VL.png The World-Wide Web Virtual Library
[WWW VL database || WWW VL search]
donations.gif asia-wwwvl.gif

Online Burma/Myanmar Library

Full-Text Search | Database Search | What's New | Alphabetical List of Subjects | Main Library | Reading Room | Burma Press Summary

Home > Main Library > Land > Land in Burma > Human activity on land in Burma/Myanmar > Land confiscation for military, commercial and other purposes

Order links by: Reverse Date Title

Land confiscation for military, commercial and other purposes

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: Search results for Burma on Landgrab.org
Description/subject: More than 70 articles, back to 2007, on landgrabbing in Burma/Myanmar,
Language: English, Français,
Source/publisher: Landgrab.org
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://farmlandgrab.org/
Date of entry/update: 24 October 2014


Individual Documents

Title: Dooplaya Situation Update: Kawkareik Township, September 2014
Date of publication: 20 November 2014
Description/subject: This Situation Update describes events occurring in Kawkareik Township, Dooplaya District in September 2014, including issues of land confiscation and explicit threats toward villagers. Starting in November 2010, the Tatmadaw began to confiscate A--- villagers land upon which they built houses for their soldiers’ families, as well as houses for members of the Border Guard Force (BGF) and the Karen Peace Force (KPF) and their families. Villagers complained to the A--- village head, who felt too afraid to raise the issue with the Military Operations Command (MOC) #19 General Tun Nay Lin. Villagers report having been threatened with arrest by KPF and BGF soldiers if they continue to complain.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (264.5K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/14-65-s1.pdf
Date of entry/update: 29 November 2014


Title: Hpapun Situation Update: Dwe Lo Township, February and March 2014
Date of publication: 19 November 2014
Description/subject: This Situation Update describes events occurring in Dwe Lo Township, Hpapun District during February and March 2014, including negative impacts of gold mining and concerns expressed by local villagers regarding education and healthcare.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (366K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/14-54-s1.pdf
Date of entry/update: 29 November 2014


Title: Myanmar: Dawei Special Economic Zone should protect rights of area residents
Date of publication: 10 October 2014
Description/subject: "As Thai Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-Ocha visits Myanmar to revive the stalled Dawei Special Economic Zone (SEZ), the governments of Thailand and Myanmar should cooperate to establish a legal framework protecting the human rights of the area’s residents, said the ICJ. The multi-billion dollar Dawei development, strategically located along the Thai-Myanmar peninsula, will be one of Southeast Asia’s largest industrial complexes, with a 250 sq km deep-sea port, petrochemical and heavy industry hub. After the project failed to attract sufficient investment, it was taken over directly by the Dawei SEZ Development Company, jointly owned by the governments of Thailand and Myanmar..."
Author/creator: Daniel Aguirre, Sam Zarifi,
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Commission of Jurists (ICJ)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 16 October 2014


Title: Dooplaya Interview: Naw A---, July 2013
Date of publication: 07 October 2014
Description/subject: "This Interview with Naw A--- describes events related to land confiscation occurring in Kawkareik Township, Dooplaya District in 2013. The Burma/Myanmar government built a school in B--- village on a plot of land belonging to Naw A---, who was neither consulted before her land was confiscated nor compensated afterwards, and as a consequence had been left homeless"
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/14-28-s7_wb_2_0.pdf
Date of entry/update: 17 October 2014


Title: Dooplaya Situation Update: Kyainseikgyi, Kawkareik and Win Yay townships, December 2013 to February 2014
Date of publication: 29 September 2014
Description/subject: "This Situation Update describes events occurring in Kyainseikgyi, Kawkareik, and Win Yay townships, Dooplaya District between December 2013 and February 2014, including land confiscation, villagers’ livelihoods, abuses, explicit threats and updates on villagers’ education and healthcare"
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (188K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/14-15-s1_0.pdf
Date of entry/update: 17 October 2014


Title: Hpa-an Situation Update: Hti Lon Township
Date of publication: 10 September 2014
Description/subject: "This Situation Update describes events occurring in Hti Lon Township, Hpa-an District in March 2014, including dam construction and the subsequent destruction of villagers land due to flooding, forced relocation, and land confiscation."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (99.63KB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/14-28-s7_wb_2.pdf
Date of entry/update: 23 October 2014


Title: Land confiscation due to a road repair and expansion project in Bilin Township, Thaton District
Date of publication: 04 September 2014
Description/subject: "This News Bulletin describes land confiscation which occurred as a result of a road repair and expansion project in Bilin Township, Thaton District, from January 2nd – 4th, 2014. On January 2nd 2014, the Zwe Nyi Naung Company arrived in D--- village, Hta Paw village tract, Bilin Township, Thaton District to repair and expand a road. The project resulted in the confiscation of villagers’ plantation lands, paddy fields and the yard around a house."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (21.53KB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/14-7-nb1_0.pdf
Date of entry/update: 23 October 2014


Title: Human rights violations by BGF Cantonment Area Commander Kya Aye in Paingkyon Township, Hpa-an District
Date of publication: 03 September 2014
Description/subject: "This News Bulletin describes human rights abuses occurring in Paingkyon Township, Hpa-an District between February 2013 and July 2014, including killing, forced labour, arbitrary taxation and land confiscation."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (3.67KB)
Date of entry/update: 24 October 2014


Title: Dooplaya Situation Update: Kawkareik, Kyonedoe and Kyainseikgyi townships
Date of publication: 29 August 2014
Description/subject: "This Situation Update describes events occurring in Kawkareik, Kyonedoe and Kyainseikgyi townships, Dooplaya District between March and May 2014, including issues of land confiscation and updates on villagers’ livelihoods and health care."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (154.66KB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/14-35-s1_0.pdf
Date of entry/update: 24 October 2014


Title: Toungoo Field Report: January to December 2013
Date of publication: 29 August 2014
Description/subject: "This field report describes events occurring in Toungoo District between January and December 2013. It includes information submitted by KHRG researchers on a range of human rights abuses and other issues of importance to local communities, including violent abuse, landmine contamination, the loss of land and other negative impacts on livelihoods related to infrastructure and industrial projects, on-going militarization and a lack of access to education."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (10.31KB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/14-1-f1.pdf
Date of entry/update: 24 October 2014


Title: Toungoo Incident Report: Stone mining in Thandaunggyi Township, June 2013
Date of publication: 19 August 2014
Description/subject: "This Incident Report describes the destruction of farmland belonging to an A--- villager as a result of stone mining in June 2013. The mining work in question was carried out without the consent of villagers living in the area. Villagers living in A--- village expressed concerns that should the mining project expand, their village and plantations would be destroyed, and stated their intention to seek further information about the project."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (8.98KB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/13-113-i1.pdf
Date of entry/update: 24 October 2014


Title: Hpa-an Short Update: Hti Lon Township, March 2014
Date of publication: 15 August 2014
Description/subject: This Short Update describes events occurring in Hti Lon Township, Hpa-an District in March 2014, including land confiscation committed by the Burma/Myanmar government and wealthy individuals, destruction of villagers land due to flooding caused by a dam, as well as the strategies of villagers to claim back their land, and obtain compensation for the land that they have lost. In Naung Ka Myaing village, fields belonging to 39 villagers were confiscated and flooded by the Yay Boat Dam (also called the Hti Lon Dam), resulting in the destruction of over 3,000 acres of land. A further 44 villagers had their land confiscated and marked as ‘forest land': The villagers filed an official case with the Burma/Myanmar government, in an attempt to receive compensation, and have submitted a list of landowners and the amount of land they lost, as well as videos portraying the land... Burma News International (bnionline.net) conducted a video news report on the case. A link to the video, as well as a description of its contents, can be found below, following the tables.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (281K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/14-28-s1.pdf
Date of entry/update: 05 December 2014


Title: BURMA/MYANMAR: Farmers face prison sentences for trespassing and move to remote prisons
Date of publication: 25 July 2014
Description/subject: "President of Myanmar, U Thein Sein, announced that the government cannot give back over 30,000 acres of paddy land that the state has been using since it was confiscated by the army two decades ago. On the one hand the President ordered state and regional governments and land management committee to cooperate with members of the parliament to solve the problem of land grabbing cases. On the other hand he has announced the government cannot handover some land back. This is leading to prosecution and prison sentences for the farmers in conflict with the army regarding their land...On 27 and 28 May 2014, 190 farmers from Pharuso Township, Kayah State were prosecuted for ploughing in land confiscated by No.531 Light Infantry Battalion. Tanintharyi regional government seized farmland for Dawei New Town Plan Project in Dawai Township and the District Administrative Officer with his team began construction on the grabbed land. Twenty farmers who did not take compensation for their land tried to halt the team. As a result, all the farmers were prosecuted; 10 were sentenced to 3 to 9 months imprisonment and the others paid fines. There are 450 farmers from Kanbalu Township, Sagaing Region who are protesting against the military and have had cases filed against them for cultivating in the confiscated land..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Asian Human Rights Commission
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 25 July 2014


