VL.png The World-Wide Web Virtual Library
[WWW VL database || WWW VL search]
donations.gif asia-wwwvl.gif

Online Burma/Myanmar Library

Full-Text Search | Database Search | What's New | Alphabetical List of Subjects | Main Library | Reading Room | Burma Press Summary

Home > What's New


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Saturday 23 July, 2016
Date of publication: 23 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: CRISS-CROSS THE NATION - Better transport key to development of rural areas - DRD...MoNREC denies privatisation rumours...Policy being drawn up to evict settlers from Myanmar’s forests...Renovation of historic sites in Innwa Ancient City to begin next month..Myanmar pottery businesses at risk of folding....Four more disciplines to be taught at YEU this year...Four men charged with theft...Yangon man charged with murder...Yaba and heroin seized in Phakant, Kyaikhto and Taunggyi...MIA collecting data of factories and mills...Motorists, bus drivers tested for alcohol on Expressway...New fuel handling jetty project leads to riverbank erosion: DWIR official...DCA arranges the installation of ADS-B system..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: India buys up Kalay’s young coconuts...Pyidaungsu Hluttaw Speaker receives Ambassador...Pyithu Hluttaw Speaker receives Ambassador...Chinese group to help cataract patients...HM meets Viet Nam Deputy Minister...President bids farewell to outgoing Cambodian Ambassador...Union Foreign Affairs Minister Daw Aung San Suu Kyi arrives Laos...Union Minister receives Vice President of the Carter Centre...Myanmar’s external trade value decreased by $500m this FY...Investment in Thilawa Special Economic Zone expected to increase up to USD 1 billion...Printing Business Matching on 23 July...56 state-owned factories being operated by private investors, mostly from China, RoK, according to MoI...Union Attorney-General holds separate talks with UN officials, My Justice Team...PATH to distribute nutrition supplement rice to Chin State...DCA arranges the installation of ADS-B system..... "OPINION": "Legal binding and the discipline" - Khin Maung Aye.....ARTICLE: "Understanding Children’s Right to Expression" - Dr. Khine Khine Win
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (2.7MB)
Date of entry/update: 23 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: Long-delayed religion census reveals only modest Muslim increase
Date of publication: 22 July 2016
Description/subject: "The long-awaited figures on religious affiliation from Myanmar's 2014 census were released earlier today, after a delay attributed to the contentious nature of the withheld data, particularly in regard to the size of Myanmar's Muslim population. According to the figures released, Buddhists compromise 87.9 percent of Myanmar’s population, a decrease of 1.5pc over the past 30 years. The release also reported 6.2pc of the population as Christian, 4.3pc Muslim and 0.5pc of Hindu out of a total estimated population of 51.4 million. The census also identified 1.2 million people not enumerated, including over 1 million in Rakhine State alone. Myanmar's previous census in 1983 demarcated 4.9pc of the country's population as Christian and 3.9pc as Muslim, meaning there has been a slight slight increase in major non-Buddhist populations in the past 30 years. The Hindu population was also reported at 0.5pc in 1983..."
Author/creator: Ye Mon and Pyae Thet Phyo
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Myanmar Times"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 22 July 2016
ML > Census


Title: 2014 Census reports
Language: English, Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Department of Population Ministry of Labour, Immigration and Population MYANMAR
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 22 July 2016
ML > Census


Title: The 2014 Myanmar Population and Housing Census Census Report Volume 2-C The Union Report: Religion
Date of publication: 21 July 2016
Description/subject: "...This report shows that Buddhism is the faith professed by the great majority of people in Myanmar, followed by Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Animism, and all other faiths, which are equally entitled to freely profess and practice their religion without discrimination. Hence I would invite you to welcome the release of census data on religion as an insight into the diverse array of faiths that characterize our country..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Department of Population Ministry of Labour, Immigration and Population MYANMAR
Format/size: pdf (646K-reduced version)
Date of entry/update: 22 July 2016
ML > Census


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Friday 22 July, 2016
Date of publication: 22 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: Keep your axes at bay - Logging suspended along Bago Yoma for 10 years...11 trafficked fishermen rescued in Yay - Ko Moe...Primary education sector improvement stressed by State Counsellor...Myanmar mountaineers honoured for successful ascent of Mt. Everest - Thein Ko Lwin...High-rise suspension causes loss of K5 B to K6 B for developers...Religious data from 2014 Census released...Motorists, bus drivers tested for alcohol on Expressway...K10m donated to monastic school...Nay Pyi Taw old road section to be extended and upgraded...Heroin and Yaba confiscated...One dead and two injured following motorcycle accident...Fugitive arrested on murder charges...Man charged over stick hurling incident...CBM plans to practice RTGS online...Only 52 high-rise buildings granted continuation of construction...Improved vege markets for Rahkine and S. Shan...1.8m MPU users this year..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: BBC reporter freed from jail following appeal...State Counsellor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi meets with Oxford University Pro- Vice Chancellor...Union Information Minister meets with Country Director for BBC Media Action...Hotels help lacquer ware industry in Bagan...300 development projects to be conducted over five years...Import value of capital goods decreases by US$800m over 3 months...Only five local and foreign delivery services legal, claims MTT...ASEAN Comprehensive Investment Agreement- ACIA Forum and Seminar concludes...Suzuki strikes sponsorship deal for 2016 ASEAN football cup...Japanese Sakura to be planted on Yangon University campus in 2017...15,000 job seekers head abroad in June..... "OPINION": "Constitutions guarantee fundamental rights" - Khin Maung Aye.....ARTICLE: "To poo or not to poo, that is not the question" - Tin Aung
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (2.8MB)
Date of entry/update: 22 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Friday 22 July, 2016
Date of publication: 22 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (9MB)
Date of entry/update: 22 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Fridaqy 22 July, 2016
Date of publication: 22 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (7.7MB)
Date of entry/update: 22 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: Regional parliaments rising to the challenge
Date of publication: 22 July 2016
Description/subject: "Early signs from the Yangon Hluttaw suggest that the state and region parliaments will do a better job of holding local governments to account than their predecessors...Myanmar's state and regional legislatures have been slow to find their feet during the country’s transition. While lawmakers in Nay Pyi Taw cut ministry budgets and reshaped draft legislation, the 14 sub-national parliaments have been largely bit players in the reform process. Rarely have they challenged the state and region governments on which they are supposed to exercise oversight. The Yangon Region Hluttaw is a case in point. Over the past five years it largely acted as a rubber stamp for the regional government, signing off on budget requests and bills, and ignoring widespread complaints about service delivery and unpopular projects. Scrutiny was minimal, and brought to bear by only a handful of mostly opposition MPs. But the sub-national legislatures are important institutions for political decentralisation, which is a key issue in negotiations toward a peace settlement and broader reconciliation with ethnic minorities. They also play a significant role in service delivery in urban areas, as they approve municipal budgets and enact laws for local elections. So is the role of these new lawmaking bodies likely to develop over the coming five years? And what are the early indications from the Yangon parliament? Before considering these questions, it’s important to understand some of the reasons behind why the Yangon hluttaw and other sub-national legislatures were largely ineffective over the past five years..."
Author/creator: Hein Ko Soe & Thomas Kean
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Frontier Myanmar"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 22 July 2016
ML > Decentralisation > Decentralisation (Decentralization) in Burma/Myanmar


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Thursday 21 July, 2016
Date of publication: 21 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: covering all the bases - Tatmadaw holds press conference on Myitkyina shooting incident, dead bodies in Lashio, Mai Ja Yang ethnic conference, relief and rehabilitation works for Rakhine flood victims...NCA groups vow to seek inclusiveness at Peace Conference - Ye Khaung Nyunt...Day Care Centre for the Aged provided with two ferries by BFM...National News Awards presented to winners...Heads of service organisations approved, appointed...Man charged with house burglary...Three people injured after bus crashes into shop in Nay Pyi Taw...Man charged with a bike theft...Educational talk held in Taungoo...Illegal weapons seized...Yangon General Post office making effort to link with more online sites...Over three-month frozen chicken to be destroyed..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: Calls to restore Nyaungshwe’s Hawnan...Amnesty International calls to relocate sulphuric acid factory...Union Foreign Affairs Minister meets with US Deputy National Security Adviser for Strategic Communications...JICA assists with over K800 million for Pyay water purification project...France made antique car can be observed in Yangon free of charge...Myanmar to cooperate with Japan to produce finished lacquerwares...SMIDB to borrow US$30million from Viet Nam bank...Taiwan and EU cease buying Myanmar green peas...Suzuki strikes sponsorship deal for 2016 ASEAN football cup..... "OPINION": "Citizenship versus multi-culturalism" - Khin Maung Aye.....ARTICLE: "Nation Building and success stories on E-Government" - Sayar Mya
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (5.3MB)
Date of entry/update: 21 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Thursday 21 July, 2016
Date of publication: 21 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (9.1MB)
Date of entry/update: 21 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Thursday 21 July, 2016
Date of publication: 21 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (8.8MB)
Date of entry/update: 21 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: Laws in Myanmar (includes Law reports 1948-1957)
Description/subject: Rather fuzzy text. Difficult to read
Language: English, Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Laws in Myanmar
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 21 July 2016
ML > Law and Constitution > The practice of law in Burma/Myanmar > Burma/Myanmar Law Reports
Law and Constitution > Links to online locations of Burma/Myanmar laws, decrees, bills, regulations etc.


Title: Govt Publishes Data on Populations of Religious Groups
Date of publication: 21 July 2016
Description/subject: "For the first time in more than three decades, Burma released data on the populations of the country’s different religious groups, based on the results of the 2014 census. The information was publicly launched by the Ministry of Labor, Immigration and Population, on Thursday in the capital Naypyidaw. The ministry said that the size of the non-enumerated populations—groups that were not counted in the census—in Karen and Kachin states were not large enough to change the proportion of religious groups at the Union or state levels. However, the non-enumerated population in western Burma—an estimated 1.09 million people who identify as Rohingya—is significant enough to have an impact on the proportion of religious groups at both the state and Union level. According to the figures, Buddhists constitute 87.9 percent of the country, Christians make up 6.2 percent, Muslims comprise 4.3 percent, animists are counted at 0.8 percent and Hindus are listed at 0.5 percent. People who identify with other religions constitute 0.2 percent and 0.1 percent identified as following no religion. These percentages represent the composition of Burma’s total population of 51.4 million, including a non-enumerated population of approximately 1.2 million. In comparison to the 1983 and 1973 censuses carried out by ex-dictator Ne Win’s military regime, the 2014 figures revealed a slight decrease in the percentage of Buddhist population and a small increase in the percentage of Christian and Muslim populations. The 1983 census reported that the Buddhist population was 89.4 percent, the Christian population was 4.9 percent, and the Muslim population was 3.9 percent—a figure believed by some to be a low estimation..."
Author/creator: San Yamin Aung
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 21 July 2016
ML > Census


Title: 2014 Census printed materials
Language: English, Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 21 July 2016
ML > Census


Title: UNFPA welcomes release of Myanmar census data on religion
Date of publication: 21 July 2016
Description/subject: "YANGON, Myanmar — Data on religion from the 2014 Myanmar Population and Housing Census has been made publicly available by the Government of Myanmar. UNFPA welcomes this release, which provides an opportunity for Myanmar to embrace its long history of cultural diversity and to promote the benefits of a truly inclusive society. “It is time to replace speculation with fact. The peoples of Myanmar form a vibrant socio-cultural fabric with the power to forge hope of sustainable peace and respectful co-existence”, says Janet E. Jackson, UNFPA Representative for Myanmar. The census gives a comprehensive picture of Myanmar’s people – who they are, how many, and where they are – and their social and economic living conditions. The results are an essential tool for effective policy development, planning, decision making, and improvement to public services. They have proven hugely useful to Government, civil society and the private sector across a range of areas that benefit the population. For example, census data were instrumental to the coordination of relief efforts during the 2015 floods. New parliamentarians also use the data to better understand the social and economic needs in their constituencies. However, an estimated 1.09 million people who wished to self-identify as Rohingya were not enumerated in the census. Most face severe restrictions to freedom of movement, depriving them of access to health services, education and employment. Many remain displaced from their homes. UNFPA recognizes their non-enumeration as a serious shortcoming of the census and a grave human rights concern, and regards it as critical that this and all rights are restored as soon as possible. Notwithstanding this omission, it is clear from the report that people who identify as Buddhist make up the majority in all states/regions except in Chin, where there is a Christian majority. Also represented in the data are people who affiliate with Islam, Hinduism, Animism, “other religion” and “no religion”..." - See more at: http://myanmar.unfpa.org/news/unfpa-welcomes-release-myanmar-census-data-religion#sthash.doZ4VtYO.dpuf
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations Popuulation Fund (UNFPA)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 21 July 2016
ML > Census


