MaritimeDigital Archive Encyclopedia

Frederic Logghe
Home > 002 Commercial vessels > 002s Sea & Ocean vessels > Cruise & passenger vessels > British vessels
Category Albums Files
Aberdeen Line
The Aberdeen Line was set up in 1825 by George Thompson of Aberdeen to run sailing ships to the St. Lawrence with a few passengers and returning with timber. By 1837 he was running a fleet of 12 sailing vessels and trading to South America, the Pacific, West Indies and the Mediterranean and in 1842 commenced regular London - Australia sailings. In 1882 a regular steamship service was introduced between London and Australia and in 1899 all ships of the line were fitted to carry frozen produce. In 1905 the company came under the joint control of White Star Line and Shaw, Savill & Albion Line, but retained it's own identity. White Star Line purchased the Australian Government owned Australian Commonwealth Line and it's fleet in 1928, but in 1931 the Kylsant shipping group which owned White Star Line, collapsed. In 1932, the Aberdeen Line was purchased by Shaw, Savill & Albion and in 1933 the fleet of the former Australian Commonwealth Line which had not been fully paid for, was also acquired and the Aberdeen & Commonwealth Line formed. In 1936 Furness Withy & Co took control of Shaw Savill & Albion, in 1938 the Aberdeen name was dropped from the title and in 1957 the last of their ships was scrapped and the company disappeared.
4 5
Atlantic Transport Line
Formed in 1881 by Bernard Baker of the Baltimore Storage & Lighterage Co, he found it economical to operate his ships under the British flag. Initial voyages were between Barrow and New York and the following year, between Amsterdam and New York under charter to the Royal Netherlands SS Co. In 1883 regular London - Baltimore voyages commenced and a London - New York service started in 1890. Occasional voyages were also made to New York from Swansea and Belfast. In 1896 ATL took over the fleet and assets of National Line.
The Atlantic Transport Line was an American company, but was effectively British operated. The solution to this in America was to form the Atlantic Transport Company of West Virginia in 1898 to acquire the assets and ships of ATL and to build and own their own American flagged ships. For economical reasons, the current fleet continued under the British flag, but was American controlled. In 1904 the company, together with many others came under the control of the newly formed International Mercantile Marine Company. The depression of 1931 caused IMMC to commence selling ATL's passenger fleet and by 1936 their last ship, Columbia was scrapped and both companies (American and British) ceased to exist.
8 4
Bibby Line / Bibby Steamship Company
John Bibby was part owner of the Dove in 1801 and purchased his first ship in 1805. The company traded initially to the Mediterranean and then expanded to South America, India and the Far East. A packet service to Dublin started in 1807. In 1850 the company bought their first steamship for the Mediterranean service and in 1857 the Levant Screw Steam Shipping Co was taken over. In 1873 Bibby Line passed control of their steamers to F. R. Leyland but in 1889 the Bibby family returned to the shipping business and formed Bibby Bros Ltd with a service to Rangoon. In 1891 the company became the Bibby Steamship Company, working in conjunction with Henderson Bros. Ltd. and later became heavily involved in trooping, some ships becoming permanent troopships. The company name was changed to Bibby Line Ltd in 1931 but with advent of independence for Burma, trade declined and many ships were charterd out. The Suez crisis of 1956 effectively finished the trade to Burma, but trooping work kept the company operational. Trooping by sea ended in 1962. Passenger services ceased in 1965 and the company joined the Seabridge consortium to operate chartered vessels and in 1971 took over Bristol City Line. The company still survives, managed from Douglas, Isle of Man and is Britain's oldest family controlled company.
Blue Anchor Line
The company was formed in London in 1869 by Wilhelm Lund, although he previously owned a part share in the JEDDO. The outbound voyages were to Australia with passengers and cargo, thence northbound in ballast to China where tea was loaded for the homeward passage. By 1874 the opening of the Suez Canal was making the China route less attractive to the Cape sailing ships and this trade was dropped in favour of direct Australia routes. In 1880 Lund took delivery of his first steamship and in 1890 sold the last of his sailing vessels. In 1909 the company's newest ship Warath disappeared off South Africa on the homeward leg of her second voyage with the loss of 211 lives. Blue Anchor never recovered from this mishap and in 1910 sold their fleet to P & O. Line and went into voluntary liquidation.
20 2
Canadian Pacific Line
6 7
Clyde Screw Steam Packet Company
The Clyde Screw Steam Packet Company commenced in 1854.
Cunard LineCunard had its beginnings in 1838 when Canadian shipping magnate Samuel Cunard, along with engineer Robert Napier, and businessmen James Donaldson, Sir George Burns, and David MacIver formed the British and North American Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The company successfully bid on the rights to a transatlantic mail shipping contract between England and America. (Winning this entitled them to use the RMS, or Royal Mail Ship, identifier as part of their vessel's names.) Later, the company would change its name to Cunard Steamships Limited.
