day and on the 26th of November departed Guam for home.

TO THE U.S.A.
She arrived at San Diego, via Pearl Harbor on December 24, 1945, and at Long Beach February 5, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned March 26, 1946.


LCI(L)-581
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 104 - DIVISION 207

COMMISSIONED WITH NAVY CREW--AT LANDINGS IN SOUTHER FRANCE
The USS LCI(L)-581 was built by the New Jersey Shipbuilding Company of Barber, New Jersey and first commissioned there on March 30, 1944, with Navy personnel. Her commanding officers have been Lt. (Jg) Ralph P. Mulligan, USNR (30 March, 1944), Ensign J. H. Gefaell, USNR (30 September, 1944), Lt. (jg) William T. Allen, USCGR (16 January, 1945), Lt. (jg) Seymour L. Treib, USCGR (23 September, 1945), and Lt. (jg) Charles A. Rice, USCGR (20 December, 1945). After shakedown and amphibious training at Solomons Island, Maryland, she arrived at Bizerte on May 24, 1944, was engaged in frequent terry runs carrying troops between Bizerte, Pozzuoli, Salerno, Anzio, Naples, Civitavecchia and Nisida in Italy. She participated in the assault on Southern France on August 15, 1944, and thereafter made three more trips to Southern France, two from Pozzuoli, Italy and one from Oran, carrying troops. On November 24, 1944, she left Oran for Norfolk.

TO THE PACIFIC--COAST GUARD MANNED
Arriving at Hampton Roads, Virginia on December 11, 1944, the 581 underwent extensive yard overhaul and repair at Lambert's Point, Virginia and on January 16, 1945, the Navy crew and officers were relieved by a Coast Guard crew and got underway on January 19, 1945, for San Diego, California, via Key West and the Canal Zone where she arrived February 13, 1945. Here the crew underwent training in the San Nicholas and San Clemente Island areas while the vessel was placed on yard availability at the Naval Repair Base. On April 20, 1945, she departed San Diego for Guam, via Pearl Harbor and Eniwetok, arriving at Guam on May 26, 1945. Here the 581 was assigned to Air Sea Rescue patrol off Pati Point, Guam and made its first of many patrols commencing June 4, 1945. Here she took part in several rescues of crashed B-29's and also made regular weather observation reporting by radio each morning. On July 11, 1945, she departed for Eniwetok where she was assigned to the Port Director for inter-atoll ferry and acted as a liberty vessel for fleet units lying off Runit Island and as a transport from Roi, Kwajalein to Eniwetok carrying personnel bound for discharge points. On November 7, 1945, she made a trip to Wake Island transporting personnel back to Eniwetok and on November 24, 1945, left Eniwetok for home.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She reached San Pedro December 15, 1945, via Pearl Harbor and San Diego.

DECOMMISSIONED
Here she was decommissioned on March 20, 1946.


LCI(L)-583
FLOTILLA 35 - GROUP 104 - DIVISION 208

COMMISSIONED WITH NAVY CREW--AT INVASION SOUTHERN FRANCE
The USS LCI(L)-583 was built by the New Jersey Shipbuilding Company of Barber, New Jersey and first commissioned there on April 3, 1944. Her commanding officers have been Lt. (jg) W. J. Sharpe, USNR (3 April, 1944) Lt. (jg) Robert J. Woodruff, USNR (3 July, 1944), Ensign James B. Neel, Jr., USNR (12 September, 1944) and Lt. (jg) Miles Warner, USCGR (16 January, 1945). After shakedown and amphibious training at Solomon's Island, Maryland, she left Norfolk on May 3, 1944, for Bizerte, Tunisia where she reported to LCI(L) Flotilla 4, Group 10, being later transferred to Flotilla 28, Group 19. After another period of intensive training she began hauling troops between Anzio, Pizzuoli, Salerno, Nisidia and Civitavecchia. On August 15, 1944, she landed troops at Cavaliere Bay on the French Riviera and followed this by a number of trips with troops from Pozzuoli to the coast of Southern France. On

--130--


November 24, 1944, she departed Oran for Norfolk, where she arrived on December 11, 1944.

TO THE PACIFIC--COAST GUARD MANNED
After an overhaul period at the Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia the 583 moved to Lambert's Point, Norfolk, Virginia, where her officers and crew were relieved by Coast Guard personnel on January 16, 1945. Next day she started for San Diego, California, which was reached on February 11, 1945, via the Canal Zone. From then until April 20, 1945, she was engaged in training maneuvers around the island of San Nichols and San Clemente, California. On April 20, 1945, she left San Diego in company with Group 104, Flotilla 35, and reached Guam on May 26, 1945, via Pearl Harbor and Eniwetok. On the 30th she departed for Saipan to C.T.U. 94.7.2 for duty in the escort pool. Here she remained until she reported to the Harbor Director, at Eniwetok on August 12, 1945, where she maintained an inter atoll ferry schedule and made trips to Roi, Kwajalein and Tarawa, transporting passengers and light cargo. From November 1, 1945, to late in November, 1945, she was assigned to duty under Commander Marshall-Gilbert Area, with operations based on the Kwajalein area.

RETURN TO U.S.A.
She reached Pearl Harbor December 12, 1945, on her way home, stopping at San Diego before reaching Long Beach on February 1, 1946.

DECOMMISSIONED
She was decommissioned at San Pedro on March 25, 1946.


--131--


MANNING OF ARMY VESSELS

Under a Joint Chiefs of Staff Agreement signed March 14, 1944, the Coast Guard was designated to man certain small Army Transportation Corps vessels some already operating in the Southwest Pacific and manned at the time by civilians. "The Coast Guard," the agreement reads, "due to decrease in category of defense in the United States, will have some personnel available to man ships and craft for which civilian personnel cannot be obtained." Five categories of Army vessels were specified AMRS (Army Marine Repair Ship), TY (Tankers), LT (Large Tugs), FS (Freight and Supply Vessels) and F (Freight Vessels. The Coast Guard eventually manned 288 of these craft. One, the FS-34 was Design 277, FS-140-234, inclusive, were Design 330, and the rest were Design 381. The following list shows dates built, description, builder, cost per unit, tonnage and motive power of the FS vessels that were Coast Guard manned:

DESIGN
NUMBER
DATE
BUILDING
DESCRIPTION LENGTH BEAM DRAFT BUILDER PLACE BUILT FS NUMBER NUMBER OF
VESSELS IN
CATEGORY
COST EACH TONNAGE MOTIVE
POWER
277 Apr.-Aug.1943 Vessel, passenger-cargo, diesel, wood 114', 277' 114'0" 13'4" 9'0" Petrich Shipbuilding Company Tacoma, Wash. FS-34 1 $294,524 320 Diesel
330 Sept. 1943-Mar. 1944 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 170', 330 169'10" 32'0" 14'2¾" Higgins Industries Inc. New Orleans, La. FS-140-161 22 $677,000 200 Diesel
330-DA Mar.-May, 1944 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 180', 330-DA 180'0" 33'0" 3'9" Higgins Industries, Inc. New Orleans, La. FS-162-179 1S $651,000 400 Diesel
330-DB May-July, 1944 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 180', 330-DB 180'0" 33'0" 3'9" Higgins Industries, Inc. New Orleans, La. FS-180-189 10 $651,000 400 Diesel
330-DC July-Oct. 1944 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 180', 330-DC 179'10" 32'0" 14'23/16" Higgins Industries, Inc. New Orleans, La. FS-190-203 14 $651,000 500 Diesel
330-DC Jan.-Mar. 1945 Vessel, Supply, diesel, steel, 180', 330-DC 179'10" 32'0" 14'23/166" Higgins Industries, New Orleans, La. FS-222-234 13 $651,000 500 Diesel
381 Apr. 1944-Mar. 1945 Vessel, Supply, diesel, steel, 176', 381 176'6" 32'0" 14'3" Wheeler Shipbuilding Corp. Brooklyn, N.Y. FS-253-290 (less 281) 37 $794,891 500 Diesel
381 Mar.-Oct. 1944 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 176', 381 176'6" 32'0" 14'3" J. H. Mathis Camden, N.J. FS-309-319 11 $847,518 500 Diesel
381 June-Oct. 1944 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 176', 381 176'6" 32'0" 14'3" Kewaunee Shipbuilding & Engineering Corporation Kewaunee, Vis. FS-343-345
FS-346-348
3
3
$824,603 500 Diesel
381 Apr.-Dec. 1944 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 176', 381 176'6" 32'0" 14'3" J. K. Welding Co. Brooklyn, N.Y. FS-349-356 8 $835,461 500 Diesel
381 Feb.-Sept. 1944 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 176', 381 176'6" 32'0" 14'3" Sturgeon Bay Shipbuilding & Drydock Company Sturgeon Bay, Wis. FS-361-367
FS-371-374
7
4
$831,033 500 Diesel
381 July, 1944-Feb. 1945 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 176', 381 176'6" 32'0" 14'3" Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporation Decatur, Ala. FS-383-386 4 $805,494 500 Diesel
381 Apr.-Dec. 1944 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 176', 381 176'6" 32'0" 14'3" United Concrete Pipe Corporation Los Angeles, Calif. FS-387-393 7 $898,398 500 Diesel
381 July, 1944-Feb. 1945 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 176', 381 176'6" 32'0" 14'3" Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporation Decatur, Ala. FS-394-400 7 $305,494 500 Diesel
381 Oct. 1944-Apr. 1945 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 176', 381 176'6" 32'0" 14'3" Hickinbotham Bros. Ltd. Stockton, Calif. FS-404-411 8 $924,477 500 Diesel
381 Apr.-Dec. 1944 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 176', 381 176'6" 32'0" 14'3" United Concrete Pipe Corporation Los Angeles, Calif. FS-546-550 5 $893,398 500 Diesel
381 July-Dec. 1944 Vessel, supply, diesel, steel, 176', 381 176'6" 32'0" 14'3" Calumet Shipyard and Drydock Company Chicago, Ill. FS-524-529 6 $837,359 500 Diesel
  TOTAL FS COAST GUARD MANNED 188

--133--


ARMY VESSELS
COAST GUARD MANNED143

FREIGHT AND SUPPLY SHIPS (FS)

FS-34
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-34 was accepted by the Coast Guard on May 22, 1945. On October 4, 1945, she was ordered to proceed to Ketchikan for further transfer to DCGO, 13th Naval District. On October 6, 1945, she departed Dutch Harbor for Kodiak and Ketchikan for Seattle. On January 25, 1946, she was at sea on a freight and supply run to Spring Island and DCGO, Seattle, advised that she would be turned back to the Army on her arrival in Seattle. On January 30, 1946, she was decommissioned as a Coast Guard manned vessel and returned to the Army on February 6, 1946.


FS-140
On October 31, 1944, the Coast Guard manned FS-140 was used for training at Pascagoula, Mississippi; Tampa, Florida; Brownsville, Texas; Gulfport, Mississippi; Mobile, Alabama; Corpus Christi, Texas; Pensacola, Florida, etc.


FS-141
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-141 was commissioned while in the Southwest Pacific area in October 1944, with Lt. W. J. Holbert, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned and operated in the Southwest Pacific area in the Philippines and Hawaii.


FS-142
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-142 was commissioned September 20, 1944, while in the Southwest Pacific area. She operated there and in Hawaii and Australia. She was decommissioned October 9, 1945. (See FS-151 for story of assistance rendered).


FS-143
The FS-143 was reported in the Southwest Pacific area on June 26, 1944. She operated in New Guinea.


FS-144
The FS-144 was commissioned October 27, 1944. She was in the Southwest Pacific area on June 26, 1944. She operated in New Guinea. She was decommissioned October 13, 1945.


FS-145
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-145 was commissioned May 2, 1944, at Los Angeles. Her commanding officers have been Lt. (jg) H. H. Sandidge, Jr., Lt. (jg) Jack Petterson, USCGR (7 October, 1945) and Lt. Lloyd C. Wilson, USCGR (October 29, 1945). She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and operated at Manila and Hawaii.


FS-146
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-146 was commissioned at Los Angeles April 21, 1944. Her commanding officers have been Lt. Comdr. H. William Moss, USCGR, Lt. (jg) Fred S. Pillsbury, USCGR, and Lt. (jg) Charles C. Sears, USCG (26 September, 1945). She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and operated in Hawaii.


FS-147
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-147 was manned by the Coast Guard February 27, 1945, her first commanding officer being Lt. Oscar D. Berg, USCGR. He was succeeded by Ensign Robert C. Spencer, USCGR, (25 October 1945), Ens. Harry J. Kolkebeck (20 November 1945), Lt. J. L. Barron (26 November 1945) and Lt. (jg) John D. Massman (27 November 1945). She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and operated in Hawaii.


FS-148
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-148 was commissioned April 24, 1944, and reported in the Southwest Pacific area on June 26, 1944. Her commanding officers have been Lt. (jg) John I, Moore, USCG and Ensign Chester B. Brach, USCGR (October 5, 1945). On October 8, 1945, command was transferred to Augustin Monzon, Master. She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and operated in Hawaii and the Philippines. She was decommissioned October 7, 1945.


FS-149
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-149 was commissioned April 21, 1944 at Los Angeles. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Jack V. Lum (USCGR). He was succeeded by Lt. Montford F. Gallagher, USCGR and Lt. (jg) Richard A. Gall, USCG (2 November, 1945). She was assigned and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-150
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-150 was commissioned September 20, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area where she operated.

RESCUE MISSION
On the morning of June 21, 1945, at 0620 according to a report signed by Lt. (jg) D. W. Ellis, commanding officer, the FS-150 out of Hollandia and bound for Finschaven, New Guinea, received an SOS from the U.S. Liberty Ship Millen Griffiths stating that it had run aground on the coast of New Guinea, just north of Finschaven and that it had a "strong leak." The FS-150 immediately set course for the given position of the grounded vessel and at 0745 was standing by her to offer whatever assistance she could give. The Liberty Ship had over 1000 Australian troops aboard which the FS-150 offered to help evacuate. There had been a storm earlier that morning, however, and as the sea was still rough, the master of the Griffiths decided to wait for better conditions before having the troops removed. The FS-150 stood by until 0830 when two tugs arrived on the scene and being signalled that it could be of no further assistance the FS-150 proceeded to Finschaven. At 1025 the FS-150 and FS-176 were asked by the Army to go back to the Griffiths to stand by for further assistance and they were so doing by 1115. At 1520 the FS-150 moved alongside the Griffiths and began taking her troops aboard, and at 1730 cast off all lines and set course for Finschaven with approximately 500 troops aboard. The FS-176 also removed about 500 troops from the stricken vessel and by 1900 the 1000 or so troops had been sent ashore at Finschaven.


--134--


FS-151
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-151 was commissioned at New Orleans on April 17, 1944. By June 26, 1944, the vessel was in the Southwest Pacific area.

STRANDED
On July 23, 1945 at 0648, in position 02°59'N, 133°20'E, while en route from Biak to the Philippines the Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-142 intercepted an SOS distress message from an unknown vessel on 500 kilocycles. After obtaining D/F bearings to verify position given in distress message, the course was changed to close that position some 00 miles away. A coded message stating ETA could not be decoded by the distressed vessel and all subsequent radio communication was in plain language. The distressed vessel was sighted at 1640 and the FS-142 arrived on scene at 1730. Present was USMC type N-3 vessel William F. Howard which had arrived about 30 minutes earlier and was lying one mile off the reef. The distressed vessel was the FS-151 stranded on the east side of Helen Reef, 6 miles from Helen Island in position 02°52'N, 131°40'E, heading in a northeasterly direction, drawing 4½ feet of water forward and normal draft aft. Breakers were about her port side resulting from a moderate SW wind and the sea was sweeping the reef. The starboard side of the FS-151 was in deeper water. Her booms were swung out to port. Two warps were out astern leading to deeper water. The FS-142 closed the distressed vessel and following blinker conversation regarding the general situation it was decided at 1800 to try pulling her off on the chance that she was not badly stranded. After the third attempt, a cable was passed and made fast to FS-151 at 1326. The cable broke loose from the bit of the 151 but the distressed vessel did not budge. Further attempts were abandoned because of darkness, strong currents and inadaptability of the FS-142 to such work. It was obvious that it would take a powerful tug to get the 151 off. At 1910 the Howard departed and at 1950 the FS-142 advised the 151 that they would be standing by at some distance off the reef because of possible enemy submarine attack following the plain language communications. The 151's personnel was in no immediate danger. At 2110 intercepted message from Nerk, a naval war vessel, to FS-151 stated that she would stand by off the reef and close in the morning if no immediate assistance was required. The FS-142 advised that she was in the vicinity also. At 0830 on July 27, 1945, present at scene were DE-367 (SOPA), APD-11, an Australian J-boat and a commercial tanker. After blinker conversation with SOPA regarding previous day's experience and stating opinion 151 was higher on reef than previous evening, SOPA decided to try and requested FS-142 to stand by. At 0942 SOPA advised that an ocean-going tug was approaching and that FS-142 could proceed. After confirming that no further help was needed by blinker with FS-151, the FS-142 proceeded back to course and to destination. The FS-151 was apparently successfully floated for on October 12, 1945, she was decommissioned and on October 13, 1945, her Coast Guard crew was removed.


