[202]

MESSAGE

FROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,

TRANSMITTING

A COPY OF THE RULES, REGULATIONS,

AND

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE NAVAL SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES;

PREPARED

BY THE BOARD OF NAVY COMMISSIONERS.

APRIL 20, 1818.

Read, and ordered to lie upon the Table.

WASHINGTON:

PRINTED BY E. DE KRAFFT.

1818

--3--

To the House of Representatives of the United States:

I transmit to the House of Representatives a copy of the rules, regulations, and instructions, for the naval service of the United States; prepared by the Board of Navy Commissioners, in obedience to an act of Congress, passed 7th of February, 1815, entitled "An act to alter and amend the several acts for establishing a Navy Department, by adding thereto a Board of Commissioners."

JAMES MONROE.

Washington, April 20, 1818.

CONTENTS.

Page.

Regulations for the government of the United States' navy yards

5

The master of the yard

9

The master shipwright

10

The navy store keeper

ib.

The purser of the yard

12

Superintendant of rope walk, gunner, and others

ib.

Navy agents

ib.

Regulations and instructions relatively to the United States' naval service

14

Commanders of fleets or squadrons

16

Rank and command

21

Salutes

22

Military honors and ceremonies

24

Regulations and instructions for commanders of squadrons, or division of ships, of the United States' navy

ib.

Of appointments

26

Of stores and provisions

28

Of fitting and refitting a ship

31

Regulations for the promotion of discipline, cleanliness, &c.

32

Cabin furniture

44

Of the lieutenant

45

Of the master

49

Regulations relative to naval surgeons, and their assistants

56

Surgeon's mates

61

The surgeon of the fleet, or hospital surgeon

62

Hospital ship

63

Pursers

64

Full and half pay and rations

78

Marines serving on board the ships of the United States

ib.

General instructions for warrant officers

76

The gunner

80

Surveys

83

Convoys

85

Masters at arms and ship's corporal

86

Midshipmen

87

Chaplain

ib.

Cook

ib.

Boatswain

88

Sailmaker

89

Carpenter

ib.

Regulations relative to recruiting

91

--5--

RULES, REGULATIONS, &c.

REGULATIONS FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY YARDS.

1. To every navy yard there shall belong a receiving ship to accommodate the officers and crews of vessels wanting repairs, where they shall be removed, when necessary, after the ships, intended for repair, have been hauled into dock or wharf, and their provisions, stores, ballast, and water casks, removed.

A receiving ship to each navy yard.

2. When the crew of a ship shall be removed, the ship is to be delivered over to the commandant of the yard, who will commence her repairs as reported necessary by officers appointed for that purpose, or as instructed by the Board of Navy Commissioners.

Commandants to take charge of repairing ships, and to repair them.

3. If, in the course of her repairs, it should be necessary to call for the aid of her officers and crew, the commandant of the yard will signify the same to the commanding officer of the ship, who will, on his requisition, from time to time, furnish the necessary number of officers and men for the service required; who are to be victualled from the stores of the ship, and are to be returned on board the receiving ship after working hours.

Officers and crew of the ship to assist, upon requisition, and to be victualled from the ship.

4. The commandant of the yard will, in all cases act in strict conformity to the instructions of the Board of Navy Commissioners, or to the report of the officers of survey; and no additional repairs or alterations, of any moment, are to be made, without instructions from the Navy Department to that effect.

Commandant to obey the instructions of the Navy Board.

5. When a ship shall be delivered to the commandant of a yard for repairs, and her crew removed, she will be under the sole direction of the commandant, who will report to the Board of Commissioners the time he received her, and will be held accountable for any unnecessary delay in her equipment. He will also report the time he delivered her to her commander.

Commandant to have the sole direction of the repairing ship.

6. While a ship is undergoing repairs, and under the control of the commandant of the yard, the authority of

Captain's authority to

--6--

cease; but he is to point out defects.

the captain over her shall cease. Yet, it will be his duty to point out, to the commandant of the yard, defects which may have escaped his notice.

Crew while on board of receiving ship to be under the command of their own officers.

7. While the crew remains on board the receiving ship, they shall be under the charge and command of the officers of the ship to which they belong; but when detailed for duty, on requisition, either in that yard or in the ship repairing, they shall be under the sole direction of the commandant, and subject to the regulations of the

yard.

Captain to have a place in the yard for the performance of particular duties.

8. Should the commanding officer of the ship have duties to perform, which are not embraced in the report of the officers who surveyed the ship, before going into dock, he will make a requisition on the commandant of the yard for a suitable place to execute them in; and if the duties of the yard will admit of his so doing, he will allot a convenient place, where the commander of the ship may, with his own crew, and in his own manner, perform the service required; provided he does not interfere with the regulations of the yard.

Matters not embraced in the report of survey may be performed in the yard by the crew of the ship.

Commandant not bound to have such repairs done, unless instructed.

9. If sails, rigging, boats, or other matters, require alteration or repairs, not included in the report of survey, the commandant of the yard may permit such alterations or repairs to be made in the yard, by the crew of the ship to which they belong, under the direction and superintendence of the commanding officer of the ship; but he shall not be bound to cause such repairs or alter-ations to be done, unless particularly instructed to that effect by the Board of Navy Commissioners, or by the commanding officer of the station, he being a senior officer; and in the latter case, a survey must be immediately held, and the report forwarded to the Board of Commissioners, that their sanction may obtained.

Commandant accountable only to the Navy Department. To cause returns to be made.

10. The commandant of the yard, although bound to obey the written orders of the senior officer of the station, as regards certain duties in the yard; is accountable only to the Navy Department, with which he will keep up a constant correspondence. He will cause to be reported weekly, the duties performed and performing in the yard; monthly, a return of expenditures; and, quarterly, a general return of receipts and expenditures, and stores remaining on hand, designating those fit for service, and those unfit, or requiring a survey; all of which reports are to be conformable to the forms A, B, C.

Commandant to inspect all returns and sign them-accountable for mistakes.

11. The commandant of the yard will inspect all returns made to the Navy Commissioners by surveying officers belonging to the yard; all of which he will sign, and will be held accountable for all mistakes.

--7--

12. The commandant of the yard will attend all weekly musters, and be particularly careful that none but able bodied and effective men are employed. He will use every exertion to obtain them on the most reasonable terms, and will see that not more men are employed than shall be necessary for the performance of the work on hand.

To attend all weekly matters: to employ none but able bodied men.

13. The commandant of the yard will draw up such rules and regulations as may be calculated to secure discipline and forward the public interest; and shall transmit a copy of such rules and regulations to the Board of Navy Commissioners for their approbation.

To draw up

rules and regulations.

14. The guard of marines detached for the protection of the yard, shall, while doing duty in the yard, be subject to the orders of the commandant, and receive from him their instructions as to the duties they are to perform therein; and all persons, enlisted into the service of the United States, and doing duty under the orders of the commandant of the yard, shall, for every offence, be subject to the act for the better government of the navy of the United States, and punished in the same manner as if the offence had been committed at sea.

Marines subject to his or-ders while employed an the yard.

All persons

doing duty under him subject to navy laws.

15. The commandant of a yard is to be as independent in his yard as a captain on board his ship. Nothing is to be done therein without his knowledge and approbation, except by virtue of the written order or orders of a superior officer, having command of the station to which the yard belongs.

Commandant

to be independent as captain of a ship.

16. The commandant of a yard will, on the requisition of commanders of ships, approved by the senior officer afloat, furnish from the public stores all supplies, comporting with the established rules of the service; and no orders are to be given to an agent, for the purchase of articles required for particular ships, unless such orders are accompanied by a certificate from the commandant of the yard, setting forth that they cannot be supplied from the public stores.

Commandant to furnish supplies on requisition.

When an agent may be

required to purchase:

17. All requisitions for supplies for ships must be made on the commandant of the yard, who, if necessary, shall make a requisition on the agent. But all such requisitions must bear the signatures of the senior officer afloat.

All requisitions to be made on the commandant.

18. Commandants of yards will always keep on hand a number of muster papers, pay papers, and other established forms, together with the several rules am regulations for the different branches of the service; and on the requisitions of commanders of ships, properly countersigned, will furnish them with the necessary number of each.

Commandant to keep on hand forms, &c. and to furnish commanders.

--8--

Commandant to transmit muster roll monthly.

19. Commanders of yards will, monthly, transmit to the Board of Navy Commissioners a complete muster roll, containing the names of all persons employed in the yards respectively, with their circumstances, &c. agreeably to forms D, and E.

When a ship is received for repairs, an account must be kept against her, &c.

20. On receiving a ship at the yard for repairs, the commandant will open an account against said ship, charging her for the work done and supplies furnished, according to the then existing rates and current prices, as to which he will make inquiries of the agent, and on stating the account of the ship, he will forward a copy of it to the Board of Navy Commissioners, signed by himself and the principal pfficer of the yard, and countersigned by the commander of the ship, for which the work was done and supplies furnished.

Men in ordinary to be victualled from the yard.

21. Men, in ordinary, shall be victualled from the yard to which they belong; and if, from any unavoidable circumstance, they should be victualled on board any United States' ship of war, where duty may have made their presence necessary, the commandant shall direct the purser of the yard to pay in kind to the purser of the ship, the quantity of provisions issued from the said ship, to the men of the yard, and the same rule must be observed in regard to the men belonging to ships and victualled in the yard.

Sheer hulk to be kept clean.

Commanders to keep them and deliver them up in good order.

22. On the delivery of a sheer hulk, or receiving ship, to a commander of a ship at the yard for the accommodation of his officers and crew, the commandant will take especial care that she is clean and in good order, and will require the commander of the ship to give particular directions, that no damages be done to such sheer hulk or receiving ship, nor to any of the store rooms or cabins; and it shall be the duty of the commander of such ship to see that the said receiving ship be kept as clean as circumstances will admit, and pumped out when necessary, during the continuance of his crew on board of her; and on quitting her, that she be delivered up clean, and as far as may depend on him, in good order, to the proper officer of the yard, or the commander of such ship as may be directed, subsequently, to take possession of her.

When a ship is laid up, an account of her stores to be taken.

23. When a ship is to be laid up in ordinary, the commandant of the yard will take a particular account of the articles delivered into store, and having first been properly tallied, he will deposite them where they will be secure from the weather. They must be tallied and landed under charge of the officers of the ship-the officers of the yard not being accountable for them until delivered at the store. Sails and rigging, when wet,

--9--

shall not be received, nor shall powder be received any where but at the magazine. The commandant will endeavor to keep the stores of the different ships separate and ready for delivery; and upon receipt of them he will give to each of the officers of different departments, receipts specifying the different articles received: duplicates of which must be sent to the Hoard of Navy Commissioners before they can be paid off.

Stores of different ships to be kept separate.

24. When a ship, intended for ordinary, is cleared of her provisions, stores, sails, and rigging, and the yards and spars, are properly disposed of, all of which must be done by her officers and crew, the commandant of the yard shall, when the crew are removed or paid off, take charge of and secure her, at proper moorings, placing on board the necessary number of men to attend to her preservation, and, if particularly instructed to that effect by the Board of Navy Commissioners, and not otherwise, he will cause awnings to be spread, or sheds to be erected, over her. He will see that all ships in ordinary are wet at proper times, and pumped out as often as occasion may require.

Commandant to take charge of a ship laid up: his duty in such case.

25. When a ship, intended for repairing, shall haul into the yard, the commandant shall point out the place she is to occupy, and he shall direct the master of the yard to attend to the placing of her anchors where he may think proper. On her removal from the yard, he shall in like manner direct the master of the yard to lift them, calling on the ship's commanding officers for such assistance as may be necessary. He will have hoys, lighters, boats, and purchases, for these purposes, in sufficient number, and of a proper kind, to answer the exigencies of the service; as also water tanks and other conveniences, when necessary, to water them; all of which he is particularly enjoined to keep in good order.

Commandants to attend to the mooring and unmooring of a ship when hauled into the yard.

To have lighters, water tanks, &c.

26. The head of one department shall have no control over the other departments in the yard. Each is accountable to the commandant of the yard, for the duties performed within his department.

Heads of departments not to control each other.

27. No slaves or negroes are to be employed in the navy yards of the United States, without the express orders of the Secretary of the Navy or of the Board of Navy Commissioners.

No slaves or negroes to be employed.

THE MASTER OF THE YARD.

1. The master of the yard shall have charge of the sheer hulk, vessels, and boats belonging to the yard, and see that, they are always in a condition for immedi-

Shall have charge of the sheer hulk,

--10--

Shall inspect his stores and keep a record.

ate service. He shall inspect all stores received for the use pf his department, and report for survey all such as may appear unserviceable. He shall keep daily records of all labor done and materials used in his department, specifying for what vessel or service he received his stores from the store keeper, and account for them in the manner hereafter specified.

Shall attend to the mooring and unmooring of all vessels. Discharge and store articles.

3. He shall attend the mooring and unmooring of all vessels; see that the tackle and purchases of the yard are in good order; discharge and store all articles received by the store keeper for the use of the yard; storing all timber and spars, agreeably to the wishes of the master shipwright.

THE MASTER SHIPWRIGHT.

To attend to the selection and conversion of timber; inspect stores.

Keep a record of labor, &c. Examine candidates for work.

1. The master shipwright shall attend to the selection and conversion of all timber; inspect the stores received into the yard for the use of his department; and report for survey such as may be unfit for service. He shall keep daily records of the labor performed and of the materials used under his directions, on the vessels in the yard, and examine and certify as to the fitness of candidates for work, before they are employed in his department.

Shall be present at all surveys; held responsible for his stores. Shall have the control of the artificers of his department

2. He shall be present at all surveys and conversions of stores belonging to his department. He will be held responsible for the preservation and storage of all masts, spars, timber, &c.; and he shall have the immediate control of all the artificers of his department.

THE NAVY STORE KEEPER.

His general duty.

1. Shall take charge of all stores, provisions, and munitions of war, delivered at the yard for service; and all storehouses and timber sheds, shall be under his charge.

Shall deliver stores on requisition, take receipts, and give credit for surplus stores.

3. Articles of stores used in the yard, shall be delivered by him to the heads of the different department on a requisition approved by the commandant of the yard, for which he shall take their receipts and hold them accountable. He shall give them credit for all surplus stores they may have required for a particular service, and returned.

How to deliver stores to vessels.

3. He shall deliver stores to vessels conformably to the rules of the service, on requisitions countersigned, as before directed, and approved by the commandant of the yard; and the commander of the vessels for which

--11--

the stores are required shall be bound to exhibit his account of stores on hand, whenever doubts arise whether the quantity demanded does not exceed the quantum allowed to vessels of her rate.

Commanders bound to exhibit accounts.

4. He shall notify the commandant of the yard, whenever there may be a deficiency of stores on hand.

To notify deficiencies.

5. He shall have the immediate control over the watchmen and laborers employed in his department.

To have the control of watchmen, &c.

6. He shall not receive into store, unless by written order from the Secretary of the Navy, or the Board of Navy Commissioners, or the commandant of the yard, articles purchased for the service, until he, the master, and the master of the department to which the stores belong, shall have examined them, and certified that they were furnished agreeably to contract; and on that certificate which he shall preserve, the order to receive them shall be given by the commandant. When stores are rejected for want of such certificate, he shall immediately inform the commandant thereof; and if it be necessary to receive them, he and the other examining officers shall fix their value.

When to receive articles in store.

To inform the commandant when stores are rejected.

7. His requisitions for stores shall be made on the agent, approved by the commandant, of the yard.

Requisitions how to be made.

8. All issues of stores, provisions, or munitions, shall be approved by the commandant of the yard, before the delivery of the articles.

Issues to be approved by the commandant

9. It shall be his duty to examine and receipt all accounts rendered for purchases, on being satisfied of their accuracy, which receipt, written on the account, with the commandant's approval, shall be the agent's authority for paying it.

To examine and receipt accounts.

10. He shall issue all stores, conformably to the rules and regulations of the service, and have the charge of their transportation from one district, yard, or dock, to another.

Shall have charge of the transportation of stores.

11. All articles whatsoever, whether for building or repairs, are to be regularly entered by the store keeper on their receipt into the yard; keeping those for gradual increase of the navy, or building, as distinct as possible from those for repairs; after which they are not to be applied to any other use than that for which they were intended or procured, except under circumstances of the most urgent necessity; and even then they are not to be so applied without the sanction of the Secretary of the Navy, or that of the Board of Navy Commissioners.

All articles received to be regularly entered, and not to be used for any purpose but that for which they were procured.

12. Every store keeper shall transmit to the Board of Navy Commissioners, quarterly, to wit: on the 1st day of January, 1st day of April, 1st day of July, and

Quarterly returns to be made.

--12--

1st day of October, of each and every year, a return of all the stores received and issued, agreeably to such forms, and under such regulations, as shall be prescribed for that purpose.

A general survey once a year of all stores.

13. There shall be, once every year, to wit: on the 1st day of December, in each and every year, a general survey, by officers to be appointed for that purpose by the Board of Navy Commissioners, of all stores in the possession or charge of navy store keepers, and such surveys shall show the precise quantity of each and every article on hand, and its state and condition. The officers charged with such surveys, are to transmit them, signed, to the Navy Commissioners.

THE PURSER OF THE YARD.

His duty.

1. Shall have charge of the victualling and paying of the officers and men belonging to the yard, and of the paying of all mechanics and laborers employed in the yard and on board of vessels in repair; and shall make to the office of the Fourth Auditor, a monthly return of moneys expended.

To issue provisions and slops.

2. He shall have the charge of issuing provisions and slops, agreeably to the established rules of the service.

SUPERINTENDENT OF ROPE WALK, GUNNER, AND OTHERS.

The superintendent of the rope walk, the master of ordnance or gunner, the boatswain, carpenter, cooper, blacksmith, boatbuilder, blockmaker, mastmaker, painter, and plumber, and all others not named or embraced in the foregoing rules and regulations, shall be governed by the general rules and regulations for navy yards, and instructions for the service, and by the particular instructions, orders, and regulations which may be issued and established by the commandant of the yard.

NAVY AGENTS.

His duties.

1. The navy agent, being the person appointed to purchase supplies for the service of the navy, pay bills, and sell off surplus or useless stores, is required to observe and abide by the following regulations, stipulations, and instructions, as well as such instructions of other officers detailed in this volume as have a bearing upon the duties assigned to him; and he is not to expect that any irregularity or omission, in the filling up of the several forms referred to herein, for the keeping of his accounts, will pass unnoticed.

--13--

2. All supplies for ships in port and not under the control of the commandant of the navy yard, are to be furnished by the agent, on the requisition of their captains or commanders, countersigned by the commanding officer afloat; provided such supplies cannot be furnished from the navy stores.

Supplies how furnished.

3. All supplies for ships repairing at the navy yard, or in ordinary, are to be furnished by the agent, on the requisition of the commandant of the yard.

Supplies for ships repairing.

4. Stores, provisions, and supplies of every description purchased by an agent for the naval service of the United States, are to be obtained at the lowest rates, and of the best quality; and upon the presentment of his accounts at the Treasury Department, he must produce such account, attested by the signature of the commanding officer of the station, in proof of its accuracy. He must also produce, at the same time, the different requisitions which were made upon him for supplies, signed and countersigned as directed in the 2d article, in proof of his authority for purchases; and, lastly, he must exhibit the receipts of the respective officers to whom the supplies were delivered. Without each and every of these documents, his account shall not be settled, nor shall he receive a credit for any account not vouched as above required.

Stores to be purchased on the lowest terms.

Accounts and vouchers to be produced.

5. All articles sent on board public ships by an agent, are to be delivered to the commanding officer, or such person as he may authorize to receive them: otherwise their delivery shall be at the risk of the agent.

How articles are to be delivered.

6. Provisions and stores purchased by an agent are to be surveyed when received on board; and if it appears, by the report of the surveying officers, that they are unfit for the service, they are to be returned to the agent, and, on settlement, the captain is to refuse to admit them in the account against the ship, and to transmit to the Secretary of the Navy a duplicate, and to the Board of Navy Commissioners a triplicate, of the report of survey, accompanied by such remarks as the case may make necessary.

