MaritimeDigital Archive Encyclopedia

Frederic Logghe
Home > 003 Military vessels > 003g Surface vessels (Post 1945) > Frigates (Steam powered) > British vessels > Tribal Class (Type 81)

F 117 Ashanti


F117.jpg

HMS Ashanti (F117) was a Tribal-class frigate of the Royal Navy. She was named after an ethnic group located in Africa. Ashanti was built by Yarrow Shipbuilders of Scotstoun. She was launched on the on 9 March 1959 and commissioned on the on 23 November 1961.

In 1962, Ashanti deployed to the Caribbean, and while there, broke down while undergoing sea trials. Ashanti was also used to trial the Westland Wasp helicopter, prior to its introduction to active service in 1964. In 1966, Ashanti deployed to the Persian Gulf and left the following year, visiting Aden a number of times while in that region, though the Withdrawal from Aden would not occur until late 1967.

In 1970, Ashanti deployed on Beira Patrol, which was designed to prevent oil reaching landlocked Rhodesia via the then Portuguese colony of Mozambique. The following year, Ashanti was involved in another highly emotional withdrawal, this time from Malta. In 1974, while on the way home from the Caribbean, Ashanti was struck by tragedy, when she was hit by a large wave, with Ashanti sadly losing two crewmembers, one of whom was P.O. John Taws. In 1977, Ashanti was struck by further tragedy, when three crew died after being trapped in a boiler room which was on fire. That same year, Ashanti was placed in Reserve. In 1981, Ashanti became a Harbour Training Ship. In 1988, Ashanti came to an explosive end, when she was sunk as a target by HM submarines Sceptre and Spartan.

1 files, last one added on Jun 25, 2006
Album viewed 64 times

F 119 Eskimo


F119.jpg

HMS Eskimo (F119) was a Tribal-class frigate of the Royal Navy, built by J.S. Whites Shipbuilders of Cowes. She was launched on 20 March 1960 and commissioned on 21 February 1963.

In 1967, Eskimo deployed to the Mediterranean, where she visited a variety of ports, as-well as performing exercises, and subsequently deployed to the Persian Gulf during the tense times there. In 1977, Eskimo deployed to the sunny climes of the West Indies, performing a variety of duties that the Royal Navy of the present-day (2004), still performs, in the form of Atlantic Patrol Task (North). Eskimo also deployed to the South Atlantic.

In 1979, Eskimo was placed in Reserve, the Standby Squadron. In 1980, Eskimo was decommissioned in 1980, and the following year, Eskimo was placed on the disposal list. She was cannibalised, used for spare parts for the three Tribals that were sold to Indonesia in 1984. Eskimo subsequently became a target vessel, and was sunk in 1986.

2 files, last one added on Jun 25, 2006
Album viewed 50 times

F 122 Gurkha


F122.jpg

HMS Gurkha (F122) was a Tribal-class frigate of the Royal Navy. She was named after an ethnic group located in Nepal, and whose people continue to serve in the British Army. Gurkha was built by Thornycroft of Woolston. She was launched on the on 11 July 1960 and commissioned on the on 13 February 1963.

Gurkha deployed to a variety of regions, including the Persian Gulf and Far East. In 1975, Gurkha deployed to the West Indies, and was involved in a variety of duties there, including performing fly-the-flag visits. In 1976, Gurkha, like many other Royal Navy warships, took part in the Third Cod War during the long fishery disputes with Iceland. Gurkha was often confronted by the aggressive Icelandic gunboats: she was rammed by the Icelandic gunboat Odin an astonishing four times in just one day, and in the following day, Gurkha was again in 'action' when she was rammed by the same gunboat three times.

In 1977, Gurkha, like many warships from a variety of nations, took part in the last, at least so far, Fleet Review of the Royal Navy to honour HM the Queen's Silver Jubilee at Spithead, home of many Fleet Reviews in the past.

In 1980, Gurkha was placed in Reserve, the Standby Squadron, due to defence cuts imposed in the defence review by the then defence minister John Nott. In response to the Falklands War in 1982, Gurkha underwent a refit before returning to active service to deployed around Home Waters to fill the gaps by the many warships that had deployed to the South Atlantic. The following year, Gurkha became the Gibraltar Guardship and in March 1984, Gurkha was decommissioned and subsequently sold to Indonesia. She was renamed Wilhelmus Zakarias Yohannes. Wilhelmus Zakarias Yohannes decommissioned from Indonesian service in 1999 and remains laid up.

