Meadville Space Center
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 24, 2020, 09:06:17 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
Project Apollo Beta 7.0 released!
http://nassp.sf.net/wiki/Installation
25068 Posts in 2094 Topics by 2266 Members
Latest Member: twa517
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  Meadville Space Center
|-+  Orbiter Mars Direct
| |-+  Development (Moderators: Iceversaka, smoothvirus)
| | |-+  Spint Development Thread
« previous next »
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 Print
Author Topic: Spint Development Thread  (Read 21664 times)
bheick
Full Member
***
Posts: 20


brianheick@hotmail.com firekraqur@yahoo.com
View Profile Email
« Reply #30 on: June 08, 2006, 06:44:43 PM »

Just another quick update.

I've decided to hand draw and scan the textures in as I go on this. It takes a little longer, but I can draw better by hand than with a mouse.

http://kimages.be/share/80028900.jpg
Logged

If it dosen't work, hit it a few times.
Zachstar
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 317

Is it Star Trek?


View Profile
« Reply #31 on: June 09, 2006, 08:24:06 AM »

Its looking very good!
Logged


-------------------------------------------
aftercolumbia
Project Team Member
Full Member
****
Posts: 95


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #32 on: June 09, 2006, 11:51:50 AM »

Looking good, I'm happy with the meshing (except possibly the thrusters being a bit aft of where they should be, but "flight test" will tell us that.)

Nice detail on the textures; I hate to bust it down for not being on spec, but alas...

1. LRSI is depicted as the side insulation, but it's actually supposed to be AFRSI, which is on the upper sides of every Orbiter except for Columbia.  Distinct tiled "carrier panels" for the first few inches above the base heatshield is optional (as AFRSI can merely be folded out of the way for base heatshield removal.

2. AFRSI also goes over most of the RCS pods; the little black borders around the nozzle exits would still be there.  There may be grey SLA (no reference imaging) or HSRI black Shuttle tile at the RCS pods' back and front ends, but I don't know if they'd be needed.

3. The base should be RCC grey, which is a matte, and (for the ferry version) seamless finish.  RCC is an off-black color, the material is used on the Shuttle Orbiter wing leading edges and nose cap.

4.  The nosecone should be anything but black, actually.  Most likely there will be some TPS material to protect it during ascent, but I haven't decided what that is.  On the inside, the doors most likely will each be painted two different colors, I'd recommend yellow and black, but the only real criteria is that they have a very sharp contrast with each other.  The rationale behind this is so that the space station or mission being approached can easily advise on the Sprint's roll alignment.  The brighter color should not be blue or pink, so it doesn't get confused into the surfaces of Earth or Mars during docking maneuvers (this could create an illusion for the observer that the Sprint is yawed more than it actually is.)  If the dark door is black, I'd put a white stripe or border around it so it could be recognized from the space sky, to keep the same thing from happening.  Note that I'm talking about the inside of the doors, which will be visible during rendesvous and docking maneuvers.

I like that little 'A' or rescue handle pointer, or whatever it is.  It makes it look authentic.  What would make it look perfect is a little round or square outline beside it to represent a door leading to the rescue handle.

Excellent work.  The last touch on the Descent Module, I think, would be to restore the sharp notch in the bottom of the RCS pods, to make it look like the PES abort rockets had once been there.
Logged
bheick
Full Member
***
Posts: 20


brianheick@hotmail.com firekraqur@yahoo.com
View Profile Email
« Reply #33 on: June 10, 2006, 10:35:44 PM »

A little bit more fixing in the textures, I have some images for reference on the AFSRI and the LSRI, so I'll include them in when I can make a suitable texture for it.

BTW: the side hatches, are these the type of marks that you mean?






EDIT: I had to revert to a earlier model version, the poly count was starting to go beyond the budget.
Logged

If it dosen't work, hit it a few times.
bheick
Full Member
***
Posts: 20


brianheick@hotmail.com firekraqur@yahoo.com
View Profile Email
« Reply #34 on: June 11, 2006, 02:10:32 PM »

Still working on the model, getting in all of the finer details. Heres my end of the day for today.