FS-152
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-152 was commissioned April 28, 1944, and was in the Southwest Pacific area on June 26, 1944, where she operated during the war. She was decommissioned on October 19, 1945.


FS-153
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-153 was commissioned April 23, 1944, and was reported in the Southwest Pacific area on June 26, 1944, where she operated during the war. Her commanding officer on October 26, 1944, was Lt. (jg) R. F. Horwath, USCGR, and on September 1, 1945 Lt. Robert B. English, Jr. USCGR. On October 31, 1945, the vessel was transferred from the Coast Guard to the Army Transportation Service and decommissioned on the same day.


FS-154
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-154 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California on April 21, 1944,with Lt, Comdr. D. H. Williams, USCGR, as first commanding officer from April 12, 1944. He was succeeded by Lt. J. D. Lee, USCGR, and on September 19, 1945,Lt. W. A. Devine, USCG, took command. On June 26, 1944, she reported in the Southwest Pacific area where she continued to operate throughout the war.


FS-155
The Coast Guard manned FS-155 was commissioned May 10, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-156
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-156 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California, May 6, 1944, with Lt. (jg) William H. Burgess, USCG, as her commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. She was decommissioned at Manila September 4, 1945, and all Coast Guard personnel removed.


FS-157
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-157 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California on May 6, 1944. Her commanding officer was Lt. Lester B. P. Dale. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-158
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-158 was commissioned May 17, 1944 at Los Angeles, California, with Lt. Sloan Wilson, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. Wallace E. Cooke, USCGR, who, on September 26, 1945 was succeeded by Lt. (jg) Robert J. Pate, Jr., USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-159
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-159 was commissioned on May 17, 1944, at Los Angeles, California, with Lt. Oliver Pickford, USCG, as first commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. On September 2, 1944, she was turned over to and accepted by the Navy and designated "USS FS-159" and attached to the Seventh Fleet Service Force.


FS-160
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-160 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California on May 17, 1944, with Lt. W. H. Seemann, Jr., USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded September 7, 1945, by Lt. (jg) William E. Thirkel, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.


FS-161 TO USSR
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-161 was withdrawn from Coast Guard manning May 19, 1944, and turned over to the Los Angeles Army office having cognizance. Arriving at San Francisco she was turned to USSR under Lend-Lease.


--135--


FS-162
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-162 was commissioned April 17, 1944. She had as her first commanding officer Lt. F. Roebuck. He was succeeded by Lt. K. L. Terrell, USCGR, and on November 18, 1945, he was succeeded by Lt. (jg) Harry F. Rice, Jr., USCGR. Lt. L. O. Pressey, USCG, succeeded Lt. Rice as commanding officer.

ASSISTANCE TO ARMY TUG
On March 3, 1945, at 1635, while proceeding from Outer Bay to Tacloban anchorage, the U.S. Army Tug TP-120 was observed to strike a shoal northeast of the red buoy marking starboard of channel off San Antonio, careen, and almost immediately to come about sharply to port and run fast aground approximately 100 yards north of the red buoy. It was also observed that a man had fallen overboard at the striking of the first shoal. The FS-162's launch was immediately cast off and proceeded to pick up the man overboard and return him to TP-120. A towing hawser was then broken out and passed to TP-120 who was pulled free and out into the channel and proceeded thereupon under her own power.

RESCUE ARMY PERSONNEL
At about 2200 on March 5, 1945, cries for help were heard off the small ship's dock in Tacloban. Three crew members of the FS-162, James E. Copple, BM 2c; George W. Varner, S 1c (R) and Robert O. C. Quinney, S 2c (R), proceeded to the scene where a small boat with Army personnel had been swamped and sunk. Life preservers were thrown to those able to swim, and when it was seen that two men were in serious difficulty, Varner and Quinney unhesitatingly went overboard to their assistance. Quinney got hold of one man with head injuries and towed him to an Army personnel craft while Varner brought the other man to the launch, where he was hauled aboard unconscious. Copple at once began resuscitation while Varner took the boat into the dock. Resuscitation continued until the arrival of the ambulance by which time the man began to gasp and had a strong pulse. The three men together with Donald E. Hanhart S1c were recommended for appropriate entries in their service jackets, for their efficiency in effecting the rescues. She was assigned to and operated in the Central and Southwest Pacific areas during the war.


FS-163 LOST IN TYPHOON
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-163 was commissioned April 18, 1944, with Lt. (jg) Don K. Townsend, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) C. M. Fish, USCG, on September 2, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. On October 12, 1945, the FS-163 was lost in a typhoon.


FS-164
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-164 was commissioned April 21, 1944. She was turned over to W. Ingram, Master, Army Transport Service by Lt. M. Hanson, Jr. USCG on February 10, 1946. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Hollandia, Manus, Lingayen, Tacloban, Tawitawi, etc.


FS-165
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-165 was commissioned April 26, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. She was decommissioned September 21, 1945.


FS-166
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-166 was commissioned April 26, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas. She was decommissioned October 9, 1945.


FS-167
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-167 was commissioned May 1, 1944. She had as her first commanding officer Lt. Pardue Geren, USCGR. He was succeeded October 24, 1945, by Lt. P. H. Woodward, USCG. She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and operated at Leyte, Tacloban, Mindoro, etc.


FS-168
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-168 was commissioned Hay 4, 1944. She had as commanding officers, Lt. (jg) Richard W. Jones, USCGR, who was succeeded September 27, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Joseph A. Kean, USCGR. She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and operated at Mindoro, Tacloban, Zamboanga, etc. She was decommissioned October 1, 1945.


FS-169
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-169 was commissioned May 4, 1944, and assigned to the Southwest Pacific area. She was decommissioned October 5, 1945.


FS-170
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-170 was commissioned May 8, 1944. She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-171
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-171 was commissioned May 10, 1944. She had as first commanding officer Lt. (jg) Lawrence D. Bragg, USCGR. He was succeeded on September 2, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Lemuel K. Hartsook, USCGR. In November 1944 she stranded on a reef in Astrolabe Bay between Finschaven and Hollandia, New Guinea, and was pulled off by the Coast Guard manned LT-636. She was decommissioned September 22, 1945.


FS-172 SUNK
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-172 was commissioned May 19, 1944. She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific area and sunk two miles off Mugil Point on Cape Croisilles, New Guinea.


FS-173
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-173 was commissioned May 14, 1944. She had as first commanding officer Lt. (jg) Lester F. Bain, USCGR. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) Joseph L. Kelly, USCGR. She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific Area and operated at Leyte, Milne Bay, etc. She was decommissioned October 25, 1945.


FS-174
The Coast Guard manner Army FS-174 was commissioned May 18, 1944. She had as commanding officer Lt. E. R. Sneeringer. She was turned over to Captain J. J. Feenan, U.S. Army, representing the transportation corps on November 29, 1945, after having been assign ed to the Southwest Pacific area and operated at Manila, Tacloban, Biak, etc.


FS-175
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-175 was commissioned May 19, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


--136--


A BUSY 'ISLAND HOPPER' MANNED BY COAST GUARDSMEN FOR THE ARMY IN THE PACIFIC WAR
A busy "Island Hopper" manned by Coast Guardsmen for the Army in the Pacific War

BROUGHT BY ITS COAST GUARD CREW THROUGH THE MAZE OF REEFS AND ATOLLS TO AN ADVANCE SOUTH PACIFIC BASE THIS ARMY FS (FREIGHT SUPPLY) SHIP GIVES UP ITS CARGO OF SUPPLIES FOR UNCLE SAM's PACIFIC INVADERS
Brought by its Coast Guard crew through the maze of reefs and atolls to an advance South Pacific base, this Army FS (Freight Supply) ship gives up its cargo of supplies for Uncle Sam's Pacific invaders

--137--


FS-176
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-176 was commissioned May 21, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Tacloban, Hollandia, etc.


FS-177
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-177 was commissioned May 26, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. She was decommissioned August 19, 1945.


FS-178
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-178 was commissioned on May 27, 1944. On August 1, 1945, she had finished discharging a cargo of chemical warfare equipment from Morotai, NEI, and was ordered drydocked in ARD-9, Humboldt Bay, Hollandia, New Guinea, to clean and paint hull. She departed drydock on the 3rd and on the 6th was underway for Milne Bay, New Guinea, where she arrived on the 12th and loaded 39 tons of life rafts for Finschaven and Hollandia arriving at the former place on the 14th to discharge 20 rafts and pick up mail and at the latter place on the 18th to unload the remainder before anchoring until the 26th at Challenge Cove, Hollandia. On that date she received a cargo of mail for Biak and proceeded there independently arriving at Sorido Lagoon on the 30th to discharge mail and load ammunition for Zamboanga, Philippine Islands. She departed next morning for Zamboanga, Philippine Islands. (The above is believed to furnish a fairly representative cross section of the day to day operations of the Coast Guard manned FS's in the Southwest Pacific area). The FS-178 was decommissioned on October 16, 1945.


FS-179
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-179 was commissioned May 28, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. She was decommissioned on October 1, 1945.


FS-180
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-180 was commissioned on May 31, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. She was decommissioned on October 18, 1945.


FS-181
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-181 was commissioned August 31, 1944. She had as her first commanding officer Lt. K. M. Baker, USCGR. He was succeeded by Lt. (Jg) L. Trestman, USCGR, on September 17, 1945, and he by Lt. Martin S. Hanson, Jr. USCGR on November 1, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Biak.


FS-182
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-182 was commissioned June 24, 1944, at New Orleans, Louisiana, with Lt. R. P. Anderson, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) Robert L. Mobley, USCGR, and he in turn by Lt. (jg) Leon A Danco, Jr. on October 1, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Hollandia.


FS-183
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-183 was commissioned July 22, 1944, at New Orleans, Louisiana, with her first commanding officer Lt. (jg) E. W. Gwiazda, USCGR. He was succeeded on October 11, 1945, by Lt, (jg) Clive V. Clark, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded on October 24, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Elliott Rubin, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-184
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-184 was commissioned at New Orleans, Louisiana on August 2, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. E. G. Berdaw, USCGR. He was succeeded by Lt. Juan R. Root, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. (jg) Henry P. Hamrock, USCGR, on September 12, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-185
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-185 was commissioned on July 24, 1944, at New Orleans, Louisiana, her first commanding officer being Lt. (Jg) L. C. Rickert, USCGR. He was succeeded September 20, 1945, by Lt. (jg) L. W. Cotro, USCGR, She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Tacloban.


FS-186
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-186 was commissioned July 24, 1944, at New Orleans, Louisiana, her first commanding officer being Lt. F. D. Obrian, USCGR. He was succeeded by Lt. G. N. Paul, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. (jg) Ernest H. Thompson, Jr. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Biak.


FS-187
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-187 was commissioned July 31, 1944, at New Orleans, Louisiana, with Lt. (Jg) W. A. Skelton, Jr. USCGR, first commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Manila, Tacloban, etc.


FS-188
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-188 was commissioned at New Orleans, Louisiana, on August 2, 1944, with Lt. (jg) A. R. Freedy, USCGR, her first commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in Hawaii, Pearl Harbor, Majuro, Eniwetok, Guam, Saipan, etc. On October 3, 1944, the commanding officer was relieved of all responsibilities and accountabilities for the vessel, the Coast Guard crew was replaced by an Army crew.


FS-189
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-189 was commissioned at New Orleans, on August 9, 1944, with Lt. B. Spencer, USCG, as commanding officer. He was succeeded on October 26, 1945, by Lt. (jg) William J. Barry, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Hollandia, Leyte, Parang, etc.


FS-190
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-190 was commissioned August 9, 1944, at New Orleans with Lt. (jg) G. A. Peterson, USCGR, as first commanding officer.

TO PHILIPPINES
On August 1, 1945, the FS-190 was attached to Service Squadron Nine, Service Force, Seventh Fleet under

--138--


operational control of CNOB, Leyte, proceeding independently from Mindoro to San Fernando, Luzon, Philippine Islands, with cargo for CNOB, Lingayen Gulf. She arrived at 1730 and awaited and completed discharge operations from the 2nd through the 4th. On the 5th she was underway independently for Tacloban, Leyte, Philippine Islands, carrying two enlisted men (USN) as passengers with no cargo. She arrived on the 7th and on the 13th got underway independently for Manus Island in the Admiralties, arriving at Seeadler Harbor, Manus Island on the 20th. Here she took on cargo for the Boat Pool, Naval Shore Facilities, Tacloban, Leyte and also cargo for USS Oglala and USS Otus. On the 27th she was underway for Tacloban, Leyte, Philippine Islands, travelling independently and blacked out at night. (The above constituted a good cross section of the activities of the typical Coast Guard manned FS type of vessel in this area and during this period).


FS-191
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-191 was commissioned on August 12, 1944, at New Orleans with Lt. (jg) E. R. Holden, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-192
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-192 was commissioned August 21, 1944, at New Orleans, Louisiana, with Lt. (jg) C. J. Stevenson, USCGR, first commanding officer. He was succeeded November 29, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Charles W. Shannon, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-193
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-193 was commissioned at New Orleans on August 23, 1944. The first commanding officer was Lt. (jg) G. W. Hayman, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-194
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-194 was commissioned at New Orleans, on August 30, 1944. The first commanding officer was Lt. (jg) C. J. Hanks, USCGR. He was succeeded on November 9, 1945, by Lt. M. S. Squires, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Milne Bay, Segond Channel, Espiritu Santo, etc.


FS-195
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-195 was commissioned at New Orleans, on August 26, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. J. P. McNabb, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-196
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-196 was commissioned at New Orleans on August 29, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. (jg) F. B. Davis, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. She was decommissioned August 22, 1945.


FS-197
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-197 was commissioned at New Orleans on September 2, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-198
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-198 was commissioned at New Orleans on September 5, 1944, with her first commanding officer being Lt. J. J. Grant, USCGR. He was succeeded October 3, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Charles W. Shannon, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Leyte, etc.


FS-199
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-199 was commissioned at New Orleans, September 18, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. (jg) L. E. Parsons, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-200
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-200 was commissioned September 19, 1944, at New Orleans, with Lt. (jg) F. J. Mahoney, USCGR, as her first commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. She was decommissioned October 29, 1945.


FS-201
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-201 was commissioned On September 30, 1944, at New Orleans, Louisiana, with Lt. R. P. Champney, Jr., USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-202
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-202 was commissioned October 7, 1944, at New Orleans, with Lt. F. G. Markle, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) Kenneth D, Killman, USCGR, who was in turn succeeded by Lt. (jg) Armand J. P. White on October 2, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Parang.


FS-203
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-203 was commissioned at New Orleans on October 17, 1944, with Lt. (jg) F. S. Shine, USCG, as first commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Hollandia. She was decommissioned October 31, 1945.


FS-222
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-222 was built at Higgins Industries, Inc. and commissioned at New Orleans on January 31, 1945, with Lt. (jg) J. A. Sayre, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. J. V. Freeny, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded September 25, 1945, by Lt. (jg) A. L. Lundberg, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. On January 18, 1946, the FS-222 was released from control of Coast Guard, AF WESPAC and transferred to control of Administration Commander, Coast Guard activities SWPA, Philippine Sea Frontier.


FS-223
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-223 was commissioned at New Orleans on February 6, 1945, with Lt. E. G. Hamilton, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded August 8, 1945, by Lt. (jg) J. W. Bingham, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Guam. On November 10, 1945, in accordance with verbal orders of Commander, Coast Guard Manning Detachment and U.S. Army Transportation Corps, Tacloban, Leyte, Philippine Islands, Rio Torres assumed command for the U.S. Army Transportation Corps.


--139--


FS-224
The Coast Guard Army FS-224 had as her first commanding officer Lt. V. A. Molstad, USCGR, who was succeeded on November 15, 1945, by Lt. W. J. Barry, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-225
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-225 was built at Higgins Industries, Inc. and commissioned at New Orleans on February 14, 1945, with Lt. F. A. Maier, USCG, as her first commanding officer. He was succeeded on March 2, 1945, by Lt. G. W. Pruitt, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-226
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-226 was commissioned February 17, 1945, at New Orleans with Lt. V. S. Colomb, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded September 28, 1945, by Lt. (Jg) J. D. Peterson, USCGR. She was assigned to an operated in the Southwest Pacific Area.


FS-227
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-227 was commissioned on March 1, 1945, at New Orleans with Lt, (jg) James C. Hale, jr., USCGR, as first commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Guam, Saipan, Eniwetok, etc.


FS-228
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-228 was commissioned March 13, 1945, at New Orleans with Lt. Budd B. Bornhoft, USCGR, first commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Guam, Saipan, Eniwetok, etc.


FS-229
She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Guam, Saipan, Eniwetok, etc.


FS-230, 231, 232, 233 AND 234
These were assigned and operated in the Pacific Ocean area.


FS-253
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-253 was commissioned on May 7, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. E. P. Jadro, USCGR, succeeded on October 5, 1945, by Lt. L. S. Sadler, USCG. On June 8, 1944, she departed from the 3rd Naval District for the West Coast towing the Army vessel QS-17. On June 21, 1944, she was reported departing Key West for Panama Canal. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Leyte. She was decommissioned on October 23, 1945.