Supplies to be surveyed, and if found unfit to be returned

7. Every cask and package of provisions and sup plies, (bread excepted,) wet or dry, must be numbered and have the contents thereof distinctly marked on it, as to quantity and kind, as well as the time when, place where, and by whom purchased or furnished. The cask are to be marked on the head, and the packages on some proper and conspicuous part of them.

Casks and packages to be marked, and how.

8. Every navy agent must forward his accounts with the necessary vouchers, for settlement, to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, quarterly, to wit: on

Forward their accounts quarterly.

--14--

the first days of January, April, July, and October; in which must be distinctly stated the moneys expended and articles furnished for each ship, for the navy or dock yard, and for other purposes. He will also be required to exhibit an account of the articles purchased and remaining in his possession, of those delivered over for sale; a statement of the sales of old or unserviceable articles, and a particular account of the moneys unexpended and remaining in his hands.

How moneys are to be paid and purchases made.

9. No moneys are to be paid over by an agent, nor purchases or sales made, nor any expenses incurred, except with the knowledge and sanction of the commanding officer of the station, or under particular instructions from the Secretary of the Navy or of the Navy Commissioners.

Penalty for pot transmitting his accounts.

10. Every agent who shall, for two successive quarters, neglect to send in his accounts for settlement, as required in the 8th article, unless specially exempted by the Secretary of the Navy, shall, from thenceforward, not be allowed any of the emoluments appertaining to the office ho holds; and if he neglects, for three successive quarters, to send them in, his powers as agent shall totally cease, and his commission be null and void.

Not to be concerned in any supplies.

11. Agents shall not be concerned, directly or indirectly, in any supplies which it may be their duty to furnish the navy; and if it shall be found that they have participated in the profits of any such supplies, they shall be dismissed from their office, and will be prosecuted to the amount of their bonds.

Not to advance money to officers of a ship destined for foreign service with-

12. Navy agents shall not advance money to pursers, or other officers of a ship, when destined on service, unless by and with the previous sanction of the Secretary of the Navy, by whom the amount shall be limited.

out special orders. Quarterly Statement of purchases.

13. Navy agents shall transmit, quarterly, to the Board of Navy Commissioners, viz: on the 1st January, 1st April, 1st July, and 1st October, of each year, a statement of all purchases turned into store, accompanied by the store keeper's receipts for the same.

REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVELY TO THE UNITED STATES' NAVAL SERVICE.

Officers in general.

To repair to their stations without delay.

1. Every officer is to repair to the fleet, squadron, ship, or station, to which he shall be appointed, without delay, after receiving orders.

To be constant in their duty.

2. Every officer, from the time of his joining the squadron, ship, or station, to which he shall be appoint-

--15--

ed, to the time of his removal, is to be constant in his attention to his duty; never absenting himself except on public service, without the consent of his commander; nor shall he remain out of the ship during the night, nor after the setting of the watch, without having obtained express permission to that effect; neither shall he absent himself from the ship for more than twenty-four hours at a time, without permission of the senior officer present.

Not to absent themselves.

3. Every officer is directed to wear his uniform at all times while on public service; and it will be the duty of commanders and others to prevent any changes whatever from being made in that which now is, or hereafter may be, established for the navy.

To wear their uniforms on service. No changes permitted.

4. Every officer is to conduct himself with perfect respect to his superiors, and to show every respect and attention to those under his orders, having a due regard to their situation; and invariably to demean himself, in every situation, so as to be an example of morality, regularity, and good order, to all persons attached to the naval service. He will observe attentively the conduct of all under his command, encouraging and commending the meritorious, and censuring, punishing, or reporting to his superiors the misconduct of those who may deserve it.

To conduct themselves with respect towards each other.

5. If an inferior shall be oppressed by his superior, or observe any misconduct in him, he is not to fail in his respect towards him; but he is to represent such oppression or misconduct to the captain of the ship, or to the commander of the fleet or squadron in which he serves, or to the Secretary of the Navy, in writing.

Inferiors to report misconduct of superiors, and how.

6. Every officer is strictly enjoined to avoid all unnecessary expenditure of money or stores belonging to the public, and, as far as may depend on him, to prevent the same in others.

To prevent needless expense.

7. Every officer is strictly enjoined to report to his commander, or the Secretary of the Navy, as circumstances may require, any neglect, collusion, or fraud, discovered by him, in contractors, agents, or other persons employed in the supplying of ships with provisions or stores, or in executing any work in the naval department, either on shipboard or on shore, whether or not such provisions or stores are under his own charge, or such work under his own inspection, or that of any other officer. But in making such representations, he will be held accountable for all vexatious and groundless charges exhibited by him in manner aforesaid.

To report the misconduct of contractors,

agents, &c.

8. Every officer is strictly forbidden to have any concern or interest in the purchasing of, or contracting

To have no interest in the supplies.

--16--

for, supplies of provisions or stores of any kind for the navy, or in any works for or appertaining to it: neither shall he receive any emolument or gratuity of any kind, either directly or indirectly, on account of such purchases, contracts, or works, from any person or persons whatever.

Commanders to sign all books, &c. before leaving their command.

9. Every commander of a fleet, squadron, or single ship, before he leave his command, is to sign all books, accounts and certificates, which may be necessary to enable officers to pass their respective accounts, or to receive their pay; provided he be satisfied that such books, accounts, and certificates are correct; as he will be held accountable to the Secretary of the Navy for all errors and improprieties appearing in papers bearing his signature.

Officers to obey the orders of their superiors, even though contrary to their general institutions, or any particular order, but to report.

10. If any officer shall receive an order from his superior, contrary to the general instructions of the Secretary of the Navy, or to any particular order he may have received from the said Secretary of the Navy, or any other superior, he shall represent, in writing, such contrariety to the superior from whom he shall have received said order; and if, after such representation, the superior shall still insist upon the execution of his order, the officer is to obey him, and to report the circumstances to the commander of the ship, to the commander of the fleet or squadron, or to the Secretary of the Navy, as may be proper.

Officers pay liable for any loss, &c.

11. The pay of every officer shall be held answerable for any loss, embezzlement, or damage, occurring through neglect of the public stores, and for all unnecessary expense.

COMMANDERS OF FLEETS OR SQUADRONS.

To make themselves acquainted with the qualities of their crews, &c. and of their captains and other officers.

Report defects in ships or supplies.

1. Every officer appointed to the command of a fleet or squadron shall obtain, as soon as possible, the most correct information of the state, qualities, and number of the ships and crews under his command; the order and discipline observed in them; the quantity and quality of provisions and stores on hand, and their fitness for the service intended. He shall acquaint himself also with the skill, capacity, and information of the commanders and other officers, that he may be enabled to select, for particular services, those best qualified, by their peculiar abilities and sound knowledge, to perform them. He shall use every exertion to equip expeditiously the fleet or squadron, and report to the Board of Navy Commissioners any defects ho may discover in the ships

--17--

or their supplies, which may unfit them for the service intended.

2. He shall not exercise any authority in a dock or navy yard, nor order any supplies of stores beyond the established quantity, nor any repairs to be undertaken in any ship; but he shall represent whatever he may think necessary to the commandant of the dock yard, or, should the case require it, to the Secretary of the Navy, or the Navy Commissioners.

Shall exercise no authority in docks or yards.

3. He shall keep the fleet or squadron in the most perfect condition for service that circumstances will admit of, and make their repairs, as far as may be in his power, by the artificers and others belonging to the ships under his command.

Shall keep the fleet in perfect condition for service.

4. He shall take every favorable opportunity to exercise the ships tinder his command, in performing all such evolutions as may be necessary in the presence of an enemy; and on all occasions he is to be careful that a proper example of alertness and attention is shown to the fleet or squadron by the ship which carries his flag.

Shall exercise his fleet in evolutions.

5. He shall be attentive in battle to the conduct of every ship or officer under his command, in order that he may be enabled to correct their errors and prevent any bad effects from misconduct, and to make a true statement, to the end that they may be rewarded or punished as their conduct may really deserve.

To be attentive in battle to every ship. Report the conduct of officers.

6. He shall direct the crews of the respective ships under his command to be frequently mustered, and cause inquiries to be made into the qualities of the men, and their fitness for the stations in which they may be rated.

Crews to be often mustered.

7. He shall inspect into the state of every ship under his command, and the order, discipline, and attention to cleanliness, and the modes adopted for the preservation of health, and the degree of attention paid to the regulations and instructions of the navy.

Inspect the state of every ship.

8. He shall not order any commander to take on board passengers, or to have supernumeraries, unless there should be strong reasons for so doing; and in such case he shall state his reasons in his order for that purpose.

Passengers and supernumeraries not to be ordered on board.

9. He shall inform the Secretary of the Navy of all his proceedings relatively to the service upon which he may be employed.

Shall report proceedings.

10. He shall correspond regularly with the Secretary of the Navy, as well as with the Board of Navy Commissioners, informing them of all orders given by him relating to the duties respectively connected with his command; and it shall be his duty to point out such naval improvements as his observations may enable him

pond with the Secretary of the Navy and Navy Commissioners. Suggest improvements,

--18--

to suggest, and such defects and neglects as may come under his notice.

Upon suspension of officers having charge of stores, survey to be held and inventory taken of such stores, Ice.

11. When it shall become absolutely necessary to suspend from employment an officer, having charge of stores, he may appoint another to act in his stead, until the pleasure of the Secretary of the Navy be known. He shall report, by the first opportunity, an account of the circumstances which may have caused the suspension, and order a survey to be held, and an inventory of the stores to be taken; one copy of which he shall forward to the Navy Department, and another he shall deliver to the officer taking charge of the stores, who will open accounts of the receipts, returns, conversions, and issues, from the period of closing the survey.

May suspend captains and others.

Must report without delay.

12. He may, in like manner, and for good reasons, suspend from their stations the captains or other officers under his command, and, on a foreign station, appoint others to act in their places until the pleasure of the Secretary of the Navy be known; but in these cases he shall immediately transmit an account thereof to the Secretary of the Navy, specifying his reasons for so doing, and furnish the captain or other officer with a duplicate of the same.

Not to alter appointments.

13. He shall not, without good and sufficient reasons, to be immediately communicated to the Secretary of the Navy, alter the appointments assigned to officers at the period of fitting out.

To preserve instructions and other papers.

To transmit a narrative at the end of every cruise.

14. He shall preserve the instructions and orders received by him, and all other papers and correspondence relating to the service upon which he may be ordered in the most intelligible form; and at the end of every cruise he shall send to the Secretary of the Navy a narrative of his proceedings, accompanied by a fair copy of such official correspondence as may have any connexion with the facts therein stated.

Conform to established rules.

15. He shall conform to the standing rules of the navy, in such directions as he shall give to established agents, and incur no expense that the public service does not render absolutely necessary.

Shall have no interest in the procurement of stores.

16. He shall have no private interest in the procurement of stores or provisions for the public service, nor in arty way interfere with the purchase or procurement of them, where there are proper officers for that purpose, except when an absolute necessity arises for making use of his credit or authority to obtain them.

Not to alter the arrangements or emoluments of agents.

17. He shall not make any alterations in the arrangements or emoluments of established agents, nor alter the pay or allowance of artificers or others employed in any department, nor order any additional

--19--

number to be employed, except when the urgency of some particular service shall require it, nor direct any additional works or repairs, alterations or improvements, to be undertaken in the docks, hospitals, or other places on shore. But he may suggest to the Secretary of the Navy, or to the Board of Navy Commissioners, the necessity for such works, repairs, &c. or direct the proper officer to make the requisite report and estimate of expense; and in such case he shall certify as to the correctness of said estimate and report.

Shall not direct any additional works in the docks, &c.

But may suggest the necessity of additional works

18. He shall obey all orders received from the Secretary of the Navy, and the Board of Commissioners of the Navy, and exact a strict attention to them from all persons under his command.

Obey all orders.

19. In the purchase of provisions or stores at places where no regular agent is established, he may appoint one for the purpose of obtaining the necessary supply, and he may himself contract for the whole quantity required, or direct each captain to purchase what the ship under his command may require: but in either case, the amount of the bills drawn will be charged to his account, until satisfactory vouchers are received to show that the articles were of & suitable quality, and purchased at the lowest rates,

His powers where there is no regular agent.

20. He shall, as far as may be practicable, wherever no regular agent may be established, have the public works which it may be necessary to have done, on contract, executed at the lowest rates and on the most reasonable terms, giving public notice that tenders may be received from those disposed to contract: copies of which contracts shall be sent by him to the Secretary of the Navy, and the Board of Navy Commissioners.

Work to be done on the best terms.

Advertise for proposals to contract.

21. Should the duties of the dock or yard require more men than those usually employed in them, the commander of the fleet or squadron shall, on the requisition of the commandant of the yard, whenever the duties of the fleet or squadron will admit of it, order as many officers and. men as may be required, from the ships for that service; but he will take especial care that no more are sent than may be absolutely necessary and useful.

To order officers and men from the fleet into a yard on requisition.

22. Each of the petty officers thus sent from the ships, shall receive eighteen cents, and the men twelve cents per diem, in addition to their pay and rations.

Extra allowance to officers and men sent from ship to dock.

23. No boats or vessels shall be hired for the use of the fleet or squadron, without the consent of the commander, and he will be careful that such consent is not given except when the service required cannot be performed by the boats of the ship under his command.

No boats to be hired without the consent of the commander.

--20--

Foreign agent—how to be paid.

24. Foreign agents are to be paid by bills drawn on the Secretary of the Navy, at the regular rate of exchange, unless otherwise instructed by the Secretary of the Navy, or bills may be disposed of and the proceeds applied towards reimbursing them: but in either case the certificates of three respectable merchants, and the approval of the commander of the fleet or squadron, must be forwarded with the letter of advice. These bills shall, in all cases, be drawn by the pursers of the respective ships for the amount of the provisions of stores received, and approved by the commander of the fleet or squadron, or by the captain of the ship when acting separately.

Hospitals to be frequently examined and sick attended to.

25. The commander of the fleet or squadron shall direct frequent examinations to be made into the hospital establishments and sick quarters under his command, and cause every attention to be paid to the comfort of the sick. He shall cause the examining officers to make him a written report of their state and condition.

When commander of a fleet is killed in battle his flag to continue flying.

26. Should the commander of a fleet or squadron be killed or disabled in battle, his flag shall continue flying while the enemy remain in sight, and the officer next in command shall be informed thereof, and take command of the fleet.

Successor in command to have the same pay, fee.

27. On the death of the commander of a fleet or squadron, the officer who succeeds him shall enjoy all the pay and emoluments of commander, in the same manner as his predecessor, until the pleasure of the Secretary of the Navy be known; but he is not to assume any badge of distinction or hoist any flag which his rank docs not entitle him to.

Commander of a fleet not to resign his command or quit his station unless compelled by sickness.

28. The commander of a fleet or squadron shall not resign his command or quit his station, unless the bad state of his health shall render a change of climate or situation absolutely necessary; and in such case, he shall not weaken the fleet or squadron, by taking from it a ship or vessel, the service of which may be necessary.

His duty on resigning.

29. When the commander of a fleet or squadron shall resign his command, he shall deliver to his successor the originals of all secret instructions, orders, and signals, and authenticated copies of all other unexecuted instructions and orders, together with such information as may be in his possession relative to the service to be performed.

In the absence of the commander.

30. In the absence of tho commander of a fleet or squadron, the senior officer shall be governed by the aforegoing instructions, and shall superintend the various duties to be performed: for the due execution of which he will be held responsible.

 

--21--

RANK AND COMMAND.

1. The commission officers of the navy of the United States are divided into the following ranks and denominations:

Commodores, commanding Squadrons. Captains, commanding frigates and vessels of 20 guns.

Masters commandant, commanding sloops. Lieutenants.

Relative rank.

2. Commodores are to wear their broad pendents at all times on board the ship they command.

Commodores to wear their pendents.

3. Captains, masters commandant, and lieutenants, shall take precedence and command in their respective ranks agreeably to the dates of their commissions; or if their commissions are of the same date, according to their number. No captain or commander shall assume the broad pendent of a commodore, except under the circumstances specified in the 26th article of the regulations relatively to commanders of fleets or squadrons.

Relative rank of officers of the same corps.

Captain not to wear the broad pendent.

4. The order in which officers shall take precedence and command in the ship to which they belong, is as follows:

Captain or commander. Lieutenants, agreeably to date or number of

their commissions. Master. Master's mate. Boatswain. Gunner. Carpenter. Midshipmen.

Rank and

precedence on shipboard.

5. If an officer in command of a fleet, squadron, or single ship, shall meet with a superior officer, he shall wait on him and show him his instructions, except such as he shall have been ordered to keep secret, and report to him the condition of his fleet or ship; and if the public service shall require, such senior officer may take him, his fleet, squadron, or ship, under his command. But a senior, meeting a junior officer, shall not, except under the most absolute necessity, require him to show any secret orders, nor divert him from the execution o1 the orders he may have received, nor take him under his command. But if, in consequence of the public service requiring it, he should find it necessary to do so he shall resign the command to him again, and him to execute the service on which he was employed; as soon as the necessity for keeping him under his or

Duty of a commander on meeting a senior. Shall show his instructions. Report the state of his command. Senior officer may take the junior under his command, Shall not require him to show secret orders. When he shall resign

his command over him.

--22--

Shall explain the cause of taking him under his command.

ders shall cease; and he shall, as early as possible, explain to the Secretary of the Navy, and to the officer from whom the junior received his orders, the cause of his so diverting or detaining him under his command.

In port a gun to be fired at setting the watch at night and on relieving the watch in the morning.

6. In ports where the regulations admit of guns being fired, the commander of a fleet or squadron will, after beating the tattoo and setting the watch at night, fire one gun, and the sentinels of the other ships shall fire their muskets. At the relieving of the watch, in the morning, he will do the same, and the sentinels of the other ships will, in like manner, fire their muskets: after which the reveille will be beaten in every ship.

Single ships to fire muskets only on certain occasions

7. Single ships, commanded by captains or commanders, are, at the setting and relieving of the watch,

to fire muskets only.

When the watch shall be set and when relieved.

8. From the 25th of March to the 21st September, the watch shall be set at 9 o'clock, and from the 21st September to the 25th March, at 8 o'clock, in the evening; and it shall always be relieved at 4 o'clock in summer, and at 5 o'clock in winter, in the morning.

SALUTES.

Commodore on separate service 13 guns.

1. Commodores, when acting on separate service, by order of the Secretary of the Navy, and not otherwise, shall receive the salute of 13 guns.

Commodore not on separate service 9 guns.

2. The salute of a commodore, when not on separate service by order of the Secretary of the Navy, shall be 9 guns.

Same rank same return of salute.

3. Officers of the same rank are to return the salutes of each other, with the same number of guns.

A captain's salute to be returned with 7 guns. A superior officer's salute to be returned according to his rank.

4. The salute of a captain is to be returned with 7 guns. The salute of officers of superior rank to that of captain is to be returned with the number of guns to which their rank entitles them.

More than one ship saluting, the return to be the salute of the officer saluted.

5. When more than one ship salutes the commander of a fleet or squadron, he will not return it until all the ships shall have ceased firing; and he will then fire the salute of an officer of his rank.

Salutes confined to the commander of a fleet.

6. The commander only of a fleet or squadron is to be saluted.

Two squadrons meeting.

7. When two squadrons meet, the officers only who command then are to salute.

Commander in chief to be saluted on hoisting his flag.

8. An officer appointed to command in chief shall be saluted on hoisting his flag, by all the ships under his command, unless an officer senior to him be present; in which case they are to salute him as soon as he shall be separated from such senior officer.

--23--

9. Commanders are not to be saluted by such officers as have not been separated from them six calendar months.

A separation of 6 months necessary to justify a salute.

10. When the President shall visit a ship of the United States Navy, he is to be saluted with 21 guns. The Vice President shall be saluted with 19 guns.

Salute of President 21 guns.

The Vice President 19 guns.

11. The Secretary of the Navy, and the other heads of Departments, governors of states or territories, and foreign ministers, are to he saluted with 17 guns.

The Secretary of the Navy etc. 17 guns.