New set of textures and AFSRI blanket, this is the best I can do for now on the TPS. Put some work into the chute bay.


Worked on the interior bay, added cable winches for the control cables on the chute


rear shot for spec test


The forward docking port


More to do, but I'm done for today
Logged

If it dosen't work, hit it a few times.
smoothvirus
Moderator
Full Member
****
Posts: 28


aircyber smoothvirus_2000
View Profile WWW
« Reply #35 on: June 17, 2006, 06:43:02 PM »

Bheick,

First of all, great work!

Also, I went to the Smithsonian's Udvar Hazy center outside DC a few days ago, I tried to get some pictures of hatches for you. Got one of the hatch on the Enterprise and one off the Apollo boilerplate CM.

main album

Enterprise  Hatch

Apollo  boilerplate hatch
Logged
aftercolumbia
Project Team Member
Full Member
****
Posts: 95


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #36 on: June 19, 2006, 01:01:04 AM »

Excellent work!  I really like the riser spools you added to the parachute bay.  The main heatshield has a nice ablative look to it; and it's good enough for RCC too.  I can think of a few good excuses to cover it in a hex grid (not the least of which is referencing locations during an on-orbit inspection of it.)

Come to think of it, there is no use implementing the Payload Escape Stage until we have a Service Module, especially since the PES is not necessary for the ERV.  The Crew Ferry version's new front runner booster for the Mk.1 OMDP is the Soyuz 2 launched from CSG (Kourou).  For the Mk. 2 it will ride on Greenstar (probably a 3 block version).

Anyway, I am really happy with it now...I really like the rescue handle too, thanks.  The pictures that Zachstar has sent me of the integrated ERV show only a small problem with the ERV RCS plumes impinging on the DMRCS thruster pods.  That should be fixed by a 45deg relative rotation between the two.  And...as long as I don't bellyache too much about the Ares' 2nd stage LOX tank arrangment...it's perfect.

Hmm...am I correct in assuming that the main Ares fairing or some skirting to protect the second stage from ascent wind will be going back in?  Mebbe I'm getting off topic...

Terry Wilson
Logged
bheick
Full Member
***
Posts: 20


brianheick@hotmail.com firekraqur@yahoo.com
View Profile Email
« Reply #37 on: June 21, 2006, 10:11:57 PM »

Well, now that the ouside has been agreed to be 'mostly done' I have started on the interior model. I am lacking some information such as the layout and type of avioncs to go with. I had a general idea ofwere to go so I started a pre-build model to work off of.

http://kimages.be/share/87592077.jpg http://kimages.be/share/40906859.jpg http://kimages.be/share/37724313.jpg

So, All I need now is the layout for the interior, and some ides on where to go.
Logged

If it dosen't work, hit it a few times.
Zachstar
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 317

Is it Star Trek?


View Profile
« Reply #38 on: June 22, 2006, 09:50:50 PM »

Terry Sent you some pics in email check it..
Logged


-------------------------------------------
aftercolumbia
Project Team Member
Full Member
****
Posts: 95


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #39 on: June 23, 2006, 03:17:42 PM »

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAACCCCCCCCCCKKKKKKKKKKK!

Okay, now that I've got that over with.  The intent of the Sprint's internal structures was essentially a combination of thrust tube and cylindrical pressure cabin.  I've managed to get a bunch of pictures fired away in emails, but I'm unable to host them to post here.  If Brian or Zach could, that would be great Wink

The arrangement rendered would probably be unable to bear the worst case entry loading scenarios for the Sprint Ferry abort scenarios, and that sort of margin would still be nice to have on Mars mission entries.  The thrust tube sort of structure allows internal pressure to help reinforce it, and also makes the main load paths somewhat simpler.  The ones I emailed away should be adequate to get the renders back on the right track, I think I need to see them in order to get a good idea of how some things are going.  I think I had previously posted the required tank diameters and placements once before.  If still needed I can find them...if need really be, I can recalculate them.