FS-254
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-254 was commissioned May 23, 1945, with Lt. Robert A. Copeland, Jr. USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded December 9, 1945, by Boatswain Peter Butler, USCG. On June 21, 1944, she departed 3rd Naval District for the Southwest Pacific. On December 7, 1945, she was turned over with all equipment, stores, etc. to U.S. 6th Army at Nagoya, Japan, Captain J. J. Freeman signing receipt for the Army.


FS-255 TORPEDOED
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-255 was commissioned at Wheeler Shipyard, Whitestone, New York, on June 6, 1944, with Lt. Ludwig Ehlers, USCG, as commanding officer. On August 3, 1944, he was succeeded by Lt. Robert F. Maloney, USCGR. On May 10, 1945, the FS-255 had proceeded to Taloma Bay with the Davao Gulf First Re-Supply Echelon with a cargo of 155mm ammunition on board, for the use of the 24th Division, U.S. Army in their operations against the enemy. On the night of May 10-11, 1945, she was anchored in 17 fathoms of water, 400 yards, 140° from the pier at the head of Taloma Bay, Davao Gulf, Mindanao, Philippine Islands. Both #1 and #2 hatches were open and about 80 tons of ammunition still on board. The ship was dark and the Quartermaster on watch was on the bridge and the security watch on #2 hatch, the engineer on watch in the engineroom. It was rainy and the weather was thick when at 0030 on May 11, 1945, she was struck by a torpedo on her port quarter in the after crew's compartment. The Commanding Officer, Lt. George A, Tardif, USCG, was in his berth at the time but immediately went on deck with a battle light to ascertain the cause of the explosion and extent of damage. He found that the torpedo had hit her on the port quarter, ordered all hands checked and a search for injured men. Three injured men were found--Frank Ness, SC 3/c (634-879), Edward P. Conliffe, Y 1/c(R) (502-867), and William Brown, BM 1/c (226-157). The commanding officer went inside the ship and looked down into the engine room. The engineer on watch was already on deck. The main engines were nearly flooded and water was pouring into the engineroom from the bulkhead aft which was badly ruptured. The officer's wardroom, galley and mess hall aft were literally torn to pieces and it was impossible to proceed further forward or aft. On the boat deck the lifeboat had its stern blown off and blasted out of the cradle and the gig had the stern blown open and the propeller and shaft bent double, was blown out of the cradle and hanging over the side by the forward falls. The 40mm gun had been blown off and one ready ammunition box belonging to it was found on the forecastle head near the anchor winch, with 40mm shells about forward of #1 hatch. The ship had buckled between #2 hatch and the bridge structure with foot high ridges in the deck plating, extending down the sides of the ship into the water. Examination of the crews quarters indicated that Lewis Cohen MoMM 2/c(R) (577-076) and Theodore R. Strong (Negro) St M 1/c(R) (690-325) who were sleeping in the crew's quarters aft were nowhere to be seen. Robert Swett (203-614) MoMM 1/c and Richard E. Hoetger (568-175) SC 1/c who were sleeping in hammocks on the fantail beneath the 40mm gun platform were also not found. Large masses of blood were seen on the deck which had been blown to a 90° angle. The signalman on LCI-21 was signalled that the FS-255 had been hit. The ship was settling fast and two life rafts were launched and men ordered to board them which were ordered to stand off clear of the ship. Three minutes later the FS-255 turned over on her port side and sank at 0050. The LCI-21 picked up all survivors ten minutes later. Out of a total enlisted complement of 20, 16 survived. All four officers also survived.


FS-256
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-256 was commissioned at New York, New York, June 16, 1944, with Lt. C. E. Thorsen, USCGR, first commanding officer. He was succeeded October 3, 1945, by Lt. (jg) K. F. Erickson, USCGR. On July 17, 1944, she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. She was decommissioned October 14, 1945.


FS-257
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-257 was commissioned June 24, 1944, at

--140--


New York, New York, with Lt. G. P. Hammond, USCG, as commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) S. N. Harstook, USCGR, and he in turn by Lt. (jg) William F. Moffatt, USCG, on June 9, 1945. On July 26, 1944, she departed the 3rd Naval District for the Southwest Pacific. She operated in the Southwest Pacific, including Leyte.


FS-258
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-258 departed the 3rd Naval District, August 20, 1944, for Los Angeles, California, towing the QS-54. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. She was decommissioned October 22, 1945.


FS-259
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-259 departed the 3rd Naval District for Los Angeles, California, on August 20, 1944, towing the QS-57. She was assigned to and operated in Hawaii.


FS-260
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-260 was commissioned at New York on July 26, 1944, with Lt. A. Smalley, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) L. F. Jones, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. (jg) William L, Barlow, USCG, on October 4, 1945. On August 28, 1944, she departed from the 3rd Naval District and on September 5, 1944, was reported towing the QS-16 to the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.


FS-261
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-261 was commissioned at New York on August 2, 1944, with Lt. (jg) L. W. Conover, USCGR, as first commanding officer. On September 9, 1944, she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.


FS-262
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-262 was commissioned at New York on August 9, 1944, with Lt. (jg) B. Hribar, USCGR, as first commanding officer. On September 22, 1944, she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.


FS-263
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-263 was commissioned at New York on August 16, 1944. Lt. (jg) W. G. Hill, USCGR, was her first commanding officer. On September 6, 1944, she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.

CARRIES MAIL AND SUPPLIES
On August 1, 1945, the FS-263 anchored in Serida Lagoon, Biak, New Guinea, without cargo awaiting orders to proceed to the Philippine area, and departed on the 2nd for Finschhafen, New Guinea. Arriving on the 6th after an uneventful voyage she loaded mail and commissary supplies for Oro Bay, New Guinea and Milne Bay, New Guinea, and on the 7th entered drydock at Finschhafen, where she remained until the 9th having her bottom scraped and repainted. On the 11th she departed Finschhafen to search for a man lost overboard on the 10th but returned to port when the man was located on Scarlet Beach having swum ashore during the night. On the 15th she departed Finschhafen for Oro Bay, New Guinea, and moored there on the 16th. Here the #3 cylinder liner of her starboard engine was found to be cracked and it was deemed inadvisable to proceed to sea with only one engine. She was therefor docked at Oro Bay, New Guinea, for the remainder of August, 1945, with cargo for Oro Bay discharged but cargo for Milne Bay still on board. While the engine was being repaired the crew was engaged in routine cleaning and upkeep work aboard the vessel. On October 12, 1945, the Coast Guard crew was removed from the FS-263 and she was decommissioned.


FS-264
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-264 was commissioned at New York on August 24, 1944, with Lt. (jg) E. F. Warner, USCGR, first commanding officer. On September 27, 1944, she departed New York towing P-751 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Leyte, Manila, etc. She was decommissioned on September 24, 1945.


FS-265
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-265 was commissioned at New York on September 1, 1944, with Lt. H. E. Dennis, USCGR, her first commanding officer. He was succeeded October 22, 1944, by Lt. (jg) Richard E. Youngren, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded on November 12, 1945, by Lt. Walter R. Young, USCGR. On September 18, 1944, she departed New York for Davisville, Rhode Island from where she returned to New York October 11, 1944, and departed on October 22, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.

EXPLODES MINE
On April 5, 1945, while on course a floating horned mine was sighted dead ahead in position 05°43'S, 147°09'E drifting across a heavily travelled shipping lane through which an aircraft carrier had been seen to pass not more than half an hour before. The FS-265 maneuvered into a position from which it was possible to explode the mine with machine gun fire. The damage to the FS-265 from the exploding mine was slight consisting of a few jammed doors and locks, short circuits in the radio transmitter and a leak in the hydraulic rudder angle indicator all of which damage was repaired.


FS-266
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-266 was commissioned at New York on September 8, 1944. Her only commanding officer was Lt. (jg) J. D. Legon, USCGR. On October 2, 1944 she departed New York after a trip to Davisville, Rhode Island, for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war. On November 25, 1945,the Coast Guard crew was relieved by a civilian officer and crew.


FS-267
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-267 was commissioned at New York on September 18, 1944, her first commanding officer being Lt. E. W. Stachle, USCGR. After a trip to Davisville, Rhode Island she departed New York October 10, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific. During July 1945 she was transferred to the Navy Department in the Pacific area.


FS-268
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-268 was commissioned at New York on September 22, 1944. Her commanding officer was Lt. Johannes Larsen, USCGR. On October 22 1944, she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Parang and elsewhere.


FS-269
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-269 was commissioned at New York on October 2, 1944. Lt. Jacob Bursey, USCGR, was her commanding officer. She departed New

--141--


York, October 22, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Palawan, Philippine Islands.


FS-270
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-270 was commissioned at New York on October 6, 1944, with Lt. (jg) G. T. Fretz, Jr., as her commanding officer. She departed New York, October 26, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war. She was decommissioned and her Coast Guard crew removed October 10, 1945.


FS-271
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-271 was commissioned at New York, October 13, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Pettus Kaufman, USCGR. He was succeeded April 26, 1945, by Lt. (jg) K. S. Hobart, USCGR. She departed New York November 2, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war. She was decommissioned September 27, 1945.


FS-272
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-272 was commissioned at New York, October 22, 1944, with Lt. E. Ayers, USCGR, as commanding officer. She departed New York November 15, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Parang, Philippine Islands.


FS-273
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-273 was commissioned at New York, November 6, 1944, with Lt. W. P. Clark, Jr., USCGR, first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. Edward L. Ayers, USCGR, who was succeeded February 1, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Louis B. Adair, USCGR. Lt. Juan E. Lacson, USCGR, took command September 30, 1945. She departed New York December 3, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war. She was decommissioned October 30, 1945.


FS-274
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-274 was commissioned at New York, October 31, 1944, and Lt. R. S. Crampton, USCGR, became her first commanding officer, November 24, 1944. He was succeeded on October 4, 1945, by Lt. (jg) G. B. Dowley, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific during the war.


FS-275
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-275 was commissioned at New York on November 6, 1944. Lt. T.H. L. Sutcliffe, USCGR, became her first commanding officer. She departed New York on December 3, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war.


FS-276
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-276 was commissioned at New York, November 13, 1944, and Lt. Antonio M. S. Santa Cruz became her first commanding officer on December 5, 1944, as she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.


FS-277
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-277 was commissioned at New York on November 20, 1944, with Lt. (jg) F. A. Grantham, USCG, as her first commanding officer. He was succeeded December 4, 1945, by Lt. Matthew L. Stanaell, USCG. She departed New York December 14, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.


FS-278
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-278 was commissioned at New York November 25, 1944, with Lt. (jg) Beverly L. Higgins, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded on June 25, 1945, by Lt. D. W. Engle, USCGR. She departed New York December 17, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated at Peleliu, Palawan, etc., during the war. She was decommissioned October 3, 1945.


FS-279
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-279 was commissioned at New York on December 2, 1944, with Lt. (jg) George W. Litchfield, USCGR, commanding officer. She departed New York, December 30, 1944, for the South-West Pacific, where she operated during the war. She was decommissioned October 22, 1945.


FS-280
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-28O was commissioned December 9, 1944, at Wheeler Shipyard, Whitestone, New York, with Lt. (jg) Davis, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded October 8, 1945, by Lt. John A Waldron, USCGR. She departed New York January 2, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war.

ASSISTANCE, AT FUEL DOCK FIRE ZAMBOANGA, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
Shortly after 2200 on July 10, 1945, the sky at Zamboanga, Philippine Islands, was illuminated by a column of flame that climbed 200 feet in the air. The entire fuel dock appeared ablaze. All hands on the FS-280 were awaiting the explosion of the two large tankers known to be moored there. Lt. Waldron, commanding officer of the FS-280, assembled a fire and rescue party consisting of himself and five Coast Guard enlisted men and proceeded to the scene, two miles away in the motor launch. As they approached, the fire seemed to be slackening in intensity and they were able to distinguish the source of the blaze, which were dolphins to which the inboard tanker USS Stonewall (IX-185) was secured. Flaming oil filled the area between the dolphins and the fire compassed a total area of 300 square feet with 2 or 3 small fires on the decks of the two tankers. 200 feet from the outboard tanker, M. V. China, a native vinta was observed aflame 75 feet off the bow of the Stonewall. The flames were 3 feet high and appeared to arise from three distinct sources of fuel within the vinta. The Coast Guardsmen proceeded down the seaward side of the China and observed a lifeboat overcrowded with an excited Chinese crew. Going alongside they quieted the Chinese and directed them to follow them to the fuel dock. Swinging under the astern of the Stonewall they observed that four hoses were hooked up on the port side aft and fire fighters aboard the Stonewall were directing three streams at a surface oil fire, 50 feet in extent, blazing under the counter and along the port quarter. The other hose was cooling the mid-ship sides, dock and dolphins that it could reach. The launch headed in and attempted to douse the flames by splashing water with floor boards ripped from the launch, but the blaze spread and they were forced back. A hose was requested and lowered and the flames under the port quarter were extinguished within five minutes. Flames still leaped from a forward dolphin just beyond reach of the ship's hose and the Coast Guardsmen requested another hose and easing under the dock that drenched the only remaining dolphin afire. Approaching within 20 feet with a third length of hose their solid stream made short work of the blaze. Going aboard the Stonewall, after the hull and remaining dolphins had been drenched to cool them off, it was learned that an accidental discharge of five barrels of aviation gasoline had been set afire by sparks from a native

--142--


boat. Only the courageous action of the fire fighters on board the two tankers had prevented them from being blown "galley west." It had been touch and go with hundreds of gallons of gasoline within 50 feet of the last flame to be extinguished. The five Coast Guardsmen who worked with Lt. Waldrop for an hour to save the two tankers acted in the best traditions of the Coast Guard and were recommended for recognition. They were:


FS-281 NOT COAST GUARD MANNED
On November 29, 1944, the Army FS-281 was withdrawn from Southwest Pacific area assignment and was not Coast Guard manned.


FS-282
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-282 was commissioned at New York December 27, 1944, with Lt. E. C. Sturgis, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded October 19, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Joshua W. Reed, USCG. She departed New York January 17, 1945, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.


FS-283
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-283 was commissioned at New York on January 2, 1945, with Lt. (jg) A. M. Coane, USCGR, as commanding officer. She departed New York on January 29, 1945, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Parang, Jacquinat Bay, etc. She was decommissioned September 25, 1945.


FS-284
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-284 was commissioned at Wheeler Shipyard, Whitestone, New York, on January 12, 1945, with Lt. (jg) Byron G. Crawford, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war. She was decommissioned August 12, 1945.


FS-285
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-285 was commissioned on January 22, 1945, at Wheeler Shipyard, Whitestone, New York, with Lt. (jg) Gordon E. Miniclier, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded on September 22, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Carl A. Haldenwanger, USCG, who in turn was succeeded by CBM M. L. Needles on November 26, 1945. She departed New York February 19, 1945, for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war.


FS-286
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-286 was commissioned with her first commanding officer as Lt. (jg) William J. Nolan, USCGR, who was succeeded September 27, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Bruce B. Davidson, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, at Milne Bay, etc. during the war. She was decommissioned October 1, 1945.


FS-287
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-287 was commissioned March 1, 1945, at Wheeler Shipyard, Whitestone, New York, with Lt. Walter A. Devine, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area at Tinian and elsewhere during the war. She was decommissioned August 23, 1945.


FS-288
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-288 was commissioned March 10, 1945, at Wheeler Shipyard, Whitestone, New York, with Lt. (jg) Paul A. Berg, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean area, i.e., at Saipan, Guam, etc., during the war.


FS-289
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-289 was assigned to and operated in Hawaii during the war.


FS-290 LOST IN TYPHOON
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-290 was assigned and operated under the Central Pacific Base Command. She was lost in a typhoon at Okinawa on November 9, 1945.


FS-309
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-309 was commissioned at New York on April 10, 1944, with Lt. (jg) Richard H. Greenless, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. Oliver Rahle. Departing New York early in May 1944, the FS-309 proceeded to Los Angeles, via Panama Canal.

IN COLLISION
En route to Honolulu from Los Angeles the FS-309 was in collision with a Navy destroyer 150 miles off the coast. With her starboard side caved in and number two hold full of water, but with no one injured, the crew shifted the cargo to port port side and rigged a collision mat, taking her to Los Angeles under her own power. The damage was repaired, the skipper exonerated by a Navy Board and the FS-309 proceeded to New Guinea, via Honolulu and Ellice Islands. At Milne Bay, New Guinea, she unloaded and reloaded for Hollandia and joined a convoy for the Philippines.

UNDER AIR ATTACK
As she approached Leyte the crew was notified that "enemy air attack can be expected at any time," but they sailed up Leyte Bay without firing a shot. A few days later, however, on Christmas Eve, 1944, the airfield at Tacloban was attacked and she began shooting at enemy planes along with shore batteries.

