II.
Development of Task Forces in the Eastern Sea Frontier


GROWTH OF TASK FORCES IN THE EASTERN SEA FRONTIER

 

The character and function of frontier task forces were described in Joint Action of the Army and the Navy, 1935, which contained the enumeration of tasks which might serve as guides in the planning and execution of operations in which Army and Navy forces would participate. In the description of coastal frontier defense, the general function of the Navy was defined as the conduct of Naval operations to gain and maintain command of vital areas and to protect the sea lanes vital to the United States. In carrying out these functions, the Navy would provide defense by:

The primary task organization proposed for the joint action of the Army and the Navy in coastal frontier defense was outlined under two categories: the naval local defense forces and the naval coastal force. The former would consist of naval units, including Coast Guard and Lighthouse Service, afloat and ashore, attached to a naval district; the latter would consist of naval units operating within the coastal zone to meet those situations in which the former forces were inadequate to carry out frontier defense. Nevertheless, the naval local defense forces would include both inshore patrol and offshore patrol groups; the first group operating within a defensive sea area or maritime control area; the second group

--13--

operating and patrolling the coastal zone outside of those areas. An escort force might consist of vessels from a naval coastal force or a naval local defense force, but the latter would be responsible for those escort groups protecting convoys within the inshore waters of naval districts. Furthermore these two coastal defense forces would have as an added purpose the carrying out of numerous functions which might assure the strategic freedom of action for the Fleet, by removing any anxiety of the Fleet in regard to the security of its bases.

The first general directive as to the actual formation of task forces under naval coastal frontiers was contained in Navy Basic War Plan, Rainbow No. 1 (WPL-42), promulgated in July 1940. To carry out the joint tasks which had been assigned within Joint Action of the Army and the Navy, 1935, and more specifically in a theoretical concept of possible war conditions as presented in the Joint Army and Navy Basic War Plan, Rainbow No. 1, the first Navy directives under this plan indicated the structure of task organization under three main categories: Operating Forces, the Services, and the Shore Establishments. Of these three, the most important in so far as naval coastal frontiers were concerned came under the Operating Forces, thus briefly summarized in Navy Basic War Plan, Rainbow No. 1:

  1. The United States Fleet, including U. S. Army Forces made available for employment with the U. S. Fleet, under the command of the Commander in Chief, U. S. Fleet;
  2. The United States Asiatic Fleet, under command of the Commander in Chief, Asiatic Fleet;
  3. The Naval Coastal Frontier Forces, under the command of the Commanders, Naval Coastal Frontiers, consisting of
    1. The Naval Coastal Forces,
    2. The Naval Local Defense Forces.

--14--

Navy Basic War Plan, Rainbow No. 1 further stipulated that the immediate command of naval local defense forces would be delegated to commanders of naval districts, While the immediate command of the naval coastal forces would remain with the commanders of the naval coastal frontiers. Authority was also given a commander of a naval coastal frontier to coordinate the activities of the Services (Transportation, Communication, Intelligence) controlled by the naval districts within his command, for purposes relating to the defense of a specific naval coastal frontier; but with due consideration for the requirements of those tasks assigned to the Services by the Chief of Naval Operations. According to Rainbow No. 1, the North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier should plan its defense to comply with "Category B", indicating that this frontier should be considered as possibly subject to minor attacks.

"Change One" of WPL-42 touched briefly on the manner in which vessels would be assigned. Naval coastal forces would comprise the naval forces assigned for the general defense of coastal frontiers; naval local defense forces would comprise naval forces assigned to the naval districts. In the light of naval tasks and joint tasks assigned, commanders of specified naval coastal frontiers were requested to prepare "Frontier Operating Plans" which would contain, in annex form, the plans for execution of the tasks relating to such additional matters as the routing of merchant shipping.

On February 3, 1941, the appearance of General Order No. 143 modified the earlier task organization by enumerating the categories of United States Naval Forces thus:

--15--

  1. The United States Fleet, comprising:
    1. The United States Atlantic Fleet,
    2. The United Pacific Fleet,
    3. The United States Asiatic Fleet;

  2. The Naval Coastal Frontier Forces,
  3. Special Task Forces,
  4. Special Duty Ships,
  5. Naval Transportation Service, 6. Naval District Craft.

General Order No. 143 contained further analysis of this organization. It was therein stated that naval coastal frontier forces are subdivided into: (a) naval coastal forces, and (b) naval local defense forces. In so far as command relations were concerned, General Order No. 1.43 reiterated that commanders of naval coastal frontiers have task responsibility to the Chief of Naval Operations for naval coastal frontier forces; but that commandants of naval districts and commanders of naval coastal frontiers have administrative responsibility direct to the Navy Department for naval local defense forces and naval coastal frontier forces, respectively. The primary importance of this General Order is that it established the task force relationship between the forces of naval coastal frontiers and the larger naval forces of the United States Fleet. Nevertheless, General Order No. 143 did not establish the forces of the naval coastal frontiers, but merely described the general structure they would follow, when formed.

Following out the directive for drawing up operation plans within naval coastal frontiers, the Commander, North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier promulgated his first Operation Plan (NA-NCF 1-41) on April 22, 1941, in which he outlined the organization of those task forces which would eventually be formed within the separate naval districts, thus:

Naval Local Defense Force, First Naval District
Naval Local Defense Force, Third Naval District
Naval Local Defense Force, Fourth Naval District
Naval Local Defense Force, Fifth Naval District

--16-

When Navy Basic War Plan, Rainbow No. 5 (WPL-46) was promulgated, on May 26, 1941, it contained a directive to the effect that the highest priority should be assigned to the preparation of the subordinate plans thus required. Consequently, immediate attention was given to this plan by the Commander, North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier. In so far as command relations were concerned, WPL-46 made one additional stipulation as to the dual status of task force command: a commander of a naval coastal frontier force would operate under the orders of the Chief of Naval Operations; but he might also be called on to operate as an officer of the United States Atlantic Fleet, under the orders of the Commander in Chief, United States Atlantic Fleet, in command of task groups of that fleet, whenever so directed. It was further stated that the Commander in Chief, United States Atlantic Fleet, might require that the commanders of naval coastal frontiers should place under his command, for limited purposes, task groups of their naval coastal frontier forces; but that such task groups would not be required to leave the limits of their respective coastal zones, except in emergency. (Precedent for a similar command relationship had earlier been made in General Order No. 109). At this time, also, the Naval Operating Base at Bermuda was assigned as a unit of the United States Atlantic Fleet, both for administrative and task purposes.