Title: Hpa-an Short Update: Don Yin Township, March 2014
Date of publication: 22 July 2014
Description/subject: This Short Update describes the confiscation of land belonging to villagers in Don Yin Township, Hpa-an District. The land was confiscated under the threat of violence by members of the Karen National Liberation Army, the KNU/KNLA-Peace Council and other individuals.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (470K)
Date of entry/update: 05 December 2014


Title: Hpa-an Situation Update: Hlaingbwe, Don Yin and Hti Lon townships, April 2014
Date of publication: 22 July 2014
Description/subject: This Situation Update describes land confiscation committed by local armed actors in Hlaingbwe, Don Yin and Hti Lon townships, Hpa-an District during 2014: Tatmadaw soldiers destroyed approximately 3,000 acres of villagers’ paddy fields during the construction of a dam in Hti Lon village... In the western part of Maw Ko village tract, a monk, coordinating with the Border Guard Force, confiscated villagers’ paddy fields and plantations. They also cut down trees which villagers use to make roofing for their houses and turned the area into a rubber plantation... Uncultivated land belonging to villagers who had emigrated to Thailand was confiscated even though the villagers held formal land titles.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (670K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/14-28-s2_pdf.pdf
Date of entry/update: 05 December 2014


Title: NOT JUST DEFENDING; ADVOCATING FOR LAW IN MYANMAR
Date of publication: June 2014
Description/subject: "...Through research on Myanmar, we argue that in authoritarian settings where legality has drastically declined, the starting point for cause lawyering lies in advocacy for law itself, in advocating for the regular application of law’s rules. Because this characterization is liable to be misunderstood as formalistic, particularly by persons familiar with less authoritarian, more legally coherent settings than the one with which we are here concerned, it deserves some brief comments before we continue...By insisting upon legal formality as a condition of transformative justice, cause lawyers in Myanmar advocate for the inherent value of rules in the courtroom, but also incrementally build a constituency in the wider society. In advocating for faithful application of declared rules, in insisting on formal legality in the public domain, lawyers encourage people to mobilize around law as an idea, essential for making law meaningful in practice. They promote a notion of the legal system as once more an arena in which citizens can set up interests that are not congruent with those of the state; an arena in which cause lawyering is made viable and in which the cause lawyer has a distinctive role to play..." Includes description and discussion of the Kanma land-grab case.....The digitised version may contain errors so the original is included an an Alternate URL.
Author/creator: Nick Cheesman, Kyaw Min San
Language: English
Source/publisher: Wisconsin International Law Journal
Format/size: pdf (226K-digitised version; 1.6MB-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs19/Cheesman_KMS__Not_just_defending-orig.pdf
Date of entry/update: 17 August 2014


Title: LAND CONFISCATION IN BURMA: A THREAT TO LOCAL COMMUNITIES & RESPONSIBLE INVESTMENT
Date of publication: 05 May 2014
Description/subject: "Land confiscation is one of the leading causes of protest and unrest in Burma, having led to the forced displacement of hundreds of thousands of people in recent years. It also undermines Burma’s fragile peace processes... •The 2008 constitution and subsequent laws are used to legitimize arbitrary land confiscation, deny access to justice, and perpetuate an environment of impunity... • Land confiscation for profitable large-scale development and commercial projects enrich the military, state- owned enterprises, and regime cronies, but result in the loss of livelihood and human rights abuses for local communities... • Land confiscation often involves violence, resulting in grievous injury, to force people off their land, or to suppress resistance to land confiscation... • Benefiting from land grabs, linked in some cases to ethnic cleansing or war atrocities, poses a risk to foreign investors and increases their exposure to judicial claims... • Prevailing censorship and other institutional obstr uctions hinder access to accurate information required for due diligence processes. • It is in the interests of the international corpora te community to ensure that legislative and institution reforms include equitable and transpare nt land acquisition procedures and measures to protect communities from impunity... Since President Thein Sein took office in 2011, the regime has allowed unbridled land confiscation for infrastructure, commercial and military development projects... The 2008 constitution identifies the state as being the ultimate owner of all land in Burma. Antiquated laws such as the 1894 Lan d Acquisition Act give the regime the right to take o ver any land, making local people extremely vulnerable to forced displacement without any recourse to remedy. Given that an estimated 70% of the population depend on small- and medium-scale agriculture for their livelihoods, land confiscation has had a devastating impact."
Language: English
Source/publisher: ALTSEAN-Burma
Format/size: pdf (337K)
Date of entry/update: 04 June 2014


Title: A political anatomy of land grabs
Date of publication: 03 March 2014
Description/subject: The phrase “land grab” has become common in Myanmar, often making front page news. This reflects the more open political space available to talk about injustices, as well as the escalating severity and degree of land dispossession under the new government. But this seemingly simple two-word phrase is in fact very complex and opaque. It thus deserves greater clarity in order to better understand the deep layers of meaning to farmers in the historical political context of Myanmar. Understanding the deeper significance and meaning that farmers attach to the words “land grab” entails frank discussions of formerly taboo subjects related to the country’s history of armed conflict, illicit drugs, cronyism and racism. Various state and non-state armed actors have been responsible for land grabs in Myanmar during the past several decades, mirroring recent historical periods.
Author/creator: Kevin Woods
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar Times
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://farmlandgrab.org/post/view/23224
Date of entry/update: 24 October 2014


Title: Myanmar's minorities face multi-faced jeopardy
Date of publication: 23 January 2014
Description/subject: "Speaking Freely is an Asia Times Online feature that allows guest writers to have their say. Please click here if you are interested in contributing. The international community, whose Western representatives so readily flock to Myanmar in both good will and selfish interest, is often an unwitting contributor to the country's persistent instability. This will likely lead not to intended peace but to more unwanted war until certain facts are fully faced..."
Author/creator: Tim Heinemann
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Asia Times Online"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 27 May 2014


Title: BURMA: Land grabbing not "in accordance with law"
Date of publication: 17 December 2013
Description/subject: "Over the course of 2013 the Asian Human Rights Commission has followed reports of a larger number of conflicts over land grabs and attempted grabs in Burma, or Myanmar. Some of the conflicts are over recently taken land, and others are reinitiating struggles begun many years ago. These land grabs include the well-known expansion of the Letpadaung Hills copper mine in Salingyi Township, Sagaing Region, under a joint project of the armed forces' holding company and a Chinese partner; the conflict between farmers and police in Ma-Ubin, in the delta, over the taking of land by a private firm with backing of local officials; and, a land grab by the police force itself in Nattalin Township, Bago Region. Most recently, news reports and online sites have detailed how villagers in Migyaunggan, Mandalay Region, have begun protesting to reclaim land taken from them by an army detachment. The local administration and cantonment board have issued warnings to protestors to desist with their actions. Meantime, senior officials have come to investigate the complaints about the land and learned that the army has no documentation to show that it is entitled to occupy the contested area. Under noxious laws passed in 2010, prior to the transfer of power to the current semi-elected government in Burma, the army retains authority to designate and use land for a variety of purposes. In the case of the Cantonment Municipalities Law, No. 32/2010, the armed forces can establish bodies for the management of land designated as being part of cantonment towns. Under the Facilities and Operations for National Defence Law of the same year, the armed forces can issue designations concerning land under or adjacent to their facilities..."
Source/publisher: Asian Human Rights Commission
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 18 December 2013


Title: The politics of the emerging agro-industrial complex in Asia’s ‘final frontier’ - The war on food sovereignty in Burma
Date of publication: 03 September 2013
Description/subject: "Burma's dramatic turn-around from 'axis of evil' to western darling in the past year has been imagined as Asia's 'final frontier' for global finance institutions, markets and capital. Burma's agrarian landscape is home to three-fourths of the country's total population which is now being constructed as a potential prime investment sink for domestic and international agribusiness. The Global North's development aid industry and IFIs operating in Burma has consequently repositioned itself to proactively shape a pro-business legal environment to decrease political and economic risks to enable global finance capital to more securely enter Burma's markets, especially in agribusiness. But global capitalisms are made in localized places - places that make and are made from embedded social relations. This paper uncovers how regional political histories that are defined by very particular racial and geographical undertones give shape to Burma's emerging agro-industrial complex. The country's still smoldering ethnic civil war and fragile untested liberal democracy is additionally being overlain with an emerging war on food sovereignty. A discursive and material struggle over land is taking shape to convert subsistence agricultural landscapes and localized food production into modern, mechanized industrial agro-food regimes. This second agrarian transformation is being fought over between a growing alliance among the western development aid and IFI industries, global finance capital, and a solidifying Burmese military-private capitalist class against smallholder farmers who work and live on the country's now most valuable asset - land. Grassroots resistances increasingly confront the elite capitalist class' attempts to corporatize food production through the state's rule of law and police force. Farmers, meanwhile, are actively developing their own shared vision of food sovereignty and pro-poor land reform that desires greater attention.... Food Sovereignty: a critical dialogue, 14 - 15 September, New Haven.
Author/creator: Kevin Woods
Language: English
Source/publisher: Transnational Institute (TNI)
Format/size: pdf (593K)
Date of entry/update: 04 September 2013