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Wednesday 20 July, 2016
Date of publication: 20 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: State Counsellor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi pays tribute to fallen martyrs...69th anniversary Martyrs’ Day at the Martyrs’ Mausoleum [PHOTO]...General Aung San’s monuments, memorials in Yangon draw record crowds...Dhammacakka Day observance ceremonies held in Yangon...DMH issues flood warning...President U Htin Kyaw and wife share merits gained with Martyr leaders in Nay Pyi Taw...Religious leaders say prayers for late national leader General Aung San on Martyrs’ Day...Alms offered to monks in memory of late martyrs in Yangon...Martyrs’ Day commemoration event held nationwide...Yaba seized in Mandalay region...Dhammacakka Day observed in Nay Pyi Taw...Weather station Buoy installed at Mandalay Gaw Wein Jetty...Cluster collision occurs in Hmawbi...Heroin seized in Nawnghkio...Licences for motorboats on Inle Lake to be issued...Myanmar National Airlines receives new ATR aircraft...Sugarcane, sugar law expected to develop sugar business...Forty purified water companies found in breach of the law...Jelly fish businesses on the decline...Over 300 SMEs late with loan repayments to SMIDB...Families of martyrs pay tribute to fallen leaders...Families of martyrs, people pay tribute to fallen leaders..... "OPINION": "Challenges for good governance" - Khin Maung Aye.....ARTICLE: "Be a Leader, not a Boss" - Khin Maung Myint
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (6.4MB)
Date of entry/update: 20 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Tuesday 19 July, 2016
Date of publication: 19 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (8.5MB)
Date of entry/update: 20 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Wednesday 20 July, 2016
Date of publication: 20 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (13MB)
Date of entry/update: 20 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Tuesday 19 July, 2016
Date of publication: 19 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (9.4MB)
Date of entry/update: 20 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Wednesday 20 July, 2016
Date of publication: 20 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (7.5MB)
Date of entry/update: 20 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: CEDAW documents on discrimination against women
Description/subject: The Convention, the Committee, Myanmar sessions, Myanmar Govt and CSO documents
Language: English
Source/publisher: CEDAW
Format/size: html, pdf
Date of entry/update: 20 July 2016
ML > Human Rights > Discrimination > Women: discrimination/violence against > UN (CEDAW) documents on discrimination against women
Women > Reports about women of Burma by source > Reports about women of Burma by UN entities
Women > Reports about women of Burma by source > Reports about women of Burma by national, regional and international NGOs


Title: Vision and Actions on Jointly Building Silk Road Economic Belt and 21st Century Maritime Silk Road
Date of publication: March 2015
Description/subject: "More than two millennia ago the diligent and courageous people of Eurasia explored and opened up several routes of trade and cultural exchanges that linked the major civilizations of Asia, Europe and Africa, collectively called the Silk Road by later generations. For thousands of years, the Silk Road Spirit - "peace and cooperation, openness and inclusiveness, mutual learning and mutual benefit" - has been passed from generation to generation, promoted the progress of human civilization, and contributed greatly to the prosperity and development of the countries along the Silk Road. Symbolizing communication and cooperation between the East and the West, the Silk Road Spirit is a historic and cultural heritage shared by all countries around the world. In the 21st century, a new era marked by the theme of peace, development, cooperation and mutual benefit, it is all the more important for us to carry on the Silk Road Spirit in face of the weak recovery of the global economy, and complex international and regional situations. When Chinese President Xi Jinping visited Central Asia and Southeast Asia in September and October of 2013, he raised the initiative of jointly building the Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st-Century Maritime Silk Road (hereinafter referred to as the Belt and Road), which have attracted close attention from all over the world. At the China-ASEAN Expo in 2013, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang emphasized the need to build the Maritime Silk Road oriented towards ASEAN, and to create strategic propellers for hinterland development. Accelerating the building of the Belt and Road can help promote the economic prosperity of the countries along the Belt and Road and regional economic cooperation, strengthen exchanges and mutual learning between different civilizations, and promote world peace and development. It is a great undertaking that will benefit people around the world. The Belt and Road Initiative is a systematic project, which should be jointly built through consultation to meet the interests of all, and efforts should be made to integrate the development strategies of the countries along the Belt and Road. The Chinese government has drafted and published the Vision and Actions on Jointly Building Silk Road Economic Belt and 21st-Century Maritime Silk Road to promote the implementation of the Initiative, instill vigor and vitality into the ancient Silk Road, connect Asian, European and African countries more closely and promote mutually beneficial cooperation to a new high and in new forms..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: People's Republic of China,
Format/size: html (78K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs22/PRC-Vision%20and%20Actions%20on%20Jointly%20Building%20Silk%20Ro...
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > Regional Dynamics > “One Belt, One Road” initiative


Title: Google search results for "One Belt, One Road"
Description/subject: 525,000 results (July 2016)
Language: English
Source/publisher: Google
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > Regional Dynamics > “One Belt, One Road” initiative


