Japanese Woodworking Forums Forum Index Japanese Woodworking Forums
Presented by www.japanesetools.com
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Hammer Head
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Japanese Woodworking Forums Forum Index -> Other Japanese Tools
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Colton Allen



Joined: 21 Jan 2007
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2007 8:45 pm    Post subject: Hammer Head Reply with quote

I recently got a 20oz Japanese Chisel Hammer and it came without a wedge holding the head to the handle. I called the company I got the hammer from and I was told that hammer does dot come with a wedge. After using it a short time the head started slipping off. My question is, how do I keep the head from slipping without a wedge, or do I just put a wedge in it?

Colton
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Chris Hall
Moderator


Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 439
Location: Vancouver Island, B.C.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2007 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, and welcome!!

Look inside the hole in the hammer head to determine if it is forged with a internal taper. The opening in the head should constrict in the middle and then flare out towards the rim of the hole. The flared out part is where the wood will go when pressed by a wedge or two.

Sometimes as many as three wedges may be required, depending upon how the opening flares. Use a dozuki to rip slots in the head (with a small hole drilled at the terminus of the kerf(s) to reduce the stress riser, ideally). Make sure the hammer head is good and dry, bone dry, and then fitis carefully. Tapping the butt end of the hilt on the floor is a good way to seat the head. You will need to repeat this a few times - each time, removing the head and inspecting the end of the hilt to see where it is rubbing against the iron. This is quite similar to the process of fitting a plane blade to the block.

Gently make adjustments, and refit, until the hilt protrudes at least 0.5 cm through the head. If all looks good, drive the wedges in. The wedges should be sized/tapered so that their introduced thickness is enough to press the sides of the hilt tightly to the flared wall of the hammer head opening. If done perfectly, the wedges ought to be a bit proud of the end grain of the hilt when driven in, so that later on you can seat them a little more tightly if neccessary. The wedges should be in a material that is at least as hard or harder than the wood used for the hilt. It should be in a wood that is 'grippy' and has high crushing resistance. Wenge, Purpleheart, Black Locust, oak, elm, etc, are suitable choices. Lignum vitae, although the hardest wood there is, would be less suitable as it is oily and slippery and wedges may not hold well.

It is a good idea to keep the hammer away from forced hot air vents and from dunks in water.

Perhaps others here would like to post pics of their hammer heads wedged in place? It is an avenue for artistic expression as well :^)


By the, the Japanese word for 'wedge' is 'kusabi'

Chris
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Jim_Blauvelt



Joined: 28 Dec 2001
Posts: 350

PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2007 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello,
The carpenter that taught me how to set hammer heads used no wedges at all.
Inspect the taper of the mortise as Chris suggested but if the head has a makers mark it shoud go towards the handle. That will put the taper in the right direction. Adjust the hammer tenon to shape but make sure it is larger than the mortise by the amount the particular handle material can be compressed. Also be sure that before you do the final sizing that the tenon end has achieved a relitive humidity reading lower than the dryest season it will see during use. Put a small champher on the tenon end. Using the peen end of a different hammer and an anvil tap the tenon on all for sides to compress it. Keep the hammer blow locations just to the inside of the tenon end. This will compress the tenon but will help to avoid cracking the end. Tap the handle into the head to get it started and then holding it free hand set it to its depth by hitting the hammer end, similar to setting a saw into its handle. It shoud be a very tight fit. Once set let it sit in an area of average humidity and the tenon will swell again.
I like this method because the tightness is in four directions on the mortise, not just two as a wedge would make. I have dozens of hammers set this way. With the exception of some seasonal adjustments, never have a problem. Will post a photo set if anyone is interested.
Jim
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Chris Hall
Moderator


Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 439
Location: Vancouver Island, B.C.

PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2007 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah Jim, let's see a photo. I've never heard of using that method to put a handle on a hammer head. It does make good sense, albeit requiring considerable close judgement in getting the fit right, no?

Chris


Last edited by Chris Hall on Mon Jan 22, 2007 1:55 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kevinT



Joined: 14 Jan 2004
Posts: 231
Location: OKC USA

PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2007 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nah, it's fairly easy. Even I can do it.

Jim, I would like to see how you did transitions and abutment to the heads.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
wilburpan



Joined: 12 Mar 2006
Posts: 105
Location: East Brunswick, NJ

PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2007 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim_Blauvelt wrote:
Will post a photo set if anyone is interested.

When has the answer to this ever been, "Nah -- I'm not interested in seeing photos"? wink

Looking forward to pictures!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Colton Allen



Joined: 21 Jan 2007
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2007 9:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Guys for all the info. Now when I get a spare moment I will have to try and set the head.

Colton

Would love to see pics also.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim_Blauvelt



Joined: 28 Dec 2001
Posts: 350

PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 4:30 pm    Post subject: hammer photos Reply with quote

here is a 15 year old wedgeless hammer. Still fine.

This tool has seen some work!



ohdetaismalll.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  232.01 KB
 Viewed:  1138 Time(s)

ohdetaismalll.jpg



older hammersmall.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  287.97 KB
 Viewed:  1136 Time(s)

older hammersmall.jpg


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jim_Blauvelt



Joined: 28 Dec 2001
Posts: 350

PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 4:42 pm    Post subject: handle tilt Reply with quote

I was taught to tilt the handle out of square from the head.
I like this shape as it puts your hand level with the impact point as opposed to above it.
a perpendicular cross hair will sight from a centerline through the hammer head and from centerline of handle at the head down to the back of the handle at the grip. This requires a kink in the tenon end of the handle.
The brand kanji is toward the handle and if it is a genno then for chiseling the flat side of the head is the primary face and for nailing it is the rounded face of the head.



tiltsmall.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  275.23 KB
 Viewed:  1189 Time(s)

tiltsmall.jpg


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jim_Blauvelt



Joined: 28 Dec 2001
Posts: 350

PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The back of the handle is straight and can be used as a helpful reference to line up surfaces prior to fastening. I keep a 1/4" jointed facet on this side of the handle.


straighsmallt.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  328.31 KB
 Viewed:  1190 Time(s)

straighsmallt.jpg


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jim_Blauvelt



Joined: 28 Dec 2001
Posts: 350

PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

shaped and compressed ready for installation


hammers 004.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  314.78 KB
 Viewed:  1148 Time(s)

hammers 004.jpg


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jim_Blauvelt



Joined: 28 Dec 2001
Posts: 350

PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

installed


hammers 002.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  225.24 KB
 Viewed:  1261 Time(s)

hammers 002.jpg


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jim_Blauvelt



Joined: 28 Dec 2001
Posts: 350

PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

a set


setsmall.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  268.7 KB
 Viewed:  1116 Time(s)

setsmall.jpg


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
johnkissel



Joined: 10 Aug 2002
Posts: 236

PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2007 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Jim,

Nice set of pics and a clear explantion. What is your preferred choice of wood for the handles?

Jk
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jim_Blauvelt



Joined: 28 Dec 2001
Posts: 350

PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2007 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like japanese white oak best but this set will have american hickory handles
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Japanese Woodworking Forums Forum Index -> Other Japanese Tools All times are GMT - 4 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group