VL.png The World-Wide Web Virtual Library
[WWW VL database || WWW VL search]
donations.gif asia-wwwvl.gif

Online Burma/Myanmar Library

Full-Text Search | Database Search | What's New | Alphabetical List of Subjects | Main Library | Reading Room | Burma Press Summary

Home > Main Library > Chao-Tzang Yawnghwe - various writings, photos etc.

Order links by: Reverse Date Title

Chao-Tzang Yawnghwe - various writings, photos etc.

Individual Documents

Title: Photo of Chao-Tzang Yawnghwe in Gothenberg, September 2002 (1)
Date of publication: 24 September 2002
Description/subject: This is cropped from a photo I took at a meal towards the end of the Burma conference, "Burma-Myanma(r) Research and its Future: Implications for Scholars and Policymakers", 21-25 September 2002.
Author/creator: David Arnott
Source/publisher: www.arnott-photo.org
Format/size: jpg (52K)
Date of entry/update: 05 August 2004


Title: Photo of Chao-Tzang Yawnghwe in Gothenberg, September 2002 (2)
Date of publication: 24 September 2002
Description/subject: This is cropped from a photo I took at a meal towards the end of the Burma conference, "Burma-Myanma(r) Research and its Future: Implications for Scholars and Policymakers", 21-25 September 2002, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Author/creator: David Arnott
Source/publisher: www.arnott-photo.org
Format/size: jpg (75K)
Date of entry/update: 05 August 2004


Title: Critique of the ICG report.
Date of publication: 21 April 2002
Description/subject: This article, which is a critique of the ICG report, "Myanmar: The Politics of Humanitarian Aid" of 2 April 2002, was adapted from the version on www.bma-online.net
Author/creator: Chao-Tzang Yawnghwe
Language: English
Format/size: html (24K)
Date of entry/update: 05 August 2004


Title: Federalism: Putting Burma Back Together Again
Date of publication: April 2002
Description/subject: Federalism in Burma: "This paper deals with the absence or the non-existence of a functional relation between the state in Burma and broader society which is also made up of non-Burman 1 ethnic segments that inhabit the historical-territorial units comprising the Union of Burma. 2 Introduction: Putting the Country Back Together Again The paper looks into the problems related to the task, as yet to be accomplished, of "putting the country back together again", in contrast to the claim of the military and its state is "keeping the country together". It is here argued that although the military has, in a manner of speaking, "kept the country together", it has also distorted the relation between the state in Burma and broader society by monopolizing power and excluding societal elements and forces from the sphere of the state and from the political arena. The military's centralist, unitary impulse, informed by it ethnocentric (Burmanization) national unity formula, has contributed to a dysfunctional state-society relation, that has in turn brought about the present crisis of decay and general breakdown, making Burma a failed state..."
Author/creator: Chao-Tzang Yawnghwe
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Legal Issues on Burma Journal" No. 11 (Burma Lawyers' Council)
Format/size: PDF
Alternate URLs: http://www.blc-burma.org/activity_pub_liob.html
Date of entry/update: 15 July 2010


Title: AN EVENING WITH DR. CHAO TZANG YAWNGHWE
Date of publication: 26 February 2002
Description/subject: "...Kao Wao recently requested Dr. Chao Tzang Yawnghwe, the Advisory Board member of the United Nationalities League for Democracy-Liberated Area, to take time out from his busy schedule to talk about his life experiences as an activist and freedom fighter. Graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree from Rangoon University and tutored English from 1960-63, when General Ne Win seized power in a military coup in 1962, Chao Tzang became one of the leading founders and served in the Shan resistance movement of the Shan State Army from 1963-1977..."
Author/creator: Chao Tzang Yawnghwe, Cham Toik (interviewer)
Language: English
Source/publisher: Kao Wao News Group
Format/size: html (33K)
Date of entry/update: 05 August 2004


Title: Burma and National Reconciliation: Ethnic Conflict and State-Society Dysfunction
Date of publication: December 2001
Description/subject: It is maintained that Burma’s ‘ethnic conflict’ is not per se ethnic, nor that of the kind faced by indigenous peoples of, for example, North America, but a conflict rooted in politics. Following the collapse of Burma’s General Ne Win’s military-socialist regime in 1988, the issue of ethnic conflict has attracted the attention from both observers and protagonists. This attention became heightened following the unraveling of the socialist bloc and the emergence of ethnic wars in those hitherto (presumed) stable socialist nation-states.
Author/creator: Chao-Tzang Yawnghwe
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Legal Issues on Burma Journal" No. 10 (Burma Lawyers' Council)
Alternate URLs: The original (and authoritative) version of this article may be found in http://www.ibiblio.org/obl/docs/Legal_Issues_on%20Burma_Journal_10.pdf
Date of entry/update: 03 August 2004