Title: The Voices of Myanmar Women
Date of publication: June 2016
Description/subject: Research Report in support of CEDAW - Alternative Report (2016).....Myanmar ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) in 1997, and its government submitted its last state report to the CEDAW Committee in 2008. In the past, women’s groups working in Myanmar had little opportunity to submit alternative reports to CEDAW; only the Women’s League of Burma (WLB), which is based on border areas, was able to submit such reports. In 2010, the political situation in Myanmar changed, allowing women’s organizations both along the border and inside the country to work together more closely. In 2012, WON (representing 38 member organizations) and WLB (representing 13 member organizations) began to work together, conducting strategic planning workshops and identifying joint strategic activities based on challenges faced and lessons learned. One of those joint projects involves CEDAW monitoring and reporting. As a follow-up of a Strategic Planning Workshop held in March 2014. WON organised a workshop on the CEDAW shadow reporting process for its members, as well as members of the WLB. After this workshop, WON and WLB agreed to work collaboratively on CEDAW NGO reporting with technical assistance from other organizations. WON chose to focus on CEDAW Articles 7, 12 and 14, as most WON members are working to promote women’s participation in politics, access to health care and the rights of rural women. The objective of this research was to explore key issues for women in the above-identified areas for inclusion in WON’s CEDAW Shadow Report. Additionally, WON hoped the research would provide support for concrete recommendations for the government in the CEDAW reporting process..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Women’s Organization Network (WON)
Format/size: pdf (901K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: CEDAW SHADOW REPORT Submitted By: Women’s Organization Network (WON) June 2016
Date of publication: June 2016
Description/subject: Executive Summary: "This report reflects the results of WON’s research and interviews of women from ten of Myanmar’s states, who shared their experiences and struggles to vindicate their rights. As a party to CEDAW, Myanmar’s government has an obligation to protect and guarantee the rights of its female citizens in a variety of realms. Of particular concern to WON are Myanmar’s shortcomings in regard to its obligations under Articles 7, 12, and 14. In 2012, women comprised only 4.42% of Myanmar’s National Parliament. The 2015 election, however, raised that percentage to 14.5%. This shift demonstrates the potential for women to play a decisive role in governing the country. Nevertheless, women still face multiple barriers to political participation at the national, regional and local levels, including gender stereotypes, safety concerns, lack of education, and legal and economic barriers. To comply with the obligations of Article 7, the government must implement legal reforms and promote social change to allow women to exercise their rights to political participation. Access to health remains illusory for many — if not most — women in Myanmar. Clinics and hospitals are few and far between, particularly in rural areas. Women report that hospital care is unaffordable and of poor quality. Women concerned by issues of cost or travel often depend on midwives and traditional birth attendants for childbirth, and while there has been a decrease in Myanmar’s maternal mortality rate, it is still high compared to neighboring countries. Abortion also continues to be illegal in Myanmar, forcing many women to seek dangerous abortions that risk their health and lives. Women lack education on sex, birth control, STIs, and HIV/AIDS. All names used in this report and the annexed research report are pseudonyms. 6 Rural women suffer disproportionately from poverty, lack of access to healthcare and education, and unemployment . Poverty is a primary concern for most rural women, who lack employment opportunities and education . Addiction to drugs or alcohol is prevalent in many households, as is domestic violence. Poverty has also led to mass migration as individuals often leave to find work in other states or countries. In other instances, poverty has forced families to take on high - interest debt . Some women, in times of economic need, turn to sex work, an illegal profession in which they are often taken harassed or abused by police. Land grabbing, often perpetrated by the Government, has also become an increasing problem for rural women. The government must provide increased services and economic opportunities to rural populations, and foster an atmosphere in which women are protected from abuse."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Women’s Organization Network (WON)
Format/size: pdf (1.1MB)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: Submission to the 64th Session CEDAW Committee for Consideration of Myanmar’s Combined Fourth and Fifth Periodic Reports
Date of publication: June 2016
Description/subject: "In its 2008 Concluding Observations on the Second and Third Periodic Report of Myanmar, the CEDAW Committee expressed concerns regarding multiple forms of discrimination against women in Myanmar in general and Rohingya women in particular. The Government of Myanmar (“the Government”) has not taken significant steps to address these concerns in the eight years since, and instead has exacerbated discrimination against Rohingya women by restricting their most basic rights and failing to prevent and address violence against them. Women throughout Myanmar face discrimination. Targeted for their religion and ethnicity in addition to their gender, Rohingya women confront multidimensional discrimination, as each form of discrimination compounds the other. Since the Concluding Observations in 2008, the conditions for Rohingya and other Muslim women have deteriorated precipitously, making the already oppressive situation desperate for many. The Government has continued, expanded, and entrenched policies limiting Rohingya freedom of movement, marriage, childbirth, and access to education, healthcare, and livelihoods — policies that often have a heightened impact on women. The Government has continued to deny Rohingya citizenship and gone further to revoke their right to vote and participate in elections for the first time. It has also failed to adequately protect victims or address large scale violence against Rohingya. The largest waves of violence occurred in 2012, resulting in hundreds of deaths and the displacement of over 100,000. The conditions in the internally displaced person (IDP) camps and the highly militarized villages in northern Rakhine State have led hundreds of thousands to flee the country, despite the risk of death and sexual abuse at the hands of trafficking gangs during the dangerous journey. The perilous situation prompted the Human Rights Council to adopt a resolution on July 3, 2015 condemning “gross violations of human rights and abuses ... in Rakhine State, in particular against Rohingya Muslims,” and called upon the Government to address, prevent, and ensure accountability for widespread discrimination and its related impact. The new Government led by the National League for Democracy (“NLD”), which took power on April 1 of this year, should immediately work to ensure compliance with CEDAW and end violations of Rohingya and other women’s basic human rights, including:.."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Women Peace Network – Arakan
Format/size: pdf (190K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: Observations and Topics to be Included in the List of Issues [related to Myanmar’s Combined Fourth and Fifth Periodic Reports to CEDAW]
Date of publication: 15 October 2015
Description/subject: Submitted to the Pre-sessional Working Group of CEDAW..... "On the occasion of Myanmar’s Combined Fourth and Fifth Periodic Reports on the Implementation of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women Submitted by: Women Peace Network – Arakan (WPNA)....."Observations Regarding Violations of CEDAW with Regard to Rohingya Women in Myanmar. The Rohingya, a Muslim ethnic minority group that has been residing in Arakan State in western Myanmar for generations, has been described as one of the most persecuted groups in the world. As has been highlighted by many local and international NGOs, women throughout Myanmar face discrimination, violence, and other forms of abuse. Thus, Rohingya women face multiple, overlapping, and reinforcing forms of discrimination based on their ethnicity, religion, and gender. Additionally, given the segregated, squalid, and insecure conditions in Arakan State, Rohingya women are particularly vulnerable to abuse..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Women Peace Network – Arakan (WPNA)
Format/size: pdf (135K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Tuesday 19 July, 2016
Date of publication: 19 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: Our Tribute to Martyrs on 69th Martyrs’ Day...State Counsellor witnesses donation for Daw Khin Kyi Foundation’s mobile library...Framework review important to make the 21st Century Panglong a success...Survey aims to gather necessary data to kick-start crop insurance system...State Counsellor meets with lots of ministers in Yangon...Pyinmana tightens security amid surge of brawls and robberies...VP U Henry Van Thio holds talks with Bago authorities on flood protection measures...Union Information Minister visits MRTV (Yangon)...Weather bureau issues flood warning...New railroad bridge to be opened later this month...Property destroyed by blaze...No people injured in vehicle overturn...60 people suffer from food poisoning in Rakhine...Illegally harvested logs seized in Muse...Developers to discuss suspension of high-rise buildings...ATM cards to be issued this month...Coffee plantations to be extended...Value of trade through Muse camp declines by almost $65m..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: Sommer Rader installed in Mandalay to measure water flow of Ayeyawady River...ATM cards to be issued this month...Fruit and veg association to pear up with Japanese firm...Value of trade through Muse camp declines by almost $65m...Fruit and veg association to pear up with Japanese firm..... POEMS: "To the Fallen Star" - Zaw Tun..."To The Martyrs" - Lokethar..... "OPINION": "Unity Within Diversity" - Khin Maung Aye.....ARTICLE: "'The Ordination Festival of the month “Waso'" - Maha Saddhamma Jotikadhaja Sithu Dr. Khin Maung Nyunt
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (5.1MB)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: Recommendations for Implementation of Pro-Poor Land Policy and Land Law in Myanmar: National Data and Regional Practices October 2015
Date of publication: October 2015
Description/subject: Submitted to the Pre-sessional Working Group of CEDAW.....Executive Summary: "Myanmar is undergoing a major transition, opening space for significant change for the first time in decades. Secure land tenure for smallhold er farmers and rural communities is essential in a heavily agrarian nation like Myanmar, where millions in the rural population – nearly 70% of the country – depend on agriculture for their livelihood s. Despite some updates to the legal framework, such as the 2012 Farmland Law and Vacant, Fallow, and Virgin Land Law, millions of Myanmar farmers remain vulnerable with insecure land tenure due to a complex and opaque set of land laws, unresolved historical land grievances, and widespread landlessness. The common aim of Namati and Landesa is to support the development of a protective, pro-poor legal framework, that will empower farmers to use the law, make informed decisions about their land, and maintain secure land tenure – ultimately leading to poverty alleviation for poor, rural women and men:..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Landsea, Namati
Format/size: pdf (672K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: Supplementary Information Concerning Women’s Land Rights in Myanmar Submitted to the 64 Pre-Sessional Working Group (November 2015)
Date of publication: November 2015
Description/subject: "This submission seeks to supplement the government report by providing field-based research on women’s land rights in Myanmar to highlight a persistent gap between law and practice. It is based on a joint report by Landesa, an NGO dedicated to securing land rights for the rural poor with experience in over 50 countries, and Namati, a global organization dedicated to legal empowerment, titled, Recommendations for Implementation of Pro-Poor Land Policy and Land Law in Myanmar: National Data and Regional Pract ices (October 2015)..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Landsea, Namati
Format/size: pdf (422K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: Observations and Topics to be Included in the List of Issues On the occasion of Myanmar’s Combined Fourth and Fifth Periodic Reports on the Implementation of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women
Date of publication: October 2015
Description/subject: Submitted to the Pre-sessional Working Group of CEDAW..... Introduction: "1. With this submission, the Global Justice Center (GJC) aims to provide guidance to the pre-session Working Group in its preparation of the list of issues to be examined during the Committee to Eliminate Discrimination against Women’s (“Committee”) review of Myanmar’s combined fourth and fifth periodic reports. It highlights several violations of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) by Myanmar and is based on a report by GJC and the Leitner Center for International Law and Justice (Fordham School of Law) comparing Myanmar’s national plan for the advancement of women against its CEDAW obligations (“Promises Not Progress: Burma’s National Plan for Women Falls Short of Gender Equality and CEDAW (attached hereto). II. Analytic Framework: 2. Since 2011, limited democratic reforms in Myanmar have not improved women’s rights or made any strides towards ensuring gender equality in general. This can be attributed, at least in part, to the fact that the focus of the reforms has been on readying Myanmar’s economy for an influx of capital and encouraging foreign investment, rather than on ensuring human rights. Additionally, the way the Government characterizes reforms needs to be carefully considered. For example, in its 2015 periodic report to the CEDAW Committee (“Periodic Report”), the Government asserts that eight laws related to women’s rights have been amended or enacted. However, consideration of these laws reveals that they are laws which provide labor and economic protections generally, not laws seeking to ameliorate the situation of women in Myanmar. In fact, only one of the laws discussed, the Social Security Law, includes specific provisions related to women (maternity leave). 3. Threats to women’s equality in Myanmar exist against an unchanged landscape shaped by a deep history of patriarchy and decades of oppressive military dictatorship. Today, these legacies remain very much alive in the form of fundamental defects that impede genuine legal reform, including legal structures guaranteeing gender equality. 4. In particular, three underlying themes are critical to understanding the complexity of injustice against women in Myanmar and the need for structural reforms in order to effect genuine positive change: (1) ongoing supremacy of military power; (2) entrenchment of military power and gender inequality in the Constitution of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar (“2008 Constitution”); and (3) lack of an independent judiciary. 5. In this submission, the GJC presents a condensed summary of the facts relating to the violations of the following articles of CEDAW: Articles 1 & 2 (definition and prohibition of discrimination, access to justice, violence against women); Article 3 (guarantee of basic human rights and fundamental freedoms); Article 7 (political participation); Article 10 (education); Article 11 (employment); Article 12 (health); Article 14 (rural women); Article 18 (precise and disaggregated data); General Recommendations 28 and 30 (conflict, post-conflict and conflict prevention). 6. At the end of each section, we suggest a list of issues, questions and clarifications for the Working Group’s consideration..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Global Justice Center
Format/size: pdf (697K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: SHADOW REPORT on Myanmar for the 64th Session of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women
Date of publication: July 2016
Description/subject: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: "Myanmar is a party to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and, as such, must fulfill its obligations to ensure both de jure and de facto equality for women. Yet, despite these obligations, women and girls across Myanmar face serious obstacles to realizing their rights to substantive equality and non-discrimination. In this Report, the Gender Equality Network (GEN) and Global Justice Center (GJC) highlight multiple barriers facing women and girls in Myanmar and offer key areas where reforms are necessary in order to promote women’s rights and the equal enjoyment of freedoms. This report can be read as a baseline of the situation on key indicators that affect the situation of women and girls in Myanmar, and therefore offers a starting point for dialogue with the newly elected government. The goal of such dialogue is to jointly tackle the systemic hurdles that impede the achievement of women’s equality and reverse some of the repressions under previous regimes. This report highlights general inequalities and discrimination faced by all women in Myanmar, but it must be noted that certain marginalized groups, such as ethnic women, rural women and older women, are not specifically discussed herein, but nonetheless experience additional and intersecting forms of discrimination. While it is encouraging that Myanmar’s transition to a quasi-civilian government in 2011 has led to limited democratic reforms, increasing engagement with the international community and a sharp increase in foreign direct investment, women have in large part not been the beneficiaries of these reforms. Advances to ensure women’s rights and improve the situation of women in Myanmar have, in general, been noticeably absent from reform efforts, in part due to the absence of women from decision-making positions and in politics. Even the Government’s reporting to this Committee identifies efforts to improve women’s rights as prospective rather than on-going, demonstrating the Government’s lack of political will to prioritize women’s issues. Gender equality continues to be viewed as a marginal area in ongoing democratization and development processes, as well as the peace process resolving decades of ethnic conflict. The Government must make actual progress, and not just present promises, to promote women’s rights and fulfill its obligations under CEDAW. A number of factors contribute to the current, and historical, lack of focus on women’s rights. Decades of military rule since a military coup in 1962 have marginalized women and deeply-embedded gender stereotypes see women as nurturers rather than leaders in society. As a result, women have historically been excluded from politics and positions of power. Achieving advances to ensure women’s equality in Myanmar is difficult because of an unchanged landscape shaped by a deep history of patriarchy, decades of oppressive military dictatorship and the continued power and influence of the military throughout society. Today, these legacies remain very much alive in the form of fundamental structural barriers that impede genuine legal reform, demonstrated through the presence of legal structures that discriminate against women (including in the Constitution), the lack of legal provisions that guarantee gender equality and the absence of adequate funding to promote policies and programmes that could contribute to women’s empowerment. The newly-formed government of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s Nationa l League for Democracy (NLD), which took office at the end of March 2016, offers an opportunity to refocus attention on the achievement of equal rights for women in Myanmar. Encouragingly, the NLD Election Platform on Women committed to, among other things, effectively implement existing laws to promote women’s rights, take action to end violence against women and ensure access to justice for women victims. While there are expectations that the situation of women in Myanmar will improve, it is crucial to be clear now about the significant work that needs to be done and to detail the steps necessary to ensure compliance with CEDAW. To achieve full compliance with CEDAW, the Government must formulate, in consultation with a broad array of civil society actors and women’s groups, and implement concrete, immediately-effective and well-funded policies, regulations, laws and other measures to ensure women’s de jure and de facto equality. Such a comprehensive effort will require coordination, commitment and significant political will, the dismantling of legal and other structures that discriminate against women and a significant reduction in the power and influence of the military"
Language: English
Source/publisher: Gender Equality Network (GEN) and Global Justice Center (GJC)
Format/size: pdf (874K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: PROMISES NOT PROGRESS: Burma’s National Plan for Women Falls Short of Gender Equality and CEDAW
Date of publication: August 2015
Description/subject: Executive Summary: "In late 2013, the Government of Burma/Myanmar (“the Government”) issued a National Strategic Action Plan for the Advancement of Women 2013-2022 (NSPAW) based in part on its obligations under the Convention to End All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). Heralded as a “historic and essential step towards substantive equality between women and men,” NSPAW was released amidst a flurry of other governmental plans, strategies, promises, and actions ostensibly aimed at transforming the country into a democracy. However, conspicuously missing from these reforms, including NSPAW, were deeper systemic overhauls of the many legal, political, cultural and socio-economic barriers to the full enjoyment of human rights in Burma which must underpin any true democracy. The issuance of NSPAW invites assessment of the state of gender equality in Burma, the prospects for NSPAW’s success in meeting its goals, and a comparison between NSPAW and Burma’s international legal obligations under CEDAW. Taking note of the need for such an assessment, as well as the opportunities presented by the forthcoming review of Burma by the CEDAW Committee in July 2016, this report by the Global Justice Center (GJC) and Leitner Center for International Law and Justice (Leitner Center) evaluates NSPAW against the reality for women on the ground in Burma and the Government’s legal obligations under CEDAW. In short, the critical analysis in this report reveals that NSPAW’s provisions are aspirational and ambiguous, without clear guidance on implementation or benchmarks for meaningful evaluation. This report further demonstrates how NSPAW fails to meaningfully grapple with the structural barriers precluding gender equality—including the 2008 Constitution of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar, decades of armed conflict and the continuing power of the military, antiquated laws and legal frameworks, and the difference between discrimination “in law” and discrimination “in effect”—all of which must be addressed in order to achieve substantive gender equality in Burma..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Global Justice Center, Leitner Center for International Law and Justice
Format/size: pdf (5.1MB)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: Protection of Race and Religion laws and discrimination against women from religious minorities
Date of publication: June 2016
Description/subject: CEDAW Committee 64th session CSW–Stakeholder Submission, Myanmar June 2016..... "Christian Solidarity Worldwide (CSW) is a human rights advocacy organisation promoting freedom of religion or belief for people of all faiths and none. In this submission, CSW would like to bring to the committee’s attention the situation of human rights, particularly freedom of religion or belief, for women in Myanmar with a specific focus on the package of “Race and Religion” laws and violence against women. Whilst there has been some significant progress in recent years towards democracy and human rights protection in Myanmar, there remain grave concerns both in areas of freedom of religion or belief and women’s rights. In 2015, a set of four laws focusing on the ‘protection of race and religion’ were implemented. This legislation aims to restrict religious conversion, inter-­‐faith marriage, polygamy and population control, effectively embedding gender bias into the legal system. Under the new “Buddhist Women’s Special Marriage Law” interfaith marriage between Buddhist women and Muslim men is restricted and the law requires interfaith couples to obtain a permit from local authorities to marry. In addition, anyone wishing to change their religion will be required to apply for permission to an 11-­member committee, consisting of officials responsible for religious affairs, immigration, women’s affairs and education. The new law violates Article 2 (non-­‐discrimination), Article 15 (equality before the law) and Article 16 (non-­‐discrimination in matters relating to marriage and family) of CEDAW. It also discriminates against religious minorities and undermines women’s right to freedom of religion or belief in Myanmar. The ‘protection of race and religion’ laws have been opposed by civil society in Burma and the international community. The UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Myanmar (Burma), Yanghee Lee, has highlighted “significant human rights concerns” relating to the legislation on religious conversions and inter-­‐faith marriage, saying it would “legalise discrimination, in particular against religious and ethnic minorities and against women”..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Christian Solidarity Worldwide (CSW)
Format/size: pdf (115K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: Summary of Myanmar CSO Shadow Report on Thematic Issues: Violence against Women
Date of publication: 17 June 2016
Description/subject: To 64th Session of UN CEDAW Committee In relation to Myanmar Combined Fourth and Fifth Periodic Report of State Party, 23rd February 2015 (CEDA W/C/MMR/4 - 5).....Key Issues on Violence Against Women: "This CEDAW Shadow Report is written by CEDAW Action Myanmar (CAM). This working group is established in 2012 and consists of 15 local organizations, network and individuals. The report consists of perceptions of 309 (with 226 women and 83 men) respondents who participated in a survey; along with news from print and social media. Myanmar has undergone revolutionary changes in its democratization process in 2010. The new people-led government came to power recently in April 2016, aims to push for fundamental transformation. Myanmar is also considered one of the world’s worst human rights abusers, and in particular rape and other sexual and gender based violence are widespread across the country. During this reporting period (2015-2016), there are still many issues on socio-economic status and political situation which has also continued to contribute to form of institutional violence across the country. During the reporting period (2015-2016), the number of cases reported has increased. With the new Government taking charge, people of Myanmar rightly expect restoration of Human Rights in the country. Though the State acceded CEDAW on 22nd July, 1997 and submitted initial report and periodic reports to CEDAW Committee, the government so far has failed in its obligation to eliminate all forms of discrimination against women. There are three key issues regarding Violence against Women. 1. Sexual Violence, particularly rape and sexual harassment--- 2. Domestic Violence--- 3. Institutional Violence, particularly rape, other forms of sexual assault perpetrated by military personnel and armed groups, uprising of current communal conflict and poverty issues..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: CEDAW Action, Myanmar (CAM)
Format/size: pdf (271K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: 64th PRE-SESSIONAL WORKING GROUP : THE REPUBLIC OF THE UNION OF MYANMAR - INFORM ATION ON ‘RACE AND RELIGION PROTECTION’ LAWS AND WHRDS.
Date of publication: 29 September 2015
Description/subject: In advance of the United Nations (UN) Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women’s adoption of the list of issues for the Republic of the Union of Myanmar’s fourth and fifth combined periodic reports in November 2015, Amnesty International would like to submit information concerning the adoption in Myanmar of four laws known as the “Protecting race and religion laws” recently approved by Myanmar’s Parliament an d signed into law by the President, and to the situation of Women Human Rights Defenders (WHRDs). The four laws – the Religious Conversion Law, the Myanmar Buddhist Women’s Special Marriage Law, the Population Control Healthcare Law and the Monogamy Law – contain many provisions which discriminate on multiple grounds, including gender, religion and marital status. Amnesty International and the International Commission of Jurists (ICJ) have undertaken a detailed analysis of the four draft laws and concluded that they do not accord with international human rights law and standards, including Myanmar’s legal obligations as a state party to the UN Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). ..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Amnesty International
Format/size: pdf (164K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: MYANMAR: BRIEFING TO THE UN COMMITTEE ON THE ELIMINATION OF DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN 64TH SESSION , 4-22 JULY 2016
Date of publication: 2016
Description/subject: INTRODUCTION: "In July 2016, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (the Committee) will examine Myanmar’s combined fourth and fifth periodic report at its 64th session. This examination provides an opportunity to review Myanmar’s progress since its last review in 2008 towards implementing in law and practice the provisions of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (the Convention). Since a quasi-civilian government came to power in 2011, Myanmar has embarked on a number of political, economic and social reforms. However, despite these reforms, Amnesty International is concerned that women and girls continue to face barriers to the full exercise of their human rights in law, policy and practice. In this briefing Amnesty International highlights four areas of concern: 1) restrictions on the rights to freedom of expression, association and peaceful assembly, which includes the situation of women human rights defenders (WHRDs); 2) the enactment of four discriminatory laws aimed at “protecting race and religion”; 3) the situation of Rohingya women and girls in Rakhine State; and 4) the lack of access to justice, truth and reparation for human rights abuses against women and girls in areas of armed conflict. Please note, however, that the concerns listed here are not exhaustive. In this submission, Amnesty International also assess progress made by Myanmar on implementing the Convention and sets out ways in which the government could better comply with its obligations under the Convention. The following documentation draws on Amnesty International’s ongoing research, which involves regular contact with local and international non-governmental organizations; and interviews with victims of human rights violations and abuses and their families, lawyers, and government officials. It also relies on daily media monitoring and extensive reading of academic and other credible publications..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Amnesty International
Format/size: pdf (966K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: Submission for the 64th session (4–22 July 2016) of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW)
Date of publication: 10 June 2016
Description/subject: Executive summary: In this submission, Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG) provides information concerning human rights issues affecting women in southeast Myanmar. The time period covered in this submission is from January 2012 to March 2016, which is a period characterised by dramatic and substantial changes in Myanmar, including the political reform process; the 2012 preliminary ceasefire agreement between the Karen National Union (KNU) and the government of Myanmar; the 2015 Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement; and the November 2015 general election, in which the National League for Democracy won a landslide victory, marking a change of course from the previous reign of consecutive military-backed governments. 2. Organisational information will be addressed first in a brief summary of KHRG and its operations and then KHRG’s research and data collection methodology will be detailed. After these initial sections, KHRG’s key findings related to human rights and discrimination of women in southeast Myanmar will be presented. The key findings will address the issues of gender inequality of (rural) women in political and public life; gender-based violence (GBV); rural women and girls’ access to education and healthcare, in particular maternal healthcare; and land confiscation and livelihood issues affecting rural women. Each of the key findings will start with a relevant quote from a local woman which is in line with KHRG’s mission to project the voices of villagers. The sections will conclude with concrete recommendations to the government..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: pdf (252K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations


Title: Long Way to Go - Continuing Violations of Human Rights and Discrimination Against Ethnic Women in Burma: CEDAW Shadow Report (English)
Date of publication: July 2016
Description/subject: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: "From 1962 to 2011 in Burma, the combination of repressive rule by a male-dominated military and a traditional cultural patriarchy had insidious and pervasive long-term negative effects on women’s equality. Decades of repression adversely impacted women’s health, well-being and welfare, ability to participate in politics and political decision-making, and educational, economic and employment opportunities. Moreover, during those six decades the military also waged war in several regions of Burma against various Ethnic Armed Organisations (EAOs), and conflict continues to this day. These long-running conflicts h ave been characterized by human rights abuses against ethnic communities, including se xual violence against ethnic women, and have had a devastating negative impact on the rights and opportunities available to ethnic women. In 2011, the military instituted a process of reform as part of a carefully-orchestrated plan to continue military rule under the guise of democracy. Since this nominally- civilian government (the Government) took power in 2011, women in Burma have experienced limited improvements with respect to fundamental human rights and freedoms but are far from enjoying the rights required by the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), to which Burma is a party. After years of “reform,” significant economic, political and social problems for women remain: widespread poverty and underdevelopment; a lack of legal, administrative and institutional capacity; a governing system that continues to lack true accountability and transparency; ongoing ethnic conflict, including continued human rights abuses and sexual violence by military forces; and pervasive gender inequality. The failure, after five years in office, of the Government to improve women’s rights to substantive equality and non-discrimination demonstrates a disregard for CEDAW’s mandates and compares unfavorably with troubling actions such as continuing sexual violence by the military, the swift passage of the discriminatory Laws on Race & Religion, and the failure to enact a comprehensive violence against women law. This Report focuses the women's human rights situation in Burma's ethnic areas, in particular in remote and conflict affected areas where most of WLB’s member organisations are operating. We highlight the ways in which rural and ethnic women in Burma are denied the equality and non-discrimination guarantees provided by CEDAW. While all women in Burma face the same struggle to enjoy their rights under CEDAW, rural and ethnic women face additional hurdles and specific harms such as trafficking, unequal access to education and healthcare, land insecurity and the devastating impact of drug production and trade. Moreover, rural and ethnic women are directly implicated by armed conflict and the quest for peace. This gap between the experiences of women in cities and urban settings versus those of ethic women in rural areas must be understood and taken account when analyzing the status of women’s rights in Burma. This Report seeks to highlight certain significant factors impeding women’s rights throughout the country. First, the military continues to play a powerful role in society and politics. This deeply-entrenched power is provided, in part, by the 2008 Constitution which grants the military complete legal autonomy over its own affairs, placing it outside of any civilian oversight by the executive or legislative branches. Further, the Constitution provides immunity to the military and Government officials for any misdeeds, including conflict-related sexual violence, in office and ensures that all military matters are to be decided solely by the military. Other provisions, such as Parliamentary quotas, ensure that the Military will retain a significant role in the legislative and executive branches. Therefore, the power and domination of the military at all levels of government is guaranteed in the Constitution, and, because the Military enjoys a veto over all Constitutional amendments, this power is unlikely to be reduced in the near future. Second, continued conflict has caused additional suffering for ethnic and rural women. The military has committed human rights abuses, including sexual violence against ethnic women, as part of its offensives in ethnic areas. Part of the conflict stems from a desire to control the vast natural resources in ethnic areas, and the military and its cronies have long-standing and extensive business interests in ethnic regions. Continuing conflict, and the web of military presence and business interests in ethnic areas, has had a devastating effect on women and women’s rights, especially in rural and ethnic areas. Third, part of the lack of progress on women’s equality is due to the woefully inadequate legal system in Burma. First and foremost, the Constitution itself establishes structural barriers to equality, and discriminates outright against women through failing to provide a CEDAW-compliant definition of discrimination and limiting job opportunities for women. It also discriminates against women indirectly by establishing the Parliamentary quotas for the military. Most of the laws that relate specifically to women are outdated, such as the Penal Code of 1861, and many laws, regulations, and policies (including customary law) are disadvantageous and discriminatory towards women. Laws passed since 2011 often did not take women’s concerns into account and some, such as the Laws on Race & Religion, are discriminatory outright. Women also do not enjoy protection from anti-discrimination legislation or a comprehensive violence against women law, which is of particular concern for women victims of conflict-related sexual violence. Moreover, even legal and other rights that are available on paper are often not enforced due to corruption in the legal system, the police force and other governmental authorities. These failures are compounded by a judiciary that is unreliable, susceptible to military influence and corruption, and often unwilling to enforce the rule of law. Outside of the formal legal system, the application of customary laws which are prevalent in rural and ethnic areas can also impede women’s access to justice. These factors present serious obstacles to women’s ability to know or enforce their rights. It is hoped that ensuring women’s equality will be a greater focus of the new NLD-led Government that came to power in April 2016. Given the structural barriers established by the military, including those in the Constitution, reducing the power and influence of the military will be a challenge. To encourage the new Government on the path to ensuring human rights, and women’s rights, it is crucial to provide it with guidelines and signposts for action. Forums such as this CEDAW review are essential to establishing benchmarks for women’s rights and equality, as promised by CEDAW. Rights under CEDAW should be made available, without restriction or further delay, to every woman and girl in Burma, regardless of her region, religion, or ethnicity."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Women's League of Burma
Format/size: pdf (3.1MB)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations
Women > Articles, reports and sites relating to women of Burma
Internal armed conflict > Internal armed conflict in Burma > Women and armed conflict > Women and armed conflict - Burma/Myanmar
Human Rights > Discrimination > Women: discrimination/violence against > Discrimination/violence against women: reports of violations in Burma


Title: Long Way to Go - Continuing Violations of Human Rights and Discrimination Against Ethnic Women in Burma: CEDAW Shadow Report - Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Date of publication: July 2016
Description/subject: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: "From 1962 to 2011 in Burma, the combination of repressive rule by a male-dominated military and a traditional cultural patriarchy had insidious and pervasive long-term negative effects on women’s equality. Decades of repression adversely impacted women’s health, well-being and welfare, ability to participate in politics and political decision-making, and educational, economic and employment opportunities. Moreover, during those six decades the military also waged war in several regions of Burma against various Ethnic Armed Organisations (EAOs), and conflict continues to this day. These long-running conflicts h ave been characterized by human rights abuses against ethnic communities, including se xual violence against ethnic women, and have had a devastating negative impact on the rights and opportunities available to ethnic women. In 2011, the military instituted a process of reform as part of a carefully-orchestrated plan to continue military rule under the guise of democracy. Since this nominally- civilian government (the Government) took power in 2011, women in Burma have experienced limited improvements with respect to fundamental human rights and freedoms but are far from enjoying the rights required by the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), to which Burma is a party. After years of “reform,” significant economic, political and social problems for women remain: widespread poverty and underdevelopment; a lack of legal, administrative and institutional capacity; a governing system that continues to lack true accountability and transparency; ongoing ethnic conflict, including continued human rights abuses and sexual violence by military forces; and pervasive gender inequality. The failure, after five years in office, of the Government to improve women’s rights to substantive equality and non-discrimination demonstrates a disregard for CEDAW’s mandates and compares unfavorably with troubling actions such as continuing sexual violence by the military, the swift passage of the discriminatory Laws on Race & Religion, and the failure to enact a comprehensive violence against women law. This Report focuses the women's human rights situation in Burma's ethnic areas, in particular in remote and conflict affected areas where most of WLB’s member organisations are operating. We highlight the ways in which rural and ethnic women in Burma are denied the equality and non-discrimination guarantees provided by CEDAW. While all women in Burma face the same struggle to enjoy their rights under CEDAW, rural and ethnic women face additional hurdles and specific harms such as trafficking, unequal access to education and healthcare, land insecurity and the devastating impact of drug production and trade. Moreover, rural and ethnic women are directly implicated by armed conflict and the quest for peace. This gap between the experiences of women in cities and urban settings versus those of ethic women in rural areas must be understood and taken account when analyzing the status of women’s rights in Burma. This Report seeks to highlight certain significant factors impeding women’s rights throughout the country. First, the military continues to play a powerful role in society and politics. This deeply-entrenched power is provided, in part, by the 2008 Constitution which grants the military complete legal autonomy over its own affairs, placing it outside of any civilian oversight by the executive or legislative branches. Further, the Constitution provides immunity to the military and Government officials for any misdeeds, including conflict-related sexual violence, in office and ensures that all military matters are to be decided solely by the military. Other provisions, such as Parliamentary quotas, ensure that the Military will retain a significant role in the legislative and executive branches. Therefore, the power and domination of the military at all levels of government is guaranteed in the Constitution, and, because the Military enjoys a veto over all Constitutional amendments, this power is unlikely to be reduced in the near future. Second, continued conflict has caused additional suffering for ethnic and rural women. The military has committed human rights abuses, including sexual violence against ethnic women, as part of its offensives in ethnic areas. Part of the conflict stems from a desire to control the vast natural resources in ethnic areas, and the military and its cronies have long-standing and extensive business interests in ethnic regions. Continuing conflict, and the web of military presence and business interests in ethnic areas, has had a devastating effect on women and women’s rights, especially in rural and ethnic areas. Third, part of the lack of progress on women’s equality is due to the woefully inadequate legal system in Burma. First and foremost, the Constitution itself establishes structural barriers to equality, and discriminates outright against women through failing to provide a CEDAW-compliant definition of discrimination and limiting job opportunities for women. It also discriminates against women indirectly by establishing the Parliamentary quotas for the military. Most of the laws that relate specifically to women are outdated, such as the Penal Code of 1861, and many laws, regulations, and policies (including customary law) are disadvantageous and discriminatory towards women. Laws passed since 2011 often did not take women’s concerns into account and some, such as the Laws on Race & Religion, are discriminatory outright. Women also do not enjoy protection from anti-discrimination legislation or a comprehensive violence against women law, which is of particular concern for women victims of conflict-related sexual violence. Moreover, even legal and other rights that are available on paper are often not enforced due to corruption in the legal system, the police force and other governmental authorities. These failures are compounded by a judiciary that is unreliable, susceptible to military influence and corruption, and often unwilling to enforce the rule of law. Outside of the formal legal system, the application of customary laws which are prevalent in rural and ethnic areas can also impede women’s access to justice. These factors present serious obstacles to women’s ability to know or enforce their rights. It is hoped that ensuring women’s equality will be a greater focus of the new NLD-led Government that came to power in April 2016. Given the structural barriers established by the military, including those in the Constitution, reducing the power and influence of the military will be a challenge. To encourage the new Government on the path to ensuring human rights, and women’s rights, it is crucial to provide it with guidelines and signposts for action. Forums such as this CEDAW review are essential to establishing benchmarks for women’s rights and equality, as promised by CEDAW. Rights under CEDAW should be made available, without restriction or further delay, to every woman and girl in Burma, regardless of her region, religion, or ethnicity."
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Women's League of Burma
Format/size: pdf (2.7MB)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Myanmar Documents submitted to CEDAW by civil society organisations
Women > Articles, reports and sites relating to women of Burma
Internal armed conflict > Internal armed conflict in Burma > Women and armed conflict > Women and armed conflict - Burma/Myanmar
Human Rights > Discrimination > Women: discrimination/violence against > Discrimination/violence against women: reports of violations in Burma