12. Major generals are to be saluted with 15 guns. Brigadier generals, with 13 guns.

Major generals 15 guns. Brigadier Generals 13 guns.

13. When a public character, high in rank, shall embark on board of any of the United States' ships of war, he may be saluted with 13 guns.

Public character on embarking 13 guns.

14. When a commanding officer anchors in any foreign port, he is to inform himself what salutes have been usually given or received by officers of his rank of other nations, and he is to insist on receiving the same mark of respect. Captains may salute foreign ports with such a number of guns as may have been customary, on receiving an assurance that an equal number shall be returned—but without such assurance, they are never to salute.

In foreign ports salutes.

15. Foreigners of distinction, on visiting the United States' ships of war, are to be saluted with such a number of guns as may suit their rank and quality.

Foreigners of distinction how saluted.

16. The anniversary of the independence of the United States, and of the birth of general George Washington, are to be celebrated by salutes of 17 guns, from every vessel in port, of the rate of a stoop of war and upwards.

Independence, birth of Washington, each 17 guns.

17. Forts or castles in the United States are not to be saluted by the United States' ships of war.

Forts or castles in the United States, no salute.

18. United States' ships of war are not to strike their topsails, nor take in their flags, in any part of the world, to any foreign ship or ships, unless such foreign ship or ships shall have first struck or shall at the same time strike their flags and topsails to ships of the United States; nor are they, within the limits and jurisdiction of the United States, to salute any foreign ships what ever.

Ships not to strike their top sails or take in their flags, Unless, &c.

Within the limits of the United States, no salute to any foreign ship.

19. Captains are not to salute; they are, however to return the salutes of foreign ships with an equal number of guns.

Captains not to salute captains.

20. If a commander of a squadron shall die when on actual service, his colors shall be lowered half mast and continue so until he is buried: minute guns, to the number his rank entitles him to, shall be fired from each of the ships present, beginning at the putting of

On the death of a commander of a squadron.

--24--

the corpse into the sea, or when it is put off, from the ship, for the shore.

On the death of a captain.

21. If a captain shall die, the ship he commanded shall wear her colors half mast, and a salute of nine minute guns shall be fired from the ship, commencing as in the preceding article.

On the death of a lieutenant.

22. If a lieutenant shall die, three volleys of musketry shall be fired at his funeral.

MILITARY HONORS AND CEREMONIES.

Commodore now to be received.

1. A commodore shall be received by a lieutenant's guard, the salute of officers, and two ruffles.

Captain how to be received.

2. A captain shall be received by a sergeant's guard, without the salute of officers or beat of drum.

Relative rank of sea and land officers.

3. The Secretaries of the War and of the Navy Departments having, with the approbation of the President of the United States, established the relative rank between officers of the army and navy, the Navy Commissioners have taken their regulations on the subject as a guide, which are as follow:

Commodores shall rank with brigadier generals.

Captains in the navy shall rank with colonels.

Masters commandant shall rank with majors.

Lieutenants in the navy shall rank with captains in the army.

Rank and precedence determined according to commission.

4. The rank and precedence of sea and land officers, as above stated, will take place according to the seniority of their commissions.

Land officers not to command sea officers: nor sea officers to command land officers.

5. This arrangement shall not give any pretence to land officers to command any part of the naval force of the United States: nor shall it give to sea officers any right to command any part of the army of the United States; nor shall either have a right to demand the compliments due to their respective ranks unless on actual service.

REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMMANDERS OF SQUADRONS, OR DIVISION OF SHIPS, OF THE UNITED STATES' NAVY.

General duty.

1. Officers having command of squadrons of the fleet, will superintend, with great attention, their respective squadrons, will see that the crews are properly disciplined, that all orders and regulations are strictly attended to and obeyed, and the crews exercised; that the provisions, stores, and water, are kept complete and in good order; that the ships and crews are kept, in every respect, fit for service, and that every precaution is taken for the preservation of health on board.

--25--

2. They will be held responsible to the commanding officer to whom they will make reports of the state and condition of their squadrons, and all applications for supplies and repairs, as well as of all other matters relating to them.

To report to their commanding officers.

3. When squadrons shall be divided, the commander of a division shall be equally accountable to the commander of a squadron.

To whom accountable.

4. The commander of one squadron or division may correct, by signal, or otherwise, the mistake or negligence of a ship in another squadron or division, whenever it is probable, that from their relative situations, that ship cannot be seen distinctly by the flag officer commanding the squadron or division to which it belongs; or, whenever, being in the presence of an enemy, the officer commanding that squadron or division, whatever be his situation, docs not himself immediately correct such negligence or mistake.

Commander of one squadron may correct mistakes of another in certain cases.

5. Commander of squadrons or divisions will, after battle, call on their captains for reports, and will afterwards report to their commander, the conduct of those under their command; and if, during battle, they should perceive any ship of any squadron or division, evidently avoiding battle, or not doing her duty, they are to send an officer to suspend the captain of that ship, and to take command of her. If the ship does not belong to the division of the commander who makes these observations, he is to give the earliest information to the commander of the squadron or division, to which such ship may belong.

After battle to call for reports, and report to his commander.

May, in certain case, suspend a captain and appoint successor.

6. A commander of a squadron, having under his command, six ships of a rate not below that of a frigate, and acting under separate orders from the Secretary of the Navy, shall be entitled to an officer of the rank of captain to assist him in regulating the details of his squadron.

Commander of a squadron of six frigates to have a captain.

7. A commodore or commander of a division, having under his command, four ships of a rate not below that of a frigate, shall be entitled to an officer of the rank of master commandant, who shall, while performing this service, receive the pay and emoluments of a captain of a frigate of the second class.

Commander of a squadron of four tri-

gates to have a master commandant.

Pay of the master commandant in this case.

8. All orders and instructions issued by the captains or masters commandant aforesaid, shall be given as orders of the commander of the fleet, squadron, or division, and shall be obeyed by those to whom they are addressed in like manner as those issued by the commander himself in his own name. But they shall never issue an order, or make any change or arrangement what

Orders to be given as of the commander of the fleet.

But not to be issued without his directions.

--26--

ever without directions from the commander, unless some very urgent necessity shall require it.

Returns, &c. to be delivered to such captain or master com-

9. Returns, applications, and reports, relating to the ships of the fleet, squadron, or division, are to be delivered to each of the captains, or masters commandant aforesaid, to be by him laid before the commander.

mandant. All orders applicable to such captain or master commandant.

10. All orders and instructions relative to the duties of the commander of the fleet, squadron, or division, will equally apply to the aforesaid captain or master commandant; whose duty it shall be to attend to, and enforce in, the fleet, squadron, or division, to which he may be attached, every rule and regulation of the navy of the United States.

OF APPOINTMENTS.

No officers to be ordered to ships without authority from the Secretary of the Navy.

No acting appointments while in the

1. No commander of a fleet, squadron, division, or single ship, while in the United States, shall order any commission or warrant officer to any ship under his command without being authorized by the Secretary of the Navy: nor shall he give acting appointments, or make any changes whatever in the arrangement and distribution of the officers of the navy, without the approbation of the Secretary of the Navy.

United States.

When acting appointments may be made.

2. On foreign stations, a commander may, when absolutely necessary, give acting appointments to fill the vacancies which may be occasioned by death or other circumstances; but in such cases, he shall take the earliest opportunity to make the circumstances known to the Secretary of the Navy, and state his reasons for making such acting appointments.

Probation of a master commandant.

8. A master commandant must serve in active employ, as such, one year, before he can be promoted to a captain.

Probation of a lieutenant.

4. A lieutenant must serve in active employ as such, two years and six months, before he can be promoted to a master commandant.

Probation of a midshipman.

Qualifications for promotion.

5. A midshipman before being promoted to the rank of a lieutenant, must be 18 years of age; have served at sea two years; be acquainted with the manner of rigging, and stowing a ship, the management of artillery at sea; arithmetic, geometry, trigonometry, and navigation. He must also know how to make astronomical calculations for nautical purposes, and pass an examination on all those points before a board of navy officers, to be appointed by the Secretary of the Navy for that purpose; by whom the morals and general character of candidates will be inquired into.

 

--27--

6. Candidates for examination and promotion are to send in their applications to the Secretary of the Navy, on the 1st day of October, and on the 1st day of March, every year; and they will be informed of the place or places, where examinations are to be held, either by letter or through the medium of the public prints.

When candidates for examination are to send in their applications.

7. If any person shall produce false certificates of age, term of service or character, such person shall, whenever it may be discovered and whatever may be his rank, be dismissed from the navy of the United States, and be ever after rendered incapable of obtaining an appointment in it.

False certificates of age,

Penalty on producing such.

8. No person shall be appointed master, until he shall have passed an examination on all points of seamanship and nautical astronomy, and rendered to the examiners the most satisfactory proofs of his morality, and of his capacity to perform the duties which may devolve upon him.

Masters, how appointed, &c.

9. Masters of extraordinary merit and for extraordinary services may be promoted to lieutenants.

Masters may be promoted.

10. No warrant as boatswain or gunner of a ship of the United States Navy, shall be given to any person who shall not have acted one year in such capacity, and produced satisfactory certificates of his good conduct and qualifications.

Boatswain and gunner to serve one year before they can be warranted.

11. On foreign stations, an officer commanding a fleet or squadron, may give orders for the examination of candidates for promotion, where they may appear entitled to it by their abilities and services; and in other cases, he shall employ three captains on this service, whose certificates shall, without delay, be transmitted to the Secretary of the Navy, after the candidates who have passed an examination, have been furnished with duplicates thereof.

Candidates may be examined on foreign stations.

How examined.

12. When acting appointments become necessary, they shall be conferred oil those who have passed their examination, if any such there be.

Acting appointments, how conferred.

13. If an inferior officer, whatever may be his rank, succeeds to the command of a ship to consequence of the death or captivity of the captain and others, he may make temporary appointments to supply the places vacant; and until he can bring the ship into port, or deliver her up to a senior officer of the navy of the United States, or receive the instructions of the Secretary of the Navy, he shall receive the pay of captain, and those acting under his appointments, shall receive the pay of the officers, whose ranks they have respectively filled.

An inferior officer succeeding to the command of a ship, may make temporary appointments, &c.

His pay, and that of those so appointed.

14. No captain whose date of commission is less than three |years standing, except under extraordinary

Captains under 3 years, not to com-

--28--

mand frigates of the first class.

circumstances, or cases of necessity, shall command a frigate of the first class.

Captain before having command of a frigate must have com-

15. No captain, whatever may be the date of his commission, shall command a frigate, unless he shall have previously commanded a sloop of war in active service for six months.

manded a sloop of war six months. No slaves.

All volunteers.

16. Slaves are not to be borne on the books of the vessels of the United States; nor shall any person compose part of the crew of any vessel of the United States, who has not voluntarily entered the service.

OF STORES AND PROVISIONS.

The Captain.

Papers to be signed by the

1. The signature of the captain shall be affixed to all papers having a reference to the expenses of the ship.

captain.

On taking command to demand an inventory.

2. On taking command, he shall demand of his predecessor, or the navy storekeeper, an inventory of all the articles furnished to the different departments of the ship from the navy stores, and if he command the ship until she is paid off, he shall send such inventory with his accounts to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury.

To examine articles received on board-

3. He shall cause a careful examination to be made of all articles received on board, for the use of the ship, and if he fail to do so, will be alone accountable for any evils resulting from defects or deficiencies in them: provided, such defect or deficiencies were passed over at the receipt of the articles, from want of a due examination thereof.

Not to stop any vessel going with articles to another ship.

4. He shall not, at any time, stop any vessel, lighter, or boat, going with provisions, water, or stores, to another ship; nor take such provisions, water, or stores for the ship under his command, except there be a most urgent and absolute necessity for so doing; and of this, he shall, without delay, inform the commanding officer present, and the captain of the ship to which such provisions, stores, or water, were going.

Purser to have

the use of ship's boats.

5. When the duties of the ship will admit of it, he shall permit the purser to use the boats for the purpose of conveying on board, pr visions, stores, and other necessaries for the use of the ship.

Captain to notify the Navy Commissioners of stores required.

6. A captain when serving abroad, and not under a superior officer, will transmit to the Board of Navy Commissioners, timely notice of such stores and provisions, as the ship he commands may require, accompanied by a survey of those on hand; and he is not to purchase any except under absolute necessity.

--29--

7. He shall not permit his stores to be applied to private uses, wasted, or without absolute necessity, converted to other purposes than those for which they were intended; and whenever he shall think it necessary to order any extraordinary expenditure or conversion of stores or provisions, his order for that purpose shall be given in writing, stating the reason or reasons for such extraordinary expenditure or conversion; which order shall be preserved and produced by the officer having charge of the stores so expended or converted, at the settlement of his accounts.

Stores not to be applied to private uses.

Extraordinary expenditure or conversion of stores.

8. If any stores or provisions shall be lost, destroyed, or embezzled, the circumstances shall be noted in the log book of the ship; and if, through neglect or design, they should be totally lost, they shall be charged to the offender, and he be brought to punishment.

Stores lost, embezzled, or destroyed.

9. He is to use the utmost economy in every thing, which relates to the expenses of his ship, and the public service confided to him, using every article for the purpose for which it was originally intended, and making his supplies and means last as long as possible. He is not to use sails for covering boats, nor for awnings, nor to convert canvass into sails not allowed for the service, nor to any other purpose than those for which they were supplied, unless they shall have first been surveyed, and reported unfit for their proper use; nor shall he make any alterations in the ship under his command, without the permission of the Board of Navy Commissioners.

Economy enjoined.

Not to use sails for covering boats, &c.

Make no alterations in the ship.

10. He will examine the weekly returns of expenditures, and with the master sign those made monthly, which, when so signed, are to be delivered to the officers having charge of stores, to be presented by them at the settlement of their accounts.

Examine and sign weekly returns.

11. He may grant to private ships of the United States, and to foreign ships, when absolutely necessary, such supplies of provisions and stores as they stand in need of, giving the officer having charge of them, written orders to that effect, and taking from the master or commander of the vessel so supplied, three receipts and three bills of exchange, drawn in favor of the Secretary of the Navy on his owner, or those concerned in the ship, for the real amount of the articles furnished; which bills, and two of the receipts shall be transmitted to the Secretary of the Navy, and the circumstances noted on the accounts and log book of the ship.

Stores, when and how to be granted to private ships.

12. When it becomes necessary to purchase stores, they shall be delivered to the proper officers of the ship, who shall sign receipts for them, and they are to be charged at their cost, by the purser of the ship against

Stores to be delivered and charged to the proper officer.

--30--

such officers in their accounts, and such charge or charges shall be transmitted to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, to stand against their pay until accounted for.

Stores received from navy yards to be charged to the proper officer.

13. Stores received from navy yards or other establishments, having navy storekeepers or other proper officers to attend to the issuing and valuation of them, are in like manner to be charged at their real value, to the respective accounts of the officers having charge of them, and these charges, as in the preceding article, are to be transmitted to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, to stand against their pay, until such stores shall be satisfactorily accounted for.

Papers of an officer, having charge of stores, when dead, how to be disposed of.

His private effects.

14. On the death of an officer having charge of stores, his public papers shall be separated from those of a private nature, the former to be forwarded by a safe conveyance, to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, and the latter together with his private effects, to be put in charge of such officer as the. captain of the ship may appoint for that purpose, to be preserved for the benefit of the legal representatives of the deceased; unless, from particular circumstances, the captain should deem it advisable to dispose of them at public sale; in which case a duplicate of the inventory, with an account of the disposal or sale, shall be transmitted to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury.

An officer having charge of stores, being separated from the ship, how captain must proceed,

15. If an officer, having charge of stores, should, from any accidental circumstance, be separated from his ship, the captain shall proceed to survey and ascertain the state of the stores, as though such officer were actually dead or discharged; and he shall, as in like case, appoint another officer to act in his place, giving the earliest intelligence of his proceedings, to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury.

The established number of boats and stores to be carried to sea.

16. He shall carry to sea with him the established number of boats and stores, and not depart from this rule without the consent of the Secretary of the Navy, or of the Board of the Navy Commissioners.

On cutting, slipping, or parting cable, captain's duty.

17. When a ship cuts, slips, or parts, her cable, the captain shall, as soon as circumstances will admit, endeavor to recover the anchor or cable lost; and should it appear that no exertion for that purpose was made by him, the value of the articles will be charged against his pay. If the ship puts to sea without recovering them, the senior officer present shall endeavor to recover them; but no vessels are to be hired for the purpose, if the boats and crews of the squadron are able to effect it. If neither of them, however, have an opportunity of recovering them, the captain of the ship whose cable was thus

--31--

cut, slipped, or parted, shall, without delay, give an account to the Board of Navy Commissioners, to the commander in chief, or to the commandant of the nearest yard; taking care to state particularly the bearings and distances of the most suitable places to mark the spot where the anchor lies, to the end that means may be immediately adopted for recovering it.

18. While in port, it shall be his duty to prevent embezzlement of stores from the ship under his command, from ships in ordinary, and from the dock and navy yards; as well as all other practices of a fraudulent nature, tending to affect the interests of the United States.

To prevent embezzlement of stores.

19. He shall attend with all the officers of his ship, when the crew is paid off, and examine carefully, to discover if any articles are concealed with a view to embezzlement; and report to the Secretary of the Navy and the Board of Navy Commissioners, the character of each officer serving under him, particularly as to his sobriety, diligence, activity and abilities; leaving a copy of that part of his report relating to the conduct of such of the officers as are to remain with the ship, in the hands of the commandant of the yard.

To attend, with all his officers, when the crew is paid off.

Report the character of officers.

OF FITTING AND REFITTING A SHIP.

The Captain.

1. When a captain is appointed to a ship in dock or ordinary, he shall visit her throughout, in company with the officers of the yard, ascertaining her qualities, trim, and condition; and shall receive from the commandant of the yard, communications as to the orders he may have received from the Board of Navy Commissioners, relative to the repairs or alterations necessary to be made.

His general duty on being appointed to a ship in dock.

2. He will give every aid in forwarding the work of the ship, informing the Board of Navy Commissioners of any neglects he may observe, and make to them a weekly report of the progress of the equipment.

To give his aid and report neglects.

3. A captain, when not under the immediate command of a superior, shall be held responsible for all accidents arising from negligence, during his absence from the ship he commands, where his presence might have prevented such accidents, unless he be absent on public duty, or by permission of the Secretary of the Navy. He shall also be held responsible, for all accidents arising from the absence of the officers and crew of the ship he commands, unless they be absent on public duty, or by permission of the Secretary of the Navy.

Responsible for accidents arising from his absence.

Or from the absence of his officers and crew.

--32--

His duty when the ship goes to refit.

4. When the ship goes into port to refit, he is to order a minute and careful survey of all stores, &c. and call upon the warrant officers to prepare lists of all such as are damaged, or require to be replaced. He is to inform himself of the regulations of the dock yard, and conform thereto. He will give to the officers of the yard previous notice of his intention to receive or return stores; and when the orders he is under require the attendance of the storekeeper and clerks put of their usual working hours, he will give them due notice of the same.

REGULATIONS FOR THE PROMOTION OF DISCIPLINE, CLEANLINESS, &C.

Officers to possess their appropriate cabins.

1. The captain is to allow every officer to possess the cabin alloted to him by the Board of Navy Commissioners, and not to order more cabins to be made, nor to alter those already put up, without their consent, or the consent of his commanding officer.

Sentinels to be posted near the magazine. Lights. Fire.

2. He is to order sentinels to be posted at the entrance into the magazine and store rooms, and at such other places as may be necessary, that no lights be taken below where danger may be apprehended, unless in good lanterns; and he is to be careful in the adoption of every precaution to guard against fire.

Who may sleep on the orlop deck or cable tiers.

Lights used then.

Smoking tobacco.

Sticking candles in the ship.

No reading in bed by candle light.

All fires and lights to be put out at the setting of the watch.

No lighted candle to be carried into the spirit room on any pretext, whilst drawing spirit. Spirits to be drawn by day only.