In "Appendix II" to Navy Basic War Plan, Rainbow No. 5, a tentative estimate was given as to the composition of forces in the naval coastal frontiers. In so far as naval coastal forces were concerned, surface craft or aircraft might be made available from three main sources; those assigned by the Chief of Naval Operations; those assigned temporarily by the Commander in Chief, United States Atlantic Fleet; and those assigned

--17-

to a naval coastal force from naval local defense forces, by order of a commander of a naval coastal frontier. In so far as the composition of naval local defense forces were concerned, the various assignments of surface craft and aircraft might be made from units already assigned or subsequently assigned by the Chief of Naval Operations to naval districts, outlying naval stations, or to activities excluded from naval districts. These might include units from special task forces or special duty ships. Such re-assignments would be made by commandants of the naval districts which had such units already under their command. These would include:

  1. Units of the Coast Guard not otherwise assigned;
  2. Units other than auxiliary type vessels;
  3. Units of the auxiliary type required for the execution of the tasks of naval local defense forces;
  4. District craft (YN, YNg, YMS, YP), certain YT for net and boom services; other classes at the discretion of a commandant);
  5. Units taken over from private sources and placed "in service not in commission."

The forces estimated to be initially available for carrying out those tasks assigned to the Navy in Joint Army and Navy Basic War Plan, Rainbow No. 5, were also given in the subordinate Navy Basic War Plan, Rainbow No. 5. These estimates indicated that the brunt of responsibility would fall on specially assigned task forces and groups of the United States Atlantic Fleet, which would have available for these plans, as of July 1, 1941, 6 battleships, 5 cruisers, 54 destroyers, 4 mine sweepers and 54 patrol planes. Supporting these, the still unformed Naval Coastal Force of the North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier was estimated, also as of July 1, 1941, thus: 5 Eagle boats, 3 gunboats, 4 coastal patrol boats, 18 patrol planes, 6 blimps. Supporting these, in the proposed composition

--18-

of forces, as outlined in WPL-46 on May 26, 1941, were the proposed assignments to naval local defense forces. These included a proposed re-assignment of naval district craft, together with other small craft which would later be purchased and converted by separate naval districts; also, such Coast Guard ships as might be left over after other assignments had been made. Thus, although WPL-46 indicated a proposed combined total of more than 100 surface craft for local defense forces in the naval districts of the North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier, these were available largely "on paper," and very few of them existed in fit condition for actual combat at that time, or in the eight months remaining before the declaration of war.

On July 1, 1941, the Chief of Naval Operations formally established the naval coastal frontiers, but stated that the forces of these frontiers would not yet be formed. It was directed that vessels assigned to naval districts and naval stations would continue in their assignments; that until further orders, new assignments of vessels would be made to naval districts and naval stations, rather than to naval coastal frontier forces, naval coastal forces or naval local defense forces.

In accordance with these various directives, the Commander, North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier promulgated Plan 0-4, Rainbow No. 5 (NA-NCF-46) on July 3, 1941. In so far as task forces were concerned, the tentative plans outlined in NA-NCF-46 were intended to furnish sufficient information to permit commandants of naval districts to proceed with the preparation of operating plans which would be in accord with Rainbow No. 5. In assigning operating areas for naval local defense forces, this plan stated that these areas would be those given in Navy

--19-

Regulations 1920; that these areas should include all inland and territorial waters, defensive coastal areas and coastal waters extended to seaward to include the coastal sea lanes within their boundaries.

Naval coastal frontier forces were formed in accordance with an order issued by the Chief of Naval Operations on September 9, 1941. The order stated that for the present the naval coastal frontier forces would be composed only of the naval local defense forces; that these would be made up of units assigned thereto by the respective commandants from units already made available to them in Assignment of Units to Naval Districts, issued July 1, 1941. Perhaps the most important result of this order was that the Commander, North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier was thus officially made a task force commander, whose orders would be carried out through commandants, serving as task group commanders.

The Atlantic Fleet Operation Plan 4-41, promulgated on April 21, 1941, had taken cognizance of the fact that ships and aircraft might be made available to frontier commanders from the forces of the Atlantic Fleet. In that Plan it was stated that Atlantic Fleet units assigned to Commander North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier would be considered as constituting Task Group 6.1; that the Commander of this Task Group would be Commander North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier.

The third Frontier Operation Plan (5-41), promulgated on October 30, 1941, took cognizance in a general way of the still undeveloped Naval Coastal Force. Directives for the theoretical structure and command relation of a Naval Coastal Force, included in WPL-46, were followed in this third Frontier Plan, wherein it was stated that the Naval Coastal Force would eventually include air and surface units assigned directly to Commander, North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier,

--20-

and directly operated by his command. Such operational preparation implied the eventual assignment to the Frontier Force of destroyers and seaworthy patrol craft, which were still non-existent in the Frontier, for all practical and operational purposes.

In November and December, 1941, many important changes were made to The Joint Army and Navy Basic War Plan, Rainbow No. 5, and consequently to the subordinate plans. Change No. 2, issued in November, 1941, established the general outlines for unity of command under The Joint Canadian-United States Basic Defense Plan No. 2 (ABC-22). Therein it was stated that for all matters requiring common action, the principal commanders of United States forces along the Atlantic coast would be five:

Commander in Chief, United States Atlantic Fleet,
Task Force Commanders, United States Atlantic Fleet,
Commander North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier,
Commanding General Northeast Defense Command,
Commanding General, GHQ.

In the organization of the forces for this joint defense plan, however, it was apparent that the task forces of the Atlantic Fleet would bear the largest part of the naval responsibility.

"Change No. 3" to WPL-46, was issued December 15, 1941. The primary purpose of this change was to indicate the specific limits of Army-Navy defense commands within the coastal frontiers. This "Change" stated again most clearly that in all joint operations which were planned for the defense of the United States Atlantic coast, the Commanding General of the Northeast Defense Command would cooperate with the Commander, North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier, who would have command of the naval coastal frontier force, composed of the Naval Coastal Force under his immediate command, and the naval local defense forces of the First,

--21-

Third, Fourth and Fifth Naval Districts, under the command of the commandants concerned, and the naval local defense force of the Naval Operating Base, Newport under the command of the Commandant, U.S. Naval Operating Base, Newport. There followed a careful statement as to the exact boundaries of sectors and sub-sectors within the North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier.

While this change has been developing, the Commander North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier had been formulating an extensive revision of Plan-0-4 (NA-NCF-46). This revision was issued on December 5, 1941, as "Change No. 2" to NA-NCF-46, and brought the organization and operating procedure up to date. Therein were given verbally and in chart form, specific details as to the following:

Eastern limits of North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier,
Reference line for coastal sea lanes,
Seaward limits of naval local defense force operating areas,
Boundaries of naval coastal force operating areas,
Boundaries of naval districts,
Air patrol areas,
Boundaries of local areas,
Sea lanes,
Defensive coastal areas.

