MaritimeDigital Archive Encyclopedia

Frederic Logghe
Home > 004 Governmental vessels > 004b United States Merchant Marine > United States Maritime Commission (USMC) > Passenger ships > P2-SE2-R1 (Admiral ships)

Admiral C. F. Hughes



Delivered to the Navy as the AP 124 on 31 January 1945; and commissioned that same day, Capt. John Trebes, USCG, in command.
She was decommissioned on 3 May 1946 and returned to the War Shipping Administration which, in turn, transferred her to the Army. Her name was struck from the Navy list in June 1946. The Army renamed the ship General Edwin D. Patrick and she served the Army Transport Service until 1 March 1950 when the Navy reacquired her. Retaining her Army name, she was assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service and was manned by a civil service crew.
Early in 1967, the transport was placed in a ready reserve status. On 30 September 1968, the ship was to be laid up at the Maritime Administration's National Defense Reserve Fleet facility at Suisun Bay, Calif. On 31 August 1969, title to the ship was transferred to the Maritime Administration. As of 1 July 1988, the transport was still berthed at Suisun Bay.

Laid down: 29 November 1943
Launched: 27 August 1944
Hull N?: 682
Displacement: 12650 tons
Dimensions: 609ft x 75.5ft x 43.5ft
Propulsion: Twin screw, turbo-electric
Speed: 19 knots
Troop capacity: 5200
Shipyard: Bethlehem Steel, Alameda

0 files
Album viewed 0 times

Admiral D. W. Taylor



Built:
Hull N?:
Displacement: 12650 tons
Dimensions: 609ft x 75.5ft x 43.5ft
Propulsion: Twin screw, turbo-electric
Speed: 19 knots
Troop capacity: 5200
Shipyard: Bethlehem Steel, Alameda

0 files
Album viewed 0 times

Admiral E.W. Eberle



She was acquired as the AP 123 by the Navy and commissioned on 24 January 1945, Capt. G. C. Carlstedt, USCG, in command.
Admiral E. W. Eberle was decommissioned on 8 May 1946 and returned to the Maritime Commission for transfer to the Army. Her name was struck from the Navy list in June 1946. The Army acquired the transport that same month and subsequently renamed her General Simon B. Buckner.
The ship was once again transferred to the Navy on 1 March 1950 and assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service.
She was returned to the Maritime Administration on 24 March 1970.

Laid down: 15 February 1943
Launched: 14 June 1944
Hull N?: 681
Displacement: 12650 tons
Dimensions: 609ft x 75.5ft x 43.5ft
Propulsion: Twin screw, turbo-electric
Speed: 19 knots
Troop capacity: 5200
Shipyard: Bethlehem Steel, Alameda

0 files
Album viewed 0 times

Admiral F. B. Upham



Laid down:
Launched:
Hull N?:
Displacement: 12650 tons
Dimensions: 609ft x 75.5ft x 43.5ft
Propulsion: Twin screw, turbo-electric
Speed: 19 knots
Troop capacity: 5200
Shipyard: Bethlehem Steel, Alameda

0 files
Album viewed 0 times

Admiral H.T. Mayo



She was commissioned as the AP 125 at Alameda on 24 April 1945, Capt. Roger C. Heimer, USCG, in command. She was decommissioned on 26 May 1946 and turned over to the War Shipping Administration, for further delivery to the Army. Her name was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 9 June 1946. Assigned to the Army Transport Service, the ship was renamed General Nelson M. Walker.
USAT Nelson M. Walker operated from that port into mid-1948, carrying troops to such ports and islands as Honolulu, Guam, Saipan, Okinawa, Yokohama, Jinsen, and Manila. In July, 1948, she entered the Todd Shipyard at San Pedro for a Safety at Sea conversion and partial conversion as a dependent carrier. This entailed the installation of cabin space for 217 passengers, two lounges, and a children's playroom, well-stocked with toys, and a ship's store, whose foremost item offered for consumption by passengers was a "wierd and wonderful concoction" known as "Coca Cola." Following this face-lifting, General Nelson M. Walker returned to service on 7 December 1948 to resume her transpacific voyages. She followed a triangular route over the next two years, sailing between San Francisco, Yokohama, and Okinawa, soon acquiring a reputation for speed and comfort, two attributes frequently put to the test in Far Eastern waters where typhoons were common. With the newly organized Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS), General Nelson M. Walker's operations were soon confined to serve Okinawa exclusively, the regularity of her appearance on that run earning her the affectionate title of the "Okinawa Express." She represented to many last connecting link between their new domicile and CONLUS, the new term which had begun to appear in military jargon in writing up travel orders and standing for "Continental Limits of the United States."
Her 27th voyage as USAT Nelson M. Walker was her last under the banner of the old Army Transport Service, and on 1 March 1950 she became USNS Nelson M. Walker (T-AP-125).
Records indicate that she was to be withdrawn from that inactive status on 5 June 1958, apparently to be inactivated and turned over to the Maritime Administration (MarAd) for lay up, and that she was placed in MarAd's reserve fleet on 20 January 1959, in the Hudson River berthing area (Jones Point), near New York City.
Reacquired by the Navy on 14 August 1965 and reinstated on the Naval Vessel Register on the same date, General Nelson M. Walker was taken out of the National Defense Reserve Fleet in August 1965 and reactivated as part of the buildup of naval forces for the Vietnam War. After operating with MSTS (Pacific) through the end of 1967, she was ultimately deactivated once again and placed in reserve at the Caven Point Army Depot in New York harbor, in early 1968. General Nelson M. Walker was transferred to Mar Ad on 16 April 1970 and laid up in the James River (Va.) berthing area. General Nelson M. Walker was struck from the Naval Vessel Register in January 1981; she remained in the James River berthing area into 1987.