Title: CEDAW Myanmar 2016-07- State Party Report: Combined fourth and fifth periodic reports of States parties due in 2014
Date of publication: 02 March 2015
Description/subject: Introduction: "Myanmar has been implementing a series of reforms simultaneously in the political, economic and social spheres since 2011, with the aim of building up state peace and stability, development and democracy. A certain extent of success has been achieved. The Government of Myanmar (GOM) has been widely carrying out the eight tasks of rural development and poverty alleviation, macro-economic reform programmes, Framework for economic and social reform, development of the agricultural sector, internal peace and national reconsolidation tasks, national education-reform, enhancement of the health sector and a people- centred budget system. In doing so, the government has enacted necessary new laws, repealed out-of-date laws, and revised existing laws..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Union of Myanmar via United Nations (CEDAW /C/MMR/4-5)
Format/size: pdf (677K)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) - UN/Myanmar documents


Title: CEDAW Myanmar 2016-07-Summary record of the 1408th meeting
Date of publication: 06 July 2016
Language: English
Source/publisher: CEDAW
Format/size: pdf (161K)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) - UN/Myanmar documents


Title: CEDAW Myanmar 2016-07-Summary record of the 1407th meeting
Date of publication: 06 July 2016
Language: English
Source/publisher: CEDAW
Format/size: pdf (168K)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) - UN/Myanmar documents


Title: CEDAW Myanmar-2016-07: Annnexes to the State Party Report
Date of publication: 02 March 2015
Language: English
Source/publisher: Govt of Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (4.5MB)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) - UN/Myanmar documents


Title: CEDAW Myanmar 2016-07: List of Issues.
Date of publication: 06 July 2016
Language: English
Source/publisher: CEDAW
Format/size: pdf (245K)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) - UN/Myanmar documents


Title: CEDAW Myanmar 2016-07-Answers to Questions
Date of publication: 06 July 2016
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar via CEDAW
Format/size: pdf (402K)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) - UN/Myanmar documents


Title: CEDAW Myanmar 2016-07-Myanmar National Human Rights Commission (MNHRC) Report to CEDAW
Date of publication: 06 July 2016
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar National Human Rights Commission (MNHRC)
Format/size: pdf (184K)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) - UN/Myanmar documents


Title: CEDAW Myanmar 2016-07-Opening Remarks of H.E. U Maung Wai, Permanent Representative of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
Date of publication: 06 July 2016
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar via CEDAW
Format/size: pdf (133K)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) - UN/Myanmar documents


Title: CEDAW Myanmar 2016-07-Additional members of Myanmar Delegation
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (340K)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) - UN/Myanmar documents


Title: CEDAW Myanmar 2016-07- Additional information
Date of publication: 06 July 2016
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (820K)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) - UN/Myanmar documents


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Monday 18 July, 2016
Date of publication: 18 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: Major Step To Peace - Daw Aung San Suu Kyi talks with non-signatory armed groups...Defence Services Commanderin- Chief’s Office (Army, Navy and Air) holds Waso robes offering ceremony...Ministry of Hotels and Tourism reminds contractors to apply for building permits before, not after, construction...Govt allocates over K10 billion to expand electricity access within Bago Region...State Counsellor visits two museums in Yangon...Rakhine Coast could be made a conservation area...DMH alerts flood warning as Chindwin exceeds danger level...Head-on-collision kills motorcyclist...Bus accident kills two, injures 34...Land plots to be returned to lepers...Kilogram of heroin seized in Banmauk...One more pedestrian overpass planned to be built this financial year...Mandalay’s milling industries held back by sub-standard machinery...Real estate expo to be held in Mandalay...Retired old buses given a second life..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: Myanmar to receive US$200 million for post-disaster relief...Tourists can’t stay away from Mandalay...President tours Genghis Khan Statue Complex in Mongolia...U Aung Lynn appointed as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Myanmar to US...Myanmar scouts to join the club...Euromoney names KBZ Myanmar’s best bank...KOICA New President visits Myanmar as the first visiting of the Southeast Asia..... "OPINION": "Invest in education and reap the rewards" - Kyaw Thura.....ARTICLE: "A new chapter in Myanmar-China relationship?" - Thein Aye.....POEM: Our Guiding Star - Pho Thit
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (4.6MB)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Monday 18 July, 2016
Date of publication: 18 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (14MB)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Monday 18 July, 2016
Date of publication: 18 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (7.9MB)
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: China’s Engagement in Myanmar: From Malacca Dilemma to Transition Dilemma
Date of publication: July 2016
Description/subject: "This briefing examines the changing political and economic landscape, outlining the key histories, developments and strategies in recent Myanmar-China relations. A particular concern is the continuing conflict in the ethnic borderlands in Myanmar, which are in the front-line of contention and where many of the country’s most valuable natural resources are located. History has long warned that instability and political failure will continue until there is inclusive peace and reform in these territories..... Key Points: " •• The changing socio-political landscape in Myanmar since the advent of a new system of government in March 2011 has brought significant challenges to China’s political and economic relations with the country. From a previous position of international dominance, China now has to engage in a diversified national landscape where different sectors of society have impact on socio-political life and other foreign actors, including the USA and Japan, are seeking to gain political and economic influence. •• China has made important steps in recognising these changes. In contrast to reliance on “government-to-government” relations under military rule, Chinese interests have begun to interact with Myanmar politics and society more broadly. A “landbridge” strategy connecting China to the Bay of Bengal has also been superseded by the aspiring, but still uncertain, “One Belt, One Road” initiative of President Xi Jinping to connect China westwards by land and sea with Eurasia and Africa. •• Many challenges remain. Government change, ethnic conflict and the 2015 Kokang crisis raise questions over political relations, border stability, communal tensions, and the security of Chinese nationals and property in Myanmar, while Chinese investments have been subject to criticism and protest. Mega-projects agreed with the previous military government are subject to particular objection, and resentment is widespread over unbridled trade in such natural resources as timber and jade that provides no local benefit and is harmful to local communities and the environment. •• Chinese interests prioritize stability in Myanmar. While keen to develop good relations in the country and support ethnic peace, Chinese officials are concerned about the sustainability of the present system of governance and what this will mean for China. A continuing preoccupation is the USA, which often dominates strategic thinking in China to the detriment of informed understanding of other countries and issues. These uncertainties have been heightened by the advent to government of the civilian-led National League for Democracy in March. •• Given their proximity and troubled histories, it is essential that good relations are developed between the two countries on the basis of equality and mutual respect. Initiatives to engage with public opinion, communities and interest groups in both countries should be encouraged. Based upon its own experiences, economic change, rather than political change, is China’s primary focus. Chinese officials, however, need to understand that Myanmar’s challenges are political at root. Criticisms should not be put down to a lack of knowledge or “anti-Chinese” sentiment. Good projects that will benefit the local population will be welcomed: bad projects that ignore their priorities and vision for development will not."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Transnational Institute (TNI)
Format/size: pdf (515K)
Alternate URLs: https://www.tni.org/en/publication/chinas-engagement-in-myanmar-from-malacca-dilemma-to-transition-...
Date of entry/update: 18 July 2016
ML > Foreign Relations > China-Burma relations
Regional Dynamics > “One Belt, One Road” initiative


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Sunday 17 July, 2016
Date of publication: 17 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: DPN seeks meeting with State Counsellor, participation in peace conference - Ye Khaung Nyunt...Dawei sees highest number of crimes in June and July...Ayeyawady water levels rise but deemed of no concern for Pyay...Over 200 villagers flee fighting in northern Shan State...Strain on Hsipaw IDP camp food rations as more villagers seek refuge from armed conflict...Waso robe offering ceremony held in Nay Pyi Taw...Labutta’s most vulnerable village to receive weather shelter worth K100 million...VP U Henry Van Thio provides relief assistance...Staff quarters for government employees to be built in Rakhine...Yaba seized in Pyigyidagun and Meiktila townships...CCTV cameras to be installed on BRT Lite buses...Anti-erosion defences of Ngawun River on their last legs...Fugitive arrested after escape from prison...Brown opium seized in Loilem..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: President U Htin Kyaw describes ASEM 11th Summit as fruitful and productive...President U Htin Kyaw holds separate talks with foreign leaders...Border trade earns over K24 trillion using ITC system within three years...Night market to be opened in Nyaungshwe...ASEM11 Summit concludes, leaders announces its resulting documents: Chair’s Statement and Ulaanbaatar Declaration on July 16..... "OPINION": "What makes our children distance themselves from school" - Kyaw Thura.....ARTICLE: "Peace through Understanding" - Dr. Khine Khine Win
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (2.5MB)
Date of entry/update: 17 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Saturday 16 July, 2016
Date of publication: 16 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: TRAINING FOR THE FUTURE - State Counsellor urges the promotion of technical vocational education training in Myanmar...Fifty-five ethnic armed groups to attend summit in Kachin State...Relief supplies provided to flood victims in Rakhine State...Rakhine children develop skin diseases from floodwaters...Private cars banned during school run in bid to cut traffic...Over 100 northern Rakhine homes at risk from river erosion...Nay Pyi Taw council administrative mechanism to undergo bottom-up approach - Thein Ko Lwin...Opium related goods and ammunition seized in Lashio...Heroin and Yaba confiscated in Amarapura and Mabein...Police arrest four men for motorcycle theft...Fisheries department plans to make a splash by reeling in illegal fishing boats...Price of chicken stable as new broiler farms open...Pilot project of 100-cinema plan to begin in target areas...State Counsellor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi visits Defence Services Museum in Nay Pyi Taw...New course to turn out skilled caretakers for minors with autism..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: American College of Sports Medicine to cooperate to promote the sector...President U Htin Kyaw addresses 11th Asia-Europe Meeting Summit in Mongolia...President U Htin Kyaw holds separate talks with heads of delegations at ASEM Summit in Mongolia...Second Myanmar-Thai Bridge will be completed in August...Petrified sal tree and palm wood products exported to foreign markets...Japan’s Hitachi Group to invest 30 billion JPY in Myanmar’s technology sector...Myanmar will participate in 13th China-AESAN goods exhibition...Surplus energy to be exported among ASEAN countries..... "OPINION": "Peace is just a nod of agreement away" - Kyaw Thura.....ARTICLE: "Full Moon of Waso, Dhammacakkapavattana Sutta Day" - Ba Sein (Religious Affairs)
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (2.6MB)
Date of entry/update: 17 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Sunday 17 July, 2016
Date of publication: 17 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (9.3MB)
Date of entry/update: 17 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Saturday 16 July, 2016
Date of publication: 17 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (7.5MB)
Date of entry/update: 17 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Sunday 17 July, 2016
Date of publication: 17 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (9.1MB)
Date of entry/update: 17 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Saturday 16 July, 2016
Date of publication: 16 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (8.2MB)
Date of entry/update: 17 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: If they had hope, they would speak - The ongoing use of state sponsored sexual violence in Burma’s ethnic communities - Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Date of publication: 24 November 2014
Description/subject: ‘If they had hope, they would speak’: The ongoing use of state-sponsored sexual violence in Burma’s ethnic communities’, highlights 118 incidences of gang-rape, rape, and attempted sexual assault that have been documented in Burma since 2010, in both ceasefire and non-ceasefire areas. This number is believed to be a fraction of the actual number of cases that have taken place. These abuses—which are widespread and systematic—must be investigated, and may constitute war crimes and crimes against humanity under international criminal law..."
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Women's League of Burma
Format/size: pdf (2.9MB)
Date of entry/update: 17 July 2016
ML > Human Rights > Discrimination > Women: discrimination/violence against > Discrimination/violence against women: reports of violations in Burma
Internal armed conflict > Internal armed conflict in Burma > Women and armed conflict > Women and armed conflict - Burma/Myanmar