3. He is not to suffer any, except the most careful of the officers and men, to have births or to sleep in the orlop or cable tiers, in which lights are never to be used without his express permission, and then in good lanterns; nor is he to allow any person to smoke tobacco in any part of the ship except the galley. He is strictly to forbid the sticking of candles against the beams, the sides, or any other part of the ship; to enjoin it upon the officers never to read in bed by the light either of lamps or candles, nor to have any lights in their cabins without some person to attend them; to cause the funnel hole to be well secured by lead or otherwise, and the funnels to be cleaned every morning before the fires are lighted; to cause all fires to be extinguished and lights to be put out at the setting of the watch, by the master at arms, and the ship's corporal, except such as he shall permit to be kept burning; and to give the most positive orders, and most rigidly to enforce them, that no lighted candle be carried into the spirit room, on any pretext whatever, whilst drawing or pumping of spirituous liquors, which duty shall be performed only by day, except on great emergencies occurring in the night.

--33--

4. He is not to suffer any person whatever to suttle on board, nor to sell any kind of beer, wines, or spirituous liquors on board to the ship's company. He is not to allow the men to sell, exchange, or in any manner dispose of the slop clothes or bedding with which they are supplied, and as far as possible to prevent any traffic amongst them, that would induce them to draw from the purser, tobacco, sugar, tea, slop clothes, or any other articles in larger qualities than are usually supplied.

No sutling.

No traffic permitted.

5. He is to be particularly attentive to the comfort and cleanliness of the men, directing them to wash themselves frequently, and to change their linen at least twice every week. He is never to suffer them to sleep in wet clothes or wet beds, if it can possibly be avoided; and to cause them frequently, particularly after bad weather, to shake their clothes and bedding in the air, and to expose them to the sun and wind.

Cleanliness and personal comfort.

Precautions.

6. As cleanliness, dryness, and pure air, essentially conduce to health, he is to exert his utmost endeavors to ensure these to the ships company in the most extensive degree. He is to cause the upper decks to be washed every morning, and the lower decks as often as may be necessary, when the weather will admit of their being properly aired and dried; to be swept every meal and the dirt to be thrown overboard. He is to cause the hammocks to be carried on deck, and the ports to be opened as often as the weather will permit, and no more chests or bags to be kept on the lower gun deck, than may be necessary for the comfort of the men; so that as few interruptions as possible may be opposed to a free circulation of air. He is to cause the wind sails and ventilations to be kept in continual operation, the ship to be pumped out daily; and, when necessary, fires to be kindled in stoves for the purpose of removing the dampness of the lower guns.

Decks to be washed, &c.

Hammocks to be aired.

Ports to be opened.

7. When a ship is first put in commission, and before the crew, provisions, and stores, are received on board of her, she is to be perfectly cleansed, and fires to be kindled for several successive days in the hold and on the birth deck, for the purpose of dissipating moisture: the beams, sides, and cartings, of the birth deck and the hold, are then to be whitewashed, and well dried before use; and this practice of whitewashing is to be continued afterwards, as often as may be necessary and proper.

Management of a ship when first put in commission.

8. The lower decks of a ship are always to be dry rubbed with sand in preference to washing, and scrapers are never to be used when the use of them can be avoided; but should the occasional use of water become necessary, the decks are, after washing, to be well swab-

Lower decks how to be cleansed.

--34--

bed and dried with stoves, before the men are permitted to go below.

Bathing.

9. In summer, or in tropical climates, bathing should be encouraged, three times every week—and with this view, bathing tubs should be placed on the forecastle or in the chains.

Clothing.

10. The clothing issued to the men is to be suitable to the seasons. But the wearing of flannel shirts is to be encouraged and permitted at all seasons, and in all climates.

Men to be barefooted when washing decks.

11. When men are employed in washing the decks, they are to be barefooted and their trousers rolled up.

River water, when and how to be used.

12. In rivers, the men are not to be permitted to drink the water alongside the ship, but casks are to be filled with the water, if fresh, and the mud and other impurities allowed to settle, before it is used.

Casks and water for sea service.

19. Before casks are filled with water for sea service, they are to be properly soaked and cleansed; and the water with which they are filled, must be of the best quality that can be procured, and free from all impurities.

Precautions in anchoring near a marsh in a hot climate.

14. When a ship anchors in the vicinity of marshes in a hot climate, the men should never be turned to duty, before the rising, and never continued thereat after the setting, of the sun, if it can possibly be avoided without any serious injury to the service. In such situations, and on wooding and watering parties, they should never be allowed to leave the ship, when there is a probability of their being on shore all day, without taking with them their rations of food and liquor, and as soon as they return on board, they are to be compelled to put on dry clothes.

No boats to be detained on shore after night.

15. The practice of detaining boats on shore for officers, after night has set in, is strictly prohibited.

In certain cases lemon acid to be supplied.

16. On cruises of unusual duration, and particularly in hot climates, ships are to be supplied with lemon acid, which is to be administered twice a week to the crew, in such quantities as the surgeon may deem proper.

Recruits to be examined.

17. On receiving newly recruited men, the captain will cause an examination into the state of their persons and clothing, and use every measure to guard against the introduction of filth and contagion on board the ship.

Captain, when and how to rate his crew.

18. As soon as possible after the ship's company is received on board, he will, with the assistance of the senior lieutenant, master, and boatswain, (and of the gunner and carpenter for their crews,) proceed to examine and rate them according to their abilities, which he is to do without partiality or favor. He is to rate as

--35--

petty officers, those only who shall be found qualified for such stations, and to take especial care that every person in the ship, without exception, does actually perform the duties of the station in which he is rated. He shall rate none as ordinary seamen, who have not been previously at sea twelve months, and are able to go aloft and perform some of the duties of seamen, nor shall he rate any as able seamen who have not been previously at sea three years, and are capable of performing most of the duties of a seamen.

Petty officers.

Ordinary seamen.

Able seamen.

19. He is without loss of time to make arrangements for quartering the officers and men; distributing them to the guns, musketry, rigging, &c; to divide them into watches; make out his quarter, station, and watch bills, with bills of the names of men stationed at every gun; to muster and exercise them frequently at the great guns, small arms; bending and unbending, loosing, reefing, and furling sails; sending up and down top-gallant-masts and yards, rowing in boats, and every other duty which it may be necessary for seamen to perform both at sea and in port.

To quarter the men and employ them in certain exercises.

20. As occasions may frequently occur on which it may be necessary and of great importance that seamen should be skilful in the use of muskets, the captain is to order a number of sailors to be exercised and trained up to the use of small arms. The following shows the number to be thus trained on board of the respective rates of vessels.

Men to be trained to the use of musketry

 

74 gun ship,

200 sailors

Number of men to be trained.

44

120

36

100

32

90

Sloops,

65

Brigs,

35

Schooners and cutters, each,

30

 

The junior lieutenant, aided by the master at arms and ship's corporal, is to have the charge of this duty, and they are to be particularly instructed to teach them only the most simple motions of loading, firing, and forming lines; endeavoring at the same time as much as possible to render the exercise pleasing to the men, and to do away that prejudice which sailors always feel against the discharge of any portion of what they conceive to be the duty of a soldier. They are also to be taught the use of the cutlass and pike, and to be exercised in the various modes of boarding a ship.

The junior lieutenant charged with this duty.

To be taught the use of the cutlass and pike.

21. To make men perfect in the use of the great guns and small arms, an expense of powder and ball is indispensably necessary; therefore, there will be allow-

Allowance of powder and ball for exercise.

--36--

ed, for exercise, every month, for six months, after |receiving the crew and guns on board, as many round shot, and as many cartridges, for the great guns, as will amount to a full broadside; and as many ball cartridges for the muskets as will furnish each man, training, with twelve, and as many blank cartridges as will furnish them with twenty-four; but, after the first six months, only half the quantity is to be furnished.

Words of command for exercise of great guns.

22. The words of command for the exercise of the great guns, shall be as follows:

Silence.

Cast loose your guns.

Level your guns.

Middle your breechings.

Take out your tompions.

Take off your aprons.

Prick and prime.

Lay on your aprons.

Handle crows and handspikes.

Point your guns at the object.

Level your guns at the object

Blow your match.

Take off your aprons.

Fire.

Stop your vents.

Sponge your guns.

Return sponge.

Load with cartridge.

Wad to cartridge and ram home.

Shot your guns.

Wad to shot and ram home.

Return rammer.

Put on your aprons.

Man your side tackles.

Run out your guns.

Level your guns, &c. as above.

It is to be observed that when training tackles are used instead of crows and handspikes, the words are to suit the case; the same will apply when locks are used instead of matches.

Division of the ship's crew.

By whom to be commanded.

Subdivisions, by whom commanded.

23. The ships company is to be divided (exclusive of marines) into as many divisions as there are lieutenants and masters allowed to the ship, and the divisions are to be as nearly equal in number as circumstances will admit. A lieutenant or master is to command each division, and to have under his orders as many master's mates and midshipmen, as the number on board, when quartered, will admit. He is again to subdivied his division into as many subdivisions as there are mates.

--37--

and midshipmen fit to command them under his orders, and to give to each of them, the command of a subdivision; but he is to attend to, and be responsible for, every thing relating to the conduct of the men who constitute the division under his command; to be present at all their exercises; to examine into the state of their clothes and bedding; to see that they keep themselves as neat and clean as the duty of the ship will admit; to prevent swearing, drunkenness, and every other immoral practice; to use every exertion to procure for them such comforts as the nature of the service and the duty they are employed in will admit; to see that the master's mates and midshipmen give every aid in the performance of their duties; and to report to the captain such of the men as they may find ignorant, idle, dirty and profligate, to the end that they may be instructed, exercised, or punished, as circumstances may require. The marines are also to be divided into equal divisions, and each division is to be commanded by a subaltern, under the direction of the captain of marines, if there be one on board—which subaltern is to attend to, and be responsible for, the conduct of the division under his command, and for the good condition of their arms, which he is very frequently to inspect.

Duties of the commander of divisions and subdivisions,

Marines to be also subdivided.

24. No captain shall carry any woman to sea, without an order from the Secretary of the Navy, or from the commander of the fleet or squadron to which he belongs.

No woman to be carried to sea.

25. Every captain is required to make himself acquainted with every coast and harbor he may visit, and, if practicable, to make charts and drawings of them, provided it can be done without giving offence; all of which he is to forward to the Board of Navy Commissioners, accompanied with a journal containing such remarks, descriptions and informations he may think necessary to give, He is to endeavor to ascertain correctly the latitude and longitude of places little known, the prevalent winds and currents, the soundings, &c. as well as every other information that may be of importance to those who visit the place after him. He will also encourage, and offer every facility to such of his officers as are desirous of entering into similar occupations and pursuits; and if any such journals or charts contain observations or remarks which may contribute to the improvement of geography, by ascertaining the latitude and longitude, fixing or rectifying the position of places, the heights and views of land, charts, plans, or descriptions of any port, anchorage, ground, coasts, islands, or danger little known; remarks relative to the direc-

Captain to make himself acquainted with coasts, harbors, &c.

Various other similar duties.

--38--

tion and effects of currents, tides or winds, the officers or persons appointed to examine them, will make extracts of whatever may appear to merit preservation, and after these extracts have been communicated to the officer or author of the journal from which they have been taken, and that he has certified in writing to the fidelity of his journal, as well as of the charts, plans, and views which he has joined to it, the same shall be signed by the officers and examiners, and transmitted with their opinion thereon, to be preserved in the depot of charts, journals, and plans.

To convoy merchant vessels.

26. Whenever he is to sail from port to port, in time of war, or appearance thereof, he is to give notice to merchant vessels bound his way, and take them under his care, if they are ready; but not to make unnecessary stay, or deviate from his orders on that account.

To transmit account of his proceedings.

27. He is, by all opportunities, to send an account of his proceedings to the Secretary of the Navy; and he is to keep up a punctual correspondence with all public officers in whatsoever concerns them.

To visit no port without orders.

28. He is not to go into any port, but such as may be directed by his orders, unless by absolute necessity, and then not to make any unnecessary stay. If employed in cruising, he is to keep the sea, the time required by his orders, or give reasons for acting to the contrary, to the Secretary of the Navy.

To choose a good birth for anchoring.

29. Upon all occasions of anchoring, he is to take great care in the choice of a good birth, and to examine the quality of the ground for anchoring where he is a stranger, sounding at least three cables length round the ship.

Upon removal to another ship, to show his unexecuted orders to his successor.

30. Upon his own removal into another ship, he is to show the originals of all such orders, as have been sent to him and remain unexecuted, to his successor, and leave with him attested copies of the same.

To leave a muster book with his successor.

31. He is to leave with his successor a complete muster book, and send all other books and accounts to the officers to whom they respectively relate.

In case of shipwreck.

32. In case of shipwreck or other disaster, whereby the ship may perish, the officers and men are to stay with the wreck as long as possible, and save all they can.

On the discharge of men from one ship to another.

33. When any men borne for wages are discharged from one ship to another, the captain of the ship from which they may be so discharged, is immediately to send pay lists of such men to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury; and the purser of the ship from which they are so discharged, is also to supply the purser of the ship to which they are transferred, a pay list, stating the balances respectively due them.

--39--

34. He is responsible for the whole conduct and good government of the ship, and for the due execution of all regulations which concern the several duties of the officers and company of the ship, who are to obey him in all things which he shall direct for the service of the United States.

Responsible for the good government of the ship.

35. He is answerable for the faults of his clerk, nor can he receive his wages without the proper certificates, and must make good all damages sustained by his neglect or irregularity.

Responsible for the faults of his clerk.

36. The quarter deck must never be left without one commission officer at least, and the other necessary officers which the captain may deem proper to attend to the duty of the ship.

Quarter deck never to be without a commission officer, &c.

37. Commanding officers are to discourage seamen from selling their wages, and not to attest letters of attorney, if the same appear to have been granted in consideration of moneys given for the purchase thereof.

38. On ships of the United States being visited by custom house officers, the captain will offer them every facility in the performance of their duties; and if there should be a suspicion of any person having articles on board, subject to the payment of duties, which such person is desirous of smuggling, he is to give them every possible assistance in discovering such articles, if they are really on board. If he should discover any officer in the act of smuggling, or attempting to smuggle, he is immediately to arrest such officer, and report the matter to the Secretary of the Navy, in order that such directions may be given, as conduct, so injurious to the public, and so disgraceful to an officer, shall require.

His duty on being visited by a customs house officer.

39. He is not, under pretence of lightness or neatness, or on any other account, to make any alteration in the manner of fitting the standing rigging, on which the safety of the masts so entirely depends; but he is to keep the shrouds and stays as they are fitted in the dock ant navy yards; and if he should have occasion to fit others he is to do it in the same manner; nor is he to suffer any alteration to be made in the established manner of rigging ships; or any experiment to be made, or expedient to be practiced, by which the shrouds, stays, or other rigging, may be endangered, or exposed to unnecessary chafing or wearing.

Not to alter the rigging.

No experiments to be made.

40. He is to favor the masts as much as possible never hazarding them in carrying too much sail, except in chase, or on other necessary occasions. He is to be attentive in observing that the shrouds and stays are properly set up, especially when new and apt to stretch; but in doing this, he is to be particularly careful in pre-

To favor his masts.

Set up his shrouds and stays.

--40--

venting the masts from being so much stayed as to risk their being crippled or sprung.

Repairs to be done onboard, as far as practicable.

41. He is to direct the carpenters and caulkers to make such repairs in the ship and boats as the stores on board will permit, that on his arrival in port, as little time and as little assistance from the dock yard as possible, may be required to refit her.

In port or roadstead to follow the motions of his superior officer.

42. While in port or roadstead, he is to follow the motions of the senior officer present, by striking or getting up the yards and top-masts, loosing or furling sails, and doing any other duties contemporaneously with the ship which the senior officer commands, unless such senior officer shall dispense with his so doing.

On a foreign ship of war coming into port, to send a lieutenant on board, &c.

To show attention and afford assistance.

43. If a foreign ship shall visit a port of the United States, the senior officer of an United States' vessel of war, (there being no flag officer present,) is to send a lieutenant to the officer commanding her, to inquire his reasons for entering, and to offer him any assistance he may stand in need of; and he, and all other officers of the United States' navy, are to show to the officers of such foreign ship, during their stay in port, such attention and respect as their rank and situation may require; and to afford such assistance to the ship, if wanted, as circumstances will admit, and as a power in amity with the United States may reasonably expect.

Births, cradles, &c. for the sick.

On the appearance of a contagious disease.

44. He is to pay every attention to the comfort of the sick and wounded, causing a comfortable place to be provided for them in any part of the ship, where they will be least incommoded. And he is to direct to be furnished, births, cradles, cots, buckets with covers, and every other convenience they may require. And on the appearance of any contagious disease, he is to cause the persons infected, to be separated from the rest of the ship's company and consult with the surgeon as to the best means of preventing the spreading of such contagious disease.

To keep copies of his official correspondence.

45. He is required to keep copies of all official correspondence.

To see strict justice done to his officers and men.

He alone to inflict punishment.

46. He is to see that on all occasions strict justice is done to the officers and men under his command, that they have their proper allowance of provisions, that no improper charges are made against their wages, and that no cruelties or oppressions are practiced. He, alone, is to order punishment to be inflicted, which is never to be done without sufficient cause, nor with greater severity than the offence shall deserve, nor in any case beyond what is authorised by the "Act for the better government of the Navy of the United States," passed April 23, 1800. All the officers and ship's company are to be

--41--

present at the infliction of every punishment, and the captain himself is to attend to see it properly executed. Not more than one dozen lashes shall he given on any account at one punishment; nor shall men be subjected to long confinement, except for trial by court martial, nor be deprived for more than a week at a time of their grog, nor punished by a reduction of their allowance of provisions, nor exposed for punishment to any uncommon hard work or service, to exposures that may endanger their health, or to any kind of torture, for any offence committed. They are, when necessary, to be brought to the gang way, or, if the offence deserves a severer punishment, they are to be tried by court martial.

Not more than 12 lashes at one punishment.

Other limitations to punishments.

47. The captain of a ship carrying a broad pendent, is on all occasions of duty, to consult his commander, and a respect due to him, requires that he should not inflict any punishment without his knowledge.

ship carrying a broad pendent, on all occasions to consult his com-

48. When the captain is removed from the command of a ship, he is to be governed by the 29th article of the regulations and instructions for the commanders of fleets and squadrons; and when removed from one ship to another, (if it can be done without any inconvenience to the service,) he will he allowed to take with him the following number of men, not however without express orders to that effect, from the Secretary of the Navy, or his commanding officer:

mander. On the removal of a captain from one ship to another, how governed.

 

If removed from a

74

may take

50,

of whom

10

may be petty officers.

do.

44

do.

40,

do.

8

do.

36

do.

32,

do.

6

do.

Sloop

do.

50,

do.

4

do.

Brig

do.

15,

do.

3

do.

Schooner or cutter

do.

10,

do.

2

 

Which men are to he in addition to his clerk, coxswain, steward, servant, or cook, whom he may remove without an order. But the men he may take with him are to be replaced from the ship he shall take command of, with an equal number of the same rate and of the same quality, as those he may take with him.

49. He is to give to his successor a particular account of the qualities of the ship according to the annexed form, together with such further information on any subject relating to her, as his experience and observation may enable him to give, and as he may deem of service to any captain commanding her, This account is to be signed by himself, the first lieutenant, master, boatswain, and carpenter, and a duplicate thereof is to be sent to the office of the Navy Commissioners. This account must be given in the following form:

To give his successor an account of the qualities of the ship.

--42--

Observations on the qualities of the United States'______the ___________-

1. Her best trim for sailing.

2. Her draft of water, forward and aft, when victualled for six months, and stored for foreign service.

3. The quantity of iron and shingle ballast on board.

4. How she sails close hauled.

in a top-gallant gale,

in a top-sail gale,

under reefed top-sails.

under her courses.

3. How she steers, and how she wears and stays, under,

her top-gallant sails,

top-sails,

reef top-sails,

courses.

6. How she lays to in a gale, and under what sail, she behaves best.

7. How she sails and steers with the wind abeam under

her royals.

top-gallant sails.

top-sails.

courses.

8. How she sails with the Wind on the quarter, under all sail.

stay sails.

royals.

top-gallant sails.

top-sails.

courses.