The final note I have on the rendered interiors is that the arrangement would beg the question of why the Sprint does not have GE D2/Soyuz style orbital module with the ability to separate prior to entry.  The answer for the real one is that it is a ferry, not intended to be lived in for long periods (thus needing the extra volume; if it has too much, the simplest idea is to shorten it.  If it has too little...well, I doubt it'll have too little...that is a three metre wide cabin that is about double the size of a Soyuz entry module.  The real reason for the orbital module is to store on orbit guidance, living volume, life support consumables, the airlock, rendezvous system, etc.  The most significant of those are far more advanced on Sprint than they are on Soyuz, and are quite small, not worth making a separate module for (docking radar, batteries, etc.)  Some are in the Service Module.  In any case, Sprint depends on a separately launched station or mission for long term operation, and has little utility other than to get crew members into space and safely back.

Excellent work on the ODS, by the way...I love it.
Logged
Zachstar
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 317

Is it Star Trek?


View Profile
« Reply #40 on: June 23, 2006, 03:34:28 PM »

Here you go

















Hope it helps!
Logged


-------------------------------------------
aftercolumbia
Project Team Member
Full Member
****
Posts: 95


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #41 on: June 23, 2006, 04:37:17 PM »

Hmm...I just wanted to make sure...the parachute bay door doesn't actually come off, I hope?  The parasol is released at rather high altitude and potentially close enough to populated (spectator) areas that the door could be blown into them.  The landing bag doors don't matter, because they aren't deployed until, at most, a few minutes before landing...in which case if it failed, the craft would turn towards the nearest body of water to prevent injury to the crew from a hard landing.  My original concept was two side by side doors for the parasol bay, forward and aft openg positions don't seem to work well because aft is RCC, while forward is the RCS pods, and the sucker has a big MOI in those directions and especially aft, aerodynamic troubles.  I think a one side arrangement would work, especially if the landing pattern is biased to a particular turning direction (most likely left).

On tanks...for the ones I drew, does the arrangement work out well enough to put in a bunch of 10in tanks?  If we need more tanks we can arrange for two belts of them, I think.  If we need bigger tanks, we can get away with reducing the pressure cabin's diameter to 2.6m at the smallest.  I think I had calculated the need for LOX to be equivalent to two 0.6m diameter tanks, which of course, won't fit in the 0.5m belt area.  Four 0.4m tanks should work though.

Finally, there needs to be a small opening for the drogue to come out before the main door is opened.  It is likely that its riser will be located too far forward, so as the stable attitude will be more nose-up than it ought to be.  The deployment will look a bit like this:

0.0sec: at approx 80,000 feet with the Descent Module beginning to destabilize near the transonic transition, the drogue mortar is fired.

0.3sec:  The drogue bag travels straight up as reckoned by the spacecraft's orientation, uncoiling a long riser,  This direction is almost perpendicular to the airflow of the Descent Module, which is still in entry attitude.

0.5sec:  The drogue inflates, retaining its deployment bag to minimize debris.  The deployment bag hangs from a lanyard near where the chutes edge risers meet to form the main riser, which is at least 12m long to ensure the drogue remains clear of the Sprint Descent Module as rotates.  The drogue itself is a ringsail parachute similar to the one used on the MER landing stage.

1.5sec: The drogue is dragged back in the airstream (forward by the craft) until it is over the Descent Module's nose, with the riser draped over the top between the two RCS pods.

2.0sec-5.0sec:  The Descent Module, now "hanging" from the drogue riser rotates to a level, airbag's first attitude.  If left alone, it will pendulum back and forth a few times before coming to a 45deg nose up attitude, airbags down.

5.0sec: just before the rotation halts at the end of the first half oscilation, the main parasol bay is opened and the drogue riser is released.  The drogue riser is connected to the main parasol bag, to act as its pilot.

6.0 sec: As I think just now about how to keep large number (some forty) risers from tangling, I just realized that they will need to be packed in waffle cells in the bottom of the bay that will keep them from getting tangled with each other earlier in the flight.  It makes sense for these to be hogged out of the pressure cabin.

