Archive for the 'Other' Category



King Kong Kitchie Kitchie Ki Me O


h1 Friday, June 1st, 2007

“King Kong Kitchie Kitchie Ki Me O” is a version of the old English song “Frog Went A-Courting.” Its first known appearance is in Wedderburn’s Complaynt of Scotland (1548) under the name “The frog came to the myl dur.” There is a reference in the London Company of Stationer’s Register of 1580 to “A Moste Strange Weddinge of the Frogge and the Mouse.” The oldest known musical version is in Thomas Ravenscroft’s Melismata in 1611.

Spaeth has a note claiming that the original version of this was supposed to refer to the Duke of Anjou’s wooing of Elizabeth I of England. If the second known version (1611, in Melismata, also reprinted in Chappell) were the oldest, this might be possible — there are seeming political references to “Gib, our cat” and “Dick, our Drake.” But the Wedderburn text, which at least anticipates the song, predates the reign of Queen Elizabeth by nine years, and Queen Mary by four. If it refers to any queen at all, it would seemingly have to be Mary Stuart; Evelyn K. Wells however, in the liner notes to the LP Brave Boys; New England traditions in folk music, (New World Records 239, 1977) suggests that the original may have been satirically altered in 1580 when it was recorded in the register of the London Company of Stationers, as this would have been at the height of the unpopular courtship.

I first heard this song on the Harry Smith Anthology:
Chubby Parker, “King Kong Kitchie Kitchie Ki-Me-O” (Columbia 15296D, 1928; on Anthology of American Folk Music, CrowTold01) (Supertone 9731, 1930) (Conqueror 7889, 1931)

Drawing by Iza Trapani

Source: Wikipedia.

Lyrics:
[G] Froggie went a courting and he did [D] ride
[G] King kong kitchie kitchie [D] ki-me-o
[G] With a sword and a pistol by his [D] side
[G] King kong kitchie kitchie [D] ki-me-o [G]

[G] Ki-mo-ke-mo ki-mo-ke
[C] Way down yonder in a hollow [D] tree
[G] An owl and a bat and a bumble [D] bee
[G] King kong kitchie kitchie [D] ki-me-o [G]

He rode ’til he came to miss mousie’s door
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o
And there he knelt upon the floor
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

Ki-mo-ke-mo ki-mo-ke
Way down yonder in a hollow tree
An owl and a bat and a bumble bee
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

He took miss mouse upon his knee
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o
And he said little mouse will you marry me
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

Ki-mo-ke-mo ki-mo-ke
Way down yonder in a hollow tree
An owl and a bat and a bumble bee
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

Miss mouse had suitors three or four
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o
And there they came right in the door
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

Ki-mo-ke-mo ki-mo-ke
Way down yonder in a hollow tree
An owl and a bat and a bumble bee
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

They grabbed mr. frog and began to fight
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o
In the hollowed tree it was a terrible night
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

Ki-mo-ke-mo ki-mo-ke
Way down yonder in a hollow tree
An owl and a bat and a bumble bee
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

Mr. frog brought the suitors to the floor
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o
With the sword and the pistol he showed all four
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

Ki-mo-ke-mo ki-mo-ke
Way down yonder in a hollow tree
An owl and a bat and a bumble bee
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

They went to the park on the very next day
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o
And left on their honeymoon right away
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

Ki-mo-ke-mo ki-mo-ke
Way down yonder in a hollow tree
An owl and a bat and a bumble bee
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

Now they live far off in a hollow tree
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o
Where they now have wealth and children three
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

Ki-mo-ke-mo ki-mo-ke
Way down yonder in a hollow tree
An owl and a bat and a bumble bee
King kong kitchie kitchie ki-me-o

St. Clair's Defeat


h1 Sunday, January 1st, 2006

St_Clair_Campaign.jpg

I first heard this song at the Gate of Horn in Chicago. Bob Gibson and Bob Camp were a duo for a short time and this was one of thier most intense songs. It’s about The Battle of Wabash River. It was also known as ‘St. Clair’s Defeat’ which was fought on November 4, 1791 between the United States and an American Indian confederacy, as part of the Northwest Indian War (also known as ‘Little Turtle’s War’). The American Indians were led by Michikinikwa (‘Little Turtle’) of the Miamis and Blue Jacket of the Shawnees. The Americans were led by General Arthur St. Clair. The Indian confederacy was victorious. The battle was the most severe defeat ever suffered by the United States at the hands of American Indians; indeed, in proportional terms it was the worst defeat that United States forces have ever suffered in battle. As a result, President George Washington forced St. Clair to resign his post, and Congress initiated its first investigation of the executive branch.
More information at these URLs:
wikipedia.org
QM Museum
Ohio
britannica.com
Lyrics:
[Em] Was November the fourth in the [G] year of ninety-[D] one
[Em] We had a sore engagement near [D] to [Em] Fort [D] Jeffer [Em] son
[G] Sinclair was our commander, which [Bm] may remembered be
[Em] But we left nine hundred soldiers in [D] that [Em] Western Terri[D] tory[Em]At Bunker’s Hill and in Quebec, where many a hero fell
Likewise out on Long Island, it is I the truth can tell
But such a dreadful carnage, never did I see
As happened all out on the plains, near the River St. Marie

