VL.png The World-Wide Web Virtual Library
[WWW VL database || WWW VL search]
donations.gif asia-wwwvl.gif

Online Burma/Myanmar Library

Full-Text Search | Database Search | What's New | Alphabetical List of Subjects | Main Library | Reading Room | Burma Press Summary

Home > Main Library > Society and Culture > Religion > Buddhism > Burmese pagodas and other religious buildings

Order links by: Reverse Date Title

Burmese pagodas and other religious buildings
See also the Architecture and Archaeology sections

Individual Documents

Title: A TIGRESS ON THE SHWEDAGON: A RESEARCH NOTE
Date of publication: December 2008
Description/subject: "...Donald Stadtner brought the following piece of history regarding the Shwedagon to our attention and sent a photograph of glasswork that recorded the event, together with the text below from Walter del Mar, The Romantic East: Burma, Assam, & Kashmir (London: Adam and Charles Black, 1906, 27-28). We reproduce it further below along with a detail of the glass painting, from a private collection in Yangon. The scene depicts the incident quite literally , with the soldier climbing "to the roof of one of the smaller shrines....." Although del Mar refers to the animal as a tiger, it was in actuality a tigress and the events discussed below occurred on 3 March 1903, the tigress having moved to the vicinity of the Shwedagon from Gyophu Lake..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: SOAS Bulletin of Burma Research 6, 2008
Format/size: pdf (292K)
Date of entry/update: 03 October 2010


Title: U Khan Dee: The Hermit on the Hill
Date of publication: June 2002
Description/subject: "More than fifty years after his death, U Khan Dee, the hermit of Mandalay Hill, is still remembered as one of the most remarkable figures of Burma's late colonial period. During the latter half Burma's colonial rule, pious visitors to Mandalay Hill would recount their tales of the venerable hermit monk who possessed remarkable powers. Some spoke of his great height, others claimed he was invisible, still others said he could turn silver into gold. And although people all over Burma today still speak reverently of U Khan Dee, his life was marked by controversy. Also known as Yathee Gyi U Khan Dee (the Great Hermit U Khan Dee), his legendary status was achieved only through a long uphill struggle. In 1908, U Khan Dee first arrived at Mandalay Hill from Yamethin Township, Mandalay, after leaving the Buddhist monkhood where he spent 12 years. He was driven by the strong desire to reconstruct religious buildings and restore Buddhist statues that were severely damaged by the series of fires that ravaged the city around the turn of the century..."
Author/creator: Aung Zaw, Shawn L Nance
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 10, No.5
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 May 2008


Title: Text and New Contexts: Shwedagon and Kyaikhtiyoe today
Date of publication: December 2001
Description/subject: "Texts and Contexts", December 2001 Conference, Universities' Historical Research Centre, Yangon University... Abstract: The paper discusses the use of texts in current renovation of pagodas in Myanmar, taking as examples aspects of work undertaken at the Shwedagon and Kyaikhtiyoe in the last two years. Different types of texts, from inscriptions and traditional accounts to contemporary technical reports, are used to illustrate the complex tradition found in the country today. These are presented in the context of past interaction including Mon influence and the Hsandawshin (Sacred Hair) heritage, as well as present links such as planetary aspects and the role of renovation in encouraging the sustenance of Theravada practice.
Author/creator: Elizabeth Moore,
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar Historical Research Journal, University of Yangon [forthcoming]
Format/size: pdf (747K)
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Shwedagon Through the Ages
Date of publication: May 1999
Description/subject: History has not always been kind to Shwedagon, Burma's most sacred pagoda, but after two and a half millennia, it still stands as a timeless monument to the spiritual aspirations of Burmese Buddhists.
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy", Vol. 7. No. 4
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Note [on the Senbyú Pagoda at Mengún]
Date of publication: 1885
Description/subject: The article is undated, but since it refers to the memoranda of Yule (1879) and Sladen (1868) it is likely to have been written in the 1880s. I have arbitrarily dated it 1885 for the sake of the order among the documents in this section.
Author/creator: J. FERGUSSON.
Language: English
Source/publisher: SOAS Bulletin of Burma Research, Vol. 2, No. 1, Spring 2004
Format/size: pdf (96 K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.soas.ac.uk/sbbr/editions/soas-bulletin-of-burma-research-volume-2-issue-1.html
Date of entry/update: 23 December 2010


Title: Remarks on the Subject [of the Senbyú Pagoda at Mengún]
Date of publication: 17 April 1879
Description/subject: "In a paper describing what I had seen of architectural remains of Hindu character in Java, which was read before the Asiatic Society of Bengal, in October, 1861, there occurred the following passage in reference to that magnificent monument of Buddhism, the Boro Bodor:— “Mr. Fergusson, who gives a good account of the Boro Bodor in his Handbook of Architecture, considers it to be a kind of representation of the great Buddhist monasteries, which are described in the Ceylonese writings as having been many stories high, and as containing hundreds of cells for monks....."
Author/creator: Col. Henry Yule, C.B
Language: English
Source/publisher: SOAS Bulletin of Burma Research, Vol. 2, No. 1, Spring 2004,
Format/size: pdf (278 K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.soas.ac.uk/sbbr/editions/soas-bulletin-of-burma-research-volume-2-issue-1.html
Date of entry/update: 23 December 2010


Title: Some Remarks upon COL. YULE'S Notes on the Senbyú Pagoda
Date of publication: 23 June 1869
Description/subject: "With reference to the interesting account of the Senbyú Pagoda at Mengun, read at the last meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society, and more particularly with reference to the remarks by Col. Yule on the Buddhas of the Boro Bodor, I would, with the greatest deference to the writer, beg to offer some suggestions derived from personal observation of the manner in which many groups of figures of Buddha (Sákya Muni) are sculptured in Bengal and the North-West Provinces of India..."
Author/creator: C. HORNE, F.R.A.S.
Language: English
Source/publisher: SOAS Bulletin of Burma Research, Vol. 2, No. 1, Spring 2004
Format/size: pdf (17 K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.soas.ac.uk/sbbr/editions/soas-bulletin-of-burma-research-volume-2-issue-1.html
Date of entry/update: 23 December 2010


Title: Some Account of the Senbyú Pagoda at Mengún, near the Burmese Capital, in a Memorandum
Date of publication: 06 January 1868
Description/subject: "...1. The Pagoda was built in the reign of king Bodo Piyah,1 in the Burmese year 1178 (A.D. 1816), by his grandson, Noungdau Gyee, now known as Bagyeedau Piyah,2 which specifies his relationship as paternal uncle to the present reigning king. 2. It is situated at Mengoon, on the west bank of the Irrawaddy, a couple of hundred yards only from the huge brick ruin which is known as the Mengoon pagoda..."
Author/creator: CAPT. E. H. SLADEN, Political Agent at Mandalé
Language: English
Source/publisher: SOAS Bulletin of Burma Research, Vol. 2, No. 1, Spring 2004
Format/size: pdf (260 K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.soas.ac.uk/sbbr/editions/soas-bulletin-of-burma-research-volume-2-issue-1.html
Date of entry/update: 23 December 2010