Laid down: 21 February 1944
Launched: 26 November 1944
Hull N?: 683
Displacement: 12650 tons
Dimensions: 609ft x 75.5ft x 43.5ft
Propulsion: Twin screw, turbo-electric
Speed: 19 knots
Troop capacity: 5200
Shipyard: Bethlehem Steel, Alameda

0 files
Album viewed 0 times

Admiral Hugh Rodman



Admiral Hugh Rodman was transferred to the Navy on 10 July 1945; and was placed in commission on the same day, Capt. Lewis E. Coley in command. She was decommissioned on 14th May 1946, and was transferred to the War Department later that month.
She served the Army Transport Service as General Maurice Rose until she and her sister Army transports were transferred to the Navy on 1 March 1950 to serve in the recently established Military Sea Transportation Service.
General Maurice Rose was transferred to the permanent custody of the Maritime Commission on 30 June 1970 and shifted to its National Defense Reserve Fleet berthing area in Virginia's James River. She was still there as of January 1987.

Laid down: 24 April 1944
Launched: 25 February 1945
Hull N?: 684
Displacement: 12650 tons
Dimensions: 609ft x 75.5ft x 43.5ft
Propulsion: Twin screw, turbo-electric
Speed: 19 knots
Troop capacity: 5200
Shipyard: Bethlehem Steel, Alameda

0 files
Album viewed 0 times

Admiral R. E. Coontz



She was commissioned by the Navy as the AP 122 on 21 November 1944, Capt. Montford R. Tawes, USNR, in command. She entered the Todd Shipyard, Brooklyn, N.Y., on 17 March 1946 and was decommissioned there on the 25th. Stricken from the Navy list in April 1946 and turned over to the War Department, the ship underwent a period of repairs and alterations and was renamed General Alexander M. Patch.
In the Army Transport Service, General Alexander M. Patch carried troops and cargo between Europe and the United States from 1946 to 1950. Reacquired by the Navy on 3 March 1950, the ship operated for the next two decades as USNS Alexander M. Patch (T-AP-122) with the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS), later renamed the Military Sealift Command (MSC). From 1950 to 1965 the ship conducted 123 round-trip voyages between Bremerhaven and New York, with an additional 16 voyages to the Mediterranean. Among her passengers was Mrs. Alexander M. Patch, the widow of the general for whom the ship had been named.
Placed in reserve in New York's upper bay along with three of her sisterships by the summer of 1967, General Alexander M. Patch was transferred to the custody of the Maritime Administration on 26 May 1970 and placed in reserve in the James River. Still carried on the Naval Vessel Register, she remains in the James River berthing area of the National Defense Reserve Fleet into mid-1985.

Laid down: 15 January 1943
Launched: 22 April 1944
Hull N?: 680
Displacement: 12650 tons
Dimensions: 609ft x 75.5ft x 43.5ft
Propulsion: Twin screw, turbo-electric
Speed: 19 knots
Troop capacity: 5200
Shipyard: Bethlehem Steel, Alameda

0 files
Album viewed 0 times

Admiral W.L. Capps



She was delivered to the Navy on 18 September 1944; and commissioned as the AP 121 that same day, Capt. N. S. Haugen, USCG, in command.
On 8 May 1946, Admiral W. L. Capps was decommissioned and returned to the Maritime Commission. Her name was struck from the Navy list in June of 1946.
The Maritime Commission transferred the ship to the Army which named her General Hugh J. Gaffey. She served the Army Transport Service until 1 March 1950 when the Navy re-acquired her. Retaining her Army name, the transport was not re-commissioned, but instead was assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service and manned by a civil service crew. USNS General Hugh J. Gaffey (T-AP-121) spent almost two decades carrying men and material to American installations throughout the Far East and the Pacific Ocean. She supported American troops during the Korean conflict in the early 1950's and performed similar service during the Vietman involvement in the mid-1960's. On 4 November 1968, General Hugh J. Gaffey was transferred to the Maritime Administration on a temporary basis to be laid up with the National Defense Reserve Fleet facility at Suisun Bay, Calif., On 31 August 1969, she was transferred permanently to Maritime Administration custody. Her name was again struck from the Navy list on 9 October 1969.
In 1978, the transport was reacquired by the Navy a second time and her name reinstated on the Navy list. Redesignated IX-507, General Hugh J. Gaffey was placed in service in November 1978 at Bremerton, Wash., to serve as a barracks ship for the crews of ships undergoing major overhaul. As of 1 January 1989, her name was still on the list of active duty service craft.