Title: Papun Situation Update: Dwe Lo Township, March 2012 to March 2013
Date of publication: 16 July 2013
Description/subject: "This report includes a situation update submitted to KHRG in May 2013 by a community member describing events occurring in Papun District mostly between March 2012 and March 2013, and also provides details on abuses since 2006. The report specifically describes incidents of forced labour, theft, logging, land confiscation and gold mining. The situation update describes military activity from August 2012 to January 2013, specifically Tatmadaw soldiers from Infantry Battalion (IB) #96 ordering villagers to make thatch shingles and cut bamboo. Moreover, soldiers stole villagers' thatch shingles, bamboo canes and livestock. It also describes logging undertaken by wealthy villagers with the permission of the Karen National Union (KNU) and contains updated information concerning land confiscation by Tatmadaw Border Guard Force (BGF) Battalions #1013 and #1014. The update also reports on gold mining initiatives led by the Democratic Karen Benevolent Army (DKBA) that started in 2010. At that time, civilians were ordered to work for the DKBA, and their lands, rivers and plantations were damaged as a result of mining operations. The report also notes economic changes that accompanied mining. In previous years villagers could pan gold from the river and sell it as a hedge against food insecurity. Now, however, options are limited because they must acquire written permission to pan in the river. This situation update also documents villager responses to abuses, and notes that an estimated 10 percent of area villagers favour corporate gold mining, while 90 percent oppose the efforts..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: pdf (292K), html
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/khrg2013/khrg13b45.html
Date of entry/update: 10 August 2013


Title: Dooplaya Situation Update: Kyone Doh Township, July to November 2012
Date of publication: 11 June 2013
Description/subject: "This report includes a situation update submitted to KHRG in December 2012 by a community member describing events occurring in Dooplaya District, between July and November 2012. The report describes problems relating to land confiscation and contains updated information regarding the sale of forest reserve for rubber plantations involving the BGF, with individuals who profited from the sale listed. Villagers in the area rely heavily upon the forest reserve for their livelihoods and are faced with a shortage of land for their animals to graze upon; further, villagers cows have been killed if they have continued to let them graze in the area. The community member explains that although fighting has ceased since the ceasefire agreement, otherwise the situation is the same; taxation demands and loss of livelihoods has resulted in villagers being forced to take odd jobs for daily wages, while some have left for foreign countries in search of work. Villagers have some access to healthcare and education supported by the Government, the KNU and local organizations..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (62K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/khrg2013/khrg13b33.pdf

http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/khrg13b33.pdf
Date of entry/update: 27 July 2013


Title: Hpa-an Situation Update: T'Nay Hsah Township, June 2012 to February 2013
Date of publication: 05 June 2013
Description/subject: "This report includes a situation update submitted to KHRG in February 2013 by a community member describing events occurring in T'Nay Hsah Township, Hpa-an District between June 2012 and February 2013. The report describes monks demanding money and labour from villagers for the building of roads and pagodas. Also detailed in this report is the loss of money and possessions by many villagers through playing the two-digit lottery. Further, the report describes the cutting down of forest in Yaw Ku and in Kru Per village tracts by the DKBA and the BGF, including 30 t'la aw trees, which villagers rely upon for their housing; the Tatmadaw have also designated land for sale without consulting local villagers. This report also describes the prevalence of amphetamine use and sale in the area, involving both young people and armed groups including the BGF, KPF and DKBA. Finally, the report details the ongoing danger posed by landmines, which continue to stop villagers from going about their livelihoods and are reportedly still being planted by armed groups..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (242K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/khrg2013/khrg13b30.html

http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/khrg13b30.pdf
Date of entry/update: 27 July 2013


Title: Rule of Law’ Will End Land Grabs in Ethnic Areas, Official Tells Activists
Date of publication: 12 May 2013
Description/subject: "An advisor to President Thein Sein met with a group of ethnic activists in Naypyidaw on Friday and tried to assuage their concerns over a recent rise in land conflicts in Burma’s ethnic areas. Tin Htut Oo, chairman of the National Economic and Social Advisory Council (NEASAC), told the activists that the government’s attempt at establishing “rule of law” would protect ethnic communities against land-grabbing. Last week, about 40 activist groups met in Rangoon and called on the government, ethnic rebel militias and the international community to ensure that the recent ceasefires in ethnic areas do not lead to a surge in land-grabbing, deforestation and the damming of rivers. NEASAC and several other presidential advisory bodies agreed to meet the groups, which were led by the Netherlands-based Transnational Institute and the Karen Environmental and Social Action Network, in order to listen to their concerns. The groups had also wanted to meet with the two most important government committees on land tenure, but their request for a meeting was declined, to the anger of the organizers..."
Author/creator: Lawi Weng
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 17 May 2013


Title: Ethnic Activists Warn of Surge in Land Grabs After Ceasefires
Date of publication: 09 May 2013
Description/subject: "About 40 ethnic activist groups are calling on the government, ethnic militias and the international community to address a surge in land-grabbing, as companies move into Burma’s ethnic regions following recent ceasefire agreements. But their campaign was off to a rocky start on Thursday when two government committees on land use declined to meet the activists. Kevin Woods, a researcher with the Netherlands-based Transnational Institute (TNI), said the Land Investment Committee, headed by Union Solidarity Development Party MP Tin Htut, and the Land Allotment and Utilization Scrutiny Committee, chaired by Win Tun Min of the Ministry of Environmental Conservation and Forestry, had turned down requests to meet with the groups. “They are the two most important committees for us to meet,” Woods said on Thursday, as the activists prepared to leave for the Burmese capital Naypyidaw. “If these committees won’t meet civil society groups from ethnic areas, where most land disputes are happening, then how do they expect to address these issues?”..."
Author/creator: Paul Vrieze
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 17 May 2013


Title: Access Denied - Land Rights and Ethnic Conflict in Burma
Date of publication: May 2013
Description/subject: The reform process in Burma/Myanmar by the quasi-civilian government of President Thein Sein has raised hopes that a long overdue solution can be found to more than 60 years of devastating civil war... Burma’s ethnic minority groups have long felt marginalized and discriminated against, resulting in a large number of ethnic armed opposition groups fighting the central government – dominated by the ethnic Burman majority – for ethnic rights and autonomy. The fighting has taken place mostly in Burma’s borderlands, where ethnic minorities are most concentrated. Burma is one of the world’s most ethnically diverse countries. Ethnic minorities make up an estimated 30-40 percent of the total population, and ethnic states occupy some 57 percent of the total land area and are home to poor and often persecuted ethnic minority groups. Most of the people living in these impoverished and war-torn areas are subsistence farmers practicing upland cultivation. Economic grievances have played a central part in fuelling the civil war. While the central government has been systematically exploiting the natural resources of these areas, the money earned has not been (re)invested to benefit the local population... Conclusions and Recommendations: The new land and investment laws benefit large corporate investors and not small- holder farmers, especially in ethnic minority regions, and do not take into account land rights of ethnic communities. The new ceasefires have further facilitated land grabbing in conflict-affected areas where large development projects in resource-rich ethnic regions have already taken place. Many ethnic organisations oppose large-scale economic projects in their territories until inclusive political agreements are reached. Others reject these projects outright. Recognition of existing customary and communal tenure systems in land, water, fisheries and forests is crucial to eradicate poverty and build real peace in ethnic areas; to ensure sustainable livelihoods for marginalized ethnic communities affected by decades of war; and to facilitate the voluntary return of IDPs and refugees. Land grabbing and unsustainable business practices must halt, and decisions on the allocation, use and management of natural resources and regional development must have the participation and consent of local communities. Local communities must be protected by the government against land grabbing. The new land and investment laws should be amended and serve the needs and rights of smallholder farmers, especially in ethnic regions.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Transnational Institute (TNI), Burma Centre Netherlands
Format/size: pdf (161K-OBL version; 3.22MB-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.tni.org/sites/www.tni.org/files/download/accesdenied-briefing11.pdf
Date of entry/update: 14 May 2013


Title: FPIC Fever: Ironies and Pitfalls
Date of publication: May 2013
Description/subject: Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC)... Text box extracted from "Access Denied - Land Rights and Ethnic Conflict in Burma" by TNI/BCN, May 2013 at http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs15/TNI-accesdenied-briefing11-red.pdf
Author/creator: Jennifer Franco,
Language: English
Source/publisher: Transnational Institute (TNI), Burma Centre Netherlands
Format/size: pdf (44K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs15/TNI-accesdenied-briefing11-red.pdf
Date of entry/update: 17 May 2013