Therein were also given the task organization and specific assignments for the Naval Coastal Force of the North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier, under the following heads:

  1. Gunboat Division ONE (PG 17, 18, 54)
  2. Gunboat Division TWO (XPG 1, 2, 3)
  3. Eagle Division ONE (PE 19) 27, 48, 55, 56)
  4. Patrol Division ONE (PY 12, 13, 15, 16)
  5. Coastal Air Patrol (18 VPB, 1 AVD)
  6. Observation Group (6 ZNP)
  7. Salem Air Patrol (CG Aircraft)
  8. Rockaway Air Patrol (CG Aircraft)
  9. Currituck Air Patrol (CG Aircraft)
  10. Escort Group (To be formed from groups (a) to (i)

--22-

With these, the naval local defense forces were listed and specific patrol areas were assigned without any change and without detailed organization because such organizational responsibility rested with the commandants of the various naval districts and of the commandant of the Naval Operating Base at New-port, Rhode Island.

With the entrance of the United States into the war, operations plans went into effect. No matter how inadequate the ships might be, they w ere forced to fulfill, to the best of their ability, such assignments as were their responsibility in coastal and harbor defense. The fourth Operation Plan (1-42), promulgated on January 3, 1942, incorporated a structure for the Naval Coastal Force and the Naval Local Defense Forces. The ten Task. Groups, representing the Naval Coastal Forces, were in accordance with those listed in NA-NCF-46, Change No. 2. This task organization still represented the program desired, but one which could not be fully consummated in action until ships and planes were assigned to make up the necessary patrol, scouting and escort groups. In this new Plan, the second part of the task organization for the Frontier included the Naval local Defense Forces of the four component Naval Districts and of N.O.B. Newport, with the Commandants as Task Group Commanders.

On January 3, the Commander, North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier issued a new Operation Plan (1-42).

The name of the North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier was formally changed to Eastern Sea Frontier by an order from the Secretary of the Navy on February 6, 1942. The order again defined command relations thus: "A Sea Frontier Commander commands two forces:

--23-

  1. Sea Frontier Force, comprising ships and aircraft duly allocated by CominCh;
  2. Local Defense Forces, comprising ships and aircraft duly allocated to the component Naval Districts by Chief of Naval Operations.

"As Commander of a Sea Frontier Force, the Commander of a sea frontier is under CominCh and in turn may have under him as task force commanders the commandants of component naval districts. As Commander of the Local Defense Forces, he is under the Chief of Naval Operations and in turn shall have under him as task force commanders the commandants of the component naval districts."

Before the next Operation Plan was promulgated, the Commander Eastern Sea Frontier issued an "Outline of Procedure and plan for Commercial Fishing Vessels", on April 7, 1942. The "Outline," which prepared the way for a later Operation Plan, indicated that in so far as these observers were concerned, their control and organization would rest chiefly with the District Intelligence Office of each Naval District. As civilian volunteers, the owners and operators of these fishing vessels did not affect the structure of task organization, because the plan for using fishing vessels, for gathering and relaying coastal information by radio phone, delegated such citizens in a volunteer capacity. Nevertheless, this "Outline" deserves mention in any survey of a system for organizing shipping for defensive purposes in the Frontier.

The fifth Operation Plan (2-42) was promulgated by Commander Eastern Sea Frontier on April 15, 1942, and represented a complete reorganization of task forces and groups. Under it, the Commandants of the Naval Districts (including the Sixth, transferred to ESF on February 4, 1942) and of the Naval Operating Base, Newport, were designated Commanders of all Task Groups within their areas of control, except for (1) escorts for

--24-

long-distance convoys, and (2) Army aircraft. Each Commandant was named as a Commander of a Task Group having a geographical name: Northern, Narragansett, New York, Delaware, Chesapeake, Southern. Within each task group were three major subdivisions:

  1. Ship Lane Patrol
  2. Naval Local Defense Force
  3. Air Patrol.

Ships in each Ship Lane Patrol were made available by reassignments from the Naval Coastal Force. These ships were to be assigned first by Chief of Naval Operations to the Commander, Eastern Sea Frontier; then re-assigned by CESF to his Task Group Commanders. Ships in the Naval Local Defense Forces were assigned directly to the Commandant of each Naval District by the Navy Department, to which each Commandant still retained administrative responsibility. Nevertheless, in so far as operational responsibility involved ships in the Naval Local Defense Force, for safeguarding swept channels, harbors, approaches and fleet bases, each Commander of a Naval Local Defense Force reported to CESF as Commander of the Eastern Sea Frontier Task Force.

The third subdivision, Air Patrol, included for each Naval District those Naval Air Stations and Coast Guard Air Stations within the geographical limit of each Naval District. There was one noteworthy exception to this, in Operation Plan 2-42: the Airships Force at NAS Lakehurst represented an independent command which reported direct to CESF as Commander of the Eastern Sea Frontier Task Force. So also the Striking Force (including the Army First Bomber Command and the Army First Air Support Command) was organized as an independent Task Group, whose Commanding Officer was directly responsible to CESF.

--25-

Two other Task Groups, independent from any Commandant of a Naval District acting as a Task Group Commander, were included in Operation Plan 2-42. These were the Convoy Escort Force and the Attack Force, both directly responsible to CESF.

In so far as terms were concerned, there was no precise use of Force, Group, and Unit. In theory, the Task Force of the Eastern Sea Frontier was composed of ten Groups; in practice, Operation Plan 2-42 named these groups and sub-groups as Task Forces, thus:

EASTERN SEA FRONTIER FORCE
(Task Force 26.1)
Commander: Rear Admiral Adolphus Andrews

26.1.1 Northern Force Rear Admiral W. T. Tarrant
 
  1. Northern Ship Lane Patrol
    (Assigned: PE 27, PC's 455, 471, 473, Siren, St. Augustine; CGC's Dix, Cartigan, Harriet Lane; undesignated 70-83 foot cutters.)
  2. Naval local Defense Force, First Naval District
  3. Northern Air Patrol
    (Coast Guard Aircraft, Salem, Massachusetts; Army aircraft as assigned.)
26.1.2 Narragansett Force Rear Admiral E. C. Kalbfus
 
  1. Narragansett Ship Lane Patrol
    (Assigned: PE 55, CGC's, Argo, General Greene; undesignated 70-83 foot cutters.)
26.1.3 New York Force Rear Admiral E. J. Marquart
 
  1. New York Ship Lane Patrol
    (Assigned: PE 48, Zircon, Sylph, PC 507, CGC's Icarus, Antietam: undesignated 70-83 foot cutters.)
  2. Naval Local Defense Force, Third Naval District
  3. New York Air Patrol
    (Coast Guard and Naval aircraft, NAS New York; Army aircraft as assigned.)