9. How she sails and rolls before the wind, and the effect on her masts, under all sail.

royals,

top-gallant sails,

top-sails.

scudding in a gale.

10. How she rides at anchor in a heavy gate and sea.

11. How she stands under her sails.

12. How she stows her provisions and water, and what quantity of the latter she carries, when victualled for four and six months, and the quantity of ballast that may be dispensed with in the room of six months provisions.

13. The number of tons, of provisions taken on board, when stored for the above time.

14. General remarks as to her sailing under all circumstances with other ships; showing the proportion she gathers to windward or fore-reaches; her proportion leeway in general, and any other circumstances worthy of note.

--43--

50. If an United States' vessel of war should be wrecked, the captain is to use every possible exertion to save the lives of the crew, and to preserve the stores, provision, and furniture of the ship. He is also to endeavor to save the ship's papers, particularly the muster and slop books; and to take special care to preserve or destroy all signals, secret orders, and instructions, to prevent their falling into improper hands. He is to dispose of the crew in a manner most conducive to their comfort and the public interest; and to be very particular in keeping up a regular and perfect discipline among them; carefully preventing the commission of any irregularity which may give offence to the inhabitants of the country they are in.

In case of ship-wreck, to use every exertion to save the lives of his crew—preserve stores. Save ship's papers. Preserve or destroy signals, secret orders, &c.

Preserve

discipline, &c.

51. He is to lose no time in getting the crew to the United States; to effect which, he is authorised to dispose of, on the best terms, the property saved from the wreck, or to draw on the Secretary of the Navy for the necessary moneys.

To get his crew to the United States. For that purpose, may dispose of the property saved or draw on the Secretary of the Navy.

52. Whenever any commander of a public ship or vessel of the United States, shall find himself placed in such circumstances as to compel him to strike his flag to an enemy, he is to take special care to destroy all his secret instructions, signal books, and private signals; and for this purpose they should be always kept fastened to a weight so heave as to sink them immediately on being thrown overboard, and on inquiring into the loss of the ship, he will produce evidence of his having done so.

When reduced to the necessity of striking his flag to an enemy, he is to destroy all secret orders, signals, &c.

53. The ship, and every person on board, being placed under the command of the captain, he will be held responsible for every thing done on board. From him will be expected an example of respect and obedience to his superiors, of unremitted attention to his duty, and a cheerful alertness in the execution of it, in all situations and under all circumstances. He will be expected to observe, himself, and strongly to enforce, in others, the most rigid economy in the expenditure of public stores, and to show, by every means in his power, a steady determination to serve his country with the utmost zeal and fidelity; and although particular duties are hereafter assigned, and various instructions given to every officer in the navy, yet the captain will be expected to see that all these instructions are obeyed, and all these duties performed by the officers to whom they are respectively assigned. From him it will be expected, that all those, whether officers or others, shall be corrected, or their conduct properly represented, who are disobedient or disrespectful to their superiors; neglectful of their duty; wasteful of the public stores: or who, by their con-

Various exemplary duties enjoined upon the commander of a public vessel.

--44--

duct or conversation, shall endeavor to render any officer or other person dissatisfied with his situation, or with the service on which he is employed. He is to observe with particular attention the conduct of every officer, and of every other person under his command; that, being acquainted with their respective merits, he may assign them such stations as they may be qualified to fill, and for arduous and dangerous enterprizes, may select those whose ability and courage may afford the best hopes of success. He is to be extremely attentive to every thing done by his clerk, who, being appointed for the sole purpose of assisting him, will be considered as always acting by his orders. He will, therefore, be held responsible for every thing done by the clerk, and be made accountable for every error he may commit in the discharge of his duly.

CABIN FURNITURE

The commander of a squadron.

1. The commander of a squadron shall be allowed, on fitting out, to equip the cabin of a ship of the line, in lieu of every expense for moveable furniture, the sum of seven hundred and fifty dollars.

Captain's cabin.

2. There shall be allowed, on fitting out, to equip the cabin of a captain, in lieu of every expense for Moveable furniture, five hundred dollars.

Master commandant.

3. There shall be allowed, on fitting out, to equip the cabin of a master and commander, in lieu of every expense for moveable furniture, four hundred dollars.

Lieutenant commanding brig.

4. There shall be allowed on fitting out, to equip the cabin of a lieutenant, commanding a brig below the rate of a sloop, in lieu of every expense for moveable furniture, two hundred dollars.

Commander of a schooner or cutter.

5. There shall be allowed on fitting out, to equip the cabin of an officer, commanding a schooner or cutter, mounting twelve guns, in lieu of every expense for moveable furniture, one hundred dollars.

Commander of a vessel of less than 12 guns.

G. There shall be allowed, on fitting out, to equip the cabin of an officer, commanding a vessel mounting less than twelve guns, in lieu of every expense for moveable furniture, fifty dollars.

Articles to be purchased by the purser.

7. The articles of furniture for cabins shall be purchased by the purser of the ship agreeably to such instructions as the commander may give him, the amount of which he is to charge to the commander's account.

Furniture, when and how transferred.

8. On the removal of a commander to another ship, he will deliver over to his successor the articles so charged to him, taking his receipt for the same. This is to be certified by the purser, who will also charge the

--45--

new commander with the amount of the articles so transferred; and the commander to whom the articles shall be delivered, shall transmit to the office of the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, the receipt so taken as aforesaid, together with the purser's certificate; otherwise, the amount of the articles furnished, will be charged against his pay on the settlement of his accounts with the Treasury Department

9. Should the ship be laid up in ordinary, the receipt of the Commandant of the yard, and the certificate of the purser, will be sufficient vouchers to entitle him to receive his pay.

When the ship is laid up.

10. Articles unfit for service must be surveyed by an order from the Navy Commissioners, or, in the event of a ship being on a foreign station, by an order from the commander of the station, on the application of the commander of the ship, and no new articles are to be furnished until the old shall be condemned, which must be certified by the officers holding the survey, and the certificate forwarded to the Navy Commissioners.

Articles unfit for service, to be surveyed.

11. Articles of cabin furniture broken or lost at sea, shall be replaced by the commander of the ship at his own expense, unless he shall make it appear by the certificate of two commission officers, that such loss or breaking was occasioned by unavoidable casualties, or accidents beyond his control.

How supplied when broken or lost at sea.

12. No articles of silver plate for the use of the cabin, are to be furnished at the expense of the United States.

No silver plate allowed.

OF THE LIEUTENANT.

1. A lieutenant is to be constantly attentive to his duty, and diligently and punctually to execute all orders for the public service, which he may receive from the captain or any senior officer. When he has the watch, he is to be constantly on deck until relieved by the officer who is to succeed him. He is to see that the men are alert and attentive to their duty; that every precaution is taken to prevent accidents from squalls or sudden gusts of wind, and that the ship is as perfectly prepared for battle, as circumstances shall admit. He is to be particularly careful that the ship be properly steered, and that a correct account be kept of her way, by the log being duly hove, and the leeway for each hour marked on the log board.

His general duty.

2. He is to see that the master's mates and midshipmen of the watch are constantly upon deck, and attentive to their duty. And he is to order the men of

His duty in regard to the watch.

--46--

the watch to be frequently mustered, and to report to the captain such as he shall find absent from their duty.

To keep the ship in her station.

3. He is to be extremely attentive to keep the ship in her station, in any squadron he may belong to; and he is to inform the Captain whenever he apprehends that he shall not be able to do so.

To inform the captain of strange sails,

4. He is to inform the captain of all strange sails that are seen; all signals that are made; all changes of sail made by the commander; all shiftings of the wind; and in general of all circumstances which may derange the order in which the fleet is sailing, or prevent the ship from continuing on the course directed to be steered.

His duty on being relieved.

5. He is to be very particular in delivering, to the lieutenant who relieves him on the watch, all orders received by him from the captain or the lieutenant he relieved, remaining unexecuted; and he is to inform him of all signals made by the commander in chief, which still remain to be obeyed. He is to point out to him, more especially in the night, the situation of the commander in chief, and to inform him what sail his ship was carrying, when it could last be ascertained, and whether the ship was coming up with, or dropping astern of, him; and he is to give, in general, whatever other information may be necessary to enable him to keep the ship in her station, if the fleet be formed in the order of sailing, or to keep well up with it if it be not so formed.

To keep men at the mast heads, &c.

6. He is to keep men at the mast heads during the day, and in proper stations during the night to look out. He is frequently to remind them of their duty, if necessary, and to relieve them more or less frequently according to the state of the weather, and the degree of their attention.

His duty on seeing a strange sail at night.

7. On a strange sail being seen in the night, during war, he is to send a midshipman to inform the captain, and is himself to make arrangements for getting the ship ready for action. He is to keep out of gun shot until everything is ready; but in doing this, he is to be careful not to remove to such a distance as to risk losing sight of her.

Not to carry too much sail, unless required particularly, &c.

6. He is never to carry so much sail as to endanger the springing of any mast or yard, unless some particular service should require it: and when he does so, he must take care that all the men in the watch are at their stations, ready to shorten sail the moment any increase of wind or other circumstances, shall make it necessary.

His duty at night.

9. In the night he is to take care that the master at arms and corporals, in their respective watches, are very particular in going the rounds, and that they visit all parts of the ship every half hour, to see that there is

--47--

no disturbance among the men, and that no candles or lamps are burning, except such as are expressly allowed.

10. He is to direct the carpenter to sound the well himself, or direct one of his mates to do it, twice at least in every watch, and to see that the ports are well barred; and the gunner, or one of his mates, to examine once at least in each watch, the state of the lashing of the guns, and to report to him when they have done so.

Carpenter to sound the well. Ports and lashings to be examined.

11. In the morning he is to direct the boatswain to examine the state of the rigging, and the carpenter that of the masts and yards. He is to receive their reports and to inform the captain of any defects they may discover.

His duty in the morning.

12. He is never to change the course of the ship without directions from the captain, unless it be necessary to avoid some danger.

Not to change the ship's course.

18. If the ship belongs to, or is in company with, any fleet or squadron, he is to direct some careful officer to observe the signals made by the commanding officer; but he is never to answer any signal, whether general, or addressed particularly to the ship, to which he belongs, until he is certain that he sees it distinctly, and understands for what purpose it is made; and he is every evening, before dark, to see that lanterns, with candles, and every thing necessary for making signals in the night, are ready and in good order; and that the number of guns which may be directed, not shotted, are ready for being fired, and to be particularly attentive in preventing any other lights being shown in the ship, when signal lights are hoisted; and when at sea, that no lights may be seen from the cabins, or any part of the ship.

When sailing in squadron, his duty in regard to signals.

14. During a fog, he is to he particularly attentive to the guns tired by the commander in chief, that, by observing any alteration that may take place either in the direction or strength of the report, he may take such steps as may be deemed necessary to prevent the ship's being separated from the fleet. He is to be very careful to order the drum to be beat, and the bell to be sounded according to the tack the ship may be on, for the information of ships that may be near.

His duty in a fog.

15. He is to see that every occurrence worthy of notice, during the watch, be properly entered on the log board, and that all signals made in the fleet are correctly minuted in such a manner as the captain shall direct; and at the end of his watch, he is to sign the log board and the report of signals with the initials of his name; and in like manner when the occurrences of the day, and the report of the signals have been entered in the

What to be noted on the log-book during the watch.

--48--

log-book, he is to sign that with his name at the end of each watch he kept.

To ascertain the lat. and long. and report to the captain.

16. He is constantly to ascertain the latitude by observation at noon or by double altitudes, as circumstances may require, and to keep an account of the ship's way, specifying the course steered and the distance run for each twenty-four hours, with the latitude and longitude she is in, and the bearings and distance of some head land from which she sailed, or towards which she may be going; with other particulars, and in any form that the captain shall direct; which account he is to deliver to the captain every day as soon afternoon, as the other duties of the ship will allow.

To make no signal without orders, except, &c.

17. He is not to make any signals by day or night, except such as may be necessary to warn ships of any danger to which they might be exposed, without the directions of the captain.

His duty in time of action.

18. In time of action he is to see that all the men under his command are at their quarters, and that they do their duty with spirit and alacrity. He is to be particularly attentive to prevent them from loading the guns improperly; from firing them before they are well pointed; and from wetting them after they have been fired; and he is to be very careful to prevent their making an improper accumulation of powder in any part of his quarters.

His duty in promoting discipline and good order.

19. He is to be attentive to the conduct of all the ship's company, to prevent all profane swearing and abusive language; all disturbances, noise, and confusion— to enforce a strict obedience to orders, proper respect to all superiors, and an observance of discipline and good order. And he is to report to the captain all those whose misconduct he shall think deserving of reprehension or punishment.

No boats allowed alongside without his orders.

His duty on receiving, and sending away stores, &c.

20. No boat is to be allowed to come along side, or to go from the ship, without direction from the lieutenant of the watch. When vessels or boats come alongside with provisions, stores, water, &c. he is to see that they are cleared without delay, and that the articles are taken into the ship with the utmost care, to prevent their suffering any damages, and when any provisions, stores, empty casks, &c. are to be sent from the ship, he is to be equally attentive in causing them to be put into the vessels or boats appointed to receive them.

On being called by signal to a commodore's ship.

21. When a lieutenant is called by signal on board of a commodore's ship, he is to carry with him an order book, in which he is to enter any orders that may require it, whether given him verbally or in writing.

--49--

52. In the absence of the captain, the senior lieutenant on board the ship, is to be responsible for every thing done on board. He is to see every part of the duty as punctually performed, as if the captain were present. He may put under arrest any officer whose conduct he shall think so reprehensible as to require it, and he may confine such men as he may think deserving of punishment, but neither he, nor any other lieutenant who may become commanding officer, is to release an officer from his arrest, nor to release or punish any man who has been confined—for this is to be done by the Captain only, unless he be absent from the ship with leave from the Secretary of the Navy, or from his commanding officer, in which case it is to be done only by the senior lieutenant commanding the ship in the captain's absence.

What is required of him in the absence of the captain.

His powers.

OF THE MASTER.

1. A master, when attached to a ship, is to be constantly attentive to his duty, and diligently and punctually to execute all orders he may receive from the captain or any of the lieutenants of the ship, for the public service.

His general duty.

2. If the ship be newly commissioned, he is to obtain the most correct information he can of the manner in which her hold was stowed when last in commission, and what were then her qualities, that her stowage may be altered if there be reason to suppose it may be done with advantage. If the ship shall not have been at sea, the master is to consult the master ship wright, on what may be the best manner of stowing her. But if he find the hold already stowed, he is to inform himself how it has been done, and he is attentively to examine her qualities at sea, that he may suggest such alterations in her stowage as he may think likely to improve them.

His duty on joining a ship newly commissioned, &c.

3. He is to be present himself at the stowing of the hold, to see that the ship has the proper quantity of iron and shingle ballast, and he is to stow her in a manner best qualified to preserve her trim, to make room in the hold and to admit of the stowage of the water and provisions without risk of damage to the casks. He is to stow away as much wood in the hold as possible; and if it should appear to him that the quantity of wood and coals will not be sufficient for the time for which the ship is victualled, he is to report it to the captain.

How to stow the hold.

4. He is to be present when stores or provisions are received on board, to see them carefully and expeditiously hoisted in to prevent their being damaged; and if any of them should appear to him to be in any respect defect-

His duty on receiving stores.

--50--

ive, he is to report it to the captain or the commanding officer on board, that they may be surveyed as soon as the service will admit, and then disposed of in conformity to the report of survey.

Old and new provisions, how to be stowed.

5. If any provisions are pointed out to him as being older than the rest, he is to stow them in such away as to admit of their being first hoisted up; and receiving any subsequent supplies, he is, whenever circumstances will admit, to put the new provisions under the old, that they may be the last expended.

To enter in the log-book the manner of stowage, &c.

6. When the storage of the hold shall be completed, he is to enter into the log-book a particular account of the manner in which it was done, specifying the quantity of iron and shingle ballast in each hold, with a draft of the same, and the manner in which they are arranged, with the size and number of the casks in each tier, and showing the manner in which they are disposed of.

His duty in regard to the cables.

7. He is to be particularly careful in observing that the cables are securely clenched—that they are properly spliced and coiled in the tiers—that the rounding is well put on and carried far enough to secure the cable from being chafed when across the cutwater.

To keep the keys of the after hold and spirit room.

His duty in regard to these departments.

8. He is to keep the keys of the after hold and spirit room, which, when wanted, he is to deliver to one of the master's mates only, strictly charging him not to suffer light to be carried into the spirit room—to attend himself, without quitting, on any account, the spirit room or after hold, while open—to see it properly secured when the service for which it was opened shall be executed, and to return the keys to him as soon as he has done so.

In regard to sails.

9. He is to see that the sails are properly fitted with points, robands, earings, &c. ready for being brought to the yards; and that the boatswain has always a sufficient number of spare points, robands, gaskets, mats, plats, knippers, &c. ready for any purpose for which they may be wanted.

On hoisting up provisions &c. from the hold.

10. He is to be attentive in observing the quantity of every species of provisions hoisted up from the hold, that, if the quantify should appear to be more than is necessary for the ship's company, he may inform the captain, he is to attend also to the quantity of wood and coal hoisted up, that he may prevent any improper expenditure of them.

In regard to water.

11. He is to be particularly careful to prevent any waste or improper expense of water, and never to allow of its being started or pumped out in the hold without particular directions from the captain—nor is he to suf-

--51--

fer more to be hoisted up in a day than the quantity allowed.

12. He is every day to report to the captain the quantity of water expended during the last twenty-four hours, and the quantity remaining on board.

To report daily expenditure of water, &c.

13. He is, with the first lieutenant, to visit the store rooms of the warrant officers, to see that they are kept as clean and as well ventilated as circumstances will admit—that no other than the stores of the ship are to be put into them, and that the stores are arranged with such regularity as to admit of any of them being found when wanted.

To visit the storerooms of the warrant officers.

14. He is frequently to visit the cable tiers, to see that they are kept clean and that no injury is done to the cables; and he is to direct the master's mate to be very careful to prevent any accumulation of dirt in the hold, and to take every opportunity of collecting and throwing overboard any filth that may be found there.

To visit the cable tiers frequently.

15. He is frequently to inspect the sail rooms, to see that they are dry and the rooms are in good order. He is to give orders for the repairing of sails immediately on discovering that they require it; and if he should find them, or any of the stores, at any time likely to be damaged by dampness, or by any other cause, he is immediately to represent it to the captain.

To inspect the sail rooms, order repair of sails, &c.

16. He is to be extremely attentive in preventing any unnecessary expense of casks, or any damage being done to them by improper violence in stowing them, or getting them into, or out of, the ship—he is never to allow them to be shaken, without the express order in writing from the captain for that purpose.

To be careful in handling casks.

17. Whenever it shall be necessary to break up or clear the hold and to start the water, he is to see that the bungs are carefully taken out of the casks and the water started upon deck from the bung holes—and that the empty casks are carefully lowered into the vessels appointed to receive them, as the expense attending the repairs of, or any considerable damage done to, the casks, by breaking in the heads or staves, or by throwing them over the gunwales, &c. will be charged against his pay.

On breaking up the hold.

18. When there is a probability of the ships being; anchored, he is to see that the anchors and cables are perfectly clear for running; that the stoppers and ring ropes are in good order, and that every thing is ready for bringing her up properly, especially when she is to anchor in high winds and in strong currents.

On the probability of anchoring—his duly.

19. When the ship is at single anchor, he is to keep the anchor clear and prevent the cables from being chaf-

When at anchor.

--52--

ed; and when she is moored, he is to keep the hawse clear; and should it at any time become foul beyond a cross, he is to represent the same to the captain or commanding officer, that it may be immediately cleared. He is to see that the rounding is in good order, and that the ship is not girt by being moored too tight.

To examine the rigging frequently.

20. He is frequently to examine into the state of the rigging; to see that the standing rigging is always kept well setup; to attend himself when it is set up; to examine frequently the running rigging, and to inform the captain when any part of it appears to be no longer serviceable.

To examine the boatswain's and the carpenter's accounts &c.