1 files, last one added on Jun 25, 2006
Album viewed 37 times

F 125 Mohawk


F125.jpg

HMS Mohawk (F125) was a Tribal-class frigate of the Royal Navy. She was named after a tribe of Native Americans, who are located in Southeast Canada and New York State. Mohawk was built by Vickers of Barrow-in-Furness. She was launched on the on 5 April 1962 and commissioned on the on 29 November 1963. She had a number of nicknames, including the 'Mighty Mo'.

In 1965, Mohawk deployed to the Persian Gulf and in 1966, Mohawk deployed on Beira Patrol, a task designed to prevent oil reaching Rhodesia via the then Portuguese colony of Mozambique. The following year, Mohawk deployed to the West Indies, with Mohawk often perform a variety of duties. Soon after, Mohawk also deployed to the Mediterranean. In 1968, Mohawk became the Gibraltar Guardship and in 1969, Mohawk was back in the West Indies.

In 1970, Mohawk underwent a drastic conversion to perform her planned role of training ship, which included the removal of her aft 4.5-in gun. Astonishingly, the changes that were made to her were reversed and she did not become a training ship. In 1972, Mohawk underwent a refit. In 1974, Mohawk deployed to the West Indies once more and subsequently deployed to the equally sunny climes of the Mediterranean. In 1977, Mohawk joined Naval On-call Force of the Mediterranean (NAVOCFORMED), a NATO multi-national squadron, and the predecessor of Standing Naval Force Mediterranean (STANAVFORMED).

Later that year, Mohawk, along with her sister-ship Zulu, was part of the eight-ship Group 6 deployment, led by the cruiser Tiger, that deployed to the Far East, visiting a variety of ports in fly-the-flag visits. While on the return journey homethe following year, via the Mediterranean, Mohawk suffered a slight embarrassment during the Group's visit to Malta. While in Dockyard Creek, Mohawk was preparing to leave, waiting for Rhyl to slip her moorings. Rhyl slipped her moorings too early, which forced Mohawk to also slip her moorings too early also, and once she did get into Grand Harbour, she attempted to turn left, so that she could subsequently to join up with the column. However, Mohawk's manoevres went awry, and she ended up on the steps of Customs House. Mohawk suffered some hull damage but was soon able to get underway.

In 1979, Mohawk was placed in Reserve, the Standby Squadron. In 1980, Mohawk decommissioned and the following year was placed on the disposal list and subsequently sold for scrap.

1 files, last one added on Jun 25, 2006
Album viewed 37 times

F 131 Nubian


F131.jpg

HMS Nubian (F131) was a Tribal-class frigate of the Royal Navy. She was named after an ethnic group located in Africa. Nubian was built by H.M. Dockyard (Portsmouth). She was launched on 6 September 1960 and commissioned on 9 October 1962.

In 1964, Nubian suffered a collision that caused minor damage. In 1967, Nubian took part in a Beira Patrol, designed to prevent oil reaching Rhodesia, which was at that time under an apartheid-style government, via the then Portuguese colony of Mozambique. In 1969, Nubian was guardship for the trans-Atlantic air race, which was designed to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Alcock & Brown's non-stop transatlantic flight from Newfoundland to the UK.

Nubian often deployed to the West Indies, being used as the guardship there, a role that has been replaced by Atlantic Patrol Task (North). In 1977, Nubian, like many warships from a variety of nations, took part in the Fleet Review at Spithead in honour of Queen Elizabeth's Silver Jubilee. The following year, Nubian helped in the clean-up in the aftermath of the grounding of the gigantic super-tanker Amoco Cadiz, off the coast of Brittany. An incredible amount of crude oil, over 200,000 tons, had polluted the coastline of Britanny.

In 1979, Nubian entered Reserve, the Standby Squadron. Nubian subsequently became a training ship, and was also 'cannibalised' for spare parts for her three sister-ships that were sold to Indonesia in 1984, in order to keep the ships running. In 1987, Nubian's career truly came to an end in the most explosive manner imaginable, when she was sunk as a target.

1 files, last one added on Jun 25, 2006
Album viewed 37 times

F 133 Tartar


F133.jpg

HMS Tartar (F123) was a Tribal-class frigate of the Royal Navy (RN). She was named after an ethnic group (the Tatars), most of whom were located in Asia and Eastern Europe.

Tartar was built by Devonport Dockyard. She was launched on the September 19, 1960 and commissioned on the February 26, 1962.