Title: BURMA: Criminalization of rights defenders and impunity for police
Date of publication: 29 April 2013
Description/subject: "The Asian Human Rights Commission condemns in the strongest terms the announcement of the commander of the Sagaing Region Police Force, Myanmar, that the police will arrest and charge eight human rights defenders whom it blames for inciting protests against the army-backed copper mine project at the Letpadaung Hills, in Monywa. The commission also condemns the latest round of needless police violence against demonstrators there..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Asian Human Rights Commission
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 29 April 2013


Title: BURMA: Criminalization of rights defenders and impunity for police
Date of publication: 29 April 2013
Description/subject: The Asian Human Rights Commission condemns in the strongest terms the announcement of the commander of the Sagaing Region Police Force, Myanmar, that the police will arrest and charge eight human rights defenders whom it blames for inciting protests against the army-backed copper mine project at the Letpadaung Hills, in Monywa. The commission also condemns the latest round of needless police violence against demonstrators there.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC)
Format/size: html (45K)
Date of entry/update: 29 April 2013


Title: BURMA: Lawyers' report on Letpadaung released in English
Date of publication: 10 April 2013
Description/subject: "(Hong Kong, April 10, 2013) A Burma-based lawyers group has released its findings on the Letpadaung land struggle in English. The 39-page illustrated report was submitted by the Lawyers Network (Myanmar) and the Justice Trust in February to the government's investigation commission into events at Letpadaung, recounts the land struggle and subsequent crackdown on protestors. The Asian Human Rights Commission said that the report offered further evidence to support arguments that the mining operation ought to be halted, and criminal actions brought against police and other officials responsible for orders to disperse protestors through the use of incendiary weapons. "It is alarming that despite having such evidence available to it, not only did the investigation commission endorse the continuation of the mining project, but also said literally nothing about the criminal responsibility of the police and other authorities involved in the brutal attack on peaceful demonstrators," Bijo Francis, acting executive director of the Hong Kong-based regional rights group, said. .."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC)
Format/size: html (49K)
Date of entry/update: 11 April 2013


Title: Nyaunglebin Situation Update: Ler Doh Township, November 2012 to January 2013
Date of publication: 09 April 2013
Description/subject: This report includes a situation update submitted to KHRG in January 2013 by a community member describing events occurring in Nyaunglebin District during the period between November 2012 and January 2013. Specifically, it describes the confiscation of more than 2375.14 acres of villagers' land by Tatmadaw Infantry Battalion #60. One villager was required by Light Infantry Battalion #264 soldiers to collect 250,000 kyat per month from the villagers who operate gold ore processing machines. The community member also describes how, despite the January 2012 ceasefire being in effect, the Tatmadaw continues to increase resupply missions in the area, which has created alarm amongst local civilians. As part of a CIDKP pilot project, 173 sacks of rice have been distributed to Muh Theh villagers. The community member reports that there was an increase in medical care in the area, where Tatmadaw medics travelled with armed soldiers to three towns in KNU-controlled areas in Kyauk Kyi Township, while FBR medics travelled with unarmed KNLA soldiers to Tatmadaw-controlled areas. In response to the land confiscation, villagers' reported their complaints by submitting a letter to the Burma government, however, no response had been received as of January.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (1.5MB
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/khrg2013/khrg13b17.html
http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/khrg_13b17_-pdf.pdf
Date of entry/update: 30 April 2013


Title: "There is no benefit, they destroyed our farmland" (English and Burmese)
Date of publication: 08 April 2013
Description/subject: WITH SUBSTANTIAL SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS, INCLUDING A PHOTO ESSAY...Selected Land and Livelihood Impacts Along the Shwe Natural Gas and China-Myanmar Oil Transport Pipeline from Rakhine State to Mandalay Division..."Yesterday, we published a photo essay and companion report highlighting the severe impacts of the Shwe natural gas and Myanmar-China oil transport pipelines on the lives and livelihoods of local communities living around these mega-projects. Set for operation later this year, these Chinese and Korean led projects will transport Myanmar and foreign resources to China while providing little benefits to communities; lands have been taken, destroyed and damaged with inadequate compensation to make way for the dual pipelines and associated infrastructure. Based on over one year of on-the-ground fact-finding inside Myanmar by EarthRights International, the photos and essay amplify the voices of communities who are calling for the projects to be suspended or diverted to avoid ongoing harms..."
Language: English, Burmese/ ျမန္မာဘာသာ
Source/publisher: EarthRights International (ERI)
Format/size: html (87K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.earthrights.org/multimedia/essay/photo-essay-selected-impacts-shwe-natural-gas-myanmar-c...
http://www.earthrights.org/sites/default/files/Shwe-Essay-Selected-Impacts-Myanmar-Language.pdf
http://www.earthrights.org/sites/default/files/Shwe-Photo-Essay-Captions-Myanmar-Language.pdf
http://www.earthrights.org/sites/default/files/daewoo-land-acquisition-english.pdf
http://www.earthrights.org/sites/default/files/Daewoo-Land-Acquisition-Burmese.pdf
http://www.earthrights.org/campaigns/press-coverage-shwe-gas-and-myanmar-china-oil-projects
http://www.earthrights.org/campaigns/civil-society-reports-statements-shwe-and-myanmar-china-oil-an...
Date of entry/update: 09 April 2013


Title: BURMA: Two sharply contrasting reports on the struggle for land at Letpadaung
Date of publication: 03 April 2013
Description/subject: "The Asian Human Rights Commission has since mid-2012 closely followed, documented and reported on the struggle of farmers in the Letpadaung Hills of central Burma against the expansion of a copper mining operation under a military-owned holding company and a partner company from China. After repeatedly being refused permission to demonstrate against the operation under the terms of the country's new antidemocratic public demonstration law, the farmers began public protests, which were met with a range of repressive measures, culminating in the night time attack on encamped protestors last November. The attack received international media coverage because the police fired white phosphorous into the protest camps causing extensive burns to protestors, the majority of them monks who had joined villagers in resistance to the mine project. In recent months two reports have been issued, in Burmese, on the struggle against the mine. The reports make interesting reading because they represent very different perspectives and understandings of the issues for the affected villagers in Letpadaung. One is the official report of an investigative commission headed by Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, published in the 12 March 2013 edition of the state newspaper. The other is an unofficial report by the 88 Students Generation group and the Lawyers Network, Upper Burma, issued before the official report, on 21 January 2013. Whereas the latter report represents a genuine effort to identify the causes for the opposition to the mine and speak to the human rights questions concerned with events in Letpadaung of 2012, the former is little more than an exercise in playing at politics, and an attempt to sidestep and obfuscate the questions of human rights involved through the use of "information" that conceals more than it reveals..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC)
Format/size: html (54K)
Date of entry/update: 03 April 2013


Title: Rampant Land Confiscation Requires Further Attention and Action from Parliamentary Committee
Date of publication: 12 March 2013
Description/subject: "This past week the parliamentary Farmland Investigation Commission submitted its report on land confiscation to the parliament. The report finds that the military have taken almost 250,000 acres of land from villagers. The commission stated that they had spoken to military leaders about the confiscation, “Vice Senior-General Min Aung Hlaing […] confirmed to me that the army will return seized farmlands that are away from its bases, and they are also thinking about providing farmers with compensation.”..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Partnership
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 27 March 2013


Title: Land grabbing as big business in Myanmar
Date of publication: 08 March 2013
Description/subject: "Inadequate land laws have opened rural Myanmar to rampant land grabbing by unscrupulous, well-connected businessmen who anticipate a boom in agricultural and property investment. If unchecked, the gathering trend has the potential to undermine the country's broad reform process and impede long-term economic progress. Under the former military regime, land grabbing became a common and largely uncontested practice. Government bodies, particularly military units, were able to seize large tracts of farmland, usually without compensation. While some of the land Land grabbing as big business in Myanmar By Brian McCartan Inadequate land laws have opened rural Myanmar to rampant land grabbing by unscrupulous, well-connected businessmen who anticipate a boom in agricultural and property investment. If unchecked, the gathering trend has the potential to undermine the country's broad reform process and impede long-term economic progress. Under the former military regime, land grabbing became a common and largely uncontested practice. Government bodies, particularly military units, were able to seize large tracts of farmland, usually without compensation. While some of the land was used for the expansion of military bases, new government offices or infrastructure projects, much of it was used either by military units for their own commercial purposes or sold to private companies. The threat of military force meant there was little grass roots opposition to these land seizures and few avenues to secure adequate compensation. That's changed under the new democratic order as local communities band together to fight back against seizure of their lands. Many of the current land disputes date to the period before the 2010 general elections that ushered in President Thein Sein's reformist quasi-civilian government...Two new land laws passed on March 30, 2012 - the Farmland Law and the Vacant, Fallow, and Virgin Land Management Law - were intended to clarify ownership under the constitution and provide protections to land owners. While the laws guaranteed more individual ownership rights, to date big businesses have profited most from the legislation. The new laws created a dysfunctional and opaque system of land registration and administration that reinforced a top-down decision-making process without local participation. The absence of adequate legal and judicial recourse for the protection of land rights has further exacerbated the situation. Rather than deter land rights violations, the laws have effectively facilitated more land grabbing and manipulation of the system..."
Author/creator: Brian McCartan
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Asia Times Online"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 01 June 2013