--26-

26.1.4 Delaware Force Rear Admiral A. E. Watson
 
  1. Delaware Ship Lane Patrol
    (Assigned: PE 56, Alabaster; CGC's Colfax; undesignated 70-83 foot cutters; British Trawlers: HMS Buttermere, Wastwater, Pentland Firth, Arctic Explorer.)
  2. Naval Local Defense Force, Fourth Naval District
  3. Delaware Air Patrol
    (Eastern Sea Frontier aircraft as made available; Army aircraft as assigned.)
26.1.5 Chesapeake Force Rear Admiral M. H. Simons
 
  1. Chesapeake Ship Lane Patrol
    (Assigned: PE 19, Tourmaline; PC's 437, 330, 412; CGC's Rush, Jackson, Cuyahoga, Dione, Legare, Calypso, Carrabassett; undesignated 70-53 foot cutters; British Trawlers: HMS Hertfordshire, Senateur Duhamel, Norwich City, St. Zeno, Bedfordshire, Lady Elsa, Coventry City, Stella Polaris, Kingston, Ceylonite, St. Loman.)
  2. Naval Local Defense Force, Fifth Naval District
  3. Chesapeake Air Patrol
    (Coast Guard and Navy aircraft, Elizabeth City; NAS Norfolk aircraft; VS1D5; Eastern Sea Frontier aircraft as assigned; Army aircraft as assigned.)
26.1.6 Southern Force Rear Admiral W. H. Allen
 
  1. Southern Ship Lane Patrol
    ((Assigned: Ruby, PC 472, CGC's Tallapoosa, Agassiz; undesignated 70-83 foot cutters; British Trawlers, HMS Wellard, Lady Rosemary, Cape Warwick, Le Tigre, Northern Chief, Northern Duke, Northern Isles, Northern Dawn.)
  2. Naval Local Defense Force, Sixth Naval District
  3. Southern Air Patrol
    (NAS Jacksonville aircraft available, other aircraft as assigned; Army aircraft as assigned.)
26.1.7 Striking Force Brig. Gen. W. T. Larsen
 
  1. First Bomber Command (First Air Force)
  2. First Air Support Command (First Air Force)

--27-

26.1.8 Airship Force Commander G. H. Mills
 
  1. ZP Squadron 12 (4 ZNP's)
26.1.9 Convoy Escort Force  
 
  1. Vessels as assigned
26.1.10 Attack Force Senior Officer
 
  1. Destroyers and vessels temporarily assigned

Again, each of these "Groups" was subdivided into Units, within a Group.

On June 3, 1942, the Vice Chief of Naval Operations reorganized the Naval Forces of the United States by General Order No. 174, which cancelled General Orders 142 and 145. The Naval Forces were here grouped in two categories as follows:

I.   Directly under the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations:
    United States Atlantic Fleet,
United States Pacific Fleet,
Sea Frontier Forces (formerly "Naval Coastal Forces"),
Special Task Forces.
II.   Under the Vice Chief of Naval Operations:
    Naval Local Defense Forces,
Naval Transportation Service,
Special Duty Ships,
Naval District Craft.

In General Order 174, it was further stated that the commanders of the sea frontier forces are under the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations (these two offices having been combined when Admiral King took command); that commanders of the sea frontier forces might have under them, as task force commanders of sea frontier forces, the commandants of component naval districts. As commanders of the naval local defense forces, the commanders of the sea frontiers were directly under the Vice Chief of Naval Operations, subject to the general

--28-

supervision of the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations. Again, in this capacity, the commanders of the sea frontiers would have under them as task force commanders, the commandants of component naval districts. It was further stated that when commandants of naval districts were assigned as task force commanders by a sea frontier commander, such duty should be their primary duty. For administrative matters not involving war operations, however, commandants of naval districts were to be governed by appropriate existing regulations, orders and instructions.

The matter of numerical designation was clarified on June 20, 1942, when the Chief of Naval Operations assigned to the Eastern Sea Frontier Force the number "90." A task force number of the Atlantic Fleet had been used prior to this time. This designation was used for the first time in the sixth Operation Plan (9-42), issued by Commander Eastern Sea Frontier on July 6, 1942. Furthermore, the word "Group" made its first appearance. Thus the task organization was given as follows:

TASK FORCE 90

90.1 Northern Group
90.2 Narragansett Group
90.3 New York Group
90.4 Delaware Group
90.5 Chesapeake Group
90.6 Southern Group
90.7 Striking Group
90.8 Airship Group
90.9 Convoy Escort Group
90.10 Killer Group

One innovation in One ration Plan 2-42 was the inclusion for the first time of Coastal Pickets as Task Units under the Task Groups of each Naval District. According to the Operation Plan, there was no

--29-

stipulation as to whether the Coastal Pickets should be organized within the structure of the Naval Local Defense Force or as an independent Unit. The Operation Plan contained full details in "Annex Baker" as to the correct procedure to be used by Coastal Pickets in making radio reports. This was supplemented on July 14th by the promulgation of a separate Coastal Picket Operation Plan 11-42, indicating that the District Coast Guard Officer of each Naval District would be in command of each Coastal Picket Group, and would be directly responsible to the Commandant of the Naval District, as Task Group Commander. Attached to this Plan was a special Grid Chart to be used for purposes of security in radio communication.

Operation Plan 16-42, issued on November 10, 1942, was the seventh Plan issued to cover all the activities of Task Groups within the Eastern Sea Frontier Force. In it, two new Task Groups were listed for the first time: the Potomac River Group (90.11) and the Severn River Naval Command covered areas included within the Eastern Sea Frontier. All Naval Local Defense Forces within the North Atlantic Naval Coastal Frontier were directed to operate as task group commands. On July 13, 1942, the Vice Chief of Naval Operations directed that the Commandants of these two commands report to the Commander, Eastern Sea Frontier for duty as subordinate task group commanders, and further report to the Commanding General, Military District of Washington, for assignment of tasks in connection with local defense of Washington. Hence the inclusion of Rear Admiral F. L. Reichmuth, USN, and Rear Admiral J. R. Beardall, USN, as task group commanders in the ESF Operation Plan 16-42.