RESCUE AT SEA--EXPLODED USS PORCUPINE
Sailing shortly afterward for Mindoro, the FS-309 was subject to concentrated attacks from enemy suicide and crash bombers while steaming through Surigao Straits, Mindanao Sea, Sulu Sea and Mindoro Straits on December 28, 1944. Some 26 enemy planes were shot down by the convoy. The 309's guns fired into one Zero, putting her ablaze shortly before she banked into the ammunition laden USS Porcupine (IX-120) 200 yards ahead. A terrific explosion followed, the concussion picking everybody several feet off the deck of the 309 and tearing the flying bridge to pieces with all shatter proof windows which were not down being completely pulverized. As the smoke rose from the Porcupine the remnants of the ill-fated ship were seen falling from the sky into the sea as shrapnel littered the deck, with booms, life rafts, hatches, etc. of the ill-starred ship dropping not 20 feet ahead of the 309. Out of the smoky area, three huge, mountainous waves were seen approaching and two men were seen frantically waving and shouting in the water. The 309 maneuvered closer and Francis L. Owens (634-827) AS, USCGR of the 309 crew jumped overboard carrying

--143--


lines to them and they were rescued. The two men turned out not to be from the Porcupine but from a Navy vessel in the column to the left of the 309, who had been blown overboard in the explosion of the Porcupine. The enemy had scored three hits. The Porcupine had entirely disappeared except for a body floating by, and two others were seen abandoned and burning in the distance. Attacks continued while anchored off Mindoro Island and the 309 went to the aid of a burning gasoline tanker hit by suicide divers and rescued her crew.

"Q" BOAT ATTACK FOILED
On January 31. 1945, the FS-309 pulled into the partially wrecked Wawa River Wharf at Nasugbu Bay where the last 300 defenders of Bataan and Corregidor had been landed and held prisoner for many days, many of them dying for want of medical care. Here enemy "Q" boats--small fast speed boats carrying two depth charges aft and attacking shipping at anchor with suicidal intent--were known to be operating. The FS-309 was the first United States vessel to remain overnight. A raft extending out from the ship was accordingly built to provide additional protection. Five days later the expected "Q" boat attack came. Shortly after 4 A.M. a watch sighted three helmeted Japanese in a motor boat. He gave the alarm and the searchlight was turned on them. Not 50 yards away they became confused and ran into the raft near the fantail. The explosion that followed blew the Japs and the "Q" boat into the air and lifted the stern of the FS-309 out of the water. A lifeboat on the 309's boat deck was completely filled with sand and water, so great was the explosion. Crew members just starting for their battle stations were thrown violently on deck while water poured into their quarters through weather doors and passageways. The men thought an enemy air bomb had hit the FS. No one was hurt and the FS was comparatively undamaged thanks to the protective raft. The bodies of a Japanese Captain and Lieutenant were found, indicating the importance of the mission, for had they succeeded the dock would have been rendered useless for some time.

PEACE
On August 19, 1945, the FS-309 was at Manila when the Japanese delegation arrived by air to receive General MacArthur's peace terms. Later she proceeded to Japan as part of the occupation force. Then on return to the United States was decommissioned.


FS-310
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-310 was commissioned on April 11, 1944, at Camden, New Jersey, with Lt. (jg) Orville E. Cummings, USCGR, as commanding officer. Departing the Delaware River same day she arrived at New York April 18, 1944, and on June 8, 1944, departed New York for the West Coast towing the QS-8, her destination the Southwest Pacific. Here she operated during the war at Leyte and elsewhere.


FS-311
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-311 was commissioned June 13, 1944, at Mathis Shipyard, Camden, New Jersey, with Lt. (Jg) Kenneth P. Howard, USCGR, as commanding officer. On July 17, 1944, she departed New York for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.


FS-312
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-312 was commissioned June 27, 1944, at New York with Lt. E. L. Janssen, USCGR, as commanding officer. On August 20, 1944, she departed New York for Los Angeles, towing the QS-12. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war at Batangas, Philippine Islands and elsewhere. She was decommissioned October 15, 1945


FS-313
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-313 was commissioned July 2, 1944, with Lt. (jg) J. F. W. Anderson, USCGR, as commanding officer. On August 20, 1944, she departed New York for Los Angeles towing QS-53. On October 27, 1944, she was withdrawn from her Hawaii assignment and her Coast Guard personnel detached at Los Angeles.


FS-314
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-314 was commissioned at Mathis Shipyard, Camden, New Jersey, on July 22, 1944, with Lt. (jg) W. I. Mittendorf, USCGR, as commanding officer. On September 4, 1944, she departed New York. She was assigned to and operated in the South west Pacific during the war at Leyte and elsewhere.


FS-315
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-315 was commissioned at New York on July 31, 1944, with Lt. D. E. Oaksmith, USCGR, as commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. (Jg) S. N. Megos, USCG. She departed New York on September 9, 1944. During August 1945, she was engaged in transportation service in the Philippine cruising some 1788 miles with 343 tons of cargo hauled and 21 passengers.


FS-316
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-316 was commissioned at New York September 12, 1944, with Lt. (Jg) J. B. Funk, Jr., USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded November 7, 1945, by Lt. M. S. Hanson, Jr., USCG. She departed New York October 1944, tor the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.


FS-317
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-317 was commissioned September 25, 1944, at Mathis Shipyard, Camden, New Jersey, with Lt. C. E. Christiansson first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. (Jg) T. B. Barron, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded on November 14, 1945, by Lt. (jg) J. W. Harrison, USCG. She departed New York October 22, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.


FS-318
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-318 was commissioned October 6, 1944, at Camden, New Jersey with Lt. R. S. Graves, USCGR, first commanding officer. He was succeeded September 29, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Richard S. True, USCGR. She departed New York November 21, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war. She was decommissioned October 14, 1945.


FS-319
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-319 was commissioned at New York October 27, 1944, with Lt. (Jg) Sterling lt. Anderson, USCG, as commanding officer. She departed New York December 11, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated at Finschhafen, Auguson, etc., during the war.


FS-343
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-343 was used for Army training. She was decommissioned September 21, 1945.


--144--


FS-344
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-344 was commissioned at New Orleans on April 7, 1945. Her first commanding officer was Lt. J. R. Choate, USCGR. He was succeeded September 12, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Marvin B. Barker, USCGR. She was used for training civilians for the Army.


FS-345
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-345 was commissioned at Kewaunee, Wisconsin, July 26, 1944, with Lt. (jg) G. W. Oberst, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area and at Guam. Her first monthly diary was submitted for July and August 1945, the vessel, on July 1, 1945, being anchored in Manila Harbor where she had proceeded two weeks previously to effect an overhaul of her main engines and generators. She was still anchored there August 31, 1945.


FS-346
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-346 was commissioned at Kewaunee, Wisconsin, August 23, 1944, with Lt. (jg) F. J. Bell, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war. She was decommissioned August 30, 1945.


FS-347
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-347 was commissioned at Kewaunee, Wisconsin on September 30, 1944, with Lt. F. N. Blake, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.


FS-348
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-348 was commissioned at Kewaunee, Wisconsin, on November 8, 1944, with Lt. (jg) M. R. Cook, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war. She was decommissioned September 28, 1945.


FS-349
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-349 was commissioned May 16, 1944, at New York with Lt. (jg) F. H. James, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded September 18, 1945, by Lt. (jg) F. A. Ziemba, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded November 19, 1945, by Lt. E. T. Bassford, USCGR. She departed New York June 21, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.

SHOOTS DOWN PLANE
On December 29, 1945, while the FS-349 was participating in "U plus 15, L-13" resupply of the Mindoro force, in the Philippines, the convoy was attacked at 0815 by several enemy aircraft. It was a single engine plan similar to an enemy "HAP" and approached the convoy from the port side. The port twin .50 caliber machine guns opened fire. The planes apparent objective was to crash dive the USS Porcupine (IX-126) 700 yards on the 349's starboard beam. Tracer projectiles from the 349's machine guns were observed entering the fuselage of the plane about the cockpit. The plane crashed about 300 yards off the 349's starboard bow at 0819 without inflicting damage to the convoy. Later at 2130 on the same day the convoy was attacked by an undetermined number of enemy aircraft and one of these was destroyed as a result of gunfire from the 349.


FS-350
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-350 was commissioned at New York July 5, 1944, with Lt. R. J. Hoenschel, USCGR, as commanding officer. She departed New York on August 8, 1944, for Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Tacloban and elsewhere. She was decommissioned September 25, 1945.


FS-351
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-351 was commissioned September 12, 1944, at the J. K. Welding Company, Yonkers, New York, with Lt. (jg) Frederick Sturges, 3rd, USCGR, as commanding officer. She departed New York October 12, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Hollandia and elsewhere.


FS-352
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-352 was commissioned at New York August 9, 1944, with Lt. (jg) E. B. Drinkwater, USCG, as commanding officer. She departed New York September 10, 1944, towing QS-19 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war. On November 28, 1945, she was turned over to the U.S. 6th Army at Nagoya, Japan.


FS-353
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-353 was commissioned at New York, October 5, 1944, with Lt. (jg) Robert H. Foster, USCGR, as commanding officer. She departed New York, October 23, 1944, for the Southwest Pacific, where she operated during the war at Hollandia and elsewhere.


FS-354
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-354 was commissioned at New York, November 10, 1944, with Lt. Ranger Rogers, USCGR, first commanding officer. He was succeeded September 22, 1945, by Ensign Frank C. Anderson, USCG, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. George B. Schwartz, USCGR, on November 26, 1945. She departed December 5, 1944, from New York for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war.


FS-355
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-355 was commissioned at New York, December 5, 1944, with Lt. R. W. Coe, USCGR, as commanding officer. She departed New York January 22, 1945, for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Zamboanga and elsewhere. She was decommissioned November 19, 1945.


FS-356
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-356 was commissioned at New York January 11, 1945, with Lt. R. V. Flouton, USCGR, as commanding officer. She operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific area during the war. She was decommissioned October 30, 1945.


FS-361
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-361 was commissioned April 10, 1944, with Lt. C. C. Gerber, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific area. She was decommissioned October 26. 1945.


FS-362
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-362 was commissioned April 10, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific area during the war. Her Coast Guard crew was removed and she was decommissioned October 10, 1945.


--145--


FS-363
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-363 was commissioned May 20, 1944, at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, with Lt. R. A. McCaffery, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Leyte, Mindoro, Parang, etc. during the war.


FS-364
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-364 was commissioned April 14, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Leyte, during the war.


FS-365
The first commanding officer of the Coast Guard manned Army FS-365 which was commissioned April 12, 1944, was Lt. Comdr. Benjamin Ayesa, USCGR. He was succeeded August 21, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Richard H. Greenless, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.


FS-366 SEES ACTION AT LEYTE
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-366 was built at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, and after being floated down the Mississippi was commissioned at New Orleans on April 20, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. (jg) Howard W. Reckhow, USCGR. Departing New Orleans May 25, 1944, she reached Long Beach, California, June 23, 1944, via Guantanamo, Cuba, and Canal Zone. She sailed for Oro Bay, New Guinea, July 13, 1944, via Hawaii, Ellice Islands, New Hebrides and Guadalcanal arriving at Milne Bay, New Guinea en route August 21, 1944. Two months spent travelling up and down New Guinea coast brought her to such places as Finschhafen, Hollandia and Biak. At Biak she was under fire from Japanese bombers who attacked a nearby air-strip but she was not allowed to fire on them. On November 7, 1944, she left Hollandia for San Pedro Bay and Tacloban, Leyte, Philippines in convoy, where she arrived under constant day and night air raids, half the time of the craw being spent at general quarters. On November 24, 1944, a large scale attack by 80 Japanese planes, 30 of them broke through the combat air patrol to bomb and strafe the air strips and shipping in the harbor, A 20mm shell hit her deck spraying shrapnel among her .50 calibre machine gun crews, wounding the gunnery officer and five enlisted men, none seriously. All were awarded the Purple Heart. The gun crews claimed hits but no definite "kill" could be established because of the numerous other vessels that were firing at the enemy planes during the action.

LUZON INVASION
Loaded with steel strips to be used for landing mats on air strips, the 366 left Leyte on January 9, 1945, en route Lingayen beachhead. As the weather cleared en route and detection by the enemy became easier as they approached the Southwest coast of Mindoro, a Kamikaze (suicide plane) hurled up against the side of a Liberty ship alongside the 366. The liberty ship was holed amidships just above the waterline and great clouds of smoke poured forth. She managed to keep going, however, and eventually made port. Constant enemy attacks at irregular intervals followed on the route to Lingayen Gulf, which was finally reached January 13, 1945 (D-day plus four). The 366 remained anchored in Lingayen Gulf on emergency standby, on guard each night for suicide swimmers with bombs on their backs and Q boats.

TRANSPORTATION DUTY--PHILIPPINES
Proceeding to Nasugbu, south of the entrance to Manila Bay, a beachhead established by the 11th Airborne Division who were pushing inland toward the city of Manila, they returned to Subic Bay for cargo for Batangas in Southern Luzon, where our troops were still fighting. They were with the first cargo ships to dock there and were warmly greeted by the natives. The same was true of Lemery and Taul where they stopped en route. On March 31, 1945, the 366 entered Manila Bay where sporadic fighting was still in progress. The city was in sad shape, the Japs having destroyed the waterfront and docks and downtown section, where its stately modern buildings were almost completely reduced to rubble. Proceeding soon to Cavite they took a cargo of ammunition to Batangas returning to Manila April 15, 1945. Toward the end of April they took another load of ammunition to the town of Legaspi on the eastern coast of Luzon and for the next few months hauled ammunition between Lingayen, Subic Bay, Manila, Batangas and Legaspi. Late in May 1945 the 366 entered a floating drydock near Guinan for a long needed overhaul and paint job. In July 1945 she carried a cargo of high octane gas to Abulug near Aparri where our airborne troops had landed. Thence she proceeded to Damortis in Lingayen Gulf for another load of ammunition for Aparri. After several more runs to Aparri, San Fernando, Subic Bay, Manila, the 366 proceeded to Mindanao. On her return to Manila her Coast Guard crew was taken off and she was decommissioned on September 22, 1945. A Philippine crew relieved the Coast Guard men.


FS-367
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-367 was commissioned April 29, 1944, with Lt. (jg) R. H. Greenless, USCGR, as commanding officer. She reached her final destination in the Philippines on December 30, 1944. In Operation L-3, near San Jose, Mindoro Island, Philippines she anchored 500 yards off Bulong Point midway between Blue and White Beaches.144 The USS Mariposa, Navy X-126, Liberty type converted oil tanker, dropped anchor about 300 yards away and some 800 yards from shore. At 1530 Japanese planes, in a sudden and devastating attack of shipping in the harbor sunk or damaged 4 ships. One crashed the USS Arcturus, a PT tender which sank almost immediately. A second made a low level straffing and bombing attack on a group of LSTs unloading at White Beach blowing the stern off one of them and then turned on the Mariposa, which it crash dived. The tanker immediately burst into flames and a number of the crew either were blown or jumped into the water. The FS-367 went to her assistance. At the same time a third Japanese plane made a low level attack on the destroyers outside the harbor, straddling two destroyers with bombs and finally crashing into the USS Gansevoort, which immediately began to burn and settle in the water, being assisted by two other destroyers, in a sinking condition. Proceeding to assist the Mariposa the 367 took several men aboard with her boarding net and James D. Ellis (675-221) SC 2/c(R) sighting a man struggling in the water and calling for help, dove into the water and supported him until both were picked up by an LSM. The 367 stayed alongside the Mariposa until all survivors had been taken off. About 1900 the 367 withdrew out of the line of fire of guns that were about to shell the Mariposa. Later this was cancelled and the Gansevoort launched 2 torpedoes into her. Immediately thereafter a great amount of burning gasoline spread over the bay making the 367's anchorage unsafe. As she was preparing to move the Gansevoort requested she come alongside and take off her crew. By the time she had reached the destroyer, however, the gasoline had spread so widely that the Gansevoort was in immediate danger of being engulfed. The FS-367, instead of stopping to take off personnel,

--146--


warped alongside the destroyer and began towing her to a safe anchorage. While so occupied another alert sounded and a Japanese plane was shot down immediately overhead. The 367 finally got the Gansevoort to safety several hundred yards off White Beach. The next day the Gansevoort was abandoned by her crew in a sinking condition. No casualties were suffered by the FS-367. She was decommissioned September 24, 1945.


FS-371
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-371 was commissioned at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, on August 1, 1944, with Lt. H. E. Melton, USCG, as commanding officer. Assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Leyte, Mindoro, Pearl Harbor, etc. during the war.


FS-372
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-372 was commissioned at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, August 22, 1944, with Lt. W. H. Bowden, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war including Leyte, Lingayen, etc.


FS-373
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-373 was commissioned at Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, on October 5, 1944, with Lt. (jg) J. L. Barron, USCGR, first commanding officer. He was succeeded October 11, 1944, by Lt. (jg) W. B. Bosworth, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas, including Tacloban, San Fernando, etc. during the war.


FS-374
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-374 was commissioned October 5, 1944. She was ' assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas, including Tacloban, Batangas, Gaang Point, etc. during the war.


FS-383
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-383 was commissioned at Decatur, Alabama, on September 24, 1944, with Lt. (jg) G. P. Kretzschman, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. H. A. Mister, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. W. L. Stansell, USCGR, on October 31, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Funafuti during the war.


FS-384
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-384 was commissioned September 24, 1944, at Decatur, Alabama, with Lt. R. L. Young, USCGR, first commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas, including Biak, during the war. She was decommissioned September 28, 1945.