The drogue/pilot draws the parasol bag (probably not a "true" bag but a mesh-like collection of reefers that emulate one.)  As it does so, the risers are uncoiled from their cells and kept apart by part of the bag that emulates a parachute slider.

As this is happening, there is very little force from the parachutes on the Descent Module, and it wil begin to rotate back to a nose up attitude, probably not too well either.  All this is happening just above the speed of sound and as the Sprint slows down, it becomes less and less stable.  It is quite likely to have some lateral rotation by this point.

7.5 sec: The tightening of the risers stops the parasol from rising any further, and the "bag" is opened, allowing the parasol to deploy to its first reefed position.

8.0 sec: As the parasol inflates, the "slider" portion of the bag holds the remainder of the parasol together, and the first right hand segment opens.  Unlike the slider on a skydiving parachute, this "slider" does not slide down the risers.  It doesn't look much like a slider either.  At its centre is a a module (probably electronic) that holds the spidery looking reefers together until the time is right to release them.

10.0 sec: the "slider" releases the first left hand segment of the parasol and then will wait until the airflow is forward enough that the ram air opens the parasol segments so that it ceases to be a "parachute" aerodynamically and starts to fly properly.

15.0 sec:  The Descent Module has probably slowed down a good 300-400m/s since parachute opening, in the highest-g moment of the whole flight...assuming it isn't an abort that is...probably about 6-8g for a couple of seconds.   Now subsonic and with enough forward airflow to inflate the parasol wing section, Sprint begins to glide.

18.0 sec: The second right segment is released

21.0 sec: The second left segment is released

24.0 sec: The third right segment is released

27.0 sec: The third left segment is released

30.0 sec: The centre segment is released and the "slider" disappears.  Its module dangles from one of the centre segment reefers.  Also by this point, the ringsail drogue pilot is dragging behind the main parasol...which is friggin' huge by the way...The brake winches are enabled and the commander is given control.

35.0 sec:  Three RocketCam compartments open up to allow the commander and pilot to see where they are going (remember, we haven't got much for windows.)  One is below the nose cone, and looks forward.  The other two, one each left and right, are located at the heads of the airbag compartments and angled at about 60deg from the forward, so providing slightly overlapping fields of view allowing the crew to the forward 180deg.  The RocketCam is made by Ecliptic Enterprises ... learn more here:

http://www.eclipticenterprises.com/products_rocketcam_dvs.php

This, of course, is why the EFIS has bigger screens than has ever been flown.  A "simulator" style environment needs to be drawn up from the RocketCam imagery and other instruments, including RDF, GPS, and INS/DASE (Digital Active Stable Element; a concept to remove the stable element gyro from the guidance system), all of which were in operation before (but they are not visual; GPS is likely to quit for a minute or two during the peak loads region because it won't be able to hear enough GPS satellites through entry ionization.)

20 min: Approximate landing time

The parasol will be similar in arrangement to the parachute for Genesis, and the parasol for X-38 which inspired the idea for Delta Sprint.  If need be, Sprint can be implemented on the much simpler reserve, so I recommend actually developing that first...it can probably be stolen as is from our current Hab and that would suit me just fine.
Logged
bheick
Full Member
***
Posts: 20


brianheick@hotmail.com firekraqur@yahoo.com
View Profile Email
« Reply #42 on: June 23, 2006, 05:01:28 PM »

Just a quick note, anything coming off the sprint after re-entry prior to parasol deployment would probably be ripped to shreds or turned to confetti with the aerodynamic pressures involved. Even if it is made out of RCC, or aluminum, the surface area would be more than adequate to put enough stress on the object to tear it apart. A big door like the one that is on the model ATM would be reduced to shards.

Just think of it like a funny car gone wrong on the race track. What happens to them going 300mph in a accident?

But I think the model could use more work anyway since I didn't notice the extra doors in the pictures you sent me. So the model needs that lading bag door, and rocket cam doors. A little extra work, but shouldn't be much.
Logged

If it dosen't work, hit it a few times.
aftercolumbia
Project Team Member
Full Member
****
Posts: 95


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #43 on: June 23, 2006, 05:15:11 PM »

Thank You Thank You Thank You Thank You Thank You Thank You Thank You Thank You!!



