VL.png The World-Wide Web Virtual Library
[WWW VL database || WWW VL search]
donations.gif asia-wwwvl.gif

Online Burma/Myanmar Library

Full-Text Search | Database Search | What's New | Alphabetical List of Subjects | Main Library | Reading Room | Burma Press Summary

Home > Main Library > Climate Change (in preparation) > Climate Change - Burma/Myanmar
Hide Links
Order links by: Reverse Date Title

Climate Change - Burma/Myanmar

  • Climate Change - Burma/Myanmar: Science

    Websites/Multiple Documents

    Title: Myanmar - Climate Change
    Description/subject: Thematic profiles and systems: AQUASTAT country profile - The AQUASTAT country profiles describe the state of water resources and agricultural water use in the respective country. Special attention is given to the water resource, irrigation, and drainage sub-sectors... FAO-GeoNetwork - FAO-GeoNetwork is a web based Geographic Data and Information Management System. It enables easy access to local and distributed geospatial information catalogues and makes available, data, graphics and documents for immediate download. FAO-GeoNetwork holds approximately 5000 standardized metadata records for digital and paper maps, most of them at the global, continent and national level... Reports and statistical data: AQUASTAT country fact sheet - AQUASTAT Long-term average annual renewable water resources by country - Forest area statistics - From Forestry Country Profiles Forest health statistics - From Forestry Country Profiles Growing stock statistics - From Forestry Country Profiles
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 21 August 2012


    Title: Myanmar Climate Change Watch
    Description/subject: An apocalyptic series of earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis and floods in the region has spooked everyone. Many people have turned to soothsayers and astrologers for advice about any impending natural disasters. But rather than consult the Mayan calender or a fortune-teller, The Irrawaddy reporter Min Naing Thu interviewed Dr Tun Lwin, the former director-general of Burma's Department of Meteorology and Hydrology (DMH). Since his resignation from the DMH in 2009, Tun Lwin has served as a technical adviser to the Regional Integrated Multi-hazard Early Warning System (RIMES) at the Asian Institute of Technology in Thailand. He also served as a consultant to the Myanmar Red Cross Society, CARE Myanmar, Action Aid Myanmar and Myanmar Egress's Network Activities Group. He has also been involved with the International Centre for Water Hazard and Risk Management (ICHARM), Myanmar Egress, World Vision Myanmar, Global Green and other organizations, focusing primarily on climate change and how to minimize damage caused by natural disasters. Tun Lwin posts many of his articles concerning meteorological issues on his website, Myanmar Climate Change Watch.
    Language: Burmese, English
    Source/publisher: Myanmar Climate Change Watch
    Format/size: html
    Alternate URLs: http://www.tunlwin.com/index.php?english
    Date of entry/update: 26 March 2011


    Individual Documents

    Title: Burma’s Global Warming Activists Turn Up the Heat on Govt
    Date of publication: 06 May 2013
    Description/subject: "RANGOON—As a water shortage hits several townships in Burma’s commercial capital and farmers nationwide anxiously await the upcoming rainy season, environmentalists are calling for more government support in the fight against climate change in this country of 60 million people. While Burma’s nominally civilian government has earned international praise for its program of political and economic reforms after decades of military rule, environmentalists say climate change is a pressing issue that has been pushed to the back burner for too long by the nation’s leaders. “The new government is trying to solve poverty and civil war, but unfortunately climate change has never been well acknowledged by our decision-makers,” meteorologist Dr. Tun Lwin said on Saturday in Rangoon at roundtable discussion about global warming in Burma, as temperatures in the country’s biggest city soared to 38 degrees Celsius..."
    Author/creator: Kyaw Phyo Tha
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 06 May 2013


    Title: Global Climate Risk Index 2013
    Date of publication: November 2012
    Description/subject: Summary: "The Global Climate Risk Index 2013 analyses to what extent countries have been affected by the impacts of weather-related loss events (storms, floods, heat waves etc.). The most recent available data from 2011 as well as for the period 1992-2011 were taken into ac- count. Most affected countries in 2011 were Thailand, Cambodia, Pakistan, El Salvador and the Philippines. For the period 1992 to 2011, Honduras, Myanmar and Nicaragua rank highest. This year's 8th edition of the an alysis reconfirms that less developed countries are generally more affected than industrialis ed countries, according to the Climate Risk Index. With re- gard to future climate change, the Climate Ri sk Index can serve as a warning signal indicat- ing past vulnerability which may further increase in regions where extreme events will be- come more frequent or more severe through climate change. While some vulnerable devel- oping countries are frequently hit by extreme ev ents, there are also some where such disas- ters are a rarity..."
    Author/creator: Sven Harmeling and David Eckstein
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: Germanwatch
    Format/size: pdf (570K)
    Date of entry/update: 07 May 2013


    Title: The Man Who Foresees Storms
    Date of publication: 28 March 2011
    Description/subject: "An apocalyptic series of earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis and floods in the region has spooked everyone. Many people have turned to soothsayers and astrologers for advice about any impending natural disasters. But rather than consult the Mayan calender or a fortune-teller, The Irrawaddy reporter Min Naing Thu interviewed Dr Tun Lwin, the former director-general of Burma's Department of Meteorology and Hydrology (DMH). Since his resignation from the DMH in 2009, Tun Lwin has served as a technical adviser to the Regional Integrated Multi-hazard Early Warning System (RIMES) at the Asian Institute of Technology in Thailand. He also served as a consultant to the Myanmar Red Cross Society, CARE Myanmar, Action Aid Myanmar and Myanmar Egress's Network Activities Group. He has also been involved with the International Centre for Water Hazard and Risk Management (ICHARM), Myanmar Egress, World Vision Myanmar, Global Green and other organizations, focusing primarily on climate change and how to minimize damage caused by natural disasters. Tun Lwin posts many of his articles concerning meteorological issues on his website, Myanmar Climate Change Watch..."
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
    Format/size: html
    Date of entry/update: 28 March 2011


    Title: Burma taking severe hit from climate change: watchdog
    Date of publication: 09 December 2009
    Description/subject: Burma is one of the countries worst affected by extreme weather resulting from climate change, according to a new report that assesses the impact of global warming over a period of nearly two decades. Published by the Berlin-based climate watchdog Germanwatch on Tuesday, the report, the Global Climate Risk Index, says that Bangladesh, Burma and Honduras were the countries most affected by extreme weather events from 1990 to 2008. The report was launched in the Danish capital of Copenhagen, where the United Nations Climate Change Conference is underway.
    Author/creator: Wai Moe
    Language: English
    Source/publisher: The Irrawaddy
    Format/size: html
    Alternate URLs: http://www2.irrawaddy.org/print_article.php?art_id=17376
    Date of entry/update: 21 September 2010