21. At the end of every week, he is to examine the boatswain's and the carpenter's accounts of stores expended, and at the end of every month he is, with the first lieutenant, to sign their expense books, which he is to examine with very great attention before he signs them, to prevent the insertion of expenditures which have not been made, or an improper account of those which have.

His duty in regard to compasses, &c.

22. He is to see that the compasses, the hour and other glasses, are properly taken care of; to try them, and compare them with each other frequently; to ascertain and prevent the bad effects of any error which may be in them; to see the log lines and lead lines correctly marked and at hand whenever they may be wanted.

To have charge of charts nautical books, &c

23. The charts, nautical books, and instruments belonging to the ship are to be delivered to, and charged to the account of, the master; and on his removal, he is to deliver them over to his successor, or the storekeeper of a yard, taking his receipt for the same; which receipt, when approved by the captain, is to relieve him from all other responsibility respecting them.

To navigate the ship under command of the captain.

24. He is, under the command of the captain, to have the charge of navigating the ship. He is to represent to the captain every possible danger in or near the ship's course, and the way to avoid it; and if it be immediate, to the lieutenant of the watch. Whenever the ship shall be approaching the land or any shoals, he is to be upon deck and keep a good look out, always sounding to inform himself of the situation of the ship.

To deliver a account daily of the situation of the ship.

25. He is every day, at noon, to deliver to the captain an account of the situation of the ship, the latitude and longitude she is in, the variation of the compass, the bearing and distance of the place sailed from, or of that to which the ship is bound, and every other particular which the captain shall direct.

Master's mates and midshipmen.

26. He is to see that a sufficient number of master's mates and midshipmen attend every day to observe

--53--

the meridian altitude of the sun, or to take double altitudes, if the obtaining of a meridian one be doubtful; and he is to direct such as he think proper to assist him in making any other observations or calculations which he may think necessary.

midshipmen to attend in making observations.

27. When the ship shall be in pilot water, although there may be a pilot on board to take charge of her, the master is to be always attentive to the manner in which she is conducted—he is to see the lead carefully hove, &c. if the pilot should not require it; and is to have every thing prepared for anchoring at the shortest notice: and if he perceive the ship standing towards danger, or if he have reason to think the pilot not properly qualified to conduct her, he is immediately to inform the captain.

His duty when the ship is in pilot water, and the pilot on board.

28. He is to endeavor to ascertain, with every possible degree of accuracy, the latitude and longitude, and the variation of the compass, at every place he visits, and of every remarkable head land which he passes. He is also to ascertain the setting and velocity of the currents, the time of high water at the full and change of the moon, the direction of the tides, with the extent of their rise and fall. He is to observe and describe, as particularly as he can, the appearances of coasts, pointing out remarkable objects by which one part may be distinguished from another. He is to apply to the captain, whenever he may thing the service will admit of it, for boats to survey any coasts or harbors which may be near; and he is to enter all the observations he may make, and all the information he may obtain, in a book, according to a prescribed form, the columns of which he is to fill up with all possible correctness. He is frequently to deliver this book to the captain for examination; and, at the end of every six calendar months, he is to deliver to him a correct copy, containing all the observations made, and information obtained, during the last six months, accompanied by the charts of all surveys taken, and the views which have been drawn of the coasts within that period, which book the captain is to transmit, by the first safe opportunity, to the Secretary of the Navy: and at the end of the voyage, or before he leaves the ship, at any time, he is to deliver to the captain, to be by him transmitted to the Navy Commissioners, a copy of such book, containing the observations, &c. and a set of charts containing the surveys, views, &c. during the whole time he may have been master of the ship

To ascertain the lat. and long. of places.

Setting and velocity of currents.

To survey coasts and harbors.

To enter his observations in a book.

Frequently to deliver this book to the captain to be examined.

At the end of every six months to deliver a copy to the captain.

At the end of the voyage to deliver another copy to the captain, of the whole.

29. He is carefully to examine the charts of every coast on which the ship may be employed; and at the end of the book of observations he is to insert a list of

To examine the charts of coasts, and note them at

--54--

the end of the book of observations.

To point out their errors.

the charts by him examined, specifying by whom and at what time they were published, with such opinion as he may have been enabled to form of their correctness or inaccuracy; distinctly pointing out every error he may discover, and which was either not known or imperfectly known before, carefully describing its bearings and distances from some remarkable point or points, with its size, the depth of the water on it at different times of tide, the soundings near it, and any other circumstances relating to it which may be worthy of notice—all which he is to insert in the ship's log-books, at the time the discoveries and observations shall be made.

To have charge of the ship's logbook.

To compare it daily with the log board. Lieutenants to sign.

30. He is to have the charge of the ship's log-book, which is to be written by the master's mates, under his immediate inspection. He is to compare it every day with the log-board, to see that every circumstance which has occurred is properly entered in it; and he is to send it immediately to the lieutenants, that they may sign their names at the end of their respective watches, while that which happened in them is still fresh in their memories. In the log-book he is to enter, with very minute exactness, each of the following circumstances, viz:

What is to be entered in the log-book.

1. The state of the weather, the directions of the wind, the courses steered, and the distances run, with every occurrence relating to the navigating of the ship, the []ing and velocity of currents, and the results of all astronomical observations made to ascertain the situation of the ship, the variations of the compass, &c.

2. The loss of yards, masts, boats, &c. the splitting of sails, the blowing away of flags or colors, and all other accidents, with the quantity of each article lost and saved.

3. Every circumstance relating to the supply, receipt, loss, survey, and returns of slop clothes, provisions, casks, and water, specifying from whom they were received, and to whom they were supplied or returned, and by whose order, if any order were given, with the number of tasks, and packages, written in words at length.

4. An account of the quantity of every species of stores purchased for the ship, or received from, or supplied to, any other United States' ships, or to merchant ships, or to any foreign ship or arsenal.

5. Every alteration made in the allowance of provisions, specifying by whose order such allowance was made.

6. The marks and numbers of every cask of provisions or bale of slops opened for the use of the ship's

--55--

company, with the quantity it is said to have contained, and the difference, if any.

7. The time when any hired vessel is employed and the time she is discharged—the name of the vessel, of the master, and of the person from whom she was hired, her burden in tuns, and the number of men employed in her; by whose order and for what purpose she was hired, and the cause which makes it necessary to hire her rather than employ the boats of the ship or squadron.

8. An account of the number of any men employed on board, who are to be paid for the service they perform—whether hired for that service or lent from other ships, mentioning the day on which they began and on which they ceased working, and the number mustered every day. Every entry of the receipt, expenditure, loss, &c. of stores or provisions, is to be carefully examined by the officer who has the charge of them, who is to signify that the account is correct, by signing his name at the bottom of it. After the log-book has been signed by the lieutenant, no alteration, however trifling, is to be made in it without the approbation of the captain, and the perfect recollection of the lieutenant of the watch that such alteration is proper.

31. At the end of every six calendar months he is to deliver a copy of the log-book for those six months, signed by himself, to the captain, to be transmitted, by the first safe opportunity, to the Secretary of the Navy; and at the end of every twelve months, he is to deliver the original log-book, signed by himself, to the captain, to be kept by him until the ship is paid off, and then to be sent to the Secretary of the Navy. If the master be superceded, he is to sign the original log-book, then in his possession, and to deliver it to his successor, who is to give him a receipt for it.

At the end of every 6 months, to furnish the captain with a copy of the log-book; and at the end of 12 months the original log-book, signed by himself. To sign the log-book when superseded and deliver it to his successor.

32. Whenever he shall be ordered to survey stores or provisions reported to be decayed or unserviceable, he is to examine the state of each article with the most scrupulous attention, never trusting to any representation or opinion of others, but making his report so conscientiously, that when called upon to confirm it upon oath, which may frequently happen, he may be perfectly ready to do so. He is, as far as his judgment may enable him to determine, to point out the cause to which the defective state of such stores or provisions are to be attributed, particularly mentioning every appearance of neglect or inattention in those who had the charge of

His duty when ordered to survey stores.

--56--

them. If he finds any articles no longer fit for the service for which they were intended, he is to mention, in his report, any other service for which he may think them fit.

His duty when surveying stores remaining in a ship.

33. Whenever he shall be ordered to survey the stores remaining in a ship, whether they are to remain in the charge of the same officer or to be transferred to another, he is to examine them with such attention as to be able, when required to make oath of the truth of his report, as well to their quality as to their quantity, never allowing any article to be inserted in the report without being satisfied that it is on board the ship.

To examine all muster hooks, left before signing them.

34. He is to examine with particular attention all muster books, tickets, vouchers for stores, and all other papers and accounts before he signs them, as he will be made responsible not only for such as he shall be found to have signed, knowing them to be false, but also for all mistakes in such books, accounts, &c. by which, through his neglecting to correct them, the public shall suffer any loss.

His duty in regard to ropemaking.

35. He is to inform the captain whenever it is probable that rope of any description may be wanted in the ship, and when the boatswain or ropemakers are ordered to make it, he is to attend frequently to see that they are diligent, that the rope is well made, and that there is no waste of yarns—he is to receive from them every day an account of the rope they have made, which is to be entered in the log-book; and he is to see that the boatswain charges himself properly with the whole of the quantity made.

REGULATIONS RELATIVE TO NAVAL SURGEONS, AND THEIR ASSISTANTS.

To report himself and lake charge of his department.

To examine and receipt for articles received.

1. Every naval surgeon, on being ordered to a vessel of war in the service of the United States, shall, without delay, report himself to the commanding officer, and take in his charge all the medicines, instruments, hospital stores, utensils, and all other articles ordered for the use of the sick, agreeably to the estimate F; for which he shall give duplicate receipts to the medical purveyor by whom they were supplied. He shall personally examine the articles before he passes his receipts, as he will be held strictly accountable for the expenditure thereof.

To keep a regular account.

2. He shall keep, or cause to be kept, a regular account of the receipt and expenditure of the said articles of medicine, according to the form G, and of the hos-

--57--

pital stores as per form H; and at the expiration of every month the amount of the respective columns of hospital shall be carried to the credit side of a book as per Form I. These books be is carefully to preserve, and at the end of every year to deliver them to the medical purveyor of the depot where he may have arrived.

To be delivered to the medical purveyor.

3. He shall, at the expiration of every cruise, report

the quantities of medicine and all other articles received, expended, and remaining on hand, to the medical purveyor of the depot where he may have arrived; which return shall be certified as just and true, and that the articles expended were, to the best of his knowledge and belief, used solely for the sick and invalids on board the ship to which he is attached, as per form G. He shall, if the ship is to be laid up, deposite all the articles remaining in his possession with the medical purveyor, and in case there should be no medical purveyor, to the surgeon of the yard or hospital where the ship is laid up, and give a written account of all losses; if returned in bad order, the cause or causes thereof. The purveyor, on receiving the balances of medicines, hospital stores, instruments and utensils, shall give a receipt for the same; and also a certificate of the condition of the instruments, specifying all losses, or if returned in bad order, in consequence of neglect—which certificates shall be forwarded to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, with the amount of the losses and repairs required, that the same may be charged to the naval surgeon. All losses which cannot reasonably be accounted for, shall be deducted from the pay of the surgeon and his assistants.

At the end of every cruise to report, &c.

Duty when the ship is to be laid up.

Liable for losses in certain cases.

His duty on being transferred.

4. When a surgeon is ordered to be transferred, he shall apply to the commanding officer of the ship, and request that two or more surgeons, or other commission officers, may be ordered to superintend the survey of all articles in his possession, in the presence of his successor, noting the quantity and quality of each article; which, when signed by the surveying officers, shall be receipted for by the surgeon who succeeds him, a duplicate of which shall be forwarded, without delay, to the medical purveyor, in order that the complement of all articles may be provided, should the vessel be destined on a long cruise. It is, however, distinctly to be understood, that the first supply shall be considered sufficient for one year, unless there shall have been an unusual prevalence of disease among the crew. This circumstance, moreover, shall be certified, and the certificate forwarded to the medical purveyor, as a voucher for deviating from the established rules of the service.

First supply to be considered sufficient for a year.

Exception.

--58--

When and how to obtain supplies on a foreign station.

5. Should a fresh supply of medicines, or other articles in the surgeon's department, be required on a foreign station, in consequence of any extraordinary number of sick, or by any injury sustained in a gale of wind, or in an action, he shall make out a requisition for such articles as he may thing absolutely necessary for the remainder of the cruise, or until he shall arrive in the United States; which requisition, when signed by the commander, shall be forwarded to the navy agent or consul of the port where the vessel may be, who will direct the supply thereof. The surgeon shall examine and approve the account of all articles thus supplied, before they are received on board.

Medicine, &c. to be condemned on survey only.

6. No condemnation of any articles of medicine or hospital stores shall take place, unless a survey shall have been had on the same, by order of the commander, at the request of the surgeon. A lieutenant, one surgeon and mate, shall be appointed for this duty; and their certificate shall be necessary to exonerate the naval surgeon from the responsibility, which these regulations impose on him.

To prescribe for casual eases on the gun deck. Visit the sick twice every day.

May stop the rations of the sick.

Amount of rations stopped to be paid to the hospital and asylum fund

7. He shall prescribe, for casual cases, on the gun deck, every morning at 9 o'clock, due notice having been previously given by his lob-lolly boy, by the ringing of a bell. He shall visit those who are confined to the births twice a day, or oftener, if necessary, and prescribe such medicines and diet as he may think proper. He shall likewise direct the stoppage of the rations of every man on the sick list, and excused from duty, when he shall issue hospital stores in lieu thereof. The amount of the rations stopped shall be accounted for by the purser of the ship at the end of every cruise, and be paid to the naval hospital and asylum fund.

His duty in regard to the sick.

8. He shall cause the patients under his care to be removed to the sick birth, whenever he shall judge it expedient. He is to request the commander to order as many men as may be requisite to attend their companions day and night, as nurses; and whilst engaged in this duty, they shall be subject to the orders of the surgeon, unless when mustered or called to quarters. Should they neglect to perform the duties required, and not use tenderness and humanity in the performance of them, the surgeon shall make a proper representation thereof to the captain. The sick birth shall be supplied with a sufficient number of buckets with covers, for the use of the sick, which shall be emptied frequently, and cleansed, and charcoal and water put in them. The birth shall be whitewashed with lime whenever an opportunity offers, and the decks sprinkled with vinegar.

--59--

9. He shall be extremely attentive to the personal cleanliness of the patients under his care. And see that the beds and bedding are properly attended to; also that the sick are supplied with such medicines, drinks, and nourishments, as their situation may require.

To attend to their personal cleanliness.

10. He shall report, daily, to the commander, the number, names, quality, and state of the sick under his care, their diseases and the probable cause of the increase of the sick, also the result of his treatment, agreeably to form K. He shall likewise deposite in the binnacle an alphabetical list of those who are or ought to be excused from duty in consequence of wounds, disease, or other injuries.

To report daily the number, &c. of the sick.

To deposite in the binnacle every morning a list of such as ought to be excused from duty.

11. The day previous to the discharge of a man from the sick report, who had been subsisted by him, he shall inform the purser in writing, in order that his steward may include him in his mess, in serving out the rations.

To notify the purser of patient's recovery.

12. He shall, at all times, be prepared with every thing necessary for the relief of wounded men; and when the ship is cleared for action, he shall repair to the cock-pit with his assistants and attendants, or to such part of the ship as the surgeon, with the consent of the commander, may consider most proper for their reception, the situation having been previously arranged.

His duty when the ship is cleared for action.

13. A variety of cases may occur, where, for the preservation of the lives of the sick, as well as for the safety of those who are well, it may be considered necessary to remove part of the sick on the gun deck, it is, therefore, deemed proper that he should recommend their removal whenever circumstances may make it necessary.

Relative to the removal of the sick to the gun deck.

14. Every patient, on being sent to the sick birth, shall, if practicable, be washed with soap and warm water; and when there is any suspicion of infection, they shall be furnished with a clean shirt and bedding: the blankets and clothes which they had used should be immersed in boiling water, in which potash has been dissolved—whence they are to be taken, washed, and dried before they are returned to the men's chests or bags. The matresses should be cleansed and frequently exposed to the sun and air.

Patients, how to be treated on being sent to sick birth.

15. He shall keep, or cause to be kept, a journal, according to the form L, of the state of the weather, number, names, age, rank, disease and treatment, when placed on the sick list, discharged therefrom, or death; noting likewise the number of days that the patient was victualled from the medical department; also such remarks on the probable origin of the disease prevailing

To keep a journal.

--60--

How the journal is to be disposed of.

on board, with a topographical account of the vicinity of anchorages, and such other professional observations as may have a tendency to benefit the public service. This journal he shall forward to the Secretary of the Navy, inspected by such of the surgeons of the navy as the Secretary of the Navy may direct, at the end of every cruise, or whenever he shall be transferred to another vessel.

How sick or wounded men are to be sent to hospital.

16. When sick or wounded men shall be sent to any of the naval hospitals of the United States, they shall be accompanied by an officer and an assistant surgeon, to see that they are conveyed with all the care and comfort that circumstances will admit of.

Sick ticket. Inventory of effects.

17. Each man sent to the hospital, shall be furnished with a sick ticket, agreeably to form M, and also an inventory of his effects, agreeably to form N.

When he shall consult with the surgeons of the fleet.

18. Whenever very important or difficult cases occur, he shall, if practicable, consult with the surgeons of the fleet.

Who to instruct in the use of the tourniquet.

19. He shall instruct his assistants and all others stationed with him, in the use of the tourniquet, and such other persons as the commander may appoint. A number of tourniquets shall be distributed to the different quarters, also two or three to each top, that the wounded men may suffer as little as possible from the loss of blood before their removal to the cock-pit.

To inspect the crew, and report contagion, &c.

20. He shall, occasionally, inspect the crew, and take every precaution to prevent the origin or progress of contagion; on the appearance of which, he shall, without delay, report the case to the commander, in order that a timely separation may be made of the sick from the well, and adopt such measures as may have a tendency to arrest the progress of the disease.

To inspect the provisions, cause the cook's coppers to be examined, &c.

21. He shall, frequently, inspect the provisions and liquors which may be served out, and report the same to the commanded when unsound. He shall likewise direct his mates to examine the cook's coppers, to see that he keeps them clean, and likewise report everything respecting diet, dress, want of personal cleanliness, in short, every thing which may come within the sphere of his knowledge, tending to promote the comfort and health of the crew.

Medicines, &c. to be faithfully administered.

22. He shall take care that the medicines, and all other articles with which he is supplied, are faithfully administered for the relief of the sick and wounded, and that no part of them be wasted or embezzled, or applied to any other purpose than that for which they were intended.

--61--

23. To enable the surgeon and his assistants to take proper care of the articles belonging to the medical department, a store room shall be allotted for their reception, which shall be solely under the charge of the surgeon, or, during his absence, of his first assistant.

To have a store room allotted to him.

24. When a ship comes to anchor at any port, he shall make out a requisition for a supply of fresh provisions and vegetables, fruit, including lemons, limes, or oranges, or such other articles as the place may afford, which he may deem proper for the use of the sick and convalescent; which requisition, being approved by the commander, shall be purchased by the purser, and the amount charged to the medical department.

On coming to an anchor at any port, to make out a requisition for fresh provisions, vegetables, &c.

25. Whenever the surgeon shall consider that a supply of fresh provisions, vegetables, or lemons, is necessary for the crew generally, he is to signify the same to the commanding officer.

When fresh provisions, vegetables, &c. are required, to signify it to the commanding officer.

26. The surgeon shall be allowed a faithful attendant to issue, under his direction, all supplies of provisions and hospital stores, and to attend to the preparation of the nourishment for the sick.

A faithful attendant allowed him.

27. The purser shall, from time to time, supply, on the requisition of the surgeon, approved by the captain or commander, such articles of provisions as he may require for the use of the sick or convalescent; which articles shall be, charged to the medical department, or against the rations of the sick which may have been stopped.

Purser to supply him with articles for the sick, &c.