Title: The Pyidaungzu, Federalism and Burman Elites: A Brief Analysis
Date of publication: May 1999
Description/subject: Drafting a constitution in Burma. "Federalism is not quite understood in Burma. In fact, it would not be wrong to say it is grossly misunderstood by -- among many others -- the Burman population segment, or at least by its armed elites (or elites in uniform). To armed Burman elites, Federalism is synonomous with the destruction or the disintegration of the Union. The Burman-dominated military led by General Ne Win introduced and entrenched this idea when they usurped power in 1962..."
Author/creator: Chao-Tzang Yawnghwe
Language: English
Source/publisher: Legal Issues on Burma Journal No. 3 (Burma Lawyers' Council)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 August 2004


Title: The Politics of Authoritarianism: The State and Political Soldiers in Burma, Indonesia and Thailand
Date of publication: September 1997
Description/subject: Abstract: "This thesis investigates the impact of military rule on the state and society by looking at three cases from the same geographical region -- Burma, Indonesia, and Thailand -- that have experienced military intervention and military rule. The thesis is framed by a number of questions: Why does the military sometimes decide to stay on to run the state after it intervenes? What happens to the military, its leaders, and most importantly, the state and society when the military reorganizes the state into a military-authoritarian order? What are the political outcomes of military rule in terms of state autonomy? How can the political variations -- the extent of military penetration into the state order -- between military regimes be explained? This thesis has found that there are three vital factors influencing the military's decision, having intervened, to stay on to rule the country. The most important factor is the emergence of an extraordinary military strongman-ruler. The second, and related, factor is military unity -- forged and maintained by the strongman-ruler and bound by the myth that the soldiers are the guardians and saviors of the state. The military supports the ruler and is in turn rewarded by him, and becomes a privileged class. Together they dominate and control other state and societal forces. In fact, while military-authoritarian states are highly autonomous from society, it is clear that the state is not well insulated from abuse by its own elites. The third factor is the extent to which the strongman-ruler is constrained by having to share power with an unimpeachable force (a person, ideal, or myth). This thesis has found that military rulers in Thailand have been constrained because of the person and the role of the monarch. This thesis has also found significant variations in military-authoritarian states. They range from a nearly pure praetorian example to a tentative quasi-democratic set up -- resulting from historical circumstances combined with the vision, political will and astuteness of the strongman-ruler, his concern with his legacy, and the presence or not of an important constraining force. The military has played a dominant role in politics in Burma and Indonesia since the 1960s; in Thailand, it has been in and out of power since the 1930s. It has become apparent from this research that, although the global democratization trend is hopeful, it is not so easy to get a politicized military to go back to the barracks to stay." A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Faculty of Graduate Studies (Department of Political Science), the University of British Columbia.
Author/creator: Chao-Tzang Yawnghwe
Language: English
Source/publisher: University of British Columbia (PhD Thesis)
Format/size: pdf (1.3MB), html (2MB), Word-full text (928K) or by individual chapter (html)
Alternate URLs: http://www.ibiblio.org/obl/docs/The_Politics_of_Authoritarianism.htm
Date of entry/update: 03 August 2004


Title: Union Day, Equality and Secession
Date of publication: 25 February 1996
Description/subject: "The Union Day is worthy of commemorating because it is an event which the military cannot claim to have any role whatsoever in bringing about. As such, military rulers have nothing meaningful to say on Union Day, except to utter empty clichés about "national unity" as Than Shwe recently did. It is amazing that he should talk about the rights of the "national races," when in fact, no one but members of the top brass have such things as human rights..."
Author/creator: Chao-Tzang Yawnghwe
Language: English
Source/publisher: reg.burma
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 August 2004


Title: THE NEW WORLD ORDER IN SOUTHEAST ASIA AND BURMA
Date of publication: 15 October 1995
Description/subject: "With the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and Cory Aquino's earlier people's power revolution, it indeed seemed that the world, and Southeast Asia too, would be shaped by economic and political freedom, i.e., by the free market economy and "middle class" democracy. The 1988 uprising in Burma which toppled Ne Win's one-man rule seemed part of a global democratization process. Quite unexpectedly, however, outside actors -- Singapore, China, and the Thai military -- stepped in to shore up the new military junta..."
Author/creator: Chao-Tzang Yawnghwe
Language: English
Source/publisher: "BurmaNet News"
Format/size: html (12K
Date of entry/update: 06 August 2004


Title: BURMA: 'CONSTRUCTIVE ENGAGEMENT'
Date of publication: June 1993
Description/subject: "(1) The Constructive Engagement policy of Thailand and ASEAN states vis-a-vis the SLORC junta in Burma stems basically from the goodwill of these governments for the people of Burma. (2) Underlying this policy are 4 major assumptions concerning the situation in, and the politics of Burma. These are:..."
Author/creator: Chao-Tzang Yawnghwe
Language: English
Source/publisher: Thai-Yunnan Newsletter, Issue 21 June 1993
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 August 2004