Title: CEDAW 64 Session (04 Jul 2016 - 22 Jul 2016)
Description/subject: The Myanmar documents are about half-way down the page. - Myanmar report, annexes etc, plus the 2 summary records from the Myanmar sessions
Language: English
Source/publisher: CEDAW
Format/size: pdf
Date of entry/update: 16 July 2016
ML > The UN System and Burma/Myanmar > Main UN human rights bodies working on Burma (Myanmar) > United Nations human rights treaties to which Myanmar is a party > Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) - UN/Myanmar documents


Title: Playing with fire
Date of publication: 15 July 2016
Description/subject: Burning lands and fragile livelihoods in the hills of Myanmar’s southern Chin State.... "Everywhere you look in Myanmar’s isolated southern Chin State in March, the landscape is burning. The crisp morning air quickly turns acrid and smoke fills the valleys, obscuring the impressive peaks of the Arakan Mountains that extend northwest over the border into India. At night, thin lines of orange flame extend off into the horizon, like fiery necklaces draped over the slopes below. Fire is an essential part of the agro-ecological landscape in Chin state. The Chin people, known for the traditional facial tattoos that adorn older Chin women, are predominantly shifting cultivators. Leading up to the rainy season, farmers set fire to the forest to clear and prepare a new patch of land for planting crops of mostly millet, maize and upland rice varieties. After harvest, the land is left to regenerate for five to 10 years, as farmers move on to a new patch of land to repeat the process. Agriculture here is extremely low input. The lack of flat land makes the use of draught animals difficult, and households lack access to fertilisers and irrigation. In fact, in most cases the only input is the labour of the farming household. While shifting cultivation is deeply integrated into the daily experiences of Chin households, farmers here face increasing economic and ecological challenges in improving the livelihoods and food security of their households — particularly in the context of ongoing reforms in the wider Myanmar economy. The hilly terrain, poor soils and lack of irrigation mean that agriculture is often a precarious pursuit, and limited to grain crops of low nutritional value..."
Author/creator: Mark Vicol
Language: English
Source/publisher: "New Mandala"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 15 July 2016
ML > Agriculture and fisheries > Shifting ("swidden", "jhum", "taungya") cultivation - Burma/Myanmar


Title: Communal Land Tenure - A Social Anthropological Study in Laos
Date of publication: 20 January 2016
Description/subject: CONCLUSION: "A developing country like Lao PDR is struggling to gain recognition from other countries in the world. This requires that the country applies a human rights perspective to governance of land. In this case the land rights are the rights of the ethnic groups in the uplands that practice customary communal tenure. These groups would like the government to accept and register their communal land use legally. The first step towards this is in the development of the National Land Use Policy which is still in draft. This study provides evidence-based arguments for the inclusion of a respect for customary communal tenure in the land policy. The field study on communal tenure in Houaphan can serve the government in terms of integration of local land governance aspects into its development planning process. The research has brought an increased understanding on biological characteristics of the common resources and how communities use and manage such resources in a way that everyone including how the poor share benefits and responsibilities to keep the resource sustainable and thus contribute to the national land management process. The research analyzed how local ethnic group farmers in Houaphan view the resources that they have traditionally used as the property of their community. They have communally organized institutions that provide sufficient incentives to ensure equity in access to land and for the farmers to invest in enhancing the productivity of the resource system through internal rules that assign rights to individual households, while protecting the outer boundaries. These rules are oral internal rules. They are collectively created, used and developed by generations of villagers. The internal rules include characteristics of natural and social aspects and they support the improvement of local life in terms of protection of the resources for future use. The research has found that the communal tenure system in Houaphan is slowly affected by legal land and forest management activities of the government, particularly where the government does not integrate local practice of use and management of local resources of local ethnic people. Currently, many international and local business investors are looking at natural resources in Houaphan province as business destination. Evidence-based research result shows that it is necessary to protect the land of the ethnic groups to safeguard against land loss to business activities which may be planned without considering existing communal tenure. Many local communities will lose their customary rights to their common property resources and the country will at the later stage have to address more complicated political issues if local communities see that they are losing land to outsiders. The evidence-based findings of this research suggest an option that communal tenure rights of local communities in Houaphan should be legally recognised along with provision of clear set of management rules and the formation of the village as a legal entity to fully exercise the management of the resources through an issuance of communal titles to the land parcels that make up the common property of the village. The communal tenure should include the fallows of the shifting cultivation uplands and all the customary communal tenure of upland and lower land communities. The cultural and social dimension of communal land use is a critical aspect to consider in order to work out strategies for the future development of rural life in the province. This will lay a foundation for local people to improve their social-economic condition and ensure their participation in the country’s development process. The study has applied selectively the theory of Thomas Højrup to form a macro view of the country’s development process in the remote areas. As part of the interpellation conditions highlighted by Højrup, the country is experiencing a profound process of transformation. The Government of Laos organizes local societies and re-arranges land and forests in order to transform a traditional subsistence economy to a market economy. In practice, interpellation does not always turns out successfully because many economic development activities destroy a local practice that is worth preserving in terms of livelihood and human rights of the communities. This happens in particular where traditional common property systems are found and the systems that have existed long before Lao PDR came into being. The transformation means change and this change is a question that needs to be clearly answered before communities agree to participate in the development process. Where such change is proposed by outsiders, local people need to know that it brings to them better results in comparison to what they already have. Otherwise they are reluctant to participate in the country’s transformation process as they value their own customary ways. This reveals that not only the country’s worldview, but also the view of local people towards how communal resources should be managed is important for the transformation. So far the local perceptions and practices of communal tenure is not widely understood by government officers and the more studies that are carried out to feed into the finalization of the land policy and new land law the better."
Author/creator: Luck Bounmixay
Language: English
Source/publisher: Universidad de Murcia, Escuela Internacional de Doctorado
Format/size: pdf (5.1MB-reduced version; 9.3MB-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs22/Bounmixay-2016-01-20-PhD_Thesis-Communal_Land_Tenure.pdf
Date of entry/update: 15 July 2016
ML > Land > Customary tenure - global and regional


Title: THE FUTURE OF CUSTOMARY TENURE. OPTIONS FOR POLICYMAKERS PROPERTY RIGHTS AND RESOURCE GOVERNANCE BRIEFING PAPER # 8
Date of publication: 2014
Description/subject: SUMMARY: "For years, policy makers have debated how to deal with customary tenure — sometimes known as ―informal,‖ ―indigenous,‖ or ―traditional law.‖ This concern arises because dual (or multiple) legal systems coexist in many countries: statutory law alongside informal, customary practices, religious law, etc. Educated urban elites tend to use the statutory system while rural citizens, the less educated, and the poor typically rely on the customary system. The presence of multiple systems can contribute to insecurity and conflict; finding ways to effectively integrate the two is an important policy challenge in many countries. In the past, most countries thought that with time and ―modernization‖ they could simply erase customary tenure systems, replacing them with statutory systems based on titled private property. Experience now shows that this is not realistic (at least in the short term) and neither may it be desirable since customary tenure systems have attributes and strengths that respond to real needs in man y countries. Furthermore, as customary systems are undermined, they leave a void that statutory administrative systems are ill equipped to fill, given the limited administrative capacity in many countries. For these reasons, policymakers now seek some sort of accommodation with customary tenure and are looking for guidance and experience with how these issues have been dealt with in other countries. As many as two billion people are currently estimated to live under customary tenure regimes. When these systems are undermined, people lose rights that are critical to their livelihoods, spawning resistance and increasing poverty among already marginal populations. This process is accelerating as international companies seek land in remote communities, forest resources are commoditized (with REDD and Payments for Eco - system Services), and periurban development creates new land markets. This brief proposes that valorizing customary tenure systems can mitigate the pressures that undermine local tenure security. This can be done by formally recognizing and providing a legal ―space‖ for customary tenure rights, by registering rights established under customary tenure regimes as statutory rights, or by implementing a hybrid model that combines elements of customary and statutory systems. In all cases, the goal is to provide cost - effective tenure security. The first section of this issue brief reviews the concept and characteristics of customary tenure systems. It next summarizes the factors contributing to the evolution of customary tenure in response to a wide range of institutional and economic pressures. This is followed by a brief assessment of how statutory and customary rights systems interact, the circumstances that propel one or the other to dominate, and examples of where and why the two are likely to come into conflict. The brief concludes with a short summary of the types of interventions that USAID projects have implemented in this domain..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: USAID Land Tenure Project
Format/size: pdf (345K)
Date of entry/update: 15 July 2016
ML > Land > Customary tenure - global and regional


Title: LOW-TECH MAGAZINE
Description/subject: "Low-tech Magazine refuses to assume that every problem has a high-tech solution. A simple, sensible, but nevertheless controversial message; high-tech has become the idol of our society. Instead, Low-tech Magazine talks about the potential of past and often forgotten knowledge and technologies when it comes to designing a sustainable society. Sometimes, these low-tech solutions could be copied without any changes. More often, interesting possibilities arise when you combine old technology with new knowledge and new materials, or when you apply old concepts and traditional knowledge to modern technology. We also keep an eye on what is happening in the developing world, where resource constraints often lead to inventive, low-tech solutions. Underlying the common view of a high-tech sustainable society is the belief that we don't have to change our affluent lifestyle. This is not a realistic view, but it sells. However, changing our lifestyle does not mean that we have to go back to the middle ages and give up all modern comforts. A downsized, sustainable industrial civilization is very well possible - and more fun, too!"
Language: English
Source/publisher: LOW-TECH MAGAZINE
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 15 July 2016
ML > Development - focus on Sustainable and Endogenous Development > Sustainable development > Roots and Resources - global and regional experience and analysis


Title: NO TECH MAGAZINE
Language: English
Source/publisher: NO TECH MAGAZINE
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 15 July 2016
ML > Development - focus on Sustainable and Endogenous Development > Sustainable development > Roots and Resources - global and regional experience and analysis


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Friday 15 July, 2016
Date of publication: 15 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: BUILDING RAKHINE STATE - Rakhine State needs pragmatic action to ensure peace, stability and development...Survey reveals over 1,700 plots of vacant land within Yangon’s industrial zones...VP U Henry Van Thio holds talks on disaster management to aid Rakhine flood victims...UEC’s electoral tribunal upholds eligibility of NLD’s representatives-elect...Ministry provides loans to village-tract farmers with unpaid debts...DMH releases water level updates...Yangon gov’t prepares to bring e-Yangon payment system online within six months - Ye Khaung Nyunt...Landslide kills four in Phakant...Landslide dam burst confirmed by ID...One worker dead, five injured following industrial accident...A man died of misfire while assaulting daughter...Two snatchers get caught in Tamwe...Illegal sawn timber seized in Sagaing...Farmers to receive advanced loan under advanced purchase system...Induced breeding of climbing perch tested in cooperation with World Fish Myanmar...Regional Wushu competition seeks fresh blood...SSMNC’s 47-member plenary session concludes...Myanmar to invest $206m in new fleets for rail transportation sector...Closing ceremony of basic tailoring course 2/2016 held in Taungoo...Circular train passenger numbers on the rise...Rate of felonies rising in Bago..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: Union Minister U Kyaw Tint Swe receives Councilor of US State Department...President U Htin Kyaw tours Incheon Free Economic Zone in Republic of Korea...Dr Pe Myint meets US ambassadors to discuss media reform...Tourism ministry approves 16 new hotels nationwide...Central Bank encourages foreign banks to proceed in seeking licenses...Petrol price need to be aligned with world price...ASEAN senior officials meet for energy issues in Nay Pyi Taw..... "OPINION": "Economic growth through more privatisation" - Kyaw Thura.....ARTICLE: "Freedom of other religions (Christianity, Hinduism, Islamism, Animism and others) in the Republic of the Union of Myanmar - Ba Sein (Religious Affairs)
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (2.9MB)
Date of entry/update: 15 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Friday 15 July, 2016
Date of publication: 15 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (11MB)
Date of entry/update: 15 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Friday 15 July, 2016
Date of publication: 15 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (9MB)
Date of entry/update: 15 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: Rivers in Myanmar: can the ecosystem tell us how things are going?
Description/subject: "Towards the end of 2015 I travelled to Myanmar and was struck by the vibrancy and beauty of a country that has gone through long periods of conflict, where the people seem to reflect an optimism and an inspirational enthusiasm for a new way of living. Rivers are the lifeblood of Burmese society, and yet coming out of years of political and economic isolation it is perhaps not surprising that the rivers are not well researched or understood. So much of Burmese culture is tied to these big rivers for transport, food and livelihoods. Many of the people live in close contact with the rivers and have a thriving boat culture, with boats and barges of all shapes and sizes navigating hundreds of kilometers up the river. With Myanmar opening up and development of its water resources occurring at a fast rate, there is an urgent need to understand the river situation and to ask questions of how best to manage these rivers so that they continue to provide services to a society that appears destined to grow. An issue that is already suggesting that things are not as good as they could be, is that the fish stocks that people are so dependent on, appear to be in serious decline. Why is this? Have the fish and the rivers themselves been used too much? Are the rivers polluted or are they suffering some other form of stress? What can be done to protect the fish stocks so that they continue to provide for the people of Myanmar? It is from questions such as these that a project was born looking at the health of the rivers in Myanmar, concentrating on the lower reaches of the Ayeyarwady (Irrawaddy), a “working river” at the heart of Myanmar’s national prosperity; and the Thanlwin (Salween), a near-pristine system with large potential for development, shared with China and Thailand..."
Author/creator: Chris Dickens
Language: English
Source/publisher: Consortium of International Agricultural Research Centers (CGIAR)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 14 July 2016
ML > Water, including dams > Water bodies (global. regional) > Water in Burma - water security and water bodies (including coastal waters) > Burma's water bodies - general