From the first Plan, issued in March 1941, to the seventh Plan, one may trace the growth of the Eastern Sea Frontier forces. At the

--30-

beginning, Commander Eastern Sea Frontier had no ships which had been assigned direct to him by the Chief of Naval Operations. In November 1942, the mimeographed "Status of Ships Assigned to the Eastern Sea Frontier" included about 200 ships, of which eleven were Destroyers, 14 were PG's and 75 were 75-83 foot Coast Guard Cutters. Among ESF ships, at various times, have been British and Canadian Corvettes, Destroyers, and minesweepers as well as two French destroyers for a very brief period and one Dutch small cruiser. The various changes are reflected in the most recent Operation Plan No. 2-44, dated 1 December 1944, which follows:

--31-

HEADQUARTERS
COMMANDER EASTERN SEA FRONTIER

90 Church Street
New York, N.Y.

ESF-16/A4-3 (TFOP)
Serial:  001199

SECRET

1 December 1944

To: Distribution List.
Subj: Commander Eastern Sea Frontier Operation Plan No. 2-44.

  1. Enclosure (1) is forwarded for information and necessary action. This Plan is effective.
  2. This Plan cancels CESF OpPlan 1-44. Destroy by burning. No destruction report is necessary.
  3. The current CESF Basic Communication Plan and Doctrine remains in effect.
  4. Distribution List acknowledge receipt of this Plan.
  5. Transmission of this document via registered mail within the Domestic Mail System of the United States is hereby authorized.
/s/ H. F. LEARY

Encl.
1. HW Copy of CFSF OpPlan No. 2-44.

DISTRIBUTION
    Special List Attached.

--32-

EASTERN SEA FRONTIER FORCE
TASK FORCE 02           
 
FEDERAL OFFICE BUILDING, 90 CHURCH STREET
NEW YORK 7, N.Y.
1 DECEMBER 1944 - 0000 GCT

Operation Plan
    No. 2-44

TASK ORGANIZATION

(a) 02.1 Northern Group Rear Admiral Felix Gygax, USN.
Northern Ship Lane Patrol.
Naval Local Defense Force.
Northern Air Group.
Air/Sea Rescue Group.
(b) 02.3 New York Group Rear Admiral Monroe Kelly, USN.
New York Ship Lane Patrol.
Naval Local Defense Force.
Air/Sea Rescue Group.
(c) 02.4 Delaware Group Rear Admiral PA. F. Draemel, USN.
Delaware Ship Lane Patrol.
Naval Local Defense Force.
Air/Sea Rescue Group.
(d) 02.5 Chesapeake Group Rear Admiral D. M. LeBreton, USN.
Chesapeake Ship Lane Patrol.
Naval Local Defense Force.
Chesapeake Air Group.
Air/Sea Rescue Group.
(e) 02.6 Southern Group Rear Admiral Jules James, USN.
Southern Ship Lane Patrol.
Naval Local Defense Force.
Southern Air Group.
Air/Sea Rescue Group.

--33-

(f) 02.7 Hdqtrs. Air Group Commander Paul C. Griggs, USN.
Quonset Air Units.
Floyd Bennett Air Units.
Cape May Air Units.
(g) 02.8 Hdqtrs. Airship Group Lt. Commander Herbert S. Graves, USN.
Lakehurst Airship Units.
(h) 02.9 Surface Escort Group Captain C. R. Woodson, USN.
(i) 02.10  
(j) 02.11 Potomac River Naval Command Rear Admiral F. L. Reichmuth, USN.
Naval Local Defense Force.
    As assigned.
(k) 02.12 Severn River Naval Command Rear Admiral J. R. Beardall, USN.
Naval Local Defense Force.
    As assigned.
(l) 02.13  
(m) 02.14 Fleet Air Wing 9 Captain D. T. Day, USN.
Headquarters Squadron 9-1.
Headquarters Squadron 9-2.
(n) 02.15 Fleet Airship Wing ONE Captain R. F. Tyler, USN.

--34-

  1. Enemy submarines continue active in the Atlantic. Surface or Air Units of the Eastern Sea Frontier Force will be shifted as circumstances warrant. Control and routine of shipping will be in accordance with current directives from Commander-in-Chief, U. S. 10th Fleet (Convoy and Routing). The Eastern Sea Frontier is Task Force 02 of the Tenth Fleet. The Eastern Sea Frontier as Task Force 02 will support the operations of the U. S. Atlantic Fleet. The Commander, Eastern Sea Frontier is also Commander of Task Group 26.2 of the U. S. Atlantic Fleet; this Task Group comprises units assigned by the U. S. Atlantic Fleet.

    By direction of the Chief of Staff, U. S. Army, and the Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Fleet, a state of "non-invasion" has been declared for the Eastern Defense Command (Army) and the Eastern Sea Frontier.

    The Eastern Sea Frontier has an initial offshore boundary. Those limits are elastic and will be extended as necessary to execute tasks in support of this plan. These initial limits are bounded as follows:

    "From the eastern seaward end of the International Boundary between the United States and Canada to position Latitude 43 North, Longitude 67 West; thence to position Latitude 42 North, Longitude 65 West; thence to meet the northern boundary of the Gulf Sea Frontier in approximate position Latitude 27 North, Longitude 75 30' West; and thence northwest along that boundary to the seaward end of the boundary between Duval and St. John Counties, Florida, in approximate position Latitude 30 15' North, Longitude 81 20' West."

    The above limits mark a division of responsibility between The Eastern Sea Frontier and adjacent Sea Frontiers and The U. S. Atlantic Fleet as to the following activities:

    1. Diversion of Shipping.
    2. Initiation of rescue activity.
    3. Warning to friendly interests of all hazards within the area being traversed.
  2. This force will attack and destroy the enemy; protect shipping and sea communications of the Associated Powers; defend the Eastern Sea Frontier; provide adequate Air/Sea Rescue; and support the U. S. Atlantic Fleet, the U. S. Army, Eastern Defense Command, and other friendly forces.

--35-

    1. NORTHERN GROUP
    2. NEW YORK GROUP
    3. DELAWARE GROUP
    4. CHESAPEAKE GROUP
    5. SOUTHERN GROUP
    6. HDQTRS. AIR GROUP
    7. HDQTRS. AIRSHIP GROUP
    8. SURFACE ESCORT GROUP
    9.  
    10. POTOMAC RIVER NAVAL COMMAND
    11. SEVERN RIVER NAVAL COMMAND
    12.  
    13. FLEET AIR WING 9
    14. FLEET AIRSHIP WING ONE

    Ship Lane Patrols utilize effective forces to protect friendly shipping in the Ship Lanes. Search for and attack enemy forces. Patrol Coastal Ship Lanes. Escort vessels when directed, and cover sorties. Support the U. S. Atlantic Fleet. Coordinate operations of own forces with Air Patrols.