FS-385
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-385 was commissioned at Decatur, Alabama, October 23, 1944, with Lt. Peter Marcoux, USCG, commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific area during the war.


FS-386
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-386 was commissioned at Decatur, Alabama, December 4, 1944, with Lt. F. S. McVeigh, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas during the war.


FS-387
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-367 was commissioned May 23, 1944, at Los Angeles with Lt. J. L. Gray, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas during the war.


FS-388
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-388 was commissioned June 2, 1944, at Los Angeles. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Homer H. Freed, USCGR. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) J. E. Emmett, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. (jg) R. E. Cox, USCGR, on April 23, 1945, and by Lt. (jg) O. D. Springer, USCGR, on November 24, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Leyte, etc. during the war.


FS-389
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-389 was commissioned June 28, 1944, at Los Angeles, California. Lt. C. N. Brown, USCGR, was her commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas during the war.


FS-390
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-390 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California, July 4, 1944, with Lt. G. E. Oliver, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded on September 28, 1945, by Lt. (jg) John L. Murchison, USCGR, She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas including Manila, Batangas, etc. She was decommissioned October 15, 1945.


FS-391
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-391 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California, July 28, 1944, with Lt. (jg) Ted C. Larsen, USCGR, assuming command, relieving Lt. Thomas A. Ruddy, USCGR. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) Henry F. Mistrey, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded October 10, 1945, by Lt. (jg) George W. Litchfield, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-392
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-392 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California, August 8, 1944, with Lt. J. A. Small, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. Philip G. Adams, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. E. R. Holden, USCGR, on October 15, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas. She was decommissioned October 19, 1945.


FS-393
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-393 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California, August 27, 1944, with Lt. R. H. H. Nichols, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas including Hollandia, Manila, etc.


FS-394
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-394 was commissioned at Decatur, Alabama, December 14, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. H. J. Whitmore, USCGR. He was succeeded by Lt. Henry J. Sandlasse, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. (jg) Kenneth R. Heeler on September 12, 1945. Lt. (jg) C. F. Mashburn, USCGR, became commanding officer on September 29, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific area.


FS-395
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-395 was commissioned at Ingalls Shipyard,

--147--


Decatur, Alabama, on January 1, 1945. Her first commanding officer was Lt. J. R. Baylis, USCGR, who was succeeded September 4, 1945, by Lt. (jg) B. G. Crawford, USCGR. He in turn, was succeeded October 1, 1945,by Lt. (jg) Melvin A. Alvey, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific area.


FS-396
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-396 was commissioned at Decatur, Alabama, on January 18, 1945. Her first commanding officer was Lt. (jg) E. H. Bowler, USCGR, who was succeeded October 29, 1945, by Lt. R. M. Johnson, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas. She departed Manila January 28, 1946, for duty in the Marshall Islands, being transferred from Coast Guard AF WES PAC to Administration Commander, Coast Guard activities SWPA, Philippine Sea Frontier, January 18, 1946.


FS-397
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-397 was commissioned at Decatur, Alabama, February 20, 1945. Her first commanding officer was Lt. (jg) E. Roswell, USCG, who was succeeded September 9, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Arthur N. Froedman, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas. On February 4, 1946, as the 397 was departing Manila for the Phoenix Group, it had been recommended she be ordered to Honolulu for refrigerator repairs and it was so directed. She departed Manila February 6, 1946, for Pearl Harbor, via Okinawa to conduct a survey of Loran equipment and to salvage if possible, the equipment abandoned by Unit 211 when it departed Okinawa. On February 1st she was assigned to the Phoenix Loran Group and assigned to DCGO, 14th ND, for operational and administrative control. On the same date she was released from control Coast Guard AF WES PAC and transferred to Administrative Commander, Coast Guard Activities SWPA, Philippine Sea Frontier. She departed Okinawa February 28, 1946, for Guam, expecting to arrive March 6, 1946. She departed Guam March 16, 1946, expecting to arrive Eniwetok 20 March for fuel and water en route Honolulu. She departed Eniwetok March 27, 1946, for Honolulu, expecting to arrive April 5, 1946.


FS-398
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-398 was assigned to and operated in the Central Pacific area.


FS-399
Commissioning of the Coast Guard manned Army FS-399 took place on January 1, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Central Pacific area at Noumea, Guadalcanal, Wake, etc.


FS-400
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-400 was assigned to and operated in the Central Pacific area including Noumea, Guadalcanal, Wake, etc.


FS-404
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-404 was commissioned at San Francisco, California, on October 24, 1944. Lt. (jg) R. S. Hall, USCGR, was her commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas. She was decommissioned October 31, 1945.


FS-405
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-405 was commissioned at San Francisco, November 23, 1944, with Ensign F. D. Statts, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded on September 12, 1945, by Lt. (jg) David Mitter, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest pacific area.


FS-406
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-406 was commissioned at San Francisco, California on December 30, 1944, with Lt. E. F. Chandler, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Biak, etc.

ASSISTS FS-257 AGROUND
On July 1, 1945, the FS-406 was in the Northeast Sulu Sea bound for Iloilo, Panay Island from Cebu, Philippine Islands. She moored at Muala Pier, Panay Island at 1215 on that day loading 35 tons of empty oil drums for shipment to Tacloban, Leyte, Philippine Islands, and departing same date anchoring off Maripipi Island for the night and proceeding through Junanbatas Channel, the FS-257, ahead of her, ran aground. The 406 stood by and rendered assistance towing her off the beach at 1200 and then proceeding to Tacloban Harbor. On the 5th she stood out of Tacloban Harbor for White Beach, Leyte Island and after unloading her cargo by barge returned to Tacloban. On the 14th having loaded 325 tons of miscellaneous cargo she left Tacloban bound for Batangas, Luzon, anchoring on the night of the 15th on the lea of Bilhirin Island and arriving at Batangas on the 17th. On the 22nd with a return load she left Batangas for Manila arriving at anchorage on the 23rd and docking on the 25th. On the 31st she was loading 300 tons of miscellaneous cargo for Puerta Princessa, Palawan Island. During July, 1945, she steamed 703.8 miles, making a total of 17,535.3 miles steamed since her commissioning.

IN TYPHOON AT OKINAWA
On September 16, 1945, while anchored at Hagushi, Okinawa with the steering assembly disabled by a typhoon on September 11, 1945, while en route from Tacloban to Hagushi, a report of another typhoon which would pass close to the east of Okinawa was received. At 1300 on the 16th T.C. 95.5.2 cleared the harbor to weather the typhoon at sea but small ships such as FS, LT and several Navy tankers and Liberty ships remained at anchor an the harbor. By 1100 on the 16th the wind had reached 25 knots coming from NE and the barometer read 29.48. Sea watches were set and anchor chain veered to 100 fathoms in 15 fathoms of water 1 mile off shore. The engines were started and kept warm until she got underway, at 0410 on September 17, 1945. A jury steering gear was set up. By 1900 on the 16th the wind had reached 70 knots from the NE and the barometer read 28.87. The ship was rolling 15 degrees but the anchor did not appear to be dragging. By 2200 the wind had shifted and was coming from the NW at 70 knots while the barometer read 28.52. By 0200 on the 17th the wind had again shifted to WNW with velocity at 70 knots, there being no protection from land with the wind from this direction. The ship was rolling and pitching and the anchor dragging slightly. By 0300 on the 17th, the barometer had risen to 28.81. At 0410 in a deep pitch of the ship the stern came down on a reef and the ship immediately got underway at flank speed, the stern hitting the reef again at 0413 and the anchor windlass being unable to take in any chain because of the heavy strain on it. The anchor chain, being welded in a pad-eye in the chain locker couldn't be slipped and they proceeded dragging the port anchor and maneuvering among ships anchored in the harbor with the use of engines. At 0600 she dropped back on her anchor about 1.5 miles off shore with both engines slow ahead. The

--148--


wind and sea were still from the WNW with wind velocity 70 knots but the barometer had risen to 29.06. The ship was pitching heavily and rolling more than 40°. At 0730 she took in the port anchor and proceeded WNW heading into the wind, a difficult operation with the jury rig steering, necessitating constant use of the engine for steering. At 0900 a visual message was sent to Navy tug #28 to stand by for assistance, the jury rig being inefficient for steering and there being heavy vibration from a bent propeller blade. At 1100 on the 17th the wind had decreased to 40 knots from the WNW and the barometer risen to 29.40. She proceeded pitching and rolling to Naha Harbor with Navy tug #28 standing by. She entered Naha Harbor at 1300 as wind decreased to 30 knots and barometer rose to 29.44. On the 18th an examination of hatches showed only a slight shift cargo in No. 1 hold, consisting of 90 tons of engineering supplies but due to a shift in No. 2 hold the ship had a port list of 2° or 3°, which couldn't be taken off with the starboard fuel and water tanks topped.

GROUNDS IN TYPHOON AND IS LOST
On October 8, 1945, while anchored in Naha, Okinawa, with steering assembly still disabled and port propeller damaged from previous typhoons a report was received that a typhoon would pass close to Okinawa. All hatches were secured and the chain veered to 60 fathoms port and 30 fathoms starboard. By 0800 on October 9, 1945, the wind had reached 25 knots and the barometer read 29.02. By 1300 the wind was 80 knots and the barometer 28.64. At 1355 the anchor was noticed to be dragging and at 1400 preparations were made to get underway to take the strain off the anchor chain. Due to high wind velocity and inefficiency of bent propeller she was unable to make headway and prevent dragging the anchor using flank speed on both engines. At 1410 with anchors still dragging the ship was bearing down on a coral reef which it struck at 1425. By 1515 the generators were out of operation due to lack of water pressure and at 1700 the wind had reached 150 knots with the barometer reading 28.70, the ship being high on the coral reef. The water had risen to a depth of 2 feet above the deck plates in the engine room from holes in the hull. By the 10th of October the water was over the main engines and generators in the engine room, the lazarette was flooded to within 12 inches of the weather deck and there was two feet of water in the after crew's quarters coming from fittings leading to the lazarette. The vessel was eventually given up as lost.


FS-407
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-407 was commissioned at San Francisco, California on January 16, 1945, with Lt. (Jg) J. R. Powell, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


FS-408
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-408 was commissioned at Stockton, California, on February 13, 1945, with Lt. (Jg) F. Roebuck, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated to the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Zamboanga, San Fernando, Tacloban, etc. On November 9, 1945, Lt. Roebuck was relieved by Captain Carl C. Elliott, WTDTC.


FS-409
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-409 was commissioned February 20, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean and Western Pacific area including Tinian, Saipan, Eniwetok, etc.


FS-410 LOST IN TYPHOON
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-410 was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean area. She was lost in a typhoon at Okinawa on November 9, 1945.


FS-411
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel FS-411 was assigned to and operated in the Pacific Ocean area, Western Pacific area and Middle Pacific area, including Hawaii, Saipan, Tinian, Guam, etc.


FS-524
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-524 was commissioned July 1, 1944, with Lt. (jg) K. B. Kell, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas. The Coast Guard crew was removed as she was decommissioned on October 11, 1945.


FS-525
was commissioned August 16, 1944, with Lt. (jg) George C. Steinemann, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Milne Bay, Hollandia, etc.


FS-526
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-526 was commissioned at New Orleans, Louisiana. On September 6, 1944, with Lt. F. M. Holbrook, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas including Mindoro, etc.


FS-527
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-527 was commissioned at Chicago, Illinois, October 14, 1944, with Lt. Gil K. Phares, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas. On August 1, 1945, she was moored at Tacloban, Leyte, Philippine Islands, loading food and ordnance supplies for the Army Base at Agusun, Macjalar Bay, Mindanao, Philippine Islands, for which she departed next day, arriving on the 3rd. Unloading begun on the 4th was completed on the 7th and she departed Macajalar Bay on the 9th returning to Tacloban on the 10th. On the 26th she began loading supplies for the Army Base at Cebu City, Cebu, for which she departed on the 26th, anchoring there on the 30th. Such a month's routine was typical of the activity of the FS vessels in this area.


FS-528
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-528 was commissioned at Chicago, Illinois, on November 15, 1944, with Lt. W. E. Ehrman, USCG, as first commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in Southwest Pacific area. On November 25, 1945, Captain Bjorn Krogaeth assumed command of FS-528 as her Coast Guard crew was removed.


FS-529
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-529 was commissioned at Chicago, Illinois, on December 28, 1944, with Lt, (jg) J. W. Harrison, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas including Funafuti, Langemak, etc. She was decommissioned September 25, 1945.


FS-546
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-546 was commissioned at Los Angeles, California, on September 27, 1944, with

--149--


Lt. (jg) C. A. Brown, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. Charles L. King, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded in October 1945 by Lt. (jg) Richard Herpers, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Leyte, etc.


FS-547
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-547 was commissioned October 4, 1944, at Los Angeles, California, with Lt. E. M. Harrison, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas. On April 11, 1945, the FS-547 was sent from Manila to San Jose, Mindoro, being loaned out by USASOS for an indefinite period. Her duties were to deliver rations, fuel and equipment to units of the Philippine Army, formerly guerrillas, located at various ports in the Visayan area, to ports administered by the P.C.A.U. #7, to transport Philippine army troops from time to time and make any and all incidental trips which the 8th Army saw fit to set up. They ran one main monthly supply trip about the second week of each month which required about a week or ten days, to which three to five extra trips were added, all of shorter duration. The usual itinerary was from Margarin Bay (port of San Jose, Mindoro) to Romblon, Romblon Island, to Balanacan (Port of Boac, Marinduque, Island) to Calapan (Capital of Mindoro Province) to Lubang, Lubang Island and back to Mangarin Bay. Two to four days were spent at their base port, ordinarily to perform ship's maintenance and repair as well as to procure ship's rations and supplies. She was decommissioned October 27, 1945.


FS-548
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-548 was commissioned November 2, 1944, with Lt. (jg) W. R. Samuelson, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded on September 11, 1945, by Lt. (jg) James E. Warren, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Leyte, etc.


FS-549
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-549 was commissioned November 29, 1944, at Los Angeles, California, with Lt. (jg) A. B. Freedy, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. Thomas D. Miller, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. Israel Trestman, USCGR, on November 16, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas. On July 2, 1945, the FS-549 fouled a line in her propeller in Taloma Bay, Mindanao while assisting the FS-550 which had grounded and was unable to pull herself clear. She was pulled off by the LT-636, Coast Guard manned, no serious damage resulted. On November 24, 1945, Master Manuel de Sequera assumed command as her Coast Guard crew was removed.


FS-550
The Coast Guard manned Army FS-550 was commissioned December 21, 1944, at Los Angeles, California, with Lt. J. F. Anderson, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area. During a sudden squall on July 2, 1945, in Taloma Bay, Mindanao, Philippine Islands, the FS-550 dragged her anchor and went aground. The FS-549 in an effort to assist her fouled her propeller and was unable to pull herself clear. The LT-636, Coast Guard manned, anchored off FS-549, then secured to the dock and clear of the bottom, and towed her to safe anchorage, then anchored off the FS-550 and pulled her clear to a safe anchorage. No serious damage resulted. She was decommissioned September 24, 1945.


LARGER TUGS (LT)

LT-1
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-1 was commissioned May 8, 1944, with Boatswain Allan A. M. Smedburg, commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war. On January 4, 1946, was turned over to Vincent P. Daver as new master of USA LT-1 as Coast Guard crew was removed.


LT-20
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-20 was commissioned October 13, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area where as well as in the Western Pacific area, she operated during the war, including Milne Bay, Hollandia, Leyte, etc. She was decommissioned October 29, 1945.


LT-21
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-21 was commissioned October 13, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area, where she operated throughout the war.


LT-54
The Coast Guard manned LT-54 was assigned to and operated in Alaska. On September 27, 1944, she departed Los Angeles Port of Embarkation towing BCL-3070 and arrived in Hawaii October 16, 1944. She departed Hawaii December 4, 1944, and arrived at Seattle Port of Embarkation. She shuttled between Seattle and Alaskan Bases until sold as surplus August 1, 1946.

LT-57
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-57 was commissioned May 4, 1944, at Los Angeles with Lt. (jg) W. J. Dudley, USCG, as commanding officer. The Coast Guard crew relieved the A.T.S. crew who had brought the vessel from New York. Though ordered to depart May 6, 1944, Lt. Dudley refused to sail inasmuch as insufficient time had been allowed for complete check of conditions and equipment. A hurried check, for example, showed that the fire hose did not fit the fire plugs, the refrigerator was not in working condition, etc. The vessel was dirty and poorly equipped with tools and spare parts.

TO PEARL HARBOR
On May 10, 1944, the vessel departed unescorted for the Far East with 2 Navy ammunition lighters in tow. The first week at sea was very trying due to seasickness and lack of experience of most of the crew, although the men were willing to learn and refused to leave their stations no matter how sick they were. At 2000 on May 16, 1944, all machinery stopped suddenly without warning. Investigation showed that the 9000 gallon after fuel tanks had been cut in and were filled with salt water instead of fuel. By 2200 all fuel lines were cleaned and tested tanks of fuel oil cut in and the tug was able to get underway again. Meanwhile due to a force 3 following wind and a force 2 following sea the two lighters came alongside and did considerable pounding. By the use of fenders and brute strength considerable damage was avoided and no one was injured. At 0400 one lighter was discovered missing and by reversing course it was located. Without a work boat it was necessary to take both lighters alongside to rig new tow line. She arrived at Pearl Harbor May 23, 1944.

