Login

Publications  •  Project Statistics

Glossary  •  Schools  •  Disciplines
People Search: 
   
Title/Abstract Search: 

Dissertation Information for Maurice Lapierre

NAME:
- Maurice Lapierre

DEGREE:
- Ph.D.

DISCIPLINE:
- Library and Information Science

SCHOOL:
- Case Western Reserve University (USA) (1973)

ADVISORS:
- William Goffman

COMMITTEE MEMBERS:
- Conrad H. Rawski
- Thomas Gleason Morris
- Tefko Saracevic

MPACT Status: Fully Complete

Title: Implications of Communication Networks for Research Organizations.

Abstract: This investigation sought in Experiment I to discover some objective, systematic means for grouping into common classes the present or prospective members of an organization with related research interests in order to facilitate, even foster, interdisciplinary research. Such research, it appeared, might be enhanced by changes in organizational design and staff assignments dictated by the adaptation and application of a mathematical model originally created in connection with a new concept of the information retrieval process: that is, the model described in Goffman's "An Indirect Method of Information Retrieval."

The forementioned model was used to identify the members of the communication network in two divisions of Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), and to measure the degree of relatedness among 189 of its members by analyzing those journals appearing in Science Citation Index (SCI) during the period 1965-1970 inclusive in which any two members of the divisions had published.

This methodology (1) identified from the selected CWRU divisions those members who had common research interests; (2) provided for the division of these members into disjoint intercommunication classes; and (3) simultaneously provided a basis for restructuring the two divisions under study.

An implication for library collection development was derived from the formation of classes through the use of the Indirect Method and constituted Experiment II.

Essentially the second study consisted in an adaptation of Bradford's Distribution. Originally, Bradford's methodology sought to identify the core journals of a given subject literature through an analysis and ordering of those journals throughout which were dispersed those articles reflecting the given subject literature. In the present experiment an attempt was made to identify the core journals which would best meet the interdisciplinary research needs of the classes, derived from the Indirect Methods through an analysis and ordering of those journals throughout which were dispersed those articles written by authors be10nging to theclasses derived from the Indirect Method.

On the basis of the results of both experiments, the following conclusions were made:

1. The Indirect Method because of its objective, systematic aspects provided better means than were currently available for grouping authors on the basis of common research interests and for simultaneously restructuring the various parts of a research organization.

2. The traditional departmental structure of the CWRU divisions investigated was appropriate to the existing needs of approximately 90% of the authors who belonged to one of the 25 classes derived from a .49 threshold.

3. The use of the classes derived from the Indirect Method in conjunction with Bradford's Distribution provided a rationale and objectivity to the development of a core journal collection not in evidence 1n the current practice.

MPACT Scores for Maurice Lapierre

A = 0
C = 0
A+C = 0
T = 0
G = 0
W = 0
TD = 0
TA = 0
calculated 2008-02-07 10:56:49

Advisors and Advisees Graph

Directed Graph

Students under Maurice Lapierre

ADVISEES:
- None

COMMITTEESHIPS:
- None