    Naval Local Defense Forces provide for the security of Fleet Bases in coordination with the Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Atlantic Fleet. Insure safe entrance to and exit of vessels from harbors by sweeping channels, approaches thereto, and vital areas. Reinforce escort units and independent patrols when available forces permit. Insure suitable security measures in harbors and approaches thereto. Patrol swept channels. Maintain Lighthouse Service and Coastal Lookout Stations.

    Air Groups patrol Frontier waters; attack enemy forces; observe end report suspicious vessels. Aid and protect friendly shipping. Cooperate with surface forces. Assist in rescue as practicable. Furnish air escorts for valuable surface units and for convoys as directed. Maintain appropriate units in a ready condition, available to meet unforeseen and changing conditions.

    Fleet Air Wing and Fleet Airship Wing utilize all available resources to enhance the operational effectiveness of the various Fleet squadrons under operational control of Eastern Sea Frontier. Provide personnel for control staffs in local operations offices which are maintained for tactical control of Air Operations in the Frontier. Supervise training of Squadron personnel; keep Commander Eastern Sea Frontier advised of the training situation as affecting the capabilities of units assigned to operate under the Frontier. Administer squadrons under operational control of the Frontier Commander in accordance with effective Fleet directives.

--36-

    Air/Sea Rescue render emergency assistance to aircraft and all vessels in distress and rescue survivors thereof.

  1. Attack enemy forces, cooperating with U. S. Army and Forces of Associated Powers.

    Examine suspicious merchant vessels.

    Stress training of personnel for war, including instruction and qualifications for advancement in rating. Emphasize training and development or anti-submarine attack methods in appropriate units.

    Positive contact with an enemy submarine must be developed persistently to the limits of offensive resources. Utilize all available aircraft. Necessary forces should remain in the area until such time as the submarine would, of necessity, be obliged to surface. Use every means to bring a positive contact to a successful conclusion.

    Enjoin officers and men not to discuss where they have been and what they have seen.

    The Navy Standard Basic Grid (JAN) System shall be used exclusively for Naval and for Joint Army-Navy use when grids are employed. CESF has also authorized system of lettered coordinates - SP 02274 where there is no special need for security; CSP 1271 and CSP 1500 where there is special need for security. Commercial Fishing Observers will continue use of former "Interceptor Command" grid originally authorized.

    This Plan cancels Operation Plan 1-44. Operation Plan 1-44 will be destroyed by burning; no destruction reports necessary.

    THIS PLAN IS EFFECTIVE 04 DECEMBER 1944 - 0400 GCT.

  2. All vessels fill to capacity with fuel and stores as opportunity offers. Aircraft arm and fuel as appropriate to type and employment.
  3. Communications in accordance with CESF current Communication Plan and Doctrine. Use E.W.T. (Q) time and so state in body of despatches. Commander Eastern Sea Frontier is located at Headquarters, 90 Church Street, New York 7, New York.

--37-

  1. Transmission of this document via registered mail within the Domestic Mail System of the United States is hereby authorized.

 

H. F. LEARY
Vice Admiral, U. S. Navy
Commander, Eastern Sea Frontier

 

DISTRIBUTION

See special distribution attached.

--38-

ESF-16/A4-3(TFOP)
Serial: 001199
EASTERN SEA FRONTIER FORCE
TASK FORCE 02
DISTRIBUTION LIST
COPIES
Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Fleet 5
Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Tenth Fleet 5
Vice Chief of Naval Operations 5
Commander-in-Chief., U. S. Atlantic Fleet 5
Commander-Air Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet 5
Commander Fleet Airships, U. S. Atlantic Fleet 5
Commandant, U. S. Coast Guard 2
Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Fourth Fleet 5
Commander, Gulf Sea Frontier 5
Commander, Caribbean Frontier 5
Commander, Panama Sea Frontier 5
Commander, Task Group 02.1
(10 copies for distribution to C.G.A.S. Salem, N.A.S. Squantum, N.A.S. South Weymouth, N.A.S. Brunswick, Me.)
N.A.S. Quonset
16
Commander, Task Group 02.3
(4 copies for distribution to N.A.S. New York, C.G.A.S. New York)
10
Commander, Task Group 02.4
(2 copies for distribution to N.A.S. Cape May)
10
Commander, Task Group 02.5
(8 copies for distribution to N.A.S. Norfolk, M.C.A.S. Cherry Point, N.A.S. Weeksville, C.G.A.S. - Elizabeth City)
15
Commander, Task Group 02.6
(8 copies for distribution to N.A.S Jacksonville., Fla., N.A.S. Beaufort, S.C., N.A.S. Charleston, S.C., N.A.S. Glynco, Ga.)
14

--39-

EASTERN SEA FRONTIER FORCE
TASK FORCE 02
DISTRIBUTION LIST
COPIES
Commander, Task Group 02.7 10
Commander, Task Group 02.8 5
Commander, Task Group 02.9 (Each vessel 1) 80
Commander, Task Group 02.11 3
Commander, Task Group 02.12 3
Commander, Task Group 02.14 5
Commander, Task Group 02.15 5
Commander Northern Air Group, ESF, 150 Causeway St., Boston, Mass. 1
Commander Chesapeake Air Group, ESF, NOB, Norfolk, 11, Va. 1
Commander Southern Air Group, ESF, Fort Sumter Hotel, Charleston, S.C. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Boston, 150 Causeway St., Boston, Mass. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Squantum, NAS, Squantum, Mass. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF So. Weymouth, NAS, South Weymouth, Mass. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Quonset, NAS, Quonset Pt., R.I. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Floyd Bennett, NAS, New York, N.Y. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Lakehurst, NAS, Lakehurst, N.J. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Cape May, NAS, Cape May, N.J. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Norfolk, NOB, Norfolk 11, Va. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Breezy Point, NAS, Norfolk, Va. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Elizabeth City, CGAS, Elizabeth City, N.C. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Weeksville, NAS, Weeksville, N.C. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Cherry Point, MCAS, Cherry Point, N.C. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Charleston, NAS, Charleston, S.C. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Beaufort, NAS, Beaufort, S.C. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Glynco, NAS Glynco, Ga. 1

--40-

ESF-16/A4-3(TFOP)
Serial: 001199
EASTERN SEA FRONTIER FORCE
TASK FORCE 02
DISTRIBUTION LIST
COPIES
Squadrons of Fleet Air Wing NINE and Fleet Airship Wing ONE under the operational control of CESF. 14
Commandant, First Naval District 2
Commandant, Third Naval District 2
Commandant, Fourth Naval District 2
Commandant, Fifth Naval District 2
Commandant, Sixth Naval District 2
Commandant, N.O.B. Newport 5
Commandant, Potomac River Naval Command 1
Commandant, Severn River Naval Command 1
Commanding General, Eastern Defense Command 10
Commanding General, First Air Force 5
SPECIAL
Commandant, Seventh Naval District 2
Commandant, Eighth Naval District 2
Commandant, Tenth Naval District 2
Commandant, Fifteenth Naval District 2
S.O.P.A., Casco Bay 2
Commandant, NOB Bermuda 2
Commanding Officer, NOB Guantanamo 2
Commander, Western Sea Frontier 3
Commander, Alaskan Sea Frontier 2
Commander, Hawaiian Sea Frontier 2
Commander, Task Force Twenty-four 2
Commander, All U. S. Forces, Aruba-Curacao 2
Commandant, N.O.B. Trinidad 2

--41-

HEADQUARTERS
COMMANDER EASTERN SEA FRONTIER

90 Church Street
New York, N.Y.

ESF-16/A4-3 (TFOP)
Serial:  001248

SECRET

9 January 1945

To: Distribution List.
Subj: Commander Eastern Sea Frontier Operation Plan No. 2-44.