In 1840 the company's first steamship, the Britannia, sailed from Liverpool to Boston, marking the beginning of the first ever regular passenger and cargo service by steamship. Cunard faced many competitors from Britain, the United States and Germany but survived them all. This was mainly due to a great focus on safety. Cunard ships were usually not the largest or the fastest but they earned a reputation for being the most reliable and the safest. The prosperous company eventually absorbed Canadian Northern Steamships Limited as well as Cunard's principal competitor, the White Star Line, owners of the ill-fated RMS Titanic.
For more than a century and a half, Cunard dominated the Atlantic passenger trade and was one of the world's most important companies. Its ships played important roles in the development of the world economy, and also participated in all of Britain's major wars from Crimea to the Falklands War (where Cunard's container ship Atlantic Conveyor was sunk by an Exocet missile).
32 133
Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company
In 1822 Brodie McGhie Wilcox, a London ship broker, and Arthur Anderson, a Scottish sailor, went into partnership to operate a shipping line, primarily operating routes between England and Spain and Portugal. In 1835 a Dublin shipowner named Captain Richard Bourne joined the business and the three men started a regular steamer service between London and Spain and Portugal - the Iberian Peninsula - using the name Peninsular Steam Navigation Company, with services to Vigo, Oporto, Lisbon and C?diz.
In 1837 the business won a contract from the British Admiralty to deliver mail to the Iberian Peninsula and in 1840 they acquired a contract to deliver mail to Alexandria in Egypt. The present company, the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company was incorporated in that year by a Royal Charter, and its name therefore includes neither "Plc" nor "Limited". Mail contracts were to be the basis of P&O's prosperity until the Second World War, but the company also became a major commercial shipping line and passenger liner operator. In 1914 it took over the British India Steam Navigation Company, which was then the largest British shipping line, owning 131 steamers. In 1918 it gained a controlling interest in the Orient Line, its partner in the England- Australia mail route. Further acquisitions followed and the fleet reached a peak of almost 500 ships in the mid 1920s. 85 of the company's ships were sunk in the First World War and 179 in the Second World War.
After 1945 the passenger market declined. P&O entered the cruise market, but it concentrated mainly on cargo ships. It entered the tanker trade in 1959 and the roll-on roll-off (RORO) ferry business in the mid 1960s. It was also a pioneer of container shipping, as a member of a four company consortium that founded Overseas Containers Limited (OCL). By the early 1980s it had converted all of its dry cargo liner routes to container operations and in 1986 it bought out the remaining OCL partners and renamed the operation P&O Containers Limited (P&OCL). P&OCL was merged with Nedlloyd in 1996 to form P&O Nedlloyd.
7 22
Union Castle Line
The Union-Castle Line was a prominent shipping line that operated a fleet of passenger liners and freighters between Europe and Africa from 1900 to 1977. The company originated as Union-Castle Mail Steamship Company, Ltd on 8 March 1900 with the merger of Union Line and Castle Line, with Castle Line taking over the fleet.
Union-Castle named all their ships with the suffix "Castle" in their names. They were well known for the lavender hulled liners with black and red funnels, running on a rigid timetable between Southampton and Cape Town. Every Thursday at 4pm a Union-Castle Royal Mail Ship would leave Southampton bound for Cape Town. At the same time, a Union-Castle Royal Mail Ship would leave Cape Town bound for Southampton.
In December 1999, the Union-Castle name was revived for a millennium cruise; the P&O ship Victoria was chartered for a 60-day cruise around Africa, and had its funnels repainted for the occasion.
37 45
White Star Line
White Star Line began as a bankrupt sailing and steam packet salvaged by Thomas H. Ismay when he purchased the name for 1,000 pounds sterling on January 18, 1868. The line had known other owners, but most met with problems and even disaster. Immediately Ismay and his partner arranged a deal with Harrland and Wolff to construct the four new steamships for the Oceanic Steam Navigation Company, Ltd. - White Star's official name with the first being launched on August 27, 1870. The Oceanic was a record breaker and innovator in steamship design. The other ships named Atlantic, Baltic and Republic completed the set. Soon more ships were added to the fleet including the larger Celtic and Adriatic.
White Star Line would be known for large, comfortable ships that offered their passengers every form of luxury. This came at the expense of speed, but made their ships favorites of many of the world's most wealthy passengers.
White Star Line was finally forced to merge with Cunard Line to secure funds needed to complete the two Queens Cunard was planning. The issue was government subsidies. Supporting two lines during the lean times of the depression was more that the British government was ready to take on - supporting one large, unified effort was acceptable - Cunard White Star Line was born.
16 45