Our militia was attacked, just as the day did break
And soon were overpowered, and forced into retreat
They killed major Ouldham, and major Briggs likewise
While horrid yells of anguished souls resounded through the skies

Major Butler he was wounded the very second fire
His manly bosom swelled with rage they forced him to retire
Like one distracted he appeared, when thus exclaim-ed he
Ye hounds of Hell shall all be slain but what revenged I’ll be

We had not very long been broke, when General Butler fell
He cries my boys I’m wounded, pray take me off this field
My word says he, what shall we do, we’re wounded every man
Go charge your valiant heros and beat them if you can

He leaned his back against a tree, and there resigned his breath
And like a valiant soldier, sunk into the arms of death
When blessed angels did await, his spirit to convey
Into celestial fields, he did quickly bend his way

We charged again and took our ground, which did our hearts elate
But there we did not tarry long, they soon made us retreat
They killed our major Ferguson, which caused his men to cry
Stand to your guns says valiant Ford, we’ll fight until we die

Our cannon balls exhausted, artillery men all slain
Our musketeers and riflemen, their fire they did sustain
Three hours more we fought like men, and they were forced to yield
While three hundred bloody warriors lay stretched across the filed

Says colonel Gibson to his men, my boys be not dismayed
I’m sure that true Virginians were never yet afraid
Ten thousand deaths I’d rather die, than they should gain this field
With that he got a fatal shot, causing him to yield

Says major Clark, my heros, we can no longer stand
We shall strive to form in order, and retreat the best we can
The word retreat being passed around, they raised a dreadful cry
Then helter skelter through the woods like wolves and sheep they fly

We left the wounded on the field, O heavens what a shock!
And many bones were shattered, and strewn across the rock
With scalping knives and tomahawks, they robbed some of their breath
While raging flames of torment, tortured other men to death

Was November the fourth in the year of ninety-one
We had a sore engagement near to Fort Jefferson
Sinclair was our commander, which may remembered be
But we left nine hundred soldiers in that Western Territory

Squid-Jigging Ground


h1 Sunday, June 1st, 2003
This squid catching song originated in Newfoundland, though the names of the places have changed due to the folk process.My wife Camilla and I love to taste and compare crispy calamari at restaurants around the world. She always asks “where do they get all this squid”? A fair question, considering the enormous amount of calamari consumed worldwide each day. I did some research to find out more about where squid come from and how to jig for squid. A preferred method of catching squid is trawling with a jig or lure. This method mimics a live lone prawn traveling through the water with an erratic movement, which creates a realistic impression of a terrified and panic ridden prey. It’s an easy effect to accomplish. Attach the lure to the end of the line using the usual method, and also attach a small weight near the swivel to keep the lure low in the water. Cast out as far as possible, and, depending on the water depth, begin reeling at a constant speed. Keep in mind you are trying to keep the prawn at a constant height of about two feet above the sea bed or sea grass, so time your reeling accordingly. Straight forward reeling won’t create a realistic effect of a panicky prawn, so occasionally sharply draw the rod upward, so the prawn shoots forward toward the surface of the water by about three feet. Then slack off reeling until the prawn reaches the depth at which it was previously traveling. Repeat randomly during reeling, but not too frequently or the squid will lose interest. Note that the squid will usually strike when the jig is falling back to its previous depth. This is due to the reduced speed and less threatening composure of the prawn. If you see squid following the lure when drawing in line close, on the next cast, trawl more slowly than before, as a not so hungry squid will not take a chance on a fast moving piece of prey, easier prey is more appealing. Don’t reel in too fast or you’ll just get a squid leg and not the whole squid. Pink lures work the best. Be careful when taking the squid out of the water, they bite, and have lots of black ink that they squirt to conceal themselves while under water. Using a net to take them off the lure is the safest way to insure that you won’t lose the squid.
Lyrics:
[D] Oh, this is the place where the fishermen gather,With [G] oilskins and [D] boots and Cape Anns [Em] battened down;

[G] All sizes and figures with [D] squid lines and jiggers,

They congregate here on the [A] squid-jigging [D] ground.