Title: Nyaunglebin Situation Update: Kyauk Kyi Township, May to July 2012
Date of publication: 08 March 2013
Description/subject: "This report includes a situation update submitted to KHRG in July 2012 by a community member describing events occurring in Ler Doh Township, Nyaunglebin District, in the period between May and July 2012, including information on the use of villagers for forced labour by Tatmadaw soldiers, a KNU campaign to inform villagers of the ceasefire process, the testing of stones for mining operations and land confiscation. The community member describes how Muh Theh villagers were forced by Tatmadaw LIB #704 Battalion Commander Nyan Win Aung to build a bridge across the Thay Nweh Loh River for the purpose of providing motorbike access from the village to Poh Khay Hkoh army camp, as well as providing information regarding taxes placed upon motorbike taxi drivers by soldiers from IB #60. The report goes on to provide details surrounding a campaign carried out by the KNU to inform villagers about the ceasefire process, during which villagers voiced their problems to the KNU, including land issues. Moreover, the report contains information about several pending, as well as current development projects in the area, including an incident in which Tatmadaw MOC #4 and LIB #704 facilitated the testing of stones in Maw Day Forest. The report also describes the purchase of 9,000 acres of land by U Nyan Shwe Win, following the Government designation of the land in question as uncultivated. The community member reports that the land in question includes local villagers' land; betel nut; durian; mangosteen; cashew; betel leaf; cardamom; and dog fruit plantations, as well as villagers' hill field farms. Villagers were not consulted about the sale of this land. The problems that this sale of land poses to those villagers relocated during the 'four cuts' is specifically detailed; previously able to return from relocation sites to work on their plantations, this sale of 'uncultivated' land puts their livelihoods at risk. Finally, the report describes flooding caused by the Kyauk N'Ga dam, resulting in damage to villagers' paddy farms.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (135K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/khrg13b8.pdf
Date of entry/update: 22 March 2013


Title: Losing Ground: Land conflicts and collective action in eastern Myanmar
Date of publication: 05 March 2013
Description/subject: "Analysis of KHRG's field information gathered between January 2011 and November 2012 in seven geographic research areas in eastern Myanmar indicates that natural resource extraction and development projects undertaken or facilitated by civil and military State authorities, armed ethnic groups and private investors resulted in land confiscation and forced displacement, and were implemented without consulting, compensating or notifying project-affected communities. Exclusion from decision-making and displacement and barriers to land access present major obstacles to effective local-level response, while current legislation does not provide easily accessible mechanisms to allow their complaints to be heard. Despite this, villagers employ forms of collective action that provide viable avenues to gain representation, compensation and forestall expropriation. Key findings in this report were drawn based upon analysis of four trends, including: Lack of consultation; Land confiscation; Disputed compensation; and Development-induced displacement and resettlement, as well as four collective action strategies, including: Reporting to authorities; Organizing a committee or protest; Negotiation; and Non-compliance, and six consequences on communities, including: Negative impacts on livelihoods; Environmental impacts; Physical security threats; Forced labour and exploitative demands; Denial of access to humanitarian goods and services; and Migration."
Language: English, Burmese/ ျမန္မာဘာသာ
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (2.35MB-report; 6.18-Appendix of raw data)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/losinggroundkhrg-march2013-fulltext.pdf
http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/losinggroundkhrgmarch2013-appendix1-rawdatatestimony.pdf
Date of entry/update: 07 March 2013


Title: Military Involved in Massive Land Grabs: Parliamentary Report
Date of publication: 05 March 2013
Description/subject: "RANGOON—Less than eight months after a parliamentary commission began investigating land-grabbing in Burma, it has received complaints that the military has forcibly seized about 250,000 acres of farmland from villagers, according to the commission’s report. The Farmland Investigation Commission submitted its first report to Burma’s Union Parliament on Friday, which focused on land seizures by the military. According to the report, the commission received 565 complaints between late July and Jan. 24 that allege that the military had forcibly confiscated 247,077 acres (almost 100,000 hectares) of land. The cases occurred across central Burma and the country’s ethnic regions, although most happened in Irrawaddy Division..."
Author/creator: Htet Naing Zaw, Aye Kyawt Khaing
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 27 March 2013


Title: Mergui-Tavoy Interview: Saw E---, July 2012
Date of publication: 01 March 2013
Description/subject: "This report contains the full transcript of an interview submitted to KHRG during July 2012, which was conducted in Mergui-Tavoy District by a community member trained by KHRG to monitor human rights conditions. The community member interviewed 45-year-old G--- villager, Saw E---, who described the destruction of agricultural land, including betel nut and coconut plantations in G--- village resulting from construction of a vehicle road by the Italian-Thai Development Company (ITD). Saw E--- raises concerns regarding the lack of compensation for damaged agricultural land and crops. He also raises his concerns that relocation will be necessary, as the road will continue to be built and is set to cross his land. Further, Saw E--- describes villagers' strategies in response, including requesting ITD to provide compensation for the value of crops lost in road construction, this compensation was promised by the company, but is yet to be received. This report, and others, will be published in March 2013 as part of KHRG's thematic report: Losing Ground: Land conflicts and collective action in eastern Myanmar..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (104K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/khrg13b4.pdf
Date of entry/update: 22 March 2013


Title: Toungoo Situation Update: Tantabin and Than Daung Townships, September to December 2012 [News Bulletin]
Date of publication: 01 March 2013
Description/subject: "This report includes a situation update submitted to KHRG in February 2013 by a community member describing events occurring in Tantabin and Than Daung Townships in Toungoo District, during the period between September and December 2012. Specifically, it describes how over 40,000 acres of villagers plantations were flooded due to Toh Boh Dam operations in October 2012, and how the Shwe Swan Aye Company provided compensation to some, but not all, of the affected villagers. This report also describes how, on September 3rd 2012, Tatmadaw Light Infantry Battalions #124, #546 and #084, based in Ba Yint Naung Camp, confiscated villagers’ lands, forcing villagers in the Than Daung Gyi area to sell their lands to the battalion. The community member reported that the Tatmadaw battalions also continue to send rations, rotate troops and conduct training every four months; in one incident, heavy and small weapons were fired during a military exercise, landing in and damaging villagers’ plantations. Villagers’ livelihood problems caused by flooding of land from the dam, as well as villagers concerns about the ceasefire process in the context of ongoing Tatmadaw military operations, are also described..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (370K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/khrg13b5.pdf
Date of entry/update: 22 March 2013


Title: SHRF Newsletter, March 2013 - Land Grabbing and Related Issues and Abuses Continue
Date of publication: March 2013
Description/subject: Commentary: Land Grabbing and Related Issues and Abuses Continue... Contents: Themes & Places of Violations reported in this issue... Acronyms: MAP... Land abandoned under force seized and original owners required to buy them back, in Lai-Kha... Burmese military let people’s militia groups grow crops on lands long cultivated by local people, in Nam-Zarng... Situation of land grabbing and related abuses in areas under the influence of a ceasefire group “UWSA”, in Murng-Ton... Original local people forced to sell land, restricted from cultivating remorte farms, in Murng-Ton... Threats of land confiscation, arrest and restrictions, in Murng-Ton... Wresting of water from original local farmers, in Murng-Ton... Land grabbed and resold by businessman under “UWSA” protection, in Murng-Ton.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Shan Human Rights Foundation (SHRF)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 27 March 2013


Title: Papun Situation Update: Dwe Lo Township, July to October 2012
Date of publication: 28 February 2013
Description/subject: "This report includes a situation update submitted to KHRG in November 2012 by a community member trained by KHRG to monitor human rights. It describes events occurring in Papun District during the period between July to October 2012. Specifically discussed are Tatmadaw and Border Guard abuses, including forced labour, portering, land confiscation, coercive land sale transactions, and damages to the villagers' livelihood. The community member mentioned that large amounts of the villagers' land were confiscated and damaged, as well as an increase in waterborne diseases, from gold mines that were initially operated by the DKBA, but now villagers are uncertain if the private parties who are negotiating permission to continue from the KNU will be allowed to continue the mines. This report also describes how Border Guard #1013 confiscated more than 75 acres of plantation land in order to build shelters for soldiers' families, which created direct problems for villagers livelihoods. Tatmadaw Infantry Battalion #96 has been forcing villagers to perform various work for the base and for soldiers on patrol, and demanded bamboo poles to repair their camp. Moe Win, a company second-in-command from Tatmadaw Light Infantry Division #44, sexually abused Naw C---, a married woman from T--- village, in her home while she, her baby, and her husband was sleeping. The Company Commander promised Naw C--- 200,000 kyat as compensation and to ensure she not report the crime, but only 100,000 kyat has been paid. This report, and others, will be published in March 2013 as part of KHRG's thematic report: Losing Ground: Land conflicts and collective action in eastern Myanmar..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (342K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/khrg13b3_0.pdf
Date of entry/update: 22 March 2013


