VL.png The World-Wide Web Virtual Library
[WWW VL database || WWW VL search]
donations.gif asia-wwwvl.gif

Online Burma/Myanmar Library

Full-Text Search | Database Search | What's New | Alphabetical List of Subjects | Main Library | Reading Room | Burma Press Summary

Home > Main Library > Society and Culture > Arts - general

Order links by: Reverse Date Title

Arts - general

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: "BurmaNet News" Arts archive
Language: English
Source/publisher: Various sources via "BurmaNet News"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 17 April 2012


Individual Documents

Title: Dynamics Of The Myanmar Drum Ensemble
Date of publication: 28 July 2015
Description/subject: Abstract: "In every society, concerning the history of arts, musical instruments are almost universal components of human culture. The Myanmar Drum Ensemble (saing wain in Myanmar language) is one of Myanmar’s traditional musical instruments. In Myanmar society, the drum ensemble is used as part of the annual-­‐cycle rituals, life-­‐cycle rituals and crisis rituals. This research describes the dynamics of the Myanmar Drum Ensemble, saing wain. Field ethnography, focus group discussions (FGD), key informant interviews (KII), in-­‐depth interviews (IDI), informal conversations (IC) and direct observation (DO) were used for data collection. Study sites are Bo Tun Zan ward in Daw Pon Township, No.2 ward in North Okkalapa Township, No.5 ward in Mayangone Township, Ye Mon village, Kyungalay village, Kyauk Ain village in Hlegu Township. The Myanmar drum ensemble emerged from a merger of the Royal Music and the Folk Music from the Kone-­‐baung period (AD 1752-­‐1856). It has three special characteristics: its Melodic Character, its Harmonic Character and its Rhythmic Character. Furthermore, the members of the drum ensembles are known to have had close relationships with the public throughout the colonial and the post-­‐independence periods. Today drum ensembles have closer contact with people from the rural areas, whereas city dwellers rely more on modern musical instruments for entertainment.".....Paper delivered at the International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015.
Author/creator: Cathy Tun
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015
Format/size: pdf (3.1MB)
Alternate URLs: http://rcsd.soc.cmu.ac.th/web/Burma/home.php#
Date of entry/update: 10 August 2015


Title: Comparative Study on the Myanmar Cloth Painting Fine Art during 11 th -­‐ 18 th Century CE : Documentary References and Survey Findings
Date of publication: 26 July 2015
Description/subject: Introduction: "The main purpose for this study on the Myanmar cloth painting fine art as comparative work during 11th–18th century is to attain perceptive knowledge and exchange of expertise among the neighbouring counties in Southeast Asia. In Myanmar, knowledge and practice of Theravada Buddhism has been related to the literature, architecture, fine arts and daily life style of the people residing in the ancient city of Bagan (11th-­‐13th century CE). At that time, the tr aditional fine arts of Myanmar in Bagan was unique and perpetually augmented. Thus varieties of arts like architecture, stucco carvings, inscriptions, sculpture of wood/stone and other materials turnery and tapestry and glazed plaques and reliefs and smith –works were decorated at the stupas and temples. Moreover, mural paintings were also depicted those mainly consisted of Buddha’s life stories including Nativity scenes, ascending the throne, great renunciation, Enlightenment 45 years preaching Dhamma, 550 Jatakas stories and Demised Buddha in the Parinicana scene. Nearly at the same period of the 11th century, fine arts on cloth painting emerged in Myanmar. According to the documentary references and survey findings of archaeologists and researchers, it was stated that Myanmar cloth painting fine arts appeared in the ancient city of Bagan (Abeyatana Temple No. 1202). Since then, the tradition of cloth painting spread out by the fine artists to the other people within Bagan and also to different places in later periods. Abeyatana Ceti, situated over the vault of the main temple No. 1202 (1084-­‐1113 CE), was the only temple being built in 11th century CE. Even after 800 years, some remains of cloth painting were seen on the lowest terrace of the Ceti of that temple. Regarding the cloth painting terraces at Abeyatana Ceti, it can be assumed to be one of the oldest extent images in Myanmar. In this paper I will also argue that it could be one of the oldest extent cloth painting idols in Southeast Asia. At the present, there are traces of cloth paintings in twenty temples in Myanmar from the 11th-­‐18th century. (See map. 1) Out of 20, sixteen temples are situated in Bagan (See map. 2), one is in Salay, one in Sarle, one in Mandalay and the final one is in Pakhan Gyi.".....International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015
Author/creator: Aye Aye Oo
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015
Format/size: pdf (3.6MB)
Alternate URLs: http://rcsd.soc.cmu.ac.th/web/Burma/home.php#
Date of entry/update: 10 August 2015


Title: Creative Tribute or Cheap Copy? The Ubiquitous, Controversial Copy Thachin In Myanmar
Date of publication: 26 July 2015
Description/subject: Abstract: "The genre copy thachin or “copy song” pervades the popular mu sic scene in Myanmar. These songs are akin to cover versions of existing international hits, but with new lyrics in the Burmese language, and performed by Burmese musicians. These songs can have incredible genre-­‐crossing capabilities, from blues to rap, heavy metal to salsa. The current situation for popular music production in Myanmar, as elsewhere, is connected with the country’s history of military rule and years of censorship and economic difficulties. Advocates for the genre of copy thachin argue that borrowing international songs allowed local artists to learn about global popular music, and the numerous popular musicians and songwriters in Myanmar are testament to this. On the other hand, with the removal of the stringent censorship regime and the increasing contact with international consumer culture, groups of Myanmar music fans are increasingly critical of copy thachin, seeing the practice as derivative and an embarrassment. This article will explore the history of the genre, notions of authenticity, and dis cuss Myanmar’s changing relationship with the symbolic capital of its own culture industry and its relationship with international popular culture.".....Paper delivered at the International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015.
Author/creator: Jane M Ferguson
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015
Format/size: pdf (788K)
Alternate URLs: http://rcsd.soc.cmu.ac.th/web/Burma/home.php#
Date of entry/update: 10 August 2015