TO LEYTE
The LT-57 departed Honolulu July 1, 1944, with two loaded barges in tow accompanied by 2 USAT's and arrived at Funafuti, Ellice Islands on July 18, 1944. She

--150--


departed Funafuti towing a Navy Net Tender and loaded fuel barge accompanied by a Navy LT and her tows on July 27, 1944. A fire in the paint locker was extinguished with no damage except that 12 of the 16 CO2 tanks were discharged through wrong installation leaving only 4 in case of an engineroom fire. Arrived at Milne Bay August 6, 1944, and departed on the 17th without tow and alone arriving at Brisbane August 23, 1944, for repairs (new thrust bearing for main engine which had to come from the States), She remained at Brisbane until November 20, 1944, when she departed unaccompanied with 3 loaded barges and one refrigeration barge in tow, total length of tow 4625 feet and very heavy. On November 22, 1944, discovered three rear barges were missing. Search was begun but discontinued on the 24th as barges were not sighted and request for instructions unheeded. Proceeded with one remaining barge arriving Hollandia December 5, 1944. Here minor repairs were made and departure was made December 25, 1944, with 3 loaded barges and two small tugs in tow escorted and in convoy. On January 4, 1945, escort was increased and air coverage provided and on the 6th she stood into San Pedro Bay, Leyte. Here the first air raids were experienced with nearest bomb hits 1/2 mile away. From the 18th to the 24th she worked night and day assisting 8 LST's retract from Cotman Hill Beach and recovering the anchor and cable for another LST.

TO SUBIC BAY, LEYTE AND MANILA--ASSISTS DESTROYER
Departing Tacloban on January 26, 1945, with 3 loaded barges and one WT in convoy heavily escorted and with air coverage all the way. On February 2, 1945, she stood into Subic Bay on D-plus 2 day. Here the crew had their first glimpse of the destruction of war. While moored to the dock a battery of 155mm guns set up within one hundred yards were firing on the enemy. She departed Subic Bay February 19, 1945, in convoy and escorted, but at 1745 on the 21st was ordered to leave the convoy and proceed to assist the torpedoed U.S. destroyer (DD-499). At 1900 she was alongside the destroyer using out pumps, the destroyer being in tow of LT-636 (also Coast Guard manned) with escorts dropping depth charge charges in the near vicinity. On the 22nd she was relieved by a Destroyer Escort with larger pumps and at 0915 the destroyer was taken in tow by a large naval tug as the LT-527 was ordered to proceed to destination. She stood into Tacloban, Leyte, on the 23rd. She departed Tacloban on March 9, 1945, with 2 loaded barges and one OL #30 which had a $3,000,000 cargo of radio equipment aboard being in convoy and escorted. On the 15th the convoy was ordered in to Subic Bay to await orders and departed on the 17th. On the 18th passed Corregidor under attack by U.S. aircraft abeam distant one mile and stood into Manila Bay and anchored. Fighting was still going on in some parts of the city. Harbor was torn by war. She departed Manila March 22, 1945, in convoy and escorted arriving at Tacloban March 26, 1945.

TO LEYTE, MINDANAO AND HOLLANDIA
She departed Tacloban April 15, 1945, with 3 loaded barges in convoy, escorted and with air coverage for the last 24 hours before entering Pollock Harbor, Mindanao on April 19, 1945, which was D plus two day. There was no action in the immediate vicinity of the harbor. Crew visited the native Moro village and saw Japanese heads mounted on stakes. The natives were very friendly but very poor. Departing Pollock Harbor on the 23rd in convoy and escorted, the LT-57 the high pressure fuel lines on the main engine parted on the 27th and the LT was taken in tow by the USA LT-219 (Coast Guard manned) which itself was disabled on the 29th and relieved in the tow by the LT-529 (Coast Guard manned). She stood into Hollandia on the 30th. Here the first overhaul and drydocking was completed, the work being performed by the ship's crew under very adverse and trying conditions.

BACK TO PHILIPPINES
Departing Hollandia on June 30, 1945, with 3 loaded barges in tow, alone and unescorted she stood into Manila on July 12, 1945. Next day she departed with the same barge in tow for Mariveles Bay, Bataan, arriving same day and delivering the tows, then proceeded to Manila on the 14th. On the 25th she departed Manila escorting the damaged USCGR-83429 for Tacloban, Leyte, and departed Tacloban on the 30th, with 3 loaded barges alone and unescorted for Mariveles Bay. She departed there August 5, 1945, for Manila. Departing Manila on the 10th for Mariveles, on August 14, 1945, she received news flash that Japan had capitulated and next day the order to "cease firing".

PERSONNEL CONDUCT OUTSTANDING
The conduct of the crew of the LT-57 was reported by the commanding officer on August 15, 1945, to have been outstanding under very trying circumstances, such as the smallness of the 400 ton vessel, slow speed the average tow being at five knots; no recreation facilities on board and in combat areas where there was no action; a darkened ship every night and no liberty; inability to advance in rating some well qualified men; and, in general, very poor mail service and many other aggravating circumstances. On August 15, 1945, seventeen of the original twenty two members of the original crew were still serving, the health of the crew having been very good.

GREATEST NEEDS REPLACEMENT PARTS, DRYDOCKING AND OVERHAULING--NAVY COOPERATION VITAL
The vessel was well built and equipped for the work, with the exception that it lacked a suitable work boat. If spare parts could have been obtained when needed and the vessel overhauled and drydocked at the proper time, very little trouble would have occurred, but with overhaul periods 18 months apart, drydocking 16 months apart replacement parts obtainable only now and then, the vessel was out of commission more than necessary. Much credit is due the Navy for their cooperation in supplying these vessels with spare parts and fresh stores. Without the Navy's help, the commanding officer of the LT-57 avers, the vessels would have been "a mass of rust, out of commission 50% of the time and the crews hungry."


LT-58
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-58 was commissioned at San Francisco, May 22, 1944. Her first commanding officer was Lt. (jg) D. R. Townshend, USCGR. He was succeeded June 2, 1944, by Lt. (jg) W. A. Woenne, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Milne Bay, etc.


LT-59
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-59 was commissioned at San Francisco March 16, 1945, with Lt. P. Goulden, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area including Eniwetok during the war.


LT-128
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-128 was commissioned on April 26, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas. She was decommissioned October 16, 1945.


--151--


LT-129
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-129 was commissioned on November 11, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Hollandia, Milne Bay, etc. during the war.


LT-131
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-131 was commissioned in the Southwest Pacific area on November 10, 1944, where, as well as in the Western Pacific area, she operated during the war. She was decommissioned October 6, 1945.


LT-132
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel LT-132 was assigned to and operated in the Middle Pacific, including Hawaii, Guam, Saipan, etc.


LT-133
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-133 was commissioned June 10, 1944, at Los Angeles, California. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Milne Bay, Hollandia, Leyte, etc. during the war. She was decommissioned September 29, 1945.


LT-134
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-134 was commissioned at San Francisco May 29, 1944, with Lt. (jg) S. E. Lewis, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Milne Bay, Hollandia, Leyte, etc. during the war. She was decommissioned October 17, 1945.


LT-135
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-135 was commissioned April 4, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Lingayen Gulf, during the war.


LT-217
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-217 was commissioned in the Southwest Pacific area on October 8, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific area, including Milne Bay, Finschhafen, Leyte, etc. during the war. She was decommissioned October 1, 1945.


LT-218
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-218 was commissioned in the Southwest Pacific area on October 8, 1944, with Lt. E. W. Townsend, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Ensign E. P. McMahon, who in turn was succeeded by Lt (jg) William W. Gaines, USCGR, on September 28, 1945. He was succeeded by Lieutenant Robert H. Wilkinson, on November 25, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Funafuti, Milne Bay, etc. during the war.


LT-219
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-219 was commissioned November 17, 1944, with Lt. O. W. Busch, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war.


LT-220
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-220 was commissioned October 28, 1944, with Paul J. Spangler, USCGR, as first commanding officer, being succeeded by Lt. F. H. Schonewolf. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Funafuti, Leyte, etc., during the war. She was decommissioned October 6, 1945.


LT-225
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-225 was commissioned in the Southwest Pacific Area on October 7, 1944. Here she operated including Hollandia, Milne Bay, etc. during the war.

ASSISTS USS BARNSTABLE
On July 30, 1945, the LT-225 proceeded out of Finschhafen, New Guinea, and beached toward position 08°27'40"S, 148°30'50"E to assist the USS Barnstable (PA-93), a Victory type ship of 22,000 tons, which was aground on an uncharted reef at this position. At 1145 on the 31st the PA was sighted off the port bow and at 1425 the LT-225 was standing by the grounded vessel awaiting instructions, which were received shortly afterward from the CO of the PA-93, who came on board. At 1650 a towing cable was passed to the grounded vessel, through the starboard hawse-pipe of the PA-93 and secured on deck. At 1720 the LT took a strain on the cable and commenced pulling off the Barnstable's starboard bow in company with the RT-Tancred who was pulling on her port bow. At 1050 on August 1, 1945, the Australian tug Salvor commenced pulling on the Barnstable's starboard bow. At 1400 the RT-Tancred stopped pulling because of engine trouble, released her towing cable and anchored a short distance away. The LT-225 and the Salvor continued pulling at various headings with varying degrees of power under the direction of the salvage officer who was aboard the PA-93. At 2035 on the 1st the PA-93 was pulled free from the reef. At 0755 on the 2nd the LT-225 proceeded to Finschhafen.


LT-226
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-226 was Coast Guard manned at Milne Bay on December 7, 1944, with Lt. (jg) Michael J. Simpson, USCGR, as commanding officer from January 16, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific area, including Funafuti, Milne Bay, Leyte, Hollandia, etc. during the war.


LT-227
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-227 was manned by the Coast Guard at Milne Bay on December 7, 1944, with Lt. (jg) Michael J. Simpson, USCG, as commanding officer. He was succeeded on January 15, 1945, by Lt. R. M. Tollefson, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas including Funafuti, etc. during the war.


LT-228
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-228 was commissioned at San Francisco April 21, 1944, with Lt. (jg) M. N. Cobb, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war.


LT-229
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-229 was commissioned May 30, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war. She was decommissioned October 6, 1945.


--152--


LT-230
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-230 was commissioned May 19, 1944, with Lt. A. B. Jacobski, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded December 4, 1945, by Lt. (jg) V. Miller, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war.


LT-231
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-231 was commissioned May 19, 1944, with Lt. James A. Alsup, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war.

TYPHOON AT OKINAWA
On September 1, 1945, she was at Tacloban, Leyte, Philippine Islands, receiving stores and supplies. She departed on the 5th for Mariveles, with reefer barge BCL-1787 in tow and thence, on the 11th proceeded to Manila where she released tow. She returned to Mariveles on the 17th and on the 18th departed Mariveles for Okinawa with three units in tow and in convoy. She arrived in Motobu Bay on the 27th where she anchored the tows. She remained here until September 29, 1945, when she moved into the anchorage at Katena Ko to seek shelter from an approaching typhoon. On October 3 and 4 she experienced strong winds with heavy rain squalls and on the 7th the barometer stood at 30.05, dropping to 29.30 by the 9th with a moderate gale blowing from the east. At 1600 on the 9th the wind had attained full hurricane force and the barometer had reached 28.70 by 1770, the lowest pressure recorded during this typhoon. At 2000 the wind shifted to the west and commenced to moderate. During the typhoon the ship had been anchored in five fathoms of water with 60 fathoms of chain out to the port anchor and rode the storm out very nicely. The greatest danger during the typhoon was from vessels breaking adrift and being swept down on the vessels still holding, ten such vessels being noted at one time during the height of the storm. After daybreak the next morning 16 vessels could be seen stranded on the beach together with a number of barges and small boats. Later many more were noted to be sunk or stranded especially in the vicinity of Naha.

AT WAKAYAMA, JAPAN
The LT-231 departed Katena Ko and proceeded to Motobu Bay on October 11, 1945, to assist two barges that had dragged anchor, one being aground and the other in shoal water. Both were towed to safe anchorages in Motobu Bay and on the 13th she proceeded to assist LT-57 float LT-537 which was hard aground on a reef in Motoby Bay, but at 1600 the LT-231 was ordered to take two barges and overtake a tug convoy which had already departed for Japan. At 1220 on the 18th the first tow of the LT-219 abeam struck and exploded a floating mine, blowing off the bow of the barge, which sank. Arriving at Wakayama on the 19th she remained there until the 28th and then returned to Okinawa, anchoring at Katena Ko and moving to Naha on November 3, 1945. She returned to Mariveles on November 9, 1945.


LT-348
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-348 was commissioned in the Southwest Pacific area on May 17, 1944, being placed under Coast Guard October 17, 1944, with Lt. (jg) B. Anderson, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war, including Hollandia, Manila, Pearl Harbor, etc.


LT-354
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-354 was commissioned at San Francisco, March 17, 1945, with Lt. E. G. Wing, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war. The Coast Guard crew was removed and she was decommissioned October 17, 1945.


LT-356
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel LT-356 was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas.


LT-357
The Coast Guard manned Army vessel LT-357 was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas.


LT-358
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-358 was commissioned at San Francisco April 6, 1945, with Lt. B. B. Bornhoft, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war.

ASSISTANCE TO TOWS AND TANKER
The LT-358 departed Mariveles, Philippine Islands in convoy but without tows. On September 20, 1945, about 2230 the USS Bivins (DE-358) signalled that two barges had broken loose from LT-357. The LT-358 went alongside the BKO-8 and WT-8 in a 25-30 knot wind and No. 5 sea and making towing cable fast to BKO-8 got underway. At 0300 on the 21st, however, the bridle of the barge parted casting the two barges adrift again and the LT-356 again went alongside and put a 15" sisal hawser into the barges capstan, setting course for Aparri at slow speed and turned the tow over to U.S. Army ST-24. On rejoining the convoy on the 23rd they were informed that C-395 had broken loose from its tow and the LT-358, securing her hawser to C-395, rejoined the convoy at 0315 on the 24th. At 0900 she was ordered to secure C-395 astern of BD-240 being towed by LT-355 which was done, and proceed to the aid of the SS Francois Henneberg, a tanker in the convoy that had broken down. Reaching the tanker at 1210 she stood by until the tanker was underway under her own power. Almost immediately she was ordered to go to the assistance of F-128 whose steering cable had broken. Reaching this unit at 1510 and passing a towing cable, attempts to tow from either bow or stern failed because of excessive yawing and poor stability of F-128. Sending a boarding party aboard a new steering cable was put in and the F-128 got underway at midnight on the 24th. They were immediately ordered to contact the LT-357 operating on one engine, and took her in tow for 4 hours when she was able to proceed oh both engines and rejoined the convoy. On the afternoon of the 26th the LT-358 delivered Army personnel from the USS Key (DE-348) to various barges and ships in the convoy. Arriving at Yagachi Bight, Okinawa, the LT's 634 and LT-226 both went aground on uncharted reefs, both of whom were towed off. The above sets forth the experiences of the average slow moving convoy in the West Pacific.

BEACHED AND LOST AT OKINAWA
On October 8, 1945, the LT-358 entered Naha Ko and anchored in 15 fathoms of water with the stern anchor and 300 feet of cable. Typhoon warnings were coming in but it was not believed it would hit Okinawa, until the 9th when the indications and reports were that it would. The anchor cable was lengthened to 800 feet and the LT-358 weathered the typhoon very well until the FS-290 drifted down on her and got her screw caught in the cable. The ships

--153--


pounded together badly and when the FS-290 tried to get away she cut the LT-358's cable and also dragged the LT's anchor. The damaged section was reeled in on the drum, the low anchor dropped immediately and held for about an hour. At 1530 no strain on the anchor chain was noticed and the shackle on the anchor was believed to have parted. At 1645 the LT-358 was on the beach, where she pounded very hard, there being four serious casualties among her personnel. At 1400 on October 10, 1945, a Navy crew came out on the breakwall about 20 feet from the ship and the crew of the LT-358 got a line to them. The stretcher case aboard was hauled across and the other casualties sent across by breeches buoy. The rest of the crew went over the line, hand over hand. The LT-358 was damaged beyond repair.


LT-454
The Coast Guard manned LT-454 was commissioned April 18, 1944, with Lt. (jg) D. E. Rile, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded September 11, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Cullen W. Edwards, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Hollandia, Manila, Lingayen, etc. during the war. On January 5, 1946, the LT-454 was turned over to an ATS civilian crew at Sydney, Australia, Hugh S. Murphy, assuming charge.


LT-455
The Coast Guard manned LT-455 was commissioned May 6, 1944, with Lt. M. Peterson, USCG, first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) J. E. Jansen, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest and Western Pacific areas during the war. The Coast Guard crew was removed and she was decommissioned October 10, 1945.