Title: Submission of Evidence to Myanmar Government’s Letpadaung Investigation Commission (full text - English)
Date of publication: 14 February 2013
Description/subject: Submission of evidence by Lawyers Network and Justice Trust to the Letpadaung Investigation Commission...(Submitted 28 January, 2013, re-submitted with exhibits 5 February, 2013)...EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: "The evidence submitted in this report covers two main issues: 1) the circumstances and validity of contracts signed by local villagers in April 2011 to allow their farmlands to be used by a copper mining joint venture between Wanbao, a Chinese military-owned company, and U Paing, a Burmese military-owned company, and 2) the circumstances and validity of the police action used to disperse peaceful protesters at the copper mine site during the early morning hours of 29 November, 2013. This submission presents relevant laws and facts concerning the Letpadaung case; it does not draw legal conclusions or make specific policy recommendations. The evidence indicates that local government authorities, acting on behalf of the joint venture companies, used fraudulent means to coerce villagers to sign contracts against their will, and then refused to allow villagers and monks to exercise their constitutional right to peaceful assembly and protest. The evidence also indicates that police used military-issue white-phosphorus (WP) grenades (misleadingly termed smoke bombs) combined with water cannons to destroy the protest camps and injure well over 100 monks with severe, deep chemical burns. White phosphorus spontaneously ignites in air to produce burning phosphorous pentoxide particles and, when combined with water, super-heated phosphoric acid..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Lawyers Network and Justice Trust via AHRC
Format/size: pdf (1.8MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.humanrights.asia/news/press-releases/AHRC-PRL-007-2013
http://justice-trust.org/wp-content/uploads/Letpadaungreportforpublicrelease.pdf (slightly different text)
Date of entry/update: 11 April 2013


Title: Rohingya miss boat on development
Date of publication: 09 November 2012
Description/subject: "The ethnic conflict that ravaged much of Rakhine State in western Myanmar last month was an opportunity for more than settling old and new scores between Muslim Rohingya and Buddhist Rakhines and co-religionist new arrivals from elsewhere in the country. Those involved were also clearing land in a densely populated area that is set to be among the country's prime bits of real estate as energy-related projects start transforming the impoverished state. More than 100 people (some reports indicate many times that number) were killed last month, untold others were wounded, and an estimated 28,000 fled or were driven from their homes in clashes between the stateless Rohingya and Buddhist citizens in a recurrence of violence last June. They are the latest incidents involving evicted ethnic groups around the country weeks before US President Obama visits Myanmar later this month. "The government has taken the opportunity to create more violence allowing a destabilized and vulnerable state which they can then take the natural resources from. This is believed to be the main reason to why so many villages [in Rakhine State] were razed to the ground," the representative of one non-government organization (NGO) told Asia Times Online, citing the source as a Rakhine resident..."
Author/creator: Syed Tashfin Chowdhury and Chris Stewart
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Asia Times Online"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 09 November 2012


Title: Pipeline Nightmare (English and Burmese)
Date of publication: 07 November 2012
Description/subject: "Shwe Pipeline Brings Land Confiscation, Militarization and Human Rights Violations to the Ta’ang People. The Ta’ang Students and Youth Organization (TSYO) released a report today called “Pipeline Nightmare” that illustrates how the Shwe Gas and Oil Pipeline project, which will transport oil and gas across Burma to China, has resulted in the confiscation of people’s lands, forced labor, and increased military presence along the pipeline, affecting thousands of people. Moreover, the report documents cases in 6 target cities and 51 villages of human rights violations committed by the Burmese Army, police and people’s militia, who take responsibility for security of the pipeline. The government has deployed additional soldiers and extended 26 military camps in order to increase pressure on the ethnic armed groups and to provide security for the pipeline project and its Chinese workers. Along the pipeline, there is fighting on a daily basis between the Burmese Army and the Kachin Independence Army, Shan State Army – North and Ta’ang National Liberation Army in Namtu, Mantong and Namkham, where there are over one thousand Ta’ang (Palaung) refugees. “Even though the international community believes that the government has implemented political reforms, it doesn’t mean those reforms have reached ethnic areas, especially not where there is increased militarization along the Shwe Pipeline, increased fighting between the Burmese Army and ethnic armed groups, and negative consequences for the people living in these areas,” said Mai Amm Ngeal, a member of TSYO. The China National Petroleum Corporation and Myanmar Oil and Gas Enterprise have signed agreements for the Shwe Pipeline, however the companies have not conducted any Environmental Impact Assessments or Social Impact Assessments. While the people living along the pipeline bear the brunt of the effects, the government will earn an estimated USD$29 billion over the next 30 years. “The government and companies involved must be held accountable for the project and its effects on the local people, such as increasing military presence and Chinese workers along the pipeline, both of which cause insecurity for the local communities and especially women. The project has no benefit for the public, so it must be postponed,” said Lway Phoo Reang, Joint Secretary (1) of TSYO. TSYO urges the government to postpone the Shwe Gas and Oil Pipeline project, to withdraw the military from Shan State, reach a ceasefire with all ethnic armed groups in the state, and address the root causes of the armed conflict by engaging in political dialogue."
Language: English, Burmese/ ျမန္မာဘာသာ
Source/publisher: Ta’ang Students and Youth Organization (TSYO)
Format/size: pdf (English, 2MB-OBL version; 6.77-original; 1.45-Burmese-OBL version)
Alternate URLs: http://www.palaungland.org/wp-content/uploads/Report/S%20P%20N%20Report/Pipeline%20Nightmare%20report%20in%20English%20version%20(Final).pdf (original)
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs14/Pipeline_Nightmare-bu-op--red.pdf (full report in Burmese)
http://www.palaungland.org/wp-content/uploads/Report/S%20P%20N%20Report/Immediate%20Release%207%20N... (Summary in Burmese)
http://www.palaungland.org/wp-content/uploads/Report/S%20P%20N%20Report/For%20Immediate%20Release%2... (Summary in Thai)
http://www.palaungland.org/wp-content/uploads/Report/S%20P%20N%20Report/2012-11%20Shwe%20Pipeline%2... (Summary in Chinese)
Date of entry/update: 07 November 2012


Title: The Burden of War - Women bear burden of displacement
Date of publication: 03 November 2012
Description/subject: Executive Summary: "Worsening conflict and abuses by Burmese government troops in northern Shan State have displaced over 2,000 Palaung villagers from fifteen villages in three townships since March 2011. About 1,000, mainly women and children, remain in three IDP settlements in Mantong and Namkham townships, facing serious shortages of food and medicine; most of the rest have dispersed to find work in China. Burmese troops have been launching offensives to crush the Kachin Independence Army (KIA), the Ta-ang National Liberation Army (TNLA), and the Shan State Army-North (SSA-N), to secure control of strategic trading and investment areas on the Chinese border, particularly the route of China’s trans-Burma oil and gas pipelines. In rural Palaung areas, patrols from sixteen Burma Army battalions and local militia have been forcibly conscripting villagers as soldiers and porters, looting livestock and property, and torturing and killing villagers suspected of supporting the resistance. This has caused entire villages to become abandoned. Interviews conducted by PWO in September 2012 show that the burden of displacement is falling largely on women, as most men have fled or migrated to work elsewhere. The ratio of women to men of working age in the IDP camps is 4:1. Women, including pregnant mothers, had to walk for up to a week through the jungle to reach the camps, carrying their children and possessions, and avoiding Burmese army patrols and landmines. Elderly people were left behind. Little aid has reached the IDP settlements, particular the largest camp housing over 500 in a remote mountainous area north of Manton, where shortages of water, food and medicines are causing widespread disease. Mothers are struggling to feed their families on loans of rice from local villagers, and have taken their daughters out of school. Some women have left children with relatives and gone to find work in China. PWO is calling urgently for aid to these IDPs, and for political pressure on Burma’s government to end its military offensives and abuses, pull back troops from conflict areas, and begin meaningful political dialogue to address the root causes of the conflict."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Palaung Women's Organization
Format/size: pdf (1.7MB-OBL version; 7.29MB-original)
Alternate URLs: http://eng.palaungwomen.com/Report/The%20Burden%20of%20War.pdf'>http://eng.palaungwomen.com/Report/The%20Burden%20of%20War.pdf
http://eng.palaungwomen.com
Date of entry/update: 06 November 2012