This is a cross section of the base of the ERV Mk. 1 Sprint Descent Module, intended to show the aft hatch location...the hinge is whimsical and quite optional.  The structure is not solid, and the ones closest to the middle will not be reachable during installation,  and so won't have fasteners where they'll rest against the pressure cabin...hatch excepted of course.

The main item is the continuation of the thrust ring into the heatshield structure.



The cabin layout attempts to show the big screens, which can contain MFD's as well as the aforementioned RocketCam views.  Note also the dedicated centreline MFDs, which are intended for system statuses.  Environmental controls are in overhead panels, and the panel tucks away while on orbit so that the docking port is accessible.

A dumb omission on the centreline panel is the missing direct drive controller, a Rotational Hand Controller (RHC) that is used in the event of guidance/main electrical failures as a last ditch for emergency control.  The three circles are the "keys", which allow the crew more direct control over critical safe and arm functions than is traditional in piloted spaceflight.  By turning the keys safe and pulling the main electrical breakers (a total of six actions), the Sprint spacecraft can be brought to a totally inert state on the pad in a matter of seconds...of course, under circumstances needing such urgency, it would likely be prudent to omit the step of disarming the Payload Escape Stage.

The control layout is a rush job and obviously wants improvement Happy



This is a repeat of the first image...oddly.



A combination boss/girth mounting technique for tanks outside the pressure cabin.  This picture was taken from http://www.psi-pci.com/images/Mount-combination.gif



From http://www.psi-pci.com/images/80200.jpg, this shows a typical hydrazine tank.



This shows from the lateral perspective, an overall layout of the pressure cabin.  Something that is inaccurate is the shape of the aft bulkhead of the pressure cabin.  It is not exactly flat, but a shallow ellipsoid that is better at holding the pressure and taking the accelleration forces from interior equipment mounted to the aft wall and transferring it to the heatshield rib fittings.

Included is a sample radial arm/pedestal mounted tank.  That isn't the exact position of the tanks, and the little tank in front of it is there too, just to show how its mounted.



This shows the "beltline" cross section and the actual location of the tanks.  The hydrazine tanks operate in blowdown mode, the nitrogen bottles are actually for emergency cabin repressurization and nitrogen compensation for small leaks.  The four LOX tanks are the estimated need for seven days of crew operations.  The LiOH scrubbers to go with them are in the aft part inside the cabin.

The landing bag locations are not final, Brian, if you think they need to go in a bay similar to that for the parasol, in order to keep the bottom of the structure from smacking into the ground too early, go ahead and do that.



This shows the beltline position.  As the A-A beltline section is intended to show the girth section of the tank, the one drawn here obviously would be a bit aft of where it is drawn.  Again, the tanks in the side view are there to illustrate mounting methods, not actual positions.

There is, of course a "floor" for the seats to mount to.  The interior lights will be white LED clusters, with emergency red LED's.  On the flight plan and other procedural paperwork, the emergency pages will be pink, and the normal pages will be a slight blue.  Under emergency lighting, the blue pages will appear a lot deeper than the pink pages and allow easy recognition and readability.  The emergency LED lights have their own built in primary lithium batteries, and would probably outlast the crew in an accident.  These batteries are on the six month replacement list for lifeboats...as you can probably imagine.

Because this is just a ferry, it won't have a kitchen or ward table, but because of the possibility of the crew spending days in it during rendezvous maneuvers or emergency survivability...as well as using it as a shelter should the crew wind up ditching in the middle of nowhere...the seat backs will tuck away.

Ta ta for now.  I hope that's enough to get started.  Oh, mebbe look at Shuttle cabin picks to see what the seats will look like.
Logged
aftercolumbia
Project Team Member
Full Member
****
Posts: 95


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #44 on: July 08, 2006, 11:33:08 PM »

Hullo...is anyone still here besides me?
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.10 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!