LT-528
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-528 was commissioned May 30, 1944, with Ensign Max B. Meyer, USCGR, as temporary commanding officer. He was succeeded July 1, 1945, by Lt. F. B. Hartson, USCG, who in turn was succeeded on December 20, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Adrian M. Obeck, USCG. She was a 143 diesel electric tug of 1500 shaft HP and 505 gross and 333 net tons assigned to duty with the Australian Base Section at Brisbane, Australia, and to the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war.

AT SYDNEY AND MELBOURNE
On October 1, 1945, she was moored at Melbourne, Australia, awaiting repairs. She was redocked on the 5th and refloated on the 8th. On the 9th she proceeded to Sydney and on the 14th departed with the USAT William Foster Cowham in tow, relieving LT-454 and proceeding to Melbourne where she arrived on the 19th. She departed for Sydney on the 20th. On the 24th she departed Sydney for Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia arriving on the 24th. She departed Newcastle on the 25th with 3 U.S. Army barges in tow en route Sydney where she arrived on the 25th. Here she was relieved of 2 and moored in Walsh Bay on the same day alongside the 3rd. On November 7, 1945, she departed Sydney towing 3 barges for Hollandia, New Guinea, arriving there November 20, 1945, after a routine and uneventful voyage. The barges had been towed 2376 miles. (The above is a sample of the work of Army Large Tugs which were Coast Guard manned in their Southwest Pacific operations).


LT-529
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-529 was commissioned at Los Angeles, May 23, 1944, with Lt. (jg) A. F. Pinkham, USCG, as commanding office. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Hollandia, Leyte, etc. during the war.


LT-530
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-530 was commissioned at Los Angeles May 23, 1944, with Lt. (jg) N. F. Cowan, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Leyte, during the war. She was decommissioned October 3, 1945.


LT-531
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-531 was commissioned April 10, 1944, and placed under Coast Guard command July 6, 1944, at Los Angeles, with Lt. (jg) J. J. Judge, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded September 5, 1945, by Lt. (jg) H. L. Chopnik, USCG. She was 135.55 feet long, 33.1 foot beam, draft 14.65 feet, with a gross tonnage of 505 tons and a net tonnage of 333 tons. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war including Batangas, Leyte, etc.


LT-535
The Coast Guard manned LT-535 was commissioned on June 6, 1944, at New Orleans, Louisiana. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, during the war. She was decommissioned October 22, 1945.


LT-536
The Coast Guard manned LT-536 was commissioned June 13, 1944 at Los Angeles. Her first commanding officer was Lt. Comdr. Alfred M. Haynes, USCG. He was succeeded December 13, 1945, by Lt. (jg) David C. Kierbow, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific area, including Hawaii, Kanehoe, Kwajalein, etc. during the war.


LT-579
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-579 was commissioned March 21, 1945, at San Francisco, with Lt. Carl McNulty, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war. She was decommissioned September 27, 1945.


LT-633
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-633 was commissioned May 6, 1944 at Los Angeles with Lt. Niels P. Olsen, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Leyte, during the war.


LT-634
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-634 was commissioned June 14, 1944, at Los Angeles, California, with Lt. Nels Larsen, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific areas, including Hollandia, etc. during the war.


LT-635
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-635 was commissioned May 24, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war. She was decommissioned September 23, 1945.


--154--


LT-636
The Army LT-636 was Coast Guard manned May 29, 1944, at Wilmington, California, with Lt. John G. Nicholson, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded October 24, 1945, by Ens. Nicholas A. Gimber, USCGR. The LT had been commissioned at Point Pleasant, West Virginia, and brought around through the Panama Canal by Army Transport Service personnel. On June 17, 1944, she departed Wilmington, California, with a concrete BCL in tow arriving at Honolulu on July 2nd and then proceeded on to Funafuti where she arrived in August 1944. She then proceeded to New Caledonia, still towing the BCL and thence to Milne Bay arriving September 17, 1944.

SALVAGE WORK
While at Milne Bay the LT-636 in company with the LT-128, also Coast Guard manned, salvaged the Liberty ship David E. Hughes, which was on Dana Gedu Reef, north of the China Straits, several attempts having to be made before the ship was pulled off, due to strong winds and heavy seas, the LT-636 suffering considerable structural damage on her port side. Another salvage job was performed on the FS-171, also Coast Guard manned, which was high on a reef in Astrolabe Bay, between Finschhafen and Hollandia, New Guinea. On December 2, 1944, the LT-636 underwent night bomber raids as she came into San Pedro Bay, Leyte, Philippine Islands. On February 2, 1945, she stood into Subic Bay two days after "D" day when the bay was under enemy mortar fire and some of the shipping undergoing night "Q" boat attacks. While en route from Subic Bay to San Pedro Bay on February 21, 1945, in convoy in the Mindanao Sea, she was detached to pick up the torpedoed destroyer USS Renshaw. She took the destroyer in tow and proceeded to San Pedro Bay, being relieved by a Navy tug 12 hours later. The destroyer was in critical condition, her power gone and rapidly taking water. She was pumped out en route by an escorting DE. While in Mangarin Bay, Mindoro Island the LT-636 was sent to pick up the Liberty ship, Benjamin Peixotto, who had lost her screw off Calavite Point in Northern Mindoro. She took the ship in tow on June 2, 1945, and towed her safely to Manila Bay, where she underwent repairs. Another salvage job was performed in Taloma Bay, Mindanao, Philippine Islands on the FS-550 and 549, both Coast Guard manned. The FS-550 had dragged her anchor during a squall and gone aground. The FS-549 in attempting to pull her off had fouled her propeller and was unable to get clear. The LT-636 first pulled the FS-549 to safe anchorage and then with the help of an LCM pulled the FS-550 clear of the beach and towed her to anchorage. No serious damage was incurred by either FS. Other towing jobs included the pulling of LST's off beaches some of which were heavily loaded and unable to move under their own power.

TOWING JOBS
The primary job of the LT-636 was towing barges from port to port. This took her into practically all the major Philippine islands. In June 1945, for example she was in seven different ports. On July 4, 1945, the LT-636 was towing the barge BKO-36 when the watch reported that the RPM's (revolution per minute) had taken a sudden decrease. The officer of the deck put a searchlight on the barge and, noticing that it was not towing in the ordinary position, called the bridge. The commanding officer looked at the barge and observed that the whole forward half was under water and that the after half was protruding straight out of the water perpendicular to the surface. Gasoline was spewing from the hatch of the half above water. He slowed the engines and reversed course and after observing the barge which continued to settle, concluded it was going to sink. At 0250 the bridle pulled clear of the bight on the barge and the LT pulled her towing gear aboard. The barge sank at 0545 in position 06°28'N, 125°45'30"E. On August 1, 1945, she departed Manila for Tacloban, Leyte, via San Juanico Straits. On August 2nd, she proceeded through Verde Island Passage and across the Sibuyan Sea. Arriving off Masbate Harbor it was decided to stand in for the night. On the morning of the 3rd she stood out of Masbate and set course for Tacloban. In the afternoon she arrived at the entrance to the San Juanico Straits at decreased speed and after passing through strong current and violent swirls and eddies between Santa Rita and Anajo Islands made the passage safely and stood into San Pedro Bay, anchoring at Tacloban at 1815 on the 3rd. On the 7th she received orders to take two gas barges to Mariveles Harbor and at 0900 stood into San Juanico Straits with the two tows hauled short, accompanied by a small tug to keep the barges straight as they passed through the dangerous passages. The Janabates Channel was reached at 1300. They decreased speed while the small tug streamed her tows. Coming out of the channel the second barge broke loose. Decreasing speed she hauled the remaining tow up shut and reversed, going along side the drifting barge and securing her to the port side and then anchored. The hawser was found to have parted in the middle. Securing the hawser by means of two bowlines, she dropped the barges astern and weighed anchor. She proceeded on to Mariveles at five knots through Black Rock Pass, Siluyan Sea and Verde Island Passage, arriving at 0743 on the morning of the 10th. Then the tug received a 30 day availability for drydocking and engine repairs. Up to August 31, 1945, she had cruised 25,038 miles. She was decommissioned September 27, 1945.


LT-637
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-637 was commissioned April 13, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war, including Manila, Hollandia, Batangas, etc.


LT-643
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-643 was commissioned on March 13, 1945, with Lt. Arthur O. Cutchin, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war including Hawaii, Kwajalein, etc.


LT-645
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-645 was assigned and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Kwajalein, etc. during the war. She was decommissioned October 6, 1945.


LT-646
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-648 was commissioned April 21, 1945, at New York, New York, with Lt. (jg) J. C. Work, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the San Francisco Port area and Alaskan area during the war.


LT-647
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-647 was commissioned at Long Beach, California, on May 17, 1945, with Lt. J. C. Sorensen, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded June 18, 1945, by Lt. J. R. Dugan, USCGR, who was in turn succeeded August 10, 1945, by Lt. Thomas H. Lane, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war. She was decommissioned September 29, 1945.


LT-648
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-648 was commissioned March 2, 1945, at

--155--


U.S. ARMY 143' STEEL HULL DIESEL ELECTRIC TUG-LT CLASS
U.S. Army 143' steel hull diesel electric tug--LT Class

U.S. ARMY 180' STEEL HULL TWIN SCREW DIESEL TANKER-Y CLASS
U.S. Army 180' stee hull twin screw diesel tanker--Y Class

--156--


New Orleans, Louisiana, with Lt. John Dalin, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Hawaiian area during the war.


LT-649
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-649 was commissioned May 27, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, including Hollandia, Leyte, etc. during the war. She was decommissioned October 1, 1945.


LT-650
The Coast Guard manned Army LT-650 was commissioned December 10, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area with Lt. (jg) E. L. Tingle, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded September 5, 1945, by Lt. T. L. Roberge, USCG, who in turn was succeeded November 10, 1945, by Lt. H. L. Albert, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war.


Tankers (Y)

Y-3
The Coast Guard-Army tanker Y-3 was manned and commissioned September 22, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area. Her first commanding officer was Lt. (jg) Eugene J. Barvian, USCGR. He was succeeded October was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area.


Y-4
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-4 was manned and commissioned on September 20, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area where she operated during the war.


Y-5
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-5 was commissioned in the Southwest Pacific area in October, 1944, with Lt. T.H. Gifford, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Ensign J. A. Mulcahy, USCGR, who was in turn succeeded by Ensign O. H. Linderott, USCGR, on November 4, 1945. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war. On December 27, 1945, the command was turned over to the U.S. 6th Army at Nagoya, Japan.


Y-6
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-6 was manned and commissioned September 20, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area where she operated, including Milne Bay, etc. during the war.


Y-7
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-7 was commissioned in October, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area with Lt. G. A. Raphaelian, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the South-west and Western Pacific areas during the war.


Y-8
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-8 was manned and commissioned September 23, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area with Lt. (jg) Walter H. Gammill, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded October 23, 1945, by Lt. (jg) H. W. Hudson, who was in turn succeeded on November 28, 1945, by Lt. (jg) Elliott Rubin, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war.


Y-9
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-9 was manned and commissioned September 24, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area, where she operated during the war including Zamboanga, etc. She was decommissioned September 29, 1945.


Y-11
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-11 was manned and commissioned September 20, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area where she operated at Brisbane, Australia and in the Western Pacific area during the war. She was decommissioned October 18, 1945.


Y-13
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-13 was commissioned in the Southwest Pacific area on August 21, 1944, with Lt. (jg) E. G. Glines, USCGR, as commanding officer. She operated here and in the Western Pacific area during the war.

Y-14
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-14 was manned and commissioned September 20, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area, where, and also in the Western Pacific area, she operated during the war. Her Coast Guard crew was removed and she was decommissioned October 12, 1945.


Y-15
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-15 was commissioned October 20, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area with Lt. H. A. Mister, USCG, as commanding officer. She operated here and in the Western Pacific area during the war.


Y-18
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-18 was commissioned October 9, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area. She operated in Australia, Brisbane, during the war.


Y-19
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-19 was commissioned October 28, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area with Lt. (jg) H. K. King, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) Charles K. Jones, USCGR, who in turn was succeeded by Lt. (jg) M. L. Kambarn, USCG, on September 25, 1945. She operated there at Hollandia and in Australia during most of the war being temporarily transferred to the Navy in March 1945.


Y-20
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-20 was commissioned September 22, 1944, with Lt, Douglas M. Mott, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded on September 10, 1945, by Ensign Patrick B. Irwin, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area and in Australia during the war, being temporarily transferred to the Navy during 1945.


Y-21
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-21 was commissioned September 20, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area with Lt. E. J. Clark, USCG, as commanding officer. She operated here and at Brisbane, Australia during the war, being temporarily transferred to the Navy during 1945.


--157--


Y-35
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-35 was commissioned at San Francisco, California, July 31, 1944, with Lt. (jg) A. B. Peterson, USCG, as commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) G. A. Verssen, USCG. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.

BEACHED
On November 14, 1945, she departed anchorage at Dumaguete for Bugo, Mindanao to deliver a cargo of 80 octane gasoline. A heavy sea and 30 to 40 knot wind were both operating directly into the anchorage which was a very poor one, being steep to, backed by coral. One or two miles out, the ship's engine failed due to lack of oil pressure and the ship was strongly set southeast, exactly how much being undetermined in a heavy downpour that reduced visibility at times to zero. The oil pressure was restored on a temporary and indefinite basis and the vessel headed back to Dumaguete while the port anchor was lowered in 40 fathoms chain to prevent grounding, this being reduced to 8 fathoms as Dumaguete was reached to enable the ship to reach a proper holding ground. The searchlight was used constantly but it was difficult to distinguish surf from waves due to the heavy sea. Finally trees were seen very clearly, the vessel being headed offshore at full speed but she was carried aground. By backing full the vessel pulled off but being single screw she broached at once again and beached solidly on the bar of the Dumaguete River, at 1650, due South of Dumaguete Light. Numerous attempts to pull her off with the ship's engines were unsuccessful, and at daybreak on the 14th the LSM-50 attempted to pull her off both from bow and stern but was unsuccessful. Again in the high tide of November 15, 1945, the same vessel, assisted by an LCM failed to pull the vessel off, but was used to carry the starboard anchor offshore. The Army at Tacloban was notified and furnished an LCM. Tacloban despatched the LT-1 on the afternoon of the 16th. A request was made for gas barges to receive cargo and lighten the ship. Daily use of the ship's engine was made at high tide and cargo was shifted longitudinally and thwartship to keep her from being frozen by sand piling up. On November 16, 1945, the ARS-27 anchored offshore without previous notification and at 1800 men and equipment were put aboard the Y-35, but an attempt made at evening high tide was unsuccessful. Again on the morning of the 17th at high tide the ARS pulled and after 2 hours the Y-35 was floated. No apparent damage had been done to hull, screw or shaft and the vessel departed for Bugo, Mindanao, at 1700 on the 17th to unload there. She was temporarily transferred to the Navy during 1945.


Y-44
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-44 was commissioned August 17, 1944, at San Francisco with Lt. (jg) R. W. Lamprecht, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war. She was decommissioned October 26, 1945.


Y-45
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-45 was commissioned September 2, 1945, at San Francisco, California, with Lt. (jg) A. A. Trast, USCG, as commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) Robert A, Keefe, USCGR, who was in turn succeeded on October 15, 1945; by Lt. (jg) H. C. Russell, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war, being temporarily transferred to the Navy during March, 1945.


Y-46
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-46 was manned and commissioned September 16, 1944, at San Francisco with Lt. (jg) C. W. Edwards, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. (jg) Kenneth A. Brinkman, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war, being temporarily transferred to the Navy during 1945. During August, 1945, the Y-46 was performing typical duties of Army tankers, Coast Guard manned in the Pacific area. Anchored off Guinan, Samar, Philippine Islands, on the 1st she was supplying 80 octane gas to the Navy Fuel Dump there and in adjacent islands. Barges were alongside all day taking oil and a wide variety of fittings were needed to service all types. Next day she departed Calicoan for Tacloban, Leyte, Philippine Islands, proceeding to San Pedro Bay off USS Blue Licks on the 3rd preparing to take on cargo. On the 4th she had completed loading 5067 barrels of MOGAS and she departed for Guinan, Samar, Philippine Islands, delivering 1725 barrels to two Navy barges alongside. She completed discharging cargo into two more fuel barges from the Navy Fuel Dump on the 5th and returned to Tacloban on the 6th, obtaining availability to clean her fresh water tanks. On the 8th she took on 16,000 gallons of fresh water. On the 9th she proceeded to San Pedro Bay and took on 5060 barrels of AVGAS from the USS Blue Licks, proceeding to Guinan on the 10th and delivering same to the Naval Fuel Dump. On the 11th she returned to Tacloban and after taking on supplies proceeded to San Pedro Bay for another 5060 barrels of AVGAS delivered to Navy Fuel Dump at Guinian. On the 20th she loaded 5060 gallons of MOGAS from the USS Blue Licks (3150 barrels) at San Pedro and from the USS Vere Drye (1930 barrels) which were delivered to the Navy Fuel Dump at Guiuan, Samar, Philippine Islands on the 21st, and 22nd, returning to Tacloban on the 23rd. On the 25th she took on 5000 barrels of MOGAS from the USS Fort Wood in San Pedro Bay and delivered them to fuel barges of the Navy Fuel Dump at Guiuan on the 26th and 27th. Returning to Tacloban on the 28th after cleaning heat exchanger main engine and making other repairs on the 29th she proceeded to San Pedro Bay and took on 5060 barrels of MOGAS which were delivered at Guiuan on the 30th and 31st.