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Thursday 14 July, 2016
Date of publication: 14 July 2016
Description/subject: EXECUTIVE: "Myanmar’s statement on the Award of the Arbitral Tribunal on the South China Sea under Annexure VII of UNCLOS 13 July 2016.....DOMESTIC NEWS: MOVING TO FIRMER GROUND - Roughly 200 Letpadaung households stranded by the roadside as Chindwin bursts...Labourers sentenced to 1 month jail or a K5,000 fine for contempt of court - Thein Ko Lwin...Vice President U Henry Van Thio inspects National Museum and National Library...Speaker U Win Myint meets with lawmakers in Magwe...Ma Ba Tha rails against Yangon Region Chief Minister while urging calm...Flag at half-mast, siren wailing and honking for Martyrs’ Day...RBE trains to run between Taikkyi, Insein this month...Exhibition aims to showcase Myanmar’s natural world...Car accident kills 5, injures 11...Ownerless illegal gold digging machines seized in Nam Lon creek...Man attempted to commit suicide by jumping down from the motel...47-member SSMNC meets to discuss religious issues...Anti-Human Trafficking Police Force give educational talks on human trafficking across the country...Army chief hands over relief aids to floods victims in Rakhine State..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: World Bank-supported project to provide financial support to all schools in Myanmar - Thein Ko Lwin...Vice President U Myint Swe receives Ro K Ambassador...President U Htin Kyaw leaves for Mongolia to attend 11th ASEM Summit...Union Information Minister meets with delegations from IMS/Fojo Media Institute, DW Akademie...CMP garment industry eyes US, Canadian and Russian markets...Sculpture business needs aid...NTT Communications to offer broadband service in Yangon...Viettel to cooperate with Myanmar National Telecom Holding to become fourth operator...Fishery exports expected to fetch US$700 million this FY..... "OPINION": "Hub with care" - Aung Myint Oo.....ARTICLE: "Monastic education schools and monastic institutions in the Republic of the Union of Myanmar" - Ba Sein (Religious Affairs)
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (2.7MB)
Date of entry/update: 14 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Wednesday 13 July, 2016
Date of publication: 13 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: FLOOD SAFETY WARNING - DMH issues alert to people in low-lying areas along Chindwin, Ngawun rivers...Only one Sangha organisation exists: SSMNC...Fifty thousand young fish for Inle Lake...Tatmadaw men donate food to flood victims...More Rakhine homes swept away as riverbank erosion intensifies...High-speed ferries along the Chindwin suspended amid rising water levels...Central Committee, working committees meet to discuss Hluttaw sessions...Calls made for continuation of survey to evaluate impact of Emerald Green Project...Electoral tribunal degazettes Shan State Hluttaw representative...New arrivals to NLD HIV clinic puts stress on resources...Yangon circle line upgrade to be implemented next fiscal year...Taninthayi Coastal Region Military Command makes donation in Kawthoung Township...Twelve vaccines to be provided publicly free of charge...Abandoned illegal logs and sawn timber seized in Aunglan...Five suspected drug dealers arrested in Gangaw...Yaba and marijuana confiscated in Mong Phyat...Illegal logs seized in Kyaukme...No more grant for changed vehicles locally manufactured...Senior General Min Aung Hlaing visits Sittwe to help flood victims...Commander-in-Chief (Air)’s shield Chess Tournament 2016 launches in Taungoo...250,000 young fish to be added into over 500 acres of paddy field..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: Workshop on technological support for agriculture development held...Large Mixed-Use Redevelopment Project in Yangon led by Mitsubishi groups...Chinese windshields in high demand...Leeches in high demand...Myanmar gold appreciates to record breaking value...PATH’s fortified rice project...Myanmar looks to develop scout registration system..... "OPINION": "Willingness to change matters most" - KhinMaung Aye.....ARTICLE: "A Right Competition or Let’s Be Second Gavesøs" - Ashin Sþriya (Gemini) (MA, ITBMU).....PEOPLE'S FORUM: Dear Editor - Hein Htet
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (2.7MB)
Date of entry/update: 14 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Thursday 14 July, 2016
Date of publication: 14 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (8.2MB)
Date of entry/update: 14 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Wednesday 13 July, 2016
Date of publication: 13 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (13MB)
Date of entry/update: 14 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Thursday 14 July, 2016
Date of publication: 14 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (8.8MB)
Date of entry/update: 14 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Wednesday 13 July, 2016
Date of publication: 13 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (9MB)
Date of entry/update: 14 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar"Tuesday 12 July, 2016
Date of publication: 12 July 2016
Description/subject: EXECUTIVE: National Reconciliation and Peace Center formed The President’s Office formed the “National Reconciliation and Peace Center” with the release of Order 50/2016 yesterday. The following is the full translation of the Order.....OTHER DOMESTIC NEWS: U Henry Van Thio talks development tasks, disaster preparedness plans for Sagaing Region, Chin State...Pyithu Hluttaw Speaker meets with lawmakers in Sagaing Region...People are key to implementing development...Sixty Cases of human trafficking exposed in the first half of 2016...Young women to shape the future...Forming of Hluttaw Committee aims to resolve Tanintharyi Region’s farmland disputes...Mandalay-Myitkyina SE train fares reduced by 22 %...Illegally bred Himalayan bears sent to Mandalay Zoo...Passenger truck overturns, injuring all on board in Nay Pyi Taw...Domestic real estate market likely to be active within second half of year...Religious population data to be released this month...Illegal weapons seized in Bago Region...20,000 yaba tablets seized in Mandalay Region, Shan State...Over 150 unlicensed vehicles seized in six months...YCDC to build twostorey markets...Consumer protection law to be rewritten...Yangon Transport Authority will be formed in July...Jengkols selling well despite the low price...Aid sent flood victims in Rakhine..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: Raid saved citizens - Nineteen Myanmar nationals rescued from traffickers in Thailand...Myanmar building materials trade open to local-foreign joint ventures...Telenor Myanmar provided MMK 86.4 million (MMK 864 Lakh) for flood response in Rakhine...Myanmar Connect returns with a global vision for Myanmar’s telecoms community..... "OPINION": "A glimmer of hope for Myanmar refugees" - Tha Sein.....ARTICLE: "The Eleventh Plenary Meeting of the Seventh State Sangha Maha Nayaka Committee of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar to be held from 13th to 14th July 2016" - Ba Sein (Religious Affairs)
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (4.5MB)
Date of entry/update: 12 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Tuesday 12 July, 2016
Date of publication: 12 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (8.2MB)
Date of entry/update: 12 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Monday 11 July, 2016
Date of publication: 11 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (11MB)
Date of entry/update: 12 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Tuesday 12 July, 2016
Date of publication: 12 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (7.8MB)
Date of entry/update: 12 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: BURMA BULLETIN Issue 114 - June 2016
Date of publication: June 2016
Description/subject: IN THIS ISSUE:- KEY STORY: SITUATION WORSENS FOR ROHINGYA: UN: Rohingya - crimes against humanity; Green card program ramps up; „Thitsar‟ program; Formation of Central Committee; Ma Ba Tha monk denounces protest... DEMOCRACY & GOVERNANCE: Peaceful Assembly and Procession Law... ETHNIC AFFAIRS & CONFLICT: Authorities ban release of torture report; Second „Panglong Conference‟ in Aug Armed conflict: clashes, civilian abuse... HUMAN RIGHTS: Burma: human trafficking update; Gambira released, for now; BBC Reporter jailed; Mosque Destroyed in Bago; Plan to settle land grab cases... NATURAL RESOURCES: Govt struggles to reign in illegal logging; Gems Scandal: missing US$100 million... WOMEN’S RIGHTS: Preparations begin for CEDAW report... DISPLACEMENT: Suu Kyi inks deal with Thailand... ECONOMY: Burma: top investment destination; Farming debt on the rise... OTHER BURMA NEWS... REPORTS.
Language: English
Source/publisher: ALTSEAN-Burma
Format/size: pdf (348-reduced version; 466K-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.altsean.org/Docs/PDF%20Format/Burma%20Bulletin/June%202016%20Burma%20Bulletin.pdf
Date of entry/update: 12 July 2016
ML > Activism and Advocacy (groups from Burma, solidarity groups, campaigns, publications) > Online publications by Burma solidarity groups > ALTSEAN-Burma archive


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Monday 11 July, 2016
Date of publication: 11 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (10MB)
Date of entry/update: 11 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Monday 11 July, 2016
Date of publication: 11 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: THREE AND COUNTING - Maubin industrial zone to become 3rd zone...State Counsellor Daw Aung San Suu Kyi to hold talks with UNFC’s Chairman on 17 July...Vice President U Henry Van Thio inspects construction and reclamation works in Sagaing Region...Workshops aim to improve ability of Myanmar scout trainers...Speaker urges representatives to serve the people...New Companies Act to relieve some burdens on SMEs...Bogyoke Aung San memorial park in Pyinmana under renovation...Police uncover nearly 60 human trafficking cases in first half of year...Two killed, 29 injured in high-speed car crash...Illegal harvested hardwood seized in Sagaing...Young man wanted for robbery...Short-Circuit fire destroys mobile sale centres in Mandalay...Two missing after fishing boat sinks...Aviation fuel stations to be built across nation...Thanhlyin bridge won’t shake property market..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: Police uncover nearly 60 human trafficking cases in first half of year...Vehicles imported through border need to be in accord with three rules...Old rice prices stable despite decline in export price of rice to China..... POEM: "Occupational Safety and Health" - Lokethar..... "OPINION": "Let’s avoid hate speech" - Khin Maung Aye.....ARTICLE: "Natural Remedies for Arthritis Pains" - Khin Maung Myint.
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (5.2MB)
Date of entry/update: 11 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: Les Nouvelles de Birmanie, Juin 2016
Date of publication: June 2016
Description/subject: LES EVENEMENTS CLEFS DU MOIS: La Birmanie est classée comme l’un des pires pays du monde concernant le trafic humain...Nations Unies: les Rohingyas pourraient être victimes de crimes contre l’humanité...Un moine de Ma Ba Tha dénonce une manifestation anti- Rohingyas...Les autorités interdisent la publication d’un rapport sur la torture par l’armée birmane...La guerre des mots pour qualifier les Rohingyas se poursuit en Birmanie...Les conflits armés: affrontements et abus contre les civils...Gambira est libéré mais toujours menacé...Aung San Suu Kyi affronte la question des migrants avec la Thaïlande...Reprise du plan controversé pour la vérification de la citoyenneté dans l’Arakan...La loi sur les rassemblements et les manifestations pacifiques amendée.....LE FOCUS DU MOIS: Le gouvernement birman demande à 3 groupes ethniques armés de déposer les armes avant de négocier la paix...
Language: Français, French
Source/publisher: Info Birmanie
Format/size: pdf (336K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.info-birmanie.org/wp-content/uploads/NDB-juin-20151.pdf
Date of entry/update: 11 July 2016
ML > Activism and Advocacy (groups from Burma, solidarity groups, campaigns, publications) > Online publications by Burma solidarity groups > Info Birmanie, "Les Nouvelles de Birmanie", "Birmanie>Net Hebdo"


Title: Ten things to know about power in Myanmar
Date of publication: 05 December 2015
Description/subject: "With an installed generating capacity of about 3,500MW and a population of more than 53 million, Myanmar’s lack of capacity offers huge potential for developers. The IPP [Independent Power Producers?] approach is still in its infancy in Myanmar and the purpose of this briefing is to highlight ten of the key issues that investors should be aware of when considering investing in power projects in Myanmar."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Norton Rose Fulbright LLP
Format/size: pdf (1MB)
Date of entry/update: 10 July 2016
ML > Economy > Infrastructure > Energy > Electrical Power: Production and Use > General articles and reports
Economy > Investment in Burma/Myanmar > Guidelines on investment in Burma/Myanmar