Title: Report on the Human Rights Situation in Burma (April-September 2012)
Date of publication: 01 November 2012
Description/subject: Introduction: "Over the period of this report, the political landscape in Burma has undergone noticeable shifts. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, once a political prisoner under house arrest, recently returned from a whirlwind tour of the United States where she received the Congressional Gold Medal, America’s highest civilian honour. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and members of the U.S. Congress touted her cooperation with Burmese President Thein Sein, who visited the United Nations in New York City. The trip, at the urging of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, also resulted in the further easing of sanctions on the Burmese government, including an end to the crippling ban on imports. Simultaneously, human rights violations persist throughout the country. Deadly civil war in ethnic areas, forced labour, child soldiers, torture and ill treatment remain grave concerns. Additionally, this report will emphasize the rampant land confiscation and forced relocation by the Burmese government. Recent events, including the arrests and beatings of farmers protesting the forced relocation of landowners from 66 villages for the Latpadaung copper mine,1 underline the on-going human rights violations by the Burmese government. In its report to the United Nations Human Rights Council, the Asian Human Rights Commission found that land grabbing is a direct result of “the convergence of the military, government agents and business”. The report cited the rising issue of former military personnel transitioning to new roles in industry. This marriage of military and industry has led to human rights violations such as the confiscation of 7,800 acres of land and untold environmental damage for the copper mine. The mining project is being completed by the military-owned Union of Myanmar Economic Holdings, in conjunction with a Chinese corporation. The effects of land confiscation have real implications on the livelihoods of civilians. A report by the Asian Legal Resource Centre (ALRC) noted that, “Almost daily, news media carry reports of people being forced out of their houses or losing agricultural land to statebacked projects, sometimes being offered paltry compensation, sometimes nothing". The 2012 Farmland Law presented an opportunity to address land grabbing but, according the ALRC, “far from reducing the prospects of land grabbing, the Farmland Law opens the door to confiscation of agricultural land on any pretext associated with a state project or the ‘national interest'"
Language: English
Source/publisher: ND-Burma
Format/size: pdf (210K-OBL version; 1.86MB-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.nd-burma.org/reports/item/103-report-on-the-human-rights-situation-in-burma.html
Date of entry/update: 02 November 2012


Title: Shan Human Rights Foundation Monthly Newsletter, October 2012 - land grabbing in Shan State
Date of publication: October 2012
Description/subject: Commentary: Rampant Land Grabbing Continues... Contents: Themes & Places of Violations reported in this issue... Acronyms... Map... Farmlands seized by police in Ta-Khi-Laek... Land grabbed and resold by military in Murng - Ton... Farmlands seized by Burmese Army-Sponsored people’s militia, in Murng-Sart... Villagers’ farmlands seized by ‘Wa’ ceasefire group, in Murng-Ton... Villagers’ lands seized by headman, with the help of land officials, in Loi-Lem... Farmlands seized without knowledge of owners in many townships in Central Shan State... Villagers fined for trying to work their farmlands taken by military in Nam-Zarng... Lands seized for building roads, displacing people, by ceasefire group in Parng-Yarng.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Shan Human Rights Foundation (SHRF)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 10 January 2013


Title: Mine Protests Challenge Myanmar Reforms - Expansion Involving Farmland in 26 Villages Prompts Latest Eruption Over Chinese Investment (text and video)
Date of publication: 24 September 2012
Description/subject: WETHMAY, Myanmar—Anger over plans to expand a Chinese-backed mine near here is emerging as a test case of Myanmar's recent political reforms. Villagers have staged raucous protests in recent weeks over the giant copper mine near Monywa in northwestern Myanmar, owned jointly by Myanmar's military and a subsidiary of China North Industries Corp., an arms manufacturer. The subsidiary, Wanbao Mining Ltd., and its Myanmar partners are hoping to expand the mine, but that would require taking over huge tracts of land and moving as many as 26 villages, locals say..."
Author/creator: Patrick Barta
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Wall Street Journal"
Format/size: html. Adobe Flash (3 minutes 28 seconds)
Date of entry/update: 14 October 2012


Title: BURMA: Farmers rise up at land grab by army-owned company
Date of publication: 13 September 2012
Description/subject: "The Asian Human Rights Commission has followed closely reports in recent weeks of an uprising by farmers against a takeover of a large area of agricultural land in upper Burma by an army-owned company and a private partner. The land grab, in the Letpadan Mountain Range of Sarlingyi Township, Sagaing Region, is of some 7800 acres of fertile land, to make way for copper mining. Currently farmers of around 26 villages cultivate the land. The residents of four villages--Siti, Wehmay, Zidaw and Kandaw--have already been forced out of their homes. The grabber is the usual suspect--Myanma Economic Holdings Ltd., a conglomerate of army interests, staffed by retired army officers, along with a joint partner company, Myanmar Wan Bao. In this case the director of the project is one Lt. Col. (Ret.) U Aung Myint. Farmers in the area began protests and interventions against the confiscation on 2 June 2012, and tensions and conflicts with local authorities have been growing since. According to reports coming daily from the region, the area of confiscated land has been placed under an administrative order declaring it off limits, and local authorities have threatened to prosecute anyone gathering to protest at the land confiscation. Their threats have so far failed to deter demonstrators: since August 24, thousands have been gathering outside company offices in the township to demand that the land be returned to them, and to object to the copper mine project. They have also raised their voices against the uncompensated destruction of crops through the movement of vehicles, dumping of rubbish and other actions by the companies that have adversely affected their lives and livelihoods..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 13 September 2012


Title: Thousands Protest Copper Mine
Date of publication: 05 September 2012
Description/subject: "Villagers say their farmland was unlawfully taken from them by a military-backed mining venture...More than 10,000 villagers in northwestern Burma demonstrated Wednesday, burning effigies and demanding the return of land they said was illegally confiscated by a mining company in a rare mass protest. They marched from the site of the Monywa copper mine, located in the Latpadaung mountain range in Saigang division’s Sarlingyi township, but were stopped by more than 200 government security personnel and company officials, said one female villager. "The police circled around us. They blocked the path to Pathein-Monywa highway so that we couldn't cross the road,” said the villager, who spoke to RFA on condition of anonymity, and who said that the protesters had marched for about one mile before they were blocked by authorities..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Radio Free Asia (RFA)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 06 September 2012


Title: Toungoo Interview: Saw H---, April 2011
Date of publication: 05 September 2012
Description/subject: This report contains the full transcript of an interview conducted during April 2011 in Tantabin Township, Toungoo District by a community member trained by KHRG to monitor human rights conditions. The community member interviewed a 37 year-old township secretary, Saw H---, who described abuses committed by several Tatmadaw battalions, including forced relocation, land confiscation, forced labour, restrictions on freedom of movement, denial of humanitarian access, targeting civilians, and arbitrary taxes and demands. Saw H--- provided a detailed description of three development projects that the Tatmadaw has planned in the area. Most notable is Toh Boh[1] hydroelectric dam on the Day Loh River, which is expected to destroy 3,143 acres of surrounding farmland. Asia World Company began building the dam in Toh Boh, Day Loh village tract during 2005. The other two projects involved the confiscation of 2,400 acres, against which the villagers formed a committee to petition for compensation and were met with threats of imprisonment. Saw H--- also described how 30 people working on the dam die each year. Also mentioned is the Tatmadaw's burning of villagers' cardamom plantations, and the villagers' attempts to limit the fire damage using fire lines. It is also described by Saw H--- how some villagers have chosen to remain in KNLA/KNU-controlled areas and produce commodities for sale, despite the attendant increase in the price of goods purchased from Tatmadaw-controlled villages, while others have fled to refugee camps in other countries. For photos of the Toh Boh Dam taken by a different community member in March 2012, see "Photo Set: More than 100 households displaced from Toh Boh Dam construction site in Toungoo," published by KHRG on August 23rd
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: pdf (225K), html
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/khrg2012/khrg12b72.html
Date of entry/update: 05 November 2012


Title: Land Grabbing in Dawei (Myanmar/Burma): a (Inter) National Human Rights Concern
Date of publication: September 2012
Description/subject: "Land grabbing is an urgent concern for people in Tanintharyi Division, and ultimately one of national and international concern, as tens of thousands of people are being displaced for the Dawei Special Economic Zone (SEZ). Dawei lies within Myanmar’s (Burma) southernmost region, the Tanintharyi Division, which borders Mon State to the North, and Thailand to the East, on territory that connects the Malay Peninsula with mainland Asia. This highly populated and prosperous region is significant because of its ecologically-diversity and strategic position along the Andaman coast. Since 2008 the area has been at risk of massive expulsion of people and unprecedented environmental costs, when a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the Thai and Myanmar governments, followed by a MoU between Thai investor Italian-Thai Development Corporation (ITD) (see Box 1) and Myanma Port Authority, granted ITD access to the Dawei region to build Asia’s newest regional hub. Thai interest in Dawei is strategic for two reasons. First, the small city happens to be Bangkok’s nearest gateway to the Andaman Sea, and ultimately to India and the Middle East. Second, the project links with a broader regional development plan, strategically plugging into the Asian Development Bank’s (ADB) East-West Economic Corridor, a massive transport and trade network connecting Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam; the Southern Economic Corridor (connecting to Cambodia); and the North-South Economic Corridor, with rail links to Kunming, China. If all goes as planned, the Dawei SEZ project, with an estimated infrastructural investment of over USD $50 billion will be Southeast Asia’s largest industrial complex, complete with a deep seaport, industrial estate (including large petrochemical industrial complex, heavy industry zone, oil and gas industry, as well as medium and light industries), and a road/pipeline/rail link that will extend 350 kilometers to Bangkok (via Kanchanaburi). The project even has its own legal framework, the Dawei Special Economic Zone Law, drafted in 2011 to ensure the industrial estate is attractive to potential investors..."
Author/creator: Elizabeth Loewen
Language: English
Source/publisher: Paung Ku and Transnational Institute (TNI)
Format/size: pdf (164K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.tni.org
Date of entry/update: 15 October 2012