Y-59
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-59 was commissioned and manned with Coast Guard personnel on August 18, 1944, at Tacloban, Leyte, Philippine Islands. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.


Y-108
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-108 was commissioned August 30, 1944, at Galveston, Texas, with Lt. (jg) T. D. Hawkes, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas, at Lae and Tacloban, during the war. She was decommissioned October 3, 1945.


Y-109
The Coast Guard manned Army tanker Y-109 was commissioned October 4, 1944, at Galveston, Texas, with Lt. (jg) A. H. Ebert, USCGR, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded on November 14, 1945, by Lt. (jg) J. M. Hart, USCGR. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.

--158--


Freight Boats (Fs)

F-8
The Coast Guard manned Army F-8 was commissioned at Los Angeles on May 15, 1944, with Lt. S. L. Sadler, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.


F-11
The Coast Guard manned Army F-11 was commissioned at Los Angeles on May 15, 1944, with Lt. (jg) G. T. J. Mahoney, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war.


F-14
The Coast Guard manned Army F-14 was commissioned on October 12, 1944, with Lt. (jg) W. L. Vaughan, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war, including Funafuti, etc.


F-16
The Coast Guard manned Army F-16 was commissioned in October, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area with Lt. (jg) H. S. Farmer, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Western Pacific area and Australia during the war.


F-51
The Coast Guard manned Army F-51 was commissioned July 4, 1944, at San Francisco, California with Lt. (jg) Admont G. Clark, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war, including Puerto Princessa, etc. Departed Funafuti, Ellice Islands, December 28, 1944, for operation in the Southwest Pacific.


F-54
The Coast Guard manned Army F-54 was commissioned October 24, 1944, with Boatswain Van E. Clark, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.


F-55
The Coast Guard manned Army F-55 was commissioned October 27, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area with Lt. (jg) C. D. Eubanks, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Hollandia, etc. during the war.


F-73
The Coast Guard manned Army F-73 was commissioned in October, 1944. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Hollandia, etc. during the war. Her Coast Guard crew was removed in the Southwest Pacific May 29, 1945.


F-74
The Coast Guard manned Army F-74 was commissioned in the Southwest Pacific area in October 1944. She was assigned to and operated in Australia during the war. The Coast Guard crew were removed in the Southwest Pacific area on Kay 17, 1945.


F-75
The Coast Guard manned Army F-75 was commissioned in the Southwest Pacific area on October 11, 1944, with Lt. (jg) L. A. Lewis, USCGR, as commanding officer. She operated there at Hollandia, etc. and in Australia during the war.


F-77
The Coast Guard manned Army F-77 was commissioned on October 7, 1944, with Boatswain D. F. Bussly, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Milne Bay, etc. during the war.


F-91
The Coast Guard manned Army F-91 was manned November 8, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area with Lt. (jg) C. G. Lieurance, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific area during the war.


F-96
The Coast Guard manned Army F-96 was commissioned in the Southwest Pacific area on November 14, 1944, with Boatswain H. C. Wilson, USCG, as commanding officer, and operated there during the war.


F-116
The Coast Guard manned Army F-116 was commissioned October 19, 1944, with Lt. (jg) M. P. Crabble, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Western Pacific area and in Australia during the war.


F-117
The Coast Guard manned Army F-117 was commissioned October 19, 1944, with Lt. (jg) R. P. Gould, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area, including Biak, etc. during the war. The Coast Guard crew were removed in the Southwest Pacific area May 7, 1945.


F-118
The Coast Guard manned Army F-118 was commissioned October 11, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area. She operated here and in the Western Pacific area, including Saipan, etc, during the war. The Coast Guard crew were removed in the Southwest Pacific area May 16, 1945.


F-120
The Coast Guard manned Army F-120 was commissioned October 23, 1944, with Ensign C. M. Linville, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific area during the war.


F-126
The Coast Guard manned Army F-126 was commissioned October 5, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area, where she operated during the war.


F-126
The Coast Guard manned Army F-128 was manned October 31, 1944, in the Southwest Pacific area, where, as well as in the Western Pacific area, she operated during the war.


F-129
The Coast Guard manned Army F-129 was commissioned in October, 1944,

--159--


COAST GUARD MANNED ARMY FREIGHT BOAT (F)
Coast Guard manned Army Freight Boat (F)

COAST GUARD MANNED U.S. ARMY REPAIR SHIP JAMES B. HOUSTON
Coast Guard manned U.S. Army Repair Ship James B. Houston

--160--


in the Southwest Pacific area where as well as in the Western Pacific area, she operated during the war.


F-130
The Coast Guard manned Army F-130 was manned on November 3, 1944, with Ensign R. V. Mathison, USCGR, as commanding officer. She was assigned to the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas during the war.


Repair Ships

William F. Fitch
The Coast Guard manned Army repair ship William F. Fitch was accepted by the Army, placed in commission and manned by the Coast Guard on June 14, 1944, at San Francisco, with Lt. Comdr. C. R. Grenager, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded on May 22, 1945, by Lt. Comdr. E. M. Chandler, USCG. The Fitch spent about a year in Hollandia, New Guinea and then proceeded to Manila. She returned to San Francisco August 16, 1946, and was turned back to the Maritime Commission February 3, 1947.


J. M. Davis
The Coast Guard manned Army repair ship J. M. Davis was commissioned July 27, 1944, at Portland, Oregon, with Lt. Comdr. G. H. Jacobson, USCG, serving as commanding officer until March 1945. Sailing from Portland, Oregon, August 25, 1944, the Davis proceeded to Hollandia, via Honolulu and Manus, then visited Manila and finally ended at Tokyo. Returning to the United States she reached San Francisco March 17, 1946, and was turned back to Maritime Commission April 4, 1947.


J. E. Gorman
The Coast Guard manned Army repair ship J. E. Gorman was commissioned at Seattle, September 5, 1944, with Lt. Comdr. W. J. Bruce, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. Comdr. C. R. Grenager, USCG. Departing Seattle October 4, 1944, she proceeded to Honolulu for repairs before proceeding to Manus, Hollandia, Cebu, Manila (two trips each), then to Kobe and Yokohama. Returning to the United States she reached Seattle on July 27, 1946, and was redelivered to the Maritime Commission on March 20, 1947.


Duluth
The Coast Guard manned Army repair ship Duluth was commissioned at San Francisco August 15, 1944, with Lt. Comdr. Ernest A. Simpson, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded by Lt. Comdr. Robert H. H. Nichols, USCGR, who was in turn succeeded by Lt. Comdr. A. J. Smalley, USCGR, on September 17, 1945. The Duluth left San Francisco August 3, 1944, and after a stay at Finschhafen, New Guinea, proceeded to Leyte and then to Subic Bay. Returning home she reached San Francisco December 1, 1946, and was redelivered to the Maritime Commission on March 20, 1947.


W. J. Connors
The Coast Guard manned Army repair ship W. J. Connors was commissioned at Portland, Oregon, on September 4, 1944, with Lt. Comdr. Adriaan Dezeeuw, USCG, as first commanding officer. The vessel had been taken over in May 1943 by the Army and had spent some time under Army command in the Aleutians. She sailed from Portland September 21, 1944, and proceeded to the Philippines then to Japan, stopping at Nagoya, Kobe and reaching Yokohama in September 1945, She returned to Seattle June 27, 1946, and was redelivered to the Maritime Commission June 16, 1947.


James B. Houston
The Coast Guard Army manned repair ship James B. Houston was commissioned at Seattle, Washington, August 9, 1944, with Lt. Comdr. E. M. Chandler, USCG, as first commanding officer. He was succeeded in turn by Lt. Comdr. J. F. Ryan, USCG, Lt. C. C. Gerber, USCGR, Lt. Comdr. M. J. Bruce, USCG, and Lt. Comdr. F. U. Nelson on July 19, 1945. She sailed from Seattle, August 14, 1944, and proceeded to Finschhafen, New Guinea via Honolulu, thence to Morotai, Hollandia, Leyte and Manila. She was redelivered to the War Shipping Administration February 25, 1946, for disposition at Manila and was sold August 17, 1946.


--161--


Index

Albireo--USS AK-90 (ex-John G. Nicolai) 49
Aquarius--USS AKA-16 57
Aultman--USS General D. K.--AP-156 21
Bayfield--USS APA-33 42
Black--USS General W. M.--AP-135 16
Breckenridge-USS General J. C.--AP-176 14
Brewster--USS General A. W.--AP-155 20
Calamus--USS AOG-25 65
Callaway--USS APA-35 43
Cambria--USS APA-36 46
Capps--USS Admiral W. H.--AP-121 11
Cavalier--USS APA-37 47
Centaurus--USS AKA-17 (LCC-38) 61
Cepheus--USS AKA-18 63
Chase--USS Samuel--APA-26 37
Codington--USS AK-173 57
Connors, W. J.--(Army Repair Vessel) 161
Cor Caroli--USS AK-91 (ex-Betsy Ross) 51
Craighead--USS AK-175 57
Davis, J. M.--(Army Repair Vessel) 161
Dickman--USS Joseph--APA-13 25
Duluth-(Army Repair Vessel) 161
Eberle--USS Admiral E. W.--(AP-123) 12
Enceladus--USS AK-80 49
Eridanus--USS AK-92--(ex-Luther Burbank) 52
Etamin--USS AK-93--(IX-173) 52
Fitch, William F.--(Army Repair Vessel) 161
Freeman--USS General H. B.--AP-143 19
Freight Boats
F-8 159
F-11 159
F-14 159
F-16 159
F-51 159
F-54 159
F-55 159
F-73 159
F-74 159
F-75 159
F-77 159
F-91 159
F-96 159
F-116 159
F-117 159
F-118 159
F-120 159
F-126 159
F-128 159
F-129 159
F-130 161
Freight and Supply Vessels--U.S. Army
Coast Guard Manned--List of
132-133
FS-34 134
FS-140 134
FS-141 134
FS-142 134
FS-143 134
FS-144 134
FS-145 134
FS-146 134
FS-147 134
FS-148 134
FS-149 134
FS-150 134
FS-151 135
FS-152 135
FS-153 135
FS-154 135
FS-155 135
FS-156 135
FS-157 135
FS-158 135
FS-159 135
FS-160 135
FS-161 135
FS-162 136
FS-163 136
FS-164 136
FS-165 136
FS-166 136
FS-167 136
FS-168 136
FS-169 136
FS-170 136
FS-171 136
FS-172 136
FS-173 136
FS-174 136
FS-175 136
FS-176 138
FS-177 138
FS-178 138
FS-179 138
FS-180 138
FS-181 138
FS-182 138
FS-183 138
FS-134 138
FS-185 138
FS-186 138
FS-187 138
FS-188 138
FS-189 138
FS-190 138
FS-191 139
FS-192 139
FS-193 139
FS-194 139
FS-195 139
FS-196 139
FS-197 139
FS-198 139
FS-199 139
FS-200 139
FS-201 139
FS-202 139
FS-203 139
FS-222 139
FS-223 139
FS-224 140
FS-225 140
FS-226 140
FS-227 140
FS-228 140
FS-229 140
FS-230 140
FS-231 140
FS-232 140
FS-233 140
FS-234 140
FS-253 140
FS-254 140
FS-255 140
FS-256 140
FS-257 140
FS-258 141
FS-259 141
FS-260 141
FS-261 141

--162--


FS-262 141
FS-263 141
FS-264 141
FS-265 141
FS-266 141
FS-267 141
FS-268 141
FS-269 141
FS-270 142
FS-271 142
FS-272 142
FS-273 142
FS-274 142
FS-275 142
FS-276 142
FS-277 142
FS-278 142
FS-279 142
FS-280 142
FS-281 143
FS-282 143
FS-283 143
FS-284 143
FS-285 143
FS-286 143
FS-287 143
FS-288 143
FS-269 143
FS-290 143
FS-309 143
FS-310 144
FS-311 144
FS-312 144
FS-313 144
FS-314 144
FS-315 144
FS-316 144
FS-317 144
FS-313 144
FS-319 144
FS-343 144
FS-344 145
FS-345 145
FS-346 145
FS-347 145
FS-348 145
FS-349 145
FS-350 145
FS-351 145
FS-352 145
FS-353 145
FS-354 145
FS-355 145
FS-356 145
FS-361 145
FS-362 145
FS-363 146
FS-364 146
FS-365 146
FS-366 146
FS-367 146
FS-371 147
FS-372 147
FS-373 147
FS-374 147
FS-383 147
FS-384 147
FS-365 147
FS-386 147
FS-387 147
FS-388 147
FS-389 147
FS-390 147
FS-391 147
FS-392 147
FS-393 147
FS-394 147
FS-395 147
FS-396 148
FS-397 148
FS-398 148
FS-399 148
FS-400 148
FS-404 148
FS-405 148
FS-406 148
FS-407 149
FS-408 149
FS-409 149
FS-410 149
FS-411 149
FS-524 149
FS-525 149
FS-526 149
FS-527 149
FS-528 149
FS-529 149
FS-546 149
FS-547 150
FS-548 150
FS-549 150
FS-550 150
 
Gordon--USS General W. H.--AP-117 8
Gorman, J. E.--(Army Repair Vessel) 161
Greely--USS General A. W.--AP-141 17
Hodges--USS General H. F.--AP-144 20
Houston, James B.--(Army Repair Vessel) 161
Howze--USS General R. L.---AP-134 15
Hughes--USS Admiral C. F.--AP-124 12
Kanawha--USS AOG-31 66
 
LCC-38 (Centaurus--USS AKA-17) 62
LCI(L)-83 117
LCI(L)-84 117
LCI(L)-85 117
LCI(L)-86 117
LCI(L)-87 118
LCI(L)-88 118
LCI(L)-69 120
LCI(L)-90 120
LCI(L)-91 121
LCI(L)-92 121
LCI(L)-93 121
LCI(L)-94 121
LCI(L)-95 122
LCI(L)-96 122
LCI(L)-319 123
LCI(L)-320 123
LCI(L)-321 124
LCI(L)-322 125
LCI(L)-323 125
LCI(L)-324 126
LCI(L)-325 126
LCI(L)-326 128
LCI(L)-349 128
LCI(L)-350 129
LCI(L)-520 129
LCI(L)-562 130
LCI(L)-581 130
LCI(L)-583 130
 
Liggett--USS Hunter--APA-14 29
 
LST-16 66
LST-17 68
LST-18 68
LST-19 69
LST-20 70
LST-21 70
LST-22 72
LST-23 73
LST-24 74

--163--


LST-25 74
LST-26 74
LST-27 75
LST-66 75
LST-67 76
LST-68 77
LST-69 78
LST-70 78
LST-71 79
LST-166 79
LST-167 80
LST-168 80
LST-169 82
LST-170 82
LST-175 82
LST-176 82
LST-202 83
LST-203 84
LST-204 84
LST-205 85
LST-206 86
LST-207 86
LST-261 87
LST-262 88
LST-326 88
LST-327 89
LST-831 91
LST-381 91
LST-758 92
LST-759 92
LST-760 92
LST-761 94
LST-762 95
LST-763 95
LST-764 96
LST-765 97
LST-766 97
lst-767 97
LST-768 98
LST-769 99
LST-770 100
LST-771 100
LST-782 101
LST-784 102
LST-785 103
LST-786 104
LST-787 105
LST-788 106
LST-789 106
LST-790 107
LST-791 108
LST-792 108
LST-793 109
LST-794 109
LST-795 110
LST-796 111
LST-829 111
LST-830 112
LST-831 113
LST-832 113
LST-884 114
LST-885 114
LST-886 115
LST-887 115
LST-1148 116
LST-1150 116
LST-1152 116
LARGE TUGS
LT-1 150
LT-20 150
LT-21 150
LT-54 150
LT-57 150
LT-58 151
LT-59 151
LT-128 151
LT-129 152
LT-131 152
LT-132 152
LT-133 152
LT-134 152
LT-135 152
LT-217 152
LT-218 152
LT-219 152
LT-220 152
LT-225 152
LT-226 152
LT-227 152
LT-228 152
LT-229 152
LT-230 153
LT-231 153
LT-348 153
LT-354 153
LT-356 153
LT-357 153
LT-358 153
LT-454 154
LT-455 154
LT-528 154
LT-529 154
LT-530 154
LT-531 154
LT-535 154
LT-536 154
LT-579 154
LT-633 154
LT-634 154
LT-635 154
LT-636 155
LT-637 155
LT-643 155
LT-645 155
LT-646 155
LT-647 155
LT-648 155
LT-649 157
LT-650 157
 
Mayo--USS ADMIRAL H. T.-AP-125 14
Meigs--USS General M. C.-AP-116 7
Menkar--USS AK-123 56
Middleton--USS ARTHUR-APA-25 34
Mintaka--USS AK-94 53
Mitchell--USS General WILLIAM-AP-114 4
Monticello--USS AP-61