28. At the expiration of every cruise, the surgeon shall report to the Secretery of the Navy the conduct of his mates; whether they have performed their duties with ability, zeal, and industry. Surgical instruments are to be delivered to the surgeon, and charged to his account; and on his removal from the ship, he is to take a receipt from his successor, the medical purveyor, or the surgeon of the hospital, when the ship may be laid up; which receipt, when approved by the captain, shall acquit him from further responsibility respecting them.

To report to the Secretary of the Navy at the end of every cruise. Surgical instruments, how to be disposed of.

SURGEON'S MATES.

1. They shall be subject to the orders of the surgeon. They shall weigh or measure every article of medicine and hospital stores issued. They shall keep a journal of the diseases and treatment of all cases; an abstract of which shall be given to the surgeon, that he may be enabled to report thereon to the Secretary of the Navy at the expiration of every cruize.

Subject to the surgeon's orders.

General duty.

2. They shall be careful to see that the medicines prescribed are administered as directed, and that the

To administer to the sick,

--62--

see the cockpit kept clean, &c.

sick are supplied with proper nourishment. They shall be particularly careful in directing the lob-lolly boy to keep the cock-pit clean, and every article therein belonging to the medical department. They shall, under the direction of the surgeon, personally apply dressings to wounds and ulcers, perform the operation of blood letting, and, in all important cases, they are personally to administer the medicines prescribed, or see them given; and do all other duties appertaining to their profession, which the surgeon may direct.

Orderlies to wash bandages, &c.

3. They must direct the orderlies to wash all bandages and compresses, daily, in hot water with soap or potash, and see that they are returned clean and dry to the cock-pit.

In the absence of the surgeon the senior mate to act as surgeon.

4. In the absence of the surgeon, the mate eldest in commission shall act as surgeon. They shall likewise aid in preparing the necessary reports required by the rules and regulations of the navy.

THE SURGEON OF THE FLEET, OR HOSPITAL SURGEON.

Residence.

Visit patients morning and evening.

1. The surgeon of the fleet is to be on board the hospital ship, if there be one in the squadron; if there be not, he is to be on board such ship, or at such place on shore, as the commander in chief shall direct. He is to visit the patients regularly, morning and evening, and oftener, when the nature and urgency of their complaints may render it necessary.

All persons attending the sick to be under his command.

2. All surgeons, surgeon's assistants, and other persons appointed to attend the sick, shall be under the orders of the surgeon of the fleet; and the arrangement of every thing relating to the part of the ship appropriated for the reception of the sick, shall be under his direction. He is to propose to the captain every thing which he may think likely to be of service to the sick, to increase their comforts, or to accelerate their cure— and as far as circumstances may admit, the captain is to comply with his proposals.

To send back men, sent to the hospital ship, who may be cured, on board their own ships.

3. If any men be sent to the hospital ship with such hurts or diseases as might be cured without danger or inconvenience in the ships they belonged to, he is to refuse to receive them, and to desire the officer who conducts them to take them back to their ship.

To visit frequently the ships of the squadron.

4. He is to visit the ships of the squadron frequently, and inquire into the health of the ship's companies, and the treatment of the sick; and where he finds them sickly he is to visit them as often as circumstances will admit, to discover, if possible, the cause of their sickness, and to advise such measures as may remove it.

--63--

5. He is, whenever he shall see occasion, to inquire into the practice of the surgeon of the ship he visits, and his manner of treating the diseases of the men under his care, and to give him such directions as ho may deem necessary.

To inquire into the practice of the surgeons—give directions.

6. He is, whenever he may think it necessary, to examine the instruments, medicines, and necessaries on board any ship; and if he finds them bad in quality, or deficient in quantity, he is to report the same to the commander in chief, that he may take such measures as circumstances may require.

To examine instruments, medicines, and necessaries for the sick.

7. He is, once every week, at least, if weather and other circumstances will admit, to report to the commander in chief the state of the sick in the hospital ship, and, as far as he shall have been able to obtain information, the general state of the sick in the fleet. He is to specify particularly in his reports, those ships which, from the unhealthiness of their crews, appear to be least fit for active service and most in want of refreshments, and he is to point out whatever he may think necessary for the recovery of the health of the crew of a ship particularly sickly, or for the preservation of the health of the fleet in general. He shall also report quarterly to the Navy Department. These reports to conform to form O.

To report weekly the state of the sick.

To specify what ships are least fit for active service, and most in want of refreshments, &c.

8. He is to consider the 2d article of the regulations relative to naval surgeons and their assistants, as applicable to him, and is to govern himself accordingly, observing the forms G, H, and I.

To consider the 2d article of the regulations relative to naval sur-

9. He shall keep a journal as per form P; a copy of which he shall, once a year, or oftener if required, transmit to the Secretary of the Navy.

geons as applicable to him. Shall keep a journal.

10. On discharging any person from hospital, he shall give him a certificate according to form R, upon the back of form Q, stating when he was received, when discharged, the amount received by him during the time he was in hospital, &c.

On discharging a man from hospital.

HOSPITAL SHIP.

1. The captain of an hospital ship is to be particularly attentive to see that the ship is kept perfectly clean, especially that part which is appropriated to the sick. He is to give strict orders that the buckets used by the sick be frequently emptied and washed, and that the dressings of wounds or sores be thrown overboard as soon as they are taken off.

The captain to see the ship kept clean.

2. He is to attend to all requisitions or proposals of the hospital surgeon, and, as far as circumstances may

To attend to the proposals

--64--

of the hospital surgeon. Sick always to have the best provisions on board.

admit, to do whatever he may recommend for the comfort and convenience of the sick. The best provisions on board must always be appropriated to the use of the sick.

To prevent wine or spirituous liquors being taken on board.

3. He is to be careful in preventing wine or spirituous liquors being carried on board without his express permission.

To keep the station assigned him.

4. He is to keep the station assigned him in the fleet, particularly when he his directed to attend to a ship, the crew of which is sickly and may frequently require the assistance of the hospital surgeon.

Attendants on the sick.

5. In addition to the complement of an hospital ship, there shall be borne, as attendants on the sick, on a list of supernumerary for wages and victuals, a surgeon, two, or, if necessary, three assistant surgeons, six landsmen as nurses, a baker, four washermen, a servant to the hospital surgeon, and a servant to the surgeon's mates.

Hospital surgeon to be furnished always with a suitable boat.

6. The captain of the hospital ship, or the captain of any other ship in which the hospital surgeon shall be embarked, is to furnish him with a proper boat, whenever he shall think it necessary to visit any ship of the fleet, or to carry his returns to the commander in chief.

PURSERS.

The purser being the officer appointed to receive and distribute the victualling stores and slops of the ship, having entered into bonds to the United States, as prescribed by law, is to abide by the following regulations and instructions; and he is not to expect that any irregularity in, or omission of, any part thereof, or of the forms referred to therein for keeping his accounts, will pass unnoticed.

Prompt settlement of his accounts enjoined.

Penalty for neglect.

1. Every purser attached to a vessel of war shall make, to the Secretary of the Navy, a statement of his accounts every three months, and settle his accounts at the Treasury every twelve months; nor shall he permit a longer time to elapse without offering his accounts for settlement, if the vessel to which he belongs be in the United States. And in the event of his failing to do so, his pay and emoluments shall cease from the time of the expiration of the twelve months, commencing at the time of his joining the vessel, or at the date of the last settlement.

Purser of a yard.

2. Every purser of a yard shall settle his accounts at the Treasury every twelve months; nor shall he permit a longer time to elapse without offering his accounts for settlement; and in the event of his so doing,

--65--

his pay and emoluments shall cease from the time of the expiration of the twelve months, commencing at the time of joining the station, or at the date of the last settlement.

5. No purser can be employed, or removed from one ship or station to another, until he shall have settled up his accounts for the ship or station to which he shall have last belonged, unless specially exempted from doing so by the Secretary of the Navy.

Not to be employed when his accounts remain unsettled.

4. Before a purser can receive orders to join a ship or station, or to be removed from one ship or station to another, he must produce a certificate from the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, or other satisfactory evidence, that he has settled up his accounts for the last ship or station to which he belonged, and that the balance against him does not exceed 1,000 dollars.

To entitle him to an order for service, he must produce a certificate of his having settled his accounts.

5. When a purser joins a ship or station, he shall see that it is provided with the necessary articles belonging to his department; take care that the provisions, victualling stores, and slops are of good quality, and demand a survey on those which may appear damaged or otherwise unfit for the service.

On joining a ship or station.

6. Tobacco will be purchased by the United States, and delivered and charged to the purser at cost and charges; and he will, on the settlement of his accounts, be allowed fifty percent, on the amount of all tobacco issued; which per centage is to be added to the cost and charges on the article when issued to the crew.

Tobacco to be furnished by the public. 50 per cent, allowed for issuing it.

7. On fitting out, there shall be furnished of tobacco a supply equal to the time for which the ship may be victualled, and there will be allowed for each man on board at the rate per annum, of twenty-four pounds of tobacco.

Annual allowance of tobacco.

8. When tobacco shall be received from the navy stores, and there shall be a difficulty in ascertaining precisely the first cost and the charges to which it shall have been subjected, it shall be charged to the men at the current retail price per pound, avoirdupois, which is to be certified by the commanding officer present, and the agent.

Tobacco when received from navy stores.

9. Every purser, on closing his accounts, shall take care to have the quantities of tobacco remaining, inserted in the surveys, in like manner with other victualling stores. He is also to prepare and deliver in to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, accounts of the issues corresponding with the different victuallings of the ship, accompanied by certificates of the captain, of the quantities issued and remaining.

Certain documents to be produced on the settlement of his accounts.

--66--

To be charged with tobacco and deficiencies.

10. The purser is to be charged with the tobacco with which he shall be supplied, according to the actual weight at the time he received it, and he will be charged with all deficiencies at the rate at which it may be delivered to the men. If, however, it shall be made appear, that from any extraordinary circumstances, an unavoidable diminution of weight should have taken place, a reasonable allowance will be made on the settlement of his accounts.

Slops to be charged to the purser.

11. All slop clothing will be charged to the purser at the cost and charges, and he is to be held accountable for the expenditure.

When and how he may be credited for loss.

12. In no case will the purser be credited even for any alleged loss by damage in slops, unless he shows, by regular surveys, signed by three officers, one at least to be commissioned, that the loss has been unavoidably sustained by damage, and not by any neglect or inattention on his part.

His profit on slops.

Required to exhibit slop account.

13. And as a compensation for the risk and responsibility, the purser shall be authorized to dispose of the slops to the crew at a profit of 10 per cent, but he must, at the end of every cruise, render a regular slop account, showing, by appropriate columns, the quantity of each kind of article received or purchased, and the prices and amount, and from whom, when, and were; and he shall show the quantity disposed of, and to whom, and at what prices; so that his slop account may show the articles, prices, and amounts received and disposed of.

No excess of slops to be issued.

14. In issues of slop clothing, the purser shall, in no instance, exceed the quantity per man annually, as stated in the following table, unless he shall be particularly instructed to do so, by the captain or commander, in which case, he is to obtain his written order, explaining the necessity of departing from this rule.

Table, showing the quantity and kind of slops allowed to be issued for the first year, per man; for the second year, two-thirds of the amount of the list prescribed for the first year's issue to be furnished in such articles of slops as the commander, may direct. All articles of wearing apparel, or materials of which wearing apparel is made, to be charged as slops; nor shall any deviation from the articles enumerated in the list, be issued to the crew, except on extraordinary occasions, and then only by written permission from the Secretary of the Navy, or by the commander when serving on a foreign station, which document shall be presented before the accounts of the purser shall be passed:

--67--

1 pea jacket, to serve 2 years.

2 blue cloth jackets.

2 do. trousers.

2 white flannel shirts.

2 do. drawers.

2 pair of yarn stockings.

2 black handkerchiefs.

2 duck frocks.

2 do. trousers.

1 do. banyans.

4 pair of shoes.

1 mattress.

2 blankets.

1 hammock.

1 red cloth vest.

2 hats.

15. When, on foreign stations, there shall be a necessity to purchase slops, they are to be procured agreeably to the established uniform of the navy, which, in winter, shall consist of blue jacket and trousers, and red vest, yellow buttons, and black hat. In summer, the dress shall be white duck jackets, trousers, and vests; and on the home station, they will be supplied from the navy stores on requisition, in the same manner as other stores are supplied.

Uniform of the navy.

How supplied at home.

16. The purser will be allowed to sell to the crew, under regulations and restrictions, the articles specified in the subjoined list, viz:

What the purser may sell to the crew.

Soap.

Tin pots.

Spoons.

Bottles of mustard.

Pepper.

Knives.

Combs.

Brushes.

Riband.

Needles.

Thread.

17. They shall not be allowed to issue more per man, annually, than the quantity and number specified in the following table, nor shall there be charged on them a profit exceeding twenty-five per cent, on the first cost and charges:

Quantity to be issued and percentage allowed.

--68--

25 lbs. of soap.

3 tin pots.

3 spoons.

2 bottles mustard.

1/2 lb. pepper.

4 knives.

4 combs.

3 brushes.

3 yards riband.

Needles and thread in reasonable quantities.

Certificate of the cost, &c of these articles to be produced.

In the event of any fraud or imposition.

On the settlement of his accounts at the Treasury, he must produce the certificate of the cost and charges of the articles abovementioned, approved by the commander; and unless that document is produced, and the most satisfactory evidence given of the charges against the men for these articles, he is not to receive any per centage on the issues of slops and tobacco: and in the event of any fraud or imposition being practised against any of the men, it shall be the duty of the commander to bring him to trial for the same, without any unavoidable delay.

Destitute men may be supplied with slops.

18. Seamen, destitute of necessaries, may be supplied with slops by an order from the captain, after the vessel has commenced her voyage.

No second supply till after 2 months' service.

19. None are to receive a second supply until they shall have served full two months, and then not exceeding in amount half their pay.

Slops, how to be issued and when.

20. Slops are to be issued out publicly, and in the presence of an officer who is to be appointed by the captain to see the articles delivered to the seamen and others, and the receipts given for the same, which he is also to certify. The captain is not to suffer any one to be supplied with slops, except when absolutely necessary, and he is to oblige those who may be ragged and in want of apparel or bedding, to receive such of these articles as they shall stand in need of.

Loan of slops from one vessel to another.

21. Whenever it shall be found necessary to lend slops from one United States' vessel to another, an order shall previously be obtained from the commanding officer, a duplicate of which, and the receipt of the purser who receives them, stating the quantity and price of very particular kind, must be forwarded to the Board of Navy Commissioners by the first safe opportunity, and the original order preserved by the purser to be produced at the settlement of his accounts, without which he will not be allowed credit for such loan.

Effects of persons dying on

22. When any one dies on board, his clothes and other effects may be sold at auction, and the amount,

--69--

after being charged to the buyer, shall be carried to the credit of the deceased for the benefit of his legal representatives.

board, how to be disposed of.

23 The purser shall be allowed a commission of five per cent to be deducted from the amount of the sale of dead men's clothes.

Purser allowance 5 per cent on sale of such clothes and effects.

24. Seamen are not to be allowed to bid for deceased officers' clothes that are above their wear, nor suffered to bid for any effects beyond their real value, nor to purchase more than the wages due them can answer for.

Seamen not to be allowed to bid for officers' clothes. &c.

25. No purser shall pay over any balance of wages to an administrator, or executor, without first obtaining an order from the Secretary of the Navy.

Balances of wages not to be paid to an administrator or executor, without a special order.

26. No purser shall draw moneys at any time or place, without the approval and signature of his commanding officer.

To draw no moneys without approval of his commanding officer.

27. At the end of the cruise, and before the payment of the ship, the purser shall return into store such of the slops and bedding as remain unissued, and forthwith render a just account of all slops and bedding that have from time to time been committed to his charge. He shall not be allowed credit for slop clothes or bedding returned as unserviceable, unless he produce condemnation of them by survey, together with an affidavit, that the whole of the said returns are the same as received from the United States' navy stores or ships, or on account of the United States; and that there was no neglect on his part, in not having timely issued those which may appear condemned as unserviceable; nor shall he be allowed credit for any unserviceable slops or beds thrown overboard, but he shall cause them to be carefully packed up and preserved, that they may be returned into store; and he is not to receive his wages, nor commissions on tobacco, without a certificate from the storekeeper of slops, that he has delivered into the slop store the said condemned slops and beds.

His duty at the end of the voyage. How he may be credited for unserviceable slops.

No slops to be thrown overboard.

His wages and commissions withheld in certain cases.

28. There shall be allowed every person serving on board the vessels of war of the United States, a daily proportion of provisions, as specified in the following table:

--70--

 

Days of the week.

lbs.

ozs.

Pounds of

Ounces of

Half pints of

Suet.

|Cheese.

Beef.

Pork.

Flour.

Bread.

Butter.

Sugar.

Tea.

Peas.

Rice

Molasses.

Vinegar.

Spirits.

Sunday

1-4

-

1 1-4

-

1-2

14

-

1

4 oz. per week.

-

-

-

-

1

Monday

-

-

-

1

-

14

-

1

1

-

-

-

1

Tuesday

-

2

1

-

14

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

Wednesday

-

-

-

1

-

14

-

1

-

1

-

-

1

Thursday

1 1-4

-

1 1-4

-

14

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

Friday

-

4

-

-

-

14

2

1

-

1

1

-

1

Saturday

-

-

1

14

-

1

1

-

-

1

1

1-2

6

3 1-2

3

1

98

2

7

4

2

2

1

1

7

Suet

1-2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

at 12 1-2 cents

6 1-4

Cheese

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

at 16 cents

6

Beef

-

-

3 1-2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

at 8 1-2 cents

29 3-4

Pork

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

at 9 1-2 cents

28 1-2

Flour

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

at 4 cents

4

Bread

-

-

-

-

-

93

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

at 5 cents per lb.

30 1-2

Batter

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

at 24 cents

3

Sugar

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

at 1 cent

7

Tea

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

at 3 cents

12

Peas

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

at 1 1-2 cents

3

Rice

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

at 2 1-2 cents

5

Molasses

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

at 3 cents

3

Vinegar

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

at 2 cents

2

Spirits

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

at 5 cents

35

$1

75

 

Purser to examine all provisions.

29. The purser being held accountable for the expenditure, he shall, as far as may be practicable, examine and inspect all provisions offered to the vessel, and none shall be received that are objected to by him, unless they are examined and approved by at least two commission officers of the vessel.

To be charged with all losses exceeding 7 1-2 per cent.

30. If, upon a settlement of the purser's provision account, there shall appear a loss or deficiency of more than seven aud a half per cent, upon the amount of pro-

--71--

visions received, he will be charged with, and held accountable for, such loss or deficiency, exceeding the seven and a half per cent, unless he shows, by regular surveys, that the loss has been unavoidably sustained by damage or otherwise.

31. In all cases where it may appear to the purser that provisions are damaged or spoiling, it will be his duty to apply to the commanding officer, who will direct a survey by three officers, one of whom at least to be a commission officer.

His duty when he thinks provisions damage or spoiling.

32. Captains or commanders may shorten the daily allowance of provisions when necessity shall require it, taking due care that each man has credit for his deficiency, that he may be paid for the same.

Captain may shorten daily allowance.

33. No officer is to draw whole allowance while the ship's company shall be on short allowance.

Restriction upon officers when crew is on short allowance.

54. Beef, for the use of the navy, is to be cut into ten pound pieces: pork into eight pound pieces; and every cask must have its contents marked on the head, and the person's name by whom it was furnished agreeably to article 42.

Navy beef and pork, how to be cut. Cask's contents, &c. to be marked on their heads.

35. If there be a want of pork, the captain may order beef to be issued in the proportion established.

Beef may be issued in lieu of pork.

36. If any provisions slip out of the slings, or are damaged through carelessness, the value of them is to be charged against the wages of the offender.

Provisions damaged .through carelessness, to be charged to the delinquent.

37. When in port, if it can be done conveniently, at a reasonable rate, the crew shall be supplied two days in each week with fresh meat, one day in lieu of salt beef, and the other in lieu of salt pork; and it is to be observed that one pound and a half of fresh meat is considered equal to one pound of salt beef, or three quarters of a pound of salt port: and the amount of the vegetables, greens, and thickening for the soup, is to be equal to the amount of the articles which may, on the day of issue, be stopped in consequence of the serving out of fresh meat.