Braemer Castle II



Built:
Owner:
Tonnage:
Dimensions:
Propulsion:
Speed:
Shipyard:

0 files
Album viewed 0 times

Briton


Briton..jpg

Built:
Owner:
Dimensions:

1 files, last one added on Sep 05, 2005
Album viewed 13 times

Dominion Monarch


Dominion_Monarch.jpg

Built:
Owner:
Dimensions:

1 files, last one added on Sep 05, 2005
Album viewed 16 times

Gaika


Gaika.jpg

Built:
Owner:
Dimensions:

1 files, last one added on Sep 05, 2005
Album viewed 15 times

Galatea


ll03.jpg

Built:
Owner:
Displacement:
Dimensions:
Propulsion:
Speed:
Shipyard:

1 files, last one added on Oct 02, 2005
Album viewed 14 times

Guelph


Guelph..jpg

Built:
Owner:
Dimensions:

1 files, last one added on Sep 05, 2005
Album viewed 11 times

Lady Lauth


LadyLauth.jpg

Built:
Owner:
Displacement:
Dimensions:
Propulsion:
Speed:
Shipyard:

1 files, last one added on Dec 26, 2005
Album viewed 11 times

Rangitane


Rangitane..jpg

Built:
Owner:
Dimensions:

1 files, last one added on Sep 05, 2005
Album viewed 15 times

Rangitata


RANGITATA.1..jpg

Built:
Owner:
Dimensions:

2 files, last one added on Sep 05, 2005
Album viewed 13 times

Rangitoto


Rangitoto_Crew..jpg

Built:
Owner:
Dimensions:

2 files, last one added on Sep 05, 2005
Album viewed 22 times

Adonia


image001~170.jpg

Built / Gebouwd:
Owner / Rederij:
Dimensions / Afmetingen:
Specifications

3 files, last one added on Mar 04, 2005
Album viewed 8 times

Akaroa


Akaroa.jpg

Built:
Owner:
Dimensions:

1 files, last one added on Aug 02, 2005
Album viewed 12 times

44 albums on 4 page(s) 1

Last additions - British vessels
385548.jpg
The Emerald664 viewsApr 23, 2007
358947.jpg
Queen Mary II501 viewsApr 23, 2007
RMSOlympic.jpg
Olympic493 viewsNov 25, 2006
Colour_RMS_Maloja.jpg
Maloja855 viewsNov 22, 2006
Section_of_Drawing_for_RMS_Maloja.jpg
Section of Drawing for RMS Maloja577 viewsNov 22, 2006
SSOrcades.jpg
Orcades550 viewsAug 25, 2006
EmpressofBritain~0.jpg
Empress Of Britain367 viewsAug 25, 2006
Cunard_QE2_16964.jpg
Queen Elizabeth II299 viewsAug 25, 2006

 
(c) 2009 Frederic Logghe GNU Free Documentation License Birds in the sky
They look so high
This is my perfect day