  1. Enclosure (1) is forwarded for information and necessary action. This Supplement No. 1 (with its Supplemental Communication Annex attached) to Operation Plan No. 2-44 will be placed in effect by dispatch. It will also be made inoperative by dispatch.
  2. Eastern Sea Frontier Operation Plan No. 2-44 remains in effect at all times.
  3. The current CESF Basic Communication Plan and Doctrine remains in effect.
  4. Distribution List acknowledge receipt of this Plan.
  5. Transmission of this document via registered mail within the Domestic Mail System of the United States is hereby authorized.
/s/ H. F. LEARY

Encl.
1. HW Copy of CFSF Supplement No. 1 to CESF Operation Plan No. 2-44.

DISTRIBUTION
    Special List Attached.

--42-

EASTERN SEA FRONTIER FORCE
TASK FORCE 02

Federal Office Building
90 Church Street
New York 7, N.Y.

SUPPLEMENT NO. 1
OPERATION PLAN No. 2-44
 
ROBOT DEFENSE TASK FORCE
 
TASK ORGANIZATION

(o) 02.2 Killer Group (Alpha)
(Assigned by CinCLant)
DD's and/or DE's
- Senior Officer
(i) 02.10 Killer Group (Beta)
(Assigned by CinCLant)
DD's and/or DE's
- Senior Officer
(l) 02.13 Killer Group (Gamma)
(Assigned by CinCLant)
DD's and/or DE's
- Senior Officer
(p) 02.16 Robot Surface Patrol (Tommy)
PF's and PG's from ESF
- Senior Officer
(q) 02.17 Robot Surface patrol (Villa)
PF's and PG's from ESF
- Senior Officer
(d) 02.5 Chesapeake Group
(Increased by at least one squadron of patrol planes from Commander Caribbean Sea Frontier - Based NAS Norfolk.)
(Increased by one VC squadron especially trained in ASW, assigned by CinCLant.)
- Rear Admiral D. M. LeBreton, USN
(f) 02.7 Hdqtrs. Air Group
(Increased by at least one squadron of patrol planes from Commander Gulf Sea Frontier - Based NAS Quonset.)
(Increased by one VC squadron especially trained in ASW, assigned by CinCLant.)
- Commander Paul C. Griggs, USN
(g) 02.8 Hdqtrs. Airship Group - Lt. Comdr. Herbert S. Graves, USN
(r) 02.18 Army Air Forces
(Initially Mitchel and Langley Air Fields)
- Major General Frank O'D. Hunter, USA

  1. A robot attack against the Eastern Seaboard is imminent and an emergency exists.
    Category A is in effect.
    A state of Non-Invasion exists.
    The Army is responsible for the defense against all air-borne launching apparatus and for the defense against robot bombs in flight. Unity of Command will be attained as described in Joint Air Support Plan, EDC-ES? [the original text was unreadable where the "?" appears - HyperWar] February, 1944.

--43-

    The "critical sea area" from which robot bombs may be launched by the enemy is bounded as follows:

    "An arc, radius 200 miles, with center at New York. Another arc, radius 200 miles, with center at Washington, D.C. A tangent to these two arcs on the east."

  1. THIS FORCE WILL SEARCH FOR, DISCOVER, ATTACK AND DESTROY ENEMY SEABORNE PLATFORMS FOR LAUNCHING ROBOT BOMBS.
  2.  

    1. (o)KILLER GROUP (ALPHA)
      (i)KILLER GROUP (BETA)
      (1)KILLER GROUP (GAMMA)
      (p)ROBOT SURFACE PATROL (TOMMY)
      (q)ROBOT SURFACE PATROL (VILLA)

      Patrol a line of bearing, ABC, off New York and the Chesapeake. Points on this line are as follows:

      A 36-08'N 73-10'W
      B 38-03'N 71-07'W
      C 39-57'N 68-58'W

      Assignments of initial forces for patrols will be made by Commander Eastern Sea Frontier.

    2. (d)CHESAPEAKE GROUP
      (f)HDQTRS. AIR GROUP
      (g)HDQTRS. AIRSHIP GROUP
      (r)ARMY AIR FORCES

      Search the "critical sea area" with available aircraft and airships.

    3. All other Task Group Commanders of the Eastern Sea Frontier will be prepared to assist Robot Defense Task Force as Commander Eastern Sea Frontier may direct.

    1. Destroy all enemy forces that are contacted. Continue search after information is received that bombs have been launched.

      Examine all suspicious vessels.

      This Supplement No. 1 to Operation Plan No. 2-44 will be placed in effect by dispatch. It will also be made inoperative by dispatch. When Commander in Chief, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, assumes operational control of the Eastern Sea Frontier, a dispatch will so indicate. Eastern Sea Frontier Operation Plan No. 2-44 remains in effect at all times.

  3. All vessels fill to capacity with fuel and stores as opportunity offers. Aircraft arm and fuel as appropriate to type and employment.
  4. Communications in accordance with CESF Supplemental Communication Annex attached. Commander Eastern Sea Frontier is located at Headquarters, 90 Church Street, New York 7, New York.
  5. Transmission of this document via registered mail within the Domestic Mail System of the United States is hereby authorized.

 

H. F. LEARY.
Vice Admiral, U.S. Navy
Commander Eastern Sea Frontier

--44-

SUPPLEMENTARY COMMUNICATION ANNEX FOR USE WITH SUPPLEMENT No. 1, OPERATION PLAN No. 2

  1. SHORE ESTABLISHMENTS
    1. Communications between Headquarters, EastSeaFron, and Naval shore establishments shall be via existing telephone and teletypewriter circuits (existing radio circuits in the event of casualty to landlines).
    2. Communications between Headquarters, EastSeaFron, and Headquarters, Eastern Defense Command, and Headquarters, First Air Force, shall be via existing telephone and teletypewriter channels.
    3. Communications between activities of the Army shall be via existing Army telephone and teletypewriter nets.