Title: Myanmar Energy Master Plan
Date of publication: December 2015
Description/subject: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: "1. Intelligent Energy Systems Pty Ltd (IES) in association with Myanmar International Consultants Co. Ltd. (MMIC) were contracted by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to undertake the following Technical Assistance (TA) project: “TA-8356 MYA: Institutional Strengthening of National Energy Committee in Energy Policy and Planning – 1 Energy Master Plan Consultant (46389-001)”. The key objective of the TA project was to prepare a Long-Term Energy Master Plan for the energy sector of Myanmar. 2. A national Energy Master Plan (EMP) defines a long-term optimal fuel supply mix taking into account a country’s primary resource endowments. The EMP is guided by the principles of long-term cost effectiveness, environmental responsibility and security of energy supply. 3. The EMP has been prepared from a strategic perspective requiring that all concerned Ministries align to a common energy development plan based on an understanding of fundamental economic development needs. According to government policy preference the EMP predicts that Myanmar’s energy sector will be require an investment of between USD 30 to 40 billion over a 15 to 20 year period. The outlook for the supply of natural gas in particular is uncertain and the EMP recognizes a potential constraint in the next decade. In an environment where there are technology choices and resource constraints a strategic approach is needed to decide the best use of energy in support of national development goals..."
Author/creator: Michael Emmerton, Stuart Thorncraft, Sakari Oksanen, U Myint Soe, Kyi Kyi Hlaing, Yi Yi Thein, U Myat Khin
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Government of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar National Energy Management Committee
Format/size: pdf (19MB-reduced version; 35MB-original)
Date of entry/update: 10 July 2016
ML > Economy > Infrastructure > Energy > Electrical Power: Production and Use > General articles and reports


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Sunday 10 July, 2016
Date of publication: 10 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: PREPARATIONS MADE - Vice President U Myint Swe inspects preparatory work for 69th Martyrs’ Day...Over 200 acres of confiscated farmland returned to owners in Mandalay Region...Yangon-Dala bridge to be constructed in 2017...OAG moves to raise awareness of accounting and auditing...Hluttaw Scrutiny Committee undertakes study to identify problems in Yangon’s legal systems...Flood Bulletin (Issued at 13:00 hr M.S.T on 9-7-2016)...Myanma Railway to build low-cost housing for squatters...EID dinner held at Sedona...Over 10,000 affected by flooding across Rakhine State...CHDB account holders to be given priority to buy low-cost flats...Over 70 complaints received by Hluttaw Scrutiny Committee in five months...200 plus bed hospitals to found PR officers...Ferry bus crashes into truck on Kyimyindine road...Two men charged with theft in Mayangon Township...Yaba and heroin seized...Dyna car overturns in Sagaing region...Strategic development Projects to be implemented in Chin Shwe Haw...Gold market training course opens in Myanmar...MPs meet with residents aggrieved by Dawei SEZ...... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: President U Htin Kyaw to pay visit to Mongolia...Workshop to be held on granting of import permits for cars with Yangon licenses...Myanmar delegation joins 64th CEDAW session in Geneva in Switzerland...Myanmar allows foreign joint ventures to trade construction materials...El Niño hurts green bean export industry...Hotel and tourism license applications go digital...Royal Express to open branches in Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore..... "OPINION": "Cheered to the echo" - Kyaw Thura.....ARTICLES: "Human Rights Education" - Dr. Khine Khine Win..."My advice for future policymakers: See the public’s success as your success" - Sri Mulyani Indrawati.....PEOPLE'S FORUM: "Built-to-order" - Aung Myint Oo.....POEM: "Competency Certification of Electricians" - Lokethar
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (2.6MB)
Date of entry/update: 10 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Sunday 10 July, 2016
Date of publication: 10 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (11MB)
Date of entry/update: 10 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Sunday 10 July, 2016
Date of publication: 10 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (7.4MB)
Date of entry/update: 10 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: Improving shifting cultivation in Southeast Asia by building on indigenous fallow management strategies
Date of publication: 1999
Description/subject: Abstract: "Shifting cultivation continues as the economic mainstay of upland communities in many countries in Southeast Asia. However, the conditions that historically underpinned the sustainability of rotations with long fallows have largely vanished. The imperative to evolve more permanent forms of land use has been exacerbated by rapid population growth, gazette- ment of remnant wildlands into protected areas, and state policies to sedentarize agriculture and discourage the use of fallows and fire. There are many compelling examples where shifting cultivators have successfully managed local resources to solve local problems. Technical approaches to stabilizing and improving productivity of shifting cultivation systems have not been notably successful. Farmer rejection of researcher-driven solutions has led to greater recog- nition of farmer constraints. This experience underlined the need for participatory, on-farm research approaches to identify solutions. The challenge is to document and evaluate indige- nous strategies for intensification of shifting cultivation through a process of research and devel- opment. This process involves identification of promising indigenous practices, characterization of the practices, validation of the utility of the practice for other communities, extrapolation to other locations, verification with key farmers, and wide-scale extension.".....Key words: farming systems, indigenous knowledge, intensification, slash-and-burn, swidden, uplands.
Author/creator: M. CAIRNS and D. P. GARRITY*
Language: English
Source/publisher: Agroforestry Systems 47 : 37–48, 1999
Format/size: pdf (136K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.worldagroforestry.org/sea/Publications/files/journal/JA0131-04.pdf
Date of entry/update: 10 July 2016
ML > Agriculture and fisheries > Shifting ("swidden", "jhum", "taungya", "kaingin") cultivation - regional and global


Title: The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)
Description/subject: "The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) is a CGIAR Consortium Research Centre. ICRAF’s headquarters are in Nairobi, Kenya, with six regional offices located in Cameroon, China, India, Indonesia, Kenya and Peru. The Centre’s vision is a rural transformation throughout the tropics as smallholder households increase their use of trees in agricultural landscapes to improve their food security, nutrition security, income, health, shelter, social cohesion, energy resources and environmental sustainability. ICRAF's mission is to generate science-based knowledge about the diverse benefits - both direct and indirect - of agroforestry, or trees in farming systems and landscapes, and to disseminate this knowledge to develop policy options and promote policies and practices that improve livelihoods and benefit the environment. The World Agroforestry Centre is guided by the broad development challenges pursued by the CGIAR. These include poverty alleviation that entails enhanced food security and health, improved productivity with lower environmental and social costs, and resilience in the face of climate change and other external shocks. ICRAF's work also addresses many of the issues being tackled by the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that aim to eradicate hunger, reduce poverty, provide affordable and clean energy, protect life on land and combat climate change..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 10 July 2016
ML > Agriculture and fisheries > Sustainable agriculture > Sustainable agriculture - global and regional
Forests and forest peoples > Forests and forest peoples - global and regional > Forests and forest peoples - programmes for rights and preservation


Title: Myanmar Climate-Smart Agriculture Strategy
Date of publication: September 2015
Description/subject: "A roadmap to resilience and sustainability: Myanmar’s climate-smart agriculture strategy....."In light of climate change, people often talk about achieving climate resilience and sustainability. How do we get there? Is there a roadmap for climate change adaptation and mitigation? At first, it might seem daunting to address climate change in Myanmar. Germanwatch’s Climate Risk Index for 1994-2013 ranked Myanmar as the second most vulnerable country in the world, after Honduras. In 2008, category 4 cyclone Nargis hit the country. According to a World Bank report, Nargis severely affected the country’s agriculture sector with losses equivalent to 80,000 tons and damaging 251,000 tons of stored crops, across 34,000 hectares of cropland. Myanmar is an agriculture-based country, with 61% of the country’s 53 million people depending on agriculture for their living. The country has also been experiencing more climate extremes like drought, flood, sea-level rise and natural disasters. The recent launching of Myanmar’s Climate-Smart Agriculture Strategy has paved the path towards guided planning for national climate change adaptation and mitigation. Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA) focuses on three pillars in tackling climate change: food security, adaptation, and mitigation. The first national consultation meeting on ‘Climate-Smart Agriculture Strategies in Myanmar’ was conducted in September 2013, facilitated by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) in Southeast Asia and the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI). The strategy aligns with the country’s National Adaptation and Plan of Action (NAPA) for climate change, which prioritizes agriculture, early warning systems and forest in its plans and development initiatives. The strategy institutionalizes Climate-Smart Villages in Myanmar as a community-based approach to a climate-resilient and sustainable agricultural development. These are benchmark villages that are vulnerable to climate change impacts and where CSA interventions will be tested, prioritized and implemented in close cooperation with the village, government units, and other stakeholders. The foundation has been laid. The next challenge now is translating the strategy into on-the-ground initiatives to achieve agricultural productivity and have climate-ready villages, provinces, and country."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation, Consortium of International Agricultural Research Centers (CGIAR)
Format/size: pdf (1MB-reduced version; 1.5MB-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.cgiar.org/consortium-news/a-roadmap-to-resilience-and-sustainability-myanmars-climate-sm...
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs22/retrieve-red.pdf
https://cgspace.cgiar.org/rest/bitstreams/63308/retrieve
Date of entry/update: 10 July 2016
ML > Climate Change > Climate Change - Burma/Myanmar > Adaptation > Policies
Climate Change > Climate Change - Burma/Myanmar > Mitigation > Policies and projects


Title: CGIAR (Consortium of International Agricultural Research Centers)
Description/subject: "CGIAR is a global research partnership for a food-secure future. CGIAR science is dedicated to reducing poverty, enhancing food and nutrition security, and improving natural resources and ecosystem services. Its research is carried out by 15 CGIAR centers in close collaboration with hundreds of partners, including national and regional research institutes, civil society organizations, academia, development organizations and the private sector..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: CGIAR
Format/size: html, pdf
Date of entry/update: 10 July 2016
ML > Agriculture and fisheries > Sustainable agriculture > Sustainable agriculture - global and regional


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Friday 8 July, 2016
Date of publication: 08 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: Countering terrorism - Myanmar focuses on domestic protection...Flood affected people in Rakhine evacuated, provided with aid...Flooding devastates shrimp industry in Rakhine State...MFF signs five-year sponsorship deal with MBL...MEE explains fuel, electricity distribution and safety measures...Road safety body steps up efforts to halve road deaths by 2020...Users fined for electricity theft in Mandalay...No budget to fix tangled power nests in Yangon; official says...Village electrification costs recouped in Mandalay...Tatmadaw flies passengers from Yangon to Coco Island...Road accident kills one, injures seven...Police accelerate crime prevention in Yangon’s townships with highest crime rates...MPA to double fines for delayed container withdrawals...Fish adding ceremony held in Katha...Ancient timber of U Bein Bridge kept in Bagaya monastery...Timber extraction suspended nationally for remainder of year..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: Players from MNL sourced for ASEAN University Games...U Hau Do Suan presents credentials to UNSG...Appointment of Ambassador agreed...Winrock International will support graft technology to aid avocado cultivation...Thai national arrested for drug trafficking...Clucking hell: Illegal chicken incinerated in Mandalay...Car imports reach over 600,000 from 2011-2012 FY to May 2016...High quality coffee exports double...Green gram export to EU expected to sell 20,000 tonnes...Management of Mount Popa, Chat Thin and Shwe Settaw Sanctuaries to be aided by Norway..... "OPINION": "The opportunity of a lifetime" - Kyaw Thura.....ARTICLE: "The Sasana Flag" (The sacred flag of Buddhists) - Ba Sein (Religious Affairs)
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (2,8MB)
Date of entry/update: 09 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "The Global New Light of Myanmar" Saturday 9 July, 2016
Date of publication: 09 July 2016
Description/subject: DOMESTIC NEWS: CSOs Make their case - CSOs come up with terms of reference for its forum - Ye Khaung Nyunt...Continuous deluges wreak havoc across Ayeyawady farmland...Mandalay municipal election set for within three months after termination of 11 members...Elephant poacher arrested in Ngapudaw, three still at large...President U Htin Kyaw inspects Yeywa Hydropower Plant in Mandalay...Second meeting on 69th Anniversary Martyrs’ Day ceremony held...Over 200 old trees to be felled to make room for road expansion...Ambulance overturns in Sintgu township...Yaba and heroin confiscated...Man dies, seven injured following car crashing...Man charged with robbery in Sagaing...Framework Agreement for Hanthawady International Airport to be signed soon...Share price stability proves fruitful for FMI...Ministry to offer birth spacing services for women free of charge..... EXTERNAL RELATIONS: FM Daw Aung San Suu Kyi receives Chinese Minister of State Security...Senior General Min Aung Hlaing meets with Chinese State Security Minister...3-country bus service proposed between India, Myanmar, Thailand...Education provided to over half of migrant children in Mae Sot...South Korea ranked six in FDI...Framework Agreement for Hanthawady International Airport to be signed soon...South Korea and Japan to invest in shoe manufacturing...Over 1,500 tonnes of rubber exported in a week...Projects aim to develop coastal regions in north, south of Myanmar...Mango growers need agricultural certificate to enter international market...Telenor subscribers in flood-hit areas receive Ks500 bill...Inter Milan to Cooperate with MFF..... "OPINION": "National reconciliation can’t wait" - Kyaw Thura.....ARTICLE: "Civil Service Academy" - U KHIN MAUNG (A retired diplomat)
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Global New Light of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (2.7MB)
Date of entry/update: 09 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Global New Light of Myanmar" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Friday 8 July, 2016
Date of publication: 08 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (9,8MB)
Date of entry/update: 09 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "Myanmar Alin" Saturday 9 July, 2016
Date of publication: 09 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (11MB)
Date of entry/update: 09 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" > "Myanmar Alin" 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Friday 8 July, 2016
Date of publication: 08 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (7.2MB)
Date of entry/update: 09 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016


Title: "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") Saturday 9 July, 2016
Date of publication: 09 July 2016
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Format/size: pdf (9.7MB)
Date of entry/update: 09 July 2016
RR > News - Daily newspapers produced by the Government of Burma/Myanmar (archive from June 2003) > "The [Global] New Light of Myanmar", "Kyemon" and "Myanmar Alin" > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") archive > "The Mirror" ("Kyemon") 2016