Title: Yuzana to return confiscated farm land
Date of publication: 31 August 2012
Description/subject: Rangoon (Mizzima) – Htay Myint, the owner of the Yuzana Company, says the company will give back more than 1,000 acres of confiscated land in the Hukaung Valley in Kachin State to the original owners, said activist Bauk Ja.
Author/creator: Kyaw Phone Kyaw and Aung Myat Tun
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Mizzima"
Format/size: html, pdf (305K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.mizzima.com/news/inside-burma/7896-yuzana-to-return-confiscated-farm-land.pdf
Date of entry/update: 01 September 2012


Title: Photo Set: More than 100 households displaced from Toh Boh Dam construction site in Toungoo
Date of publication: 23 August 2012
Description/subject: "This Photo Set presents 17 still photographs taken by a local community member who has been trained by KHRG to monitor human rights conditions. The photos were all taken in March 2012 at the Toh Boh Dam construction site in Tantabin Township within locally-defined Toungoo District. According to the community member who took these photos, more than 100 households have been relocated from the area now occupied by the dam construction site, where construction is ongoing."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: pdf (400K), html
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/khrg2012/khrg12b71.html
Date of entry/update: 24 August 2012


Title: Shan Human Rights Foundation Monthly Newsletter, August 2012 - land grabbing in Shan State
Date of publication: August 2012
Description/subject: Commentary: Why people still flee Shan State and seek refuge in other countries... Contents: Themes & Places of Violations reported in this issue... MAP... Situation of people fleeing their native places in Kae-See... Land confiscation and mining project causing people to flee, in Murng-Su... Military operation, forced labour and extortion, causing people to flee, in Murng-Kerng... Continuing forced labour, forced recuruitment and extortion causing people to flee, in Lai-Kha... Forced recruitment causing people to flee, in Kung-Hing Military and police persecution causing people to flee, in Nam-Zarng... Forced relocation and land confiscation causing people to flee, in Murng-Nai... Beating and intimidation causing people to flee, in Larng-Khur.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Shan Human Rights Foundation (SHRF)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 10 January 2013


Title: Shan Human Rights Foundation Monthly Newsletter, March 2012 - land grabbing in Shan State
Date of publication: March 2012
Description/subject: Commentary: Land Confiscation... Situation of land confiscation in Nam-Zarng and Kun-Hing... Land confiscated, villagers house destroyed, in Nam-Zarng... Cultivated land confiscated in Nam-Zarng... Farmlands and cemetery ground confiscated in Nam-Zarng... Lands confiscated, forced labour used, to build new military bases and an airstrip, in Kun-Hing... Confiscation of land with regard to mining projects... Land Confiscation due to coal mining concession in Murng-Sart... Land grabbing by businessmen in cooperation with military authorities and their cronies... Lands forcibly taken, village forced to move, in Kaeng-Tung... Lands forcibly taken and sold, in Kaeng-Tung... Land forcibly taken and sold in Murng-Ton... Designation of cultivated lands as military property and levy... Land designated miltary areas, taxes levied, in Kun-Hing .
Language: English
Source/publisher: Shan Human Rights Foundation (SHRF)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 10 January 2013


Title: Shan Human Rights Foundation Monthly Newsletter, July 2011 - land grabbing, forced relocation and extortion in Shan State
Date of publication: July 2011
Description/subject: Commentary: Confiscation and Extortion... Forcible rice procurement continues in Kaeng - Tung... Confiscation of rice fields in Kaeng-Tung... Farmland confiscated for building new military base in Kun-Hing... Confiscation of rice fields in Murng – Nai... Leased rice field threatened to be forcibly taken, rent not paid in full, in Murng - Ton... Houses forcibly taken in Murng-Ton... Extortion of money from travelers worsens in Kun-Hing... People forced to pay for election expenses long after poll, in Kaeng-Tung... Extortion of money intensifies, becomes more frequent, for constructing military bases, in Kun-Hing... High interest charged on a loan without advance knowledge, in Kun-Hing.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Shan Human Rights Foundation (SHRF)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 10 January 2013


Title: Shan Human Rights Foundation Monthly Newsletter, May 2011 - extortion and land grabbing in Shan State
Date of publication: May 2011
Description/subject: Commentary: Confiscation and Extortion... Situation of land confiscation... Confiscation of cultivated land for state infrastructure in Murng-Nai and Kaeng- Tung... Land confiscated for reselling in Murng-Pan... Rice fields confiscated and cultivated by military using forced labour, in Murng - Pan... Situation of abuses related to civilian vehicles... Confiscation of civilian vehicles in Nam-Zarng,Ta-Khi-Laek and Kaeng-Tung... Confiscation of civilian motorcycles in Loi-Lem... Extortion of money from civilian vehicles at checkpoints in Southern and Eastern Shan State... Villagers’ pigs extorted, chickens stolen, in Kae-See... Situation of extortion and stealing of villagers livestock... Extortion of chickens, forced labour, in Kun-Hing... Situation of other types of extortion... Extortion in Kaeng-Tung.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Shan Human Rights Foundation (SHRF)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 10 January 2013


Title: Overview of Land Confiscation in Arakan State
Date of publication: June 2010
Description/subject: Introduction: "The following analysis has been compiled to bring attention to a wider audience of many of the problems facing the people of Burma, especially in Arakan State. The analysis focuses particularly on the increase in land confiscation resulting from intensifying military deployment in order to magnify security around a number of governmental developments such as the Shwe Gas, Kaladan, and Hydropower projects in western Burma of Arakan State...Conclusion: "The SPDC's ongoing parallel policy of increasing militarisation while increased forced land confiscation to house and feed the increasing troop numbers causes widespread problems throughout Burma. By stripping people of the land upon which peopl's livelihoods are based, whilst providing only desultory compensation if any at all, many citizens face threats to their food security as well as water shortages, a decrease or abolition of their income, eradicating their ability to educate their children in order to create a sustainable income source in the future. Additionally, the policy of using forced labour in the Government's construction and development projects, coupled with the disastrous environmental effects of many of these projects, continues to create severe health problems throughout the country whilst simultaneously stifling the local economy so that varied or sustainable work is difficult to become engaged in. All of this often leads to people fleeing the country in search of a better life."
Language: English
Source/publisher: All Arakan Students' and Youths' Congress (AASYC)
Format/size: pdf (2.3MB)
Date of entry/update: 16 June 2010


Title: The Impact of the confiscation of Land, Labor, Capital Assets and forced relocation in Burma by the military regime
Date of publication: May 2003
Description/subject: 1. Introduction 1; 2. Historical Context and Current Implications of the State Taking Control of People, Land and Livelihood 2; 2.1. Under the Democratically Elected Government 2; 2.1.1. The Land Nationalization Act 1953 2; 2.1.2. The Agricultural Lands Act 1953 2; 3. Under the Revolutionary Council (1962-1974) 2; 3.1. The Tenancy Act 1963 3; 3.2. The Protection of the Right of Cultivation Act, 1963 3; 4. The State Gains Further Control over the Livelihoods of Households 3; 4.1. Under the Burma Socialist Programme Party (BSPP) Rule (1974 - 1988) 3; 4.1.1 Land Policy and Institutional Reforms 3; 4.2 Under the Military Rule II - SLORC/SPDC (1988 - present) 4; 4.2.1. Keeping it Together: Agriculture, Economy, and Rural Livelihood 5; 5. Militarization of Rural Economy 8; 5.1. Land confiscation 8; 5. 2. Land reclamation 11; 5.3. Military Agricultural Projects 13; 5.4. The Fleecing of Burmese Farmers 15; 5.5. Procurement 17; 5.5.1. Other crops 20; 5.5.2. Farmers tortured in Mon State 23; 6. Forced Relocation and Disparity of Income and wealth 25; 7. Conclusion 29... APPENDICES NOT YET ACQUIRED Appendix 1. Summary Report on Human Rights Violations by SPDC and DKBA Troops in 7 Districts of KNU ( 2000 to 2002) 31; Appendix 2. Forced labor by SPDC troops on road construction from Pa-pun to Kamamaung in 2003 38; Appendix 3. Survey Questionnaires (Ward/village and Household - in Burmese) 45.
Author/creator: Dr Nancy Hudson-Rodd, Dr Myo Nyunt, Saw Thamain Tun, Sein Htay
Language: English
Source/publisher: NCUB, FTUB
Format/size: html (19K) pdf (649K, 812K, 413K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs17/land_confiscation-NHR+al-en-red.pdf
Date of entry/update: 12 August 2003