  2. AIRCRAFT
    1. When communicating with base, aircraft in flight (LTA and HTA - Army and Navy) shall employ plane-to-base frequency normal to base.
    2. Aircraft at a scene of action shall employ 3000 kcs voice for communication with all craft (air and surface) concerned in the immediate operation.

  3. SURFACE CRAFT
    1. Surface craft shall maintain a continuous guard on 4410 kcs for communications between ship-and-shore and in addition shall continuously guard the Washington Primary FOX Schedule.
    2. At a scene of action 3000 kcs shall be continuously guarded as indicated in II(B) above.

  4. HOMING
    1. 414 kcs is the "homing" frequency and shall be employed by both air and surface craft.

  5. VOICE CALLS
    1. General. The first word of all voice calls in connection with this operation is "GREEN". The second word of all voice calls shall be as follows:
      1. Army aircraft, ABLE.
      2. Navy aircraft, (LTA and HTA), NAN.
      3. Surface craft, SUGAR.
      4. Aircraft engaged in Air/Sea rescue, BIRD.
      5. Surface craft engaged in Air/Sea rescue, WHALE.

    2. Numerical Designators. The third part of the voice call for all craft engaged in these operations shall be a numerical designator as follows:
      1. "Any of all" - ZERO
      2. Army aircraft - ONE through NINE NINE
      3. Naval aircraft (HTA) - ONE ZERO ZERO through ONE SEVEN FOUR
      4. Naval aircraft (LTA) - ONE SEVEN FIVE through ONE NINE NINE
      5. a. Surface craft normally attached to ESF. - TWO ZERO ZERO through TWO FOUR NINE
        b. Surface craft assigned by CinCLant to ESF for operational control (These calls to be assigned by CESF upon reporting.) - TWO FIVE ZERO through TWO NINE NINE

--45-

      1. An aircraft carrier and its surface escort assigned to CESF for operational control will employ voice calls in accordance with V,B(5)b, above. The Commanding officer of the carrier shall assign numerical designator to individual aircraft of his complement from THREE ZERO ZERO through THREE FOUR NINE, and shall inform CESF of assignments made.

--46-

EASTERN SEA FRONTIER FORCE
TASK FORCE 02
DISTRIBUTION LIST
COPIES
Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Fleet 5
Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Tenth Fleet 5
Vice Chief of Naval Operations 5
Commander-in-Chief., U. S. Atlantic Fleet 5
Commander-Air Force, U. S. Atlantic Fleet 5
Commander Fleet Airships, U. S. Atlantic Fleet 5
Commandant, U. S. Coast Guard 2
Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Fourth Fleet 5
Commander, Gulf Sea Frontier 5
Commander, Caribbean Frontier 5
Commander, Panama Sea Frontier 5
Commander, Task Group 02.1
(10 copies for distribution to C.G.A.S. Salem, N.A.S. Squantum, N.A.S. South Weymouth, N.A.S. Brunswick, Me.)
N.A.S. Quonset
16
Commander, Task Group 02.3
(4 copies for distribution to N.A.S. New York, C.G.A.S. New York)
10
Commander, Task Group 02.4
(2 copies for distribution to N.A.S. Cape May)
10
Commander, Task Group 02.5
(8 copies for distribution to N.A.S. Norfolk, M.C.A.S. Cherry Point, N.A.S. Weeksville, C.G.A.S. - Elizabeth City)
15
Commander, Task Group 02.6
(8 copies for distribution to N.A.S Jacksonville., Fla., N.A.S. Beaufort, S.C., N.A.S. Charleston, S.C., N.A.S. Glynco, Ga.)
14

--47-

EASTERN SEA FRONTIER FORCE
TASK FORCE 02
DISTRIBUTION LIST
COPIES
Commander, Task Group 02.7 10
Commander, Task Group 02.8 5
Commander, Task Group 02.9 (Each vessel 1) 80
Commander, Task Group 02.11 3
Commander, Task Group 02.12 3
Commander, Task Group 02.14 5
Commander, Task Group 02.15 5
Commander Northern Air Group, ESF, 150 Causeway St., Boston, Mass. 1
Commander Chesapeake Air Group, ESF, NOB, Norfolk, 11, Va. 1
Commander Southern Air Group, ESF, Fort Sumter Hotel, Charleston, S.C. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Boston, 150 Causeway St., Boston, Mass. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Squantum, NAS, Squantum, Mass. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF So. Weymouth, NAS, South Weymouth, Mass. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Quonset, NAS, Quonset Pt., R.I. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Floyd Bennett, NAS, New York, N.Y. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Lakehurst, NAS, Lakehurst, N.J. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Cape May, NAS, Cape May, N.J. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Norfolk, NOB, Norfolk 11, Va. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Breezy Point, NAS, Norfolk, Va. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Elizabeth City, CGAS, Elizabeth City, N.C. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Weeksville, NAS, Weeksville, N.C. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Cherry Point, MCAS, Cherry Point, N.C. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Charleston, NAS, Charleston, S.C. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Beaufort, NAS, Beaufort, S.C. 1
OinC, Air Control ESF Glynco, NAS Glynco, Ga. 1

--48--

EASTERN SEA FRONTIER FORCE
TASK FORCE 02
DISTRIBUTION LIST
COPIES
Squadrons of Fleet Air Wing NINE and Fleet Airship Wing ONE under the operational control of CESF. 14
Commandant, First Naval District 2
Commandant, Third Naval District 2
Commandant, Fourth Naval District 2
Commandant, Fifth Naval District 2
Commandant, Sixth Naval District 2
Commandant, N.O.B. Newport 5
Commandant, Potomac River Naval Command 1
Commandant, Severn River Naval Command 1
Commanding General, Eastern Defense Command 10
Commanding General, First Air Force 5
SPECIAL
Commandant, Seventh Naval District 2
Commandant, Eighth Naval District 2
Commandant, Tenth Naval District 2
Commandant, Fifteenth Naval District 2
S.O.P.A., Casco Bay 2
Commandant, NOB Bermuda 2
Commanding Officer, NOB Guantanamo 2
Commander, Western Sea Frontier 3
Commander, Alaskan Sea Frontier 2
Commander, Hawaiian Sea Frontier 2
Commander, Task Force Twenty-four 2
Commander, All U. S. Forces, Aruba-Curacao 2
Commandant, N.O.B. Trinidad 2

--49--

Contents
Previous Chapter [1] Next Chapter [3]



Transcribed and formatted by Rick Pitz for the HyperWar Foundation