Meadville Space Center
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
August 07, 2020, 05:04:56 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Gemini 060615 released!
25068 Posts in 2094 Topics by 2266 Members
Latest Member: twa517
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  Meadville Space Center
|-+  Sol 2018
| |-+  Planning
| | |-+  Tech: Fusion in 2018
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: Tech: Fusion in 2018  (Read 4963 times)
Zachstar
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 317

Is it Star Trek?


View Profile
« on: December 03, 2007, 04:46:55 AM »

No spaceflight can be achieved without raw power. In the days before Plasma Impulse (Another discuss topic) Mankind rode into space on the power of chemical rockets.

For many years there were multiple studies on how to get a serious alternative to the huge weight and cost of chemical propulsion. NERVA was an early example. They were destroyed by politics and budget changes.

For many years mankind suffered from having a lack of a serious power source. The most advanced was the old fission nuclear power plants that were extremely expensive to build and maintain.

This finally changed with the advent of the "Enhanced Electrostatic Fusion Device" which is a mouthful for a small clean fusion reactor that gives hundreds of thousands of volts of pure electricity. Perfect for transforming Earth into a Hydrogen/Oxygen economy and ending many serious problems plaguing us for decades or centuries.

The most important aspect of this device was its ability and size to be fitted on large spacecraft. The match of the century was the ability to power the "Enhanced Plasma Impulse Drive" Which has revolutionized spaceflight and offers us our first manned flight to Pluto.

---------

--Real World--

EMC2 Fusion:
http://www.emc2fusion.org/
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=1996321846673788606

VASIMR:
http://ston.jsc.nasa.gov/collections/TRS/_techrep/TP-1995-3539.pdf
http://www.adastrarocket.com/
http://www.nasa.gov/vision/space/travelinginspace/future_propulsion.html
Logged


-------------------------------------------
bstockus
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 3


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2008, 07:14:33 AM »

Helium-3 could also be used to power fusion reactors in 2018.  Helium-3 is currently considered the most viable source for developing fusion power.  Also, the moon is considered rich in Helium-3, and this is one of the big drivers behind NASA's plan to return to the moon.
Logged
Zachstar
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 317

Is it Star Trek?


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2008, 03:34:27 AM »

Helium-3 could also be used to power fusion reactors in 2018.  Helium-3 is currently considered the most viable source for developing fusion power.  Also, the moon is considered rich in Helium-3, and this is one of the big drivers behind NASA's plan to return to the moon.

Just wanted to set this straight. The Helium-3 talk is a PR stunt. There is currently no effective way to extract helium 3 from lunar materials en masse without one heck of a mission there ahead of time.

No you need to use Pb-11
Logged


-------------------------------------------
MJF
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 5


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2009, 02:03:02 PM »

So, are you saying we should go to Mars first?  Happy
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.10 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!