Laid down: 15 December 1942
Launched: 20 February 1944
Hull N?: 679
Displacement: 12650 tons
Dimensions: 609ft x 75.5ft x 43.5ft
Propulsion: Twin screw, turbo-electric
Speed: 19 knots
Troop capacity: 5200
Shipyard: Bethlehem Steel, Alameda

0 files
Album viewed 0 times

Admiral W. S. Benson



Admiral William S. Benson was accepted from the maritime Commission on 23 August 1944 and commissioned the same day, Capt. Francis H. Gardner in command. After fitting out and provisioning at the Naval Supply Depot, Oakland, Calif., Admiral W.S. Benson stood out of San Francisco Bay on 1 September 1944 for San Pedro, Calif., to commence shakedown training. She returned to Todd's Wilmington yard on 15 October 1944 for major alterations, and upon completion of this yard period reported to Commander, Western Sea Frontier and Commander, Naval Transport Service, for duty.
Decommissioned on 3 June 1946, and turned over to the Maritime Commission for disposal, Admiral W.S. Benson was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 3 July 1946. Transferred to the Army Transport Service, the ship was renamed General Daniel I. Sultan.
After operating with the Army Transport Service as USAT General Daniel I. Sultan,the ship was reacquired by the Navy on 1 March 1950 and reinstated on the Naval Vessel Register on the same day. Assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) as USNS General Daniel I. Sultan (T-AP-120), the transport, operating out of San Francisco, supported United Nations operations in Korea which came as a result of the North Korean invasion in June, 1950.
Transferred to the custody of the Maritime Administration (MarAd) on 7 November 1968, for lay-up at the Suisun Bay reserve facility, General Daniel I. Sultan was transferred to that agency on 31 August 1969, and was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 9 October 1969. She was still at Suisun Bay, in the National Defense Reserve Fleet, into August 1987.
General Daniel I. Sultan was awarded two battle stars for her service in the Korean War.

Laid down: 10 December 1942
Launched: 22 November 1943
Hull N?: 678
Displacement: 12650 tons
Dimensions: 609ft x 75.5ft x 43.5ft
Propulsion: Twin screw, turbo-electric
Speed: 19 knots
Troop capacity: 5200
Shipyard: Bethlehem Steel, Alameda

0 files
Album viewed 0 times

Admiral W. S. Sims



Delivered to the Navy on 27 September 1945 as the AP 127 and commissioned the same day, Capt. Edward C. Holden, USNR, in command. Decommissioned at San Francisco on 21 June 1946, she was simultaneously transferred to the War Shipping Administration. Admiral W. S. Sims was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 3 July 1946.
Turned over to the Army for operation with the Army Transport Service (ATS), the ship was renamed General William O. Darby.
After operations with the ATS as USAT General William O. Darby, the ship was reacquired by the Navy on 1 March 1950 and reinstated on the Naval Vessel Register on 28 April 1950 as USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127).
Placed in reserve at Caven Point Army Depot in New York harbor in 1968, General William O. Darby was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 9 January 1969 and transferred to the Maritime Commission's reserve fleet. At one point in 1976, the state of Maryland expressed an interest in alleviating its overcrowded correctional facilities by the use of the ship. Vehement objections to the retention of the name of the Army war hero on a ship designated to incarcerate prisoners apparently arose, contributing in large part to the cancellation of the ship's name on 6 July 1976. The ship, herself, now merely the unnamed T-AP-127, remained on the Naval Vessel Register. Reclassified as IX-510 in October, 1981, the ship was towed from her berth in the James River to the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, where she was placed in service on 1 July 1982. In 1987 she was serving as a barracks and accommodation ship at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, providing berthing and messing facilities for ships undergoing work at the yard.
General William O. Darby (T-AP-127) was awarded one battle star for her service during the Vietnam War.

Laid down: 15 June 1944
Launched: 4 June 1945
Hull N?: 685
Displacement: 12650 tons
Dimensions: 609ft x 75.5ft x 43.5ft
Propulsion: Twin screw, turbo-electric
Speed: 19 knots
Troop capacity: 5200
Shipyard: Bethlehem Steel, Alameda

0 files
Album viewed 0 times

10 albums on 1 page(s)

Last additions - P2-SE2-R1 (Admiral ships)
No image to display
 
(c) 2009 Frederic Logghe GNU Free Documentation License Birds in the sky
They look so high
This is my perfect day