Tartar undertook deployments to the West Indies and Far East and in 1968, Tartar deployed to the Persian Gulf, which was, at that time, quiet a tense period for diplomatic relations between the UK and Iran, which was then ruled by Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi. In 1975, Tartar began a Fishery Protection Patrol in the Barents Sea, and in 1976, Tartar got involved in the Third Cod War during the fishery disputes with Iceland. Tartar was in the thick of it for much of the deployment, with a number of encounters with the notorious Icelandic gunboats, specifically with Tyr, who often got entangled with RN warships and British fishing trawlers during the Cod Wars. On the 1st April, Tartar was rammed twice by Tyr and in May, she further encounters with Iceland's Navy when she was rammed twice by another Icelandic gunboat Aegir.

Later that year, Tartar, while deployed to the West Indies as guardship, began a search for the wreckage of a Cubana DC8-40 passenger plane, which was lost off Barbados after a bomb onboard had exploded. Seventy-three people were killed in the tragic incident. Tartar successfully found the wreckage. In 1977, Tartar, along with many warships from a variety of nations, took part in the last, so far, Fleet Review of the Royal Navy, in honour of HM the Queen's Silver Jubilee.

In 1980, Tartar was placed in Reserve when she joined the Standby Squadron. In 1982, in response to the Falklands War, Tartar was taken out of Reserve, first undertaking a refit before returning to active service, though she would not see action in the Falklands, simply performing a variety of duties in Home Waters, due to the gaps made by the many warships that had joined the Task Force, headed by the aircraft carrier Hermes, for the South Atlantic. In 1984, Tartar decommissioned from the Royal Navy and was subsequently sold to Indonesia. She was renamed Hasanuddin. Hasanuddin remains in service with the Indonesian Navy.

1 files, last one added on Jun 25, 2006
Album viewed 37 times

F 124 Zulu


F124.jpg

HMS Zulu (F124) was a Tribal-class frigate of the Royal Navy. She was the third ship bearing the name of HMS Zulu, having been named after an ethnic group located primarily in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. Zulu was built by Alex Stephens & Sons Shipbuilders of Govan. She was launched on the on 3 July 1962 and commissioned on the on 17 April 1964.

Zulu was the only Tribal built with Seacat missiles; her six sister frigates were built with two 40 mm Bofors guns and fitted with Seacat during later refits.

In 1972, a United States Navy P-3 Orion aircraft crashed on a mountain in northern Morocco. Zulu sent her Westland Wasp helicopter to the wreckage sight, where the helicopter sadly found five dead bodies. All fourteen of the aeroplane's crew were killed. In 1974, Zulu deployed to the West Indies. In 1975, while in the western hemisphere, Zulu patrolled the coast of Belize, which was at that time threatened by its neighbours, specifically Guatemala, who had desires to annex a large amount of Belizean territory.

In 1977, Zulu took part in the last, at the time, Fleet Review of the Royal Navy. It took place in honour of Queen Elizabeth's Silver Jubilee. Later that year, Zulu, along with her sister-ship Mohawk, was part of the eight-ship Group 6 deployment, led by the cruiser HMS Tiger, that deployed to the Far East, visiting a variety of ports in fly-the-flag visits, as-well as performing naval exercises. Zulu returned home, along with the rest of the Group, in 1978, via the Mediterranean, where the group, minus Mohawk, which had suffered slight hull damage in an accident in Malta, performed naval exercises before returning to the UK.

In 1979, Zulu was placed in Reserve, the Standby Squadron, and then placed on the disposal list in 1981. The following year, in response to the Falklands War, Zulu was taken out of Reserve, so that she could fill in the gaps in Home Waters created by the many warships that had deployed to the South Atlantic to take part in the war. The following year, Zulu became the Gibraltar Guardship. In 1984, Zulu was decommissioned and subsequently sold to Indonesia along with two of her sister-ships. Zulu was renamed Martha Kristina Tiyahahu. Martha Kristina Tiyahahu remains in service with the Indonesian Navy.

2 files, last one added on Jun 25, 2006
Album viewed 45 times

7 albums on 1 page(s)

Last additions - Tribal Class (Type 81)
F117.jpg
F 117 Ashanti286 viewsJun 25, 2006
F119.jpg
F 119 Eskimo217 viewsJun 25, 2006
F119_2.jpg
F 119 Eskimo270 viewsJun 25, 2006
F122.jpg
F 122 Gurkha273 viewsJun 25, 2006
F124.jpg
F 124 Zulu260 viewsJun 25, 2006
F124_2.jpg
F 124 Zulu303 viewsJun 25, 2006
F125.jpg
F 125 Mohawk199 viewsJun 25, 2006
F131.jpg
F 131 Nubian200 viewsJun 25, 2006

 
(c) 2009 Frederic Logghe GNU Free Documentation License Birds in the sky
They look so high
This is my perfect day