Some are workin’ their jiggers while others are yarnin’,

There’s some standin’ up and there’s more lyin’ down;

While all kinds of fun, jokes and tricks are begun

As they wait for the squid on the squid-jiggin’ ground.

There’s men from Bar Harbour and men from the Tickle,

In all kinds of motorboats, green, grey and brown;

There’s a red headed Tory out here in a dory

Running down Squires on the squid-jiggin’ ground.

The man with the whiskers is old Jacob Steele;

He’s gettin well up but he’s still pretty sound.

While Uncle Bob Hawkins wears three pair o’ stockin’s

Whenever he’s out on the squid-jiggin’ ground.

God bless my sou’wester, there’s Skipper John Cheeby,

He’s the best hand at squid-jiggin’ here, I’ll be bound.

Hello! What’s the row? He’s jiggin’ one now,

The very first squid on the squid-jiggin’ ground.

Holy smoke! What a bustle! All hands are excited.

It’s a wonder to me that nobody is drowned.

There’s a bustle, confusion, a wonderful hustle,

They’re all jiggin’ squid on the squid-jiggin’ ground.

There’s poor Uncle Billy, his whiskers are spattered

With spots of the squid juice that’s flying around;

One poor little boy got it right in the eye,

But they don’t give a hang on the squid-jiggin’ ground.

Says Bobby, “The squid are on top of the water,

I just got me jigger ’bout one fathom down” —

When a squid in the boat squirted right down his throat,

And he’s swearin’ like mad on the squid-jiggin’ ground.

If you ever feel inclined to go squiddin’,

Leave your white shirts and collars behind in the town.

And if you get cranky without your silk hanky

You’d better steer clear of the squid-jiggin’ ground.

Oh, this is the place where the fishermen gather,

With oilskins and boots and Cape Anns battened down;

All sizes and figures with squid lines and jiggers,

They congregate here on the squid-jigging ground.

Waltzing Matilda


h1 Tuesday, January 1st, 2002

Waltzing Matilda is an Australian icon. It is quite likely that more Australians know the words to this song than the national anthem. There is probably no other song that is more easily recognised by a populace: young or old: ocker or a newly arrived immigrant.
Lyrics:
[G] Once a jolly [D] swagman [Em] camped by a [C] billabong,

[G] Under the [Em] shade of a [Am] coolibah [D] tree,

[G] And he sang as he [D] watched and [Em] waited 'til his [C] billy boiled

[G] 'Who'll come [Em] a-waltzing, [Am] Ma- [D]tilda, with [G] me?'

[G] Waltzing [Em] Matilda, [C] Waltzing [Am] Matilda

[G] Who'll come [Em] a-waltzing, [Am] Matilda, with [D] me

[G] And he sang as he [D] watched and [Em] waited 'til his [C] billy boiled,

[G] 'Who'll come [Em] a-waltzing, [Am] Ma- [D]tilda, with [G] me?'

Swagman – a drifter, a hobo, an itinerant shearer who carried all his belongings wrapped up in a blanket or cloth called a swag.

Billabong – a waterhole near a river

Coolibah – a eucalyptus tree

Billy- a tin can with a wire handle used to boil water in

Along came a jumbuck to drink at the billabong,

Up jumped the swagman and grabbed him with glee,

And he sang as he stowed that jumbuck in his tucker bag,

'You'll come a-waltzing, Matilda, with me'.

Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda

Who'll come a-waltzing, Matilda, with me

And he sang as he watched and waited 'til his billy boiled,

'Who'll come a-waltzing, Matilda, with me?'.

Jumbuck – a sheep

Tucker Bag – a bag for keeping food in

Up rode the squatter, mounted on his thoroughbred,

Down came the troopers, one, two, three,

'Whose is that jumbuck you've got in your tucker bag?'

'You'll come a-waltzing, Matilda, with me'.

Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda

Who'll come a-waltzing, Matilda, with me

And he sang as he watched and waited 'til his billy boiled,

'Who'll come a-waltzing, Matilda, with me?'.

Squatter – a wealthy landowner.

Trooper – a policeman, a mounted militia-man.

Up jumped the swagman, leapt into the billabong,

'You'll never catch me alive,' said he,

And his ghost may be heard as you pass by the billabong,

'Who'll come a-waltzing, Matilda, with me'.

Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda

Who'll come a-waltzing, Matilda, with me

And he sang as he watched and waited 'til his billy boiled,

'Who'll come a-waltzing, Matilda, with me?'