Fresh meat, when and how issued.

38. As all are to be equal in point of victualling, no officer or other person is, on any account, to select provisions for his own use, either on shore, in store, or on board ship. Nor are they to be paid in kind for any savings of provisions, or to draw more of any one article than is allowed by the established ration. The ship's provisions are calculated and intended for daily subsistence, and must be issued agreeably to this intention.

No officer shall select provisions for himself, nor be paid for any savings.

39. Provisions and stores purchased by agents are to be surveyed when received on board, and if it should appear by the report of the surveying officers, that they

Provisions and stores to be surveyed and

--72--

returned, if unfit.

Not to be admitted in the agent's accounts.

are unfit for the public service, they are to be returned to the agent; and, on settlement, the captain is to refuse to admit them into the agent's account against the ship, and is to transmit to the Board of Navy Commissioners a duplicate of the report of survey, with such remarks as the case may make necessary.

Provisions unfit for service, if in the U. S. to be returned into store or to the agent, to fee sold; if in a foreign port, how to be disposed of; if at sea, how to be disposed of.

Copy of the survey to be preserved.

40. Provisions and stores unfit for service are, after survey, if in a port of the United States, to be returned into the navy stores, or to the navy agent, to be disposed of at public sale, to the best advantage; if in a foreign port, they are, by order of the commander or captain, to be sold by the purser, or such other person as the commander or captain may appoint; and if at sea, or in a situation where they cannot be otherwise disposed of, they are to be thrown overboard. But in either case, the purser or officer having charge of the stores is to preserve a copy of the survey, with a certificate of the manner in which the articles were disposed of; otherwise such purser or other person will not be allowed credit for the amount thereof.

Provisions and stores to be often examined.

41. Provisions and stores, especially on foreign voyages, are to be often examined by order of the captain, and every necessary measure adopted for their preservation.

Casks and packages to be marked and numbered.

42. Every cask and packages of provisions, wet, or dry, bread excepted, sent on board the United States' ships of war, is to have the contents thereof, as to quantity and kind, distinctly marked on it, together with a number, and the time when, place where, and by whom, purchased or furnished. The casks are to be marked on the head, and the packages on some proper or conspicuous part of them.

Spirit casks to be gauged, &c.

43. The casks for spirits are to be stowed in the spirit room; to be surveyed by a sworn gauger, and the quantity they will contain, in gallons, (wine measure,) is to be marked plainly on each, near the bung. Casks in which liquor of any kind is brought on board, are also in like manner to be gauged, and the contents marked on them.

Duty of the commander on receiving fresh provisions.

44. In all cases where fresh meet is received on board, the commander is to see that it is good and wholesome; that it is fairly and equally distributed among the officers and crew, that no particular pieces are reserved for the officers or others, that a lieutenant, master's mate, or midshipman, attend the distribution in some public and convenient part of the ship, where it shall be pricked for in the customary manner.

--73--

FULL AND HALF PAY AND RATIONS.

1. The full pay and full rations of all commission and warrant officers shall commence from the date of their acknowledgment of the receipt of their orders for service, unless there should appear to have been unnecessary delay in their executing said orders, in which case the Secretary of the Navy will direct their pay to commence at the time of their joining the command, ship, or station to which they may have been ordered.

Full pay and full rations, when to commence.

2. The full pay and full rations of all commission and warrant officers shall cease, when they shall be notified by the Secretary of the Navy, that their active services are no longer required.

Full pay and full rations, when to cease.

3. Officers thrown out of active employment by order of the Secretary of the Navy shall be entitled to only half their pay and half their rations.

When only entitled to half pay and half rations.

4. The resignation of a half pay officer when called into active service, will be considered a disobedience of orders.

Resignation of a half pay officer, when considered disobedience of orders.

5. A lieutenant succeeding to the command of a ship, by the death of the captain, and any officer, properly qualified, who shall be appointed on any foreign station by the senior officer present to act in a station vacated by the death of the officer who held it, shall receive the pay allotted to that station, until another officer shall supersede him.

In certain cases officers to receive the pay of superior stations.

6. The pay of an officer who quits the ship he belonged to on any foreign station, whatever may be his reasons, shall cease from the time he quits her, unless the Secretary of the Navy shall be satisfied that his removal was absolutely necessary for the recovery of his health.

Pay to cease on quitting a ship on foreign stations.

7. The half pay of officers who leave the United States on furlough for more than twelve months shall cease after that period; nor shall they again be entitled to it but by order of the Secretary of the Navy; and no officer, whatever may be his reasons, will be considered as belonging to the service, unless he report himself to the Secretary of the Navy once a year, if practicable for him to do so.

Half pay of officers on furlough out of the U. S. to cease after 12 months.

Officers considered out of service unless they report themselves once a year

MARINES SERVING ON BOARD THE SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES.

1. The marine detachments appointed to serve on board the ships of the United States, are to be entered upon their books, as part of the complement for victuals; and with regard to provisions and short allowance mo-

To be entered upon the books of the ship.

--74--

ney, they are to be, in all respects, upon the same footing with the seamen.

When marines are wanted, how to proceed.

2. When marines are wanted on board any ship or vessel, the commanding sea officer at the port where such ship or vessel shall be, is to give as early notice as possible of the number wanted, to the commanding marine officer on shore.

Officers to reside on board.

3. The commission and noncommission officers are to go on board with the men, and reside there constantly with them at their duty.

Marine officers to obey the orders of the captain. To be treated with respect. To possess their cabins.

4. All marine officers are to obey the orders of the captain or commanding officer of the ship, and also of the commanding officer of the watch. The marine officers are, upon all occasions, to be treated, as well by the captain of the ship as by all other officers and people belonging to her, with the respect, decency, and regard due to the commissions they bear. They are to possess the cabins or births erected for them.

Marines to be frequently exercised. To be employed as sentinels.

Not to be compelled to go aloft. Not to be ill treated or struck.

5. The marines are to be exercised by the marine officers in the use of their arms, as often as possible, that they may become expert in the use thereof. They are to be employed as sentinels, and upon all other duties and service on board the ship which they may be capable of, and therein to be subject to the directions of the officers of the ship; but they are not to be obliged to go aloft, or to be punished for not showing an inclination to do so. And the captain or commanding officer of the ship is strictly charged not to suffer them to be ill treated, nor a sergeant or corporal to be struck on any account, by any of the officers, petty officers, or seamen.

Not to be discharged or entered as seamen.

6. No marine, serving on board any of the United States' vessels of war, is to be discharged as such, and entered as a seaman, without special authority from the Secretary of the Navy.

When sent on duty, not to be discharged from the books of the ship.

7. When any marines shall be sent upon duty, either on board of any other ship or on shore, they are. not to be discharged from the books of the ship from which they shall be sent, while such ship shall remain in port, and not have the established number completed with other marines.

Officer to have charge of the arm chests.

In cases of loss or damage, who chargeable.

8. The commanding marine officer is to have in his possession, the chests prepared for the arms and the cartridges for the use of the marines. The arms and drums are to be under his charge, and he is to be accountable for any loss or damage that may happen for want of sufficient care in him; but if any such loss or damage happen by the default of any other person, the marine officer is immediately to acquaint the captain of the ship therewith, who is to cause the value thereof, to

--75--

be forthwith noted against the defaulter's name in order to its being deducted from his pay or wages.

9. The marine arms are to be kept clean and in good condition by the marines themselves, so far as they can do the same; but if necessary, the marine officers may apply to the captain for the assistance of one or more armorer's mates, to repair the arms; and the captain, in such case, will order such assistance to be afforded.

Arms to be kept clean.

Armorer's mates may assist in repairing arms.

10. When marines are sent on board of any of the United States' ships, in order to serve at sea, the captain of the ship is to cause the purser to supply them, upon their coming on board, with a suit of bedding, if necessary, and from time to time, with such further bedding and slop clothes, &c. as the commanding marine officer may represent them to be in want of; for all which, the officer, charged with paying the marines, shall settle with the purser of the ship, charging the amount thereof to the accounts of the marines to whom such bedding and slops have been so issued.

On joining ship, to be provided with bedding, &c.

How account is to be settled.

11. The commanding marine officer on board must examine, once a week, at least, into the state of the clothing and slops belonging to each marine, and if he finds any loss or abuse, must inquire how it happened, and he is to inform the captain of the ship of the circumstances, who will apply such corrective as may be necessary to prevent the recurrence of such losses or abuses.

Marine officer to examine the clothing, &c. weekly.

12. When any marine, belonging to the ship, dies, his clothing and effects (except his uniform marine clothing) are to be sold at the mast by auction, and the produce charged against the names of the buyers; and the marine officer will, by the first opportunity, transmit to the paymaster of the marine corps, an inventory of the effects so sold, and an account of the money or amount for which they sold, signed by the captain and purser of the ship, in order that such amount may be paid over to the legal representatives of the deceased.

In cases of death, how effects are to be disposed of.

13. A store room, on board of each ship, to be in the possession of the marine officer, is to be appropriated exclusively for the spare clothing, accoutrements, and all other necessaries for the use of the marines.

Store room to be provided.

14. Marines, sick or wounded, are to be taken the same care of by the surgeon of the ship that the seamen are; and when it shall be necessary to send them out of the ship for cure, they are to be sent on shore to the hospital, or sick quarters, and are to be in all respects under the same regulations that are established for the seamen; sick tickets are to be sent with them, similar

Marines sent to hospitals.

To be under the same regulations as seamen.

--76--

Their bedding, clothes, &c. to be sent with them.

To be bound and labelled.

In cases of discharge, death, and desertion, how clothes to be disposed of.

to those to be sent with the seamen. The captain of the ship, and the commanding marine officer on board, are to see that their bedding, clothes, and necessaries, are sent along with them, and the particulars of which are to be noted at the foot of the sick tickets. The commanding marine officer will see that each man's things be securely bound together and labelled. The proper officer at the hospital or sick quarters, and the marine officer attending hospital duty, (where there shall be any,) are to take care that the same be safely deposited and preserved till the marines are either discharged, run, or die. If discharged, they are to be delivered to their respective owners, and in the cases ol desertion and death, they are to be disposed of as provided in the case of dead men's clothes on board of ship.

To be continued on the ship's books.

15. Marines sent sick on shore are to be continued upon the books of the ship, from which they shall be sent, unless the proportion of marines allowed the ship be completed during his sickness; and in the latter case, they are, when recovered, to be turned over to some other ship wanting marines, or to be sent to the nearest marine station. So soon as the number allowed the ship be completed, all marines sent sick on shore, are to be discharged from, the ship's books, as the ship must never be charged with more than the complement of marines allowed her.

Marines re-turned on ship board from an hospital. To be charged with any clothing received at the hospital.

16. When a marine is returned on ship board from an hospital or sick quarters, the captain of the ship is to take care that there be charged against his name the value of any clothing he may have been supplied with at the hospital, which the hospital surgeon is to set off upon the ticket of discharge from the hospital.

How their subsistence must be charged.

17. The rations issued to the marines must be charged by the purser to the subsistence of the marine corps, in order that the subsistence of the navy may have credit therefor, in the settlement of his accounts.

They are to be paid by the purser of the ship.

18. Marines are to be paid by the purser of the ship, while they are on board of ship, and charged the same as the ship's crew. Pay rolls, signed by the purser, and countersigned by the marine officer, are to be regularly transmitted to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR WARRANT OFFICERS.

To examine the store rooms and inform of defects.

1. The warrant officers of the United States' vessels of war, when in ordinary, are to examine, frequently, the condition of the store rooms apointed to receive their respective stores, and are to inform the master

--77--

shipwright of the yard, of any defects in them which may require to be repaired, that they may be fit to receive the stores whenever the ship shall be put in commission; and when any ship is commissioned, the warrant officers are to use their utmost endeavors to get their stores on board as expeditiously as the other duties, necessary to the equipment of a ship, will permit.

To use all diligence in getting their stores on board.

2. When they receive stores on board, whether at the fitting out of the ship, or on any subsequent supply, they are to be very particular in ascertaining that they are of good quality, and that they receive the full quantity specified in the note or memorandum sent with them; and they are immediately to report to the captain any defect or deficiency which they may discover in them.

To see that the stores are of good quality

Report defects or deficiencies.

3. They are to keep an account, according to the forms delivered to them, of the receipt, expenditure, (expressed in words and not in figures,) condemnation by survey, or supplying of stores; always specifying the place, and the person from whom the stores are received, or the person to whom they are supplied.

Keep accounts of stores.

4. No waste of stores, not perishable, will ever be allowed, except from unavoidable accidents, which are to be particularly, mentioned in the log-book, wherein the quantity of every article is to be specified. Two of the principal officers present at such accident are to certify that it did happen; and if the quantity of stores lost be considerable, the quantity remaining is to be ascertained by survey.

No waste to be allowed.

5. If stores of any description be lost or damaged through neglect, or by the misconduct of any officer, of other person, the officer having the charge of such stores is to report such misconduct or neglect to the captain, that the value of the stores may be charged against the wages of the delinquent.

Stores lost or damaged through neglect or misconduct.

6. Every officer shall be responsible for the conduct of his yeoman. He is most carefully to avoid the setting down of any stores as expended, which have not been used, or the stating them as having been expended for any other purposes than those to which they wen actually applied.

Responsible for yeoman's conduct. Expenditure of stores.

7. Every officer shall be responsible for any errors he may make in his accounts, and he shall pay out of his wages the full value of all stores not properly accounted for, or improperly expended, unless he shall produce an order from his captain to expend them in a manner contrary to the regulations contained in these instructions, and the established practice of the service

Accountable for errors.

--78--

Yeomen not to take stores without express orders. To examine stores frequently.

8. Officers are not to suffer the yeomen to take stores from the store rooms without their express order. They are frequently to examine the quantity remaining, and if they have doubts of its being as great as it ought to be, they are to apply for a survey thereon.

To charge themselves with stores supplied by other officers.

9. When they are supplied with stores, by other officers, whether of the same ship or any other, they are to charge themselves with such stores, and are to mention their having done so in the receipt they give for them.

One officer not to supply another without the captain's order.

10. One officer shall not supply another with stores, nor lend any, without an order, in writing, from the captain, and when he does supply or lend them, he is to demand a receipt, in which the quntity of every article is to be written in words at length, in which is to be mentioned by whose order they were supplied; and he is also to give under his hand, to the officer supplied, a voucher of delivery, specifying the stores as particularly as in the receipt.

To conform to established dimensions.

11. Officers when appropriating rope, canvass, or any other article to use, are to be very attentive to conform to the established length and other dimensions of whatever it may be intended to make.

Conversion of stores.

12. When they convert stores to any other use than those for which they were originally intended, they are to enter them in their accounts, as having been so converted, and are to charge themselves with whatever they convert them into.

Masts, sails, &c. lost or blown away.

13. When masts, sails, colors, or other stores are blown away or lost, they are to be very particular in the quality they expend in that manner, as they will probably be required to make oath to the truth of that part of their accounts.

Stores damaged or worn out, to be surveyed.

14. When stores are damaged or worn out, the officer who has charge of them, is to apply to the captain to have them surveyed, and after they are surveyed, he is to be careful to apply them to whatever use the surveying officers shall appoint, charging himself with those articles into which he may be directed to convert them.

Store rooms to be kept clean, &c.

15. They are to visit their store rooms very frequently, to see that they are kept clean, that they are well aired, and that the stores are so arranged as to admit of their being easily got at when wanted.

No lights, but in lanterns, to be carried to the store rooms.

16. They are never to carry, nor to suffer others to carry, lights in their store rooms, except in good lanterns, the doors of which are never to be opened in the store rooms.

No liquors in the magazine.

17. They are strictly charged not to put into the magazine, the wings, or any of the store rooms, any

--79--

wine or spirituous, liquors, nor to keep any quantity in their cabins, except such as the captain shall expressly permit.

and other places.

18. When the ship is to be dismantled, either for the purpose of being refitted or paid off, they are to be particularly careful in preventing their stores, rigging, &c. from being cut, or in any other way damaged. They are to see that all the stores they send from the ship are tallied, and very carefully put into the boats or vessels which are to carry them, and to take every possible precaution to prevent their receiving damage on their way to the store houses.

Their particular duties upon dismantling the ship.

19. When a warrant officer is about to be removed from a ship, or when he wishes to puss his accounts, which he will be allowed to do at the expiration of every twelve calendar months, he is to Apply to the captain for a survey on his stores, who will obtain from his commanding officer an order for that purpose; or, if he should have no immediate commanding officer, will himself order the survey, that the quantity of stores remaining on board may be correctly ascertained.

On removal to another ship, or for passing his accounts, to apply for a survey of his stores.

20. When a warrant officer dies, the captain is immediately to apply to the commanding officer present, to order, or, if the ship be alone, he is himself to order, a survey of the stores remaining on board; one copy of the report of such survey is to be scaled up with the papers of such deceased officer, and another copy is to be delivered to his successor to be considered as his first charge.

Duty of the captain on the death of a warrant officer.

81. As all warrant officers may at times he called to survey stores, they are strictly charged to perform that duty with the utmost attention, and to make all their reports with the strictest truth and impartiality, so that when called on, they may be able, conscientiously, to make oath to the correctness of the report they may have made.

Warrant officers enjoined to be very careful on surveys.

22. When ordered to survey stores represented as being unfit for service, they are to examine every part of them very carefully, and if they find them unfit for the service for which they were originally intended, they are to point out in their report any other service to which they may be appropriated.

In cases of surveys on stores represented as unfit for service.

23. When ordered to survey stores for the purpose of ascertaining their quantity; whether to enable the officer in whose charge they are placed, to pass his accounts, or to transfer them from one officer to another they are not to take any account of them from the officer who has charge of them, but, as far as it shall be possible for them to do so, they are themselves to ascertain their real quantity.

In cases of surveys to ascertain quantity of stores.

--80--

THE GUNNER.

His general duty.

1. The gunner having received directions for that purpose, from the captain, is to inform the officer having charge Of ordnance, when the ship will be ready to receive, her guns. He is to attend to receive them on board, and to see that every gun is put into its proper carriage, and placed in its proper port. No. 1, being the foremast gun, on the larboard side, and No. 2, the foremost gun, on the starboard side, on each deck.

To employ his crew in fitting breechings, &c.

2. He is, whenever duties will admit, to employ his mates and the men of his crew, in fitting the breeching, and tackle that they may be ready for the guns when received on board.

To examine the magazine.

3. He is to examine very carefully into the state of the magazine, that he may be certain of its being properly fitted and perfectly dry, before the powder is carried on board; but if he should find any appearance of dampness, he is to report it to the captain, that it may be properly dried.

On receiving powder on board.

4. He is to inform the captain when the powder will be ready to be sent on board, that the fire in the galley may be put out, before the vessel which carries it is suffered to come along side. While the powder is taking into the ship, no candles are to be kept lighted, except those in the light room; nor is any man to be allowed to smoke tobacco. As soon as the whole is stored in the magazine, the gunner is to see the doors, the light room, and the scuttle, carefully secured: and is to deliver the keys to the captain, or such other officer as he shall appoint to take care of them.

Never to go into the magazine without orders.

No person will himself to open the doors, &c.

5. He is never to go into the magazine without being ordered. He is never to allow the doors of the ma-zinc to be opened by any but himself. He is not to open them until the proper officer is in the light room; and he is to be very careful in observing that the men who go into the magazine have not about them any thing which can strike fire.

To keep powder no where but in the magazine.

Exception.

6. He is never to keep any quantity of powder in any other part of the ship than the magazine, except that which the captain shall order to be kept in the powder boxes, or powder horns, on deck; and when he delivers cartridges from the magazine, he is to be very particular that they are in cases properly shut. And whenever it may be necessary to remove powder from the ship, he is to use the utmost caution, that all the passages to the magazine may be wetted, so as to prevent accidents.

--81--

7. He is to turn the barrels of powder once at least in every three months, to prevent the separation of the nitre from the other ingredients of the powder. He is also to examine frequently, the barrels, and if he should find any of them defective, he is to remove the powder into some of the barrels which have been emptied. He is frequently to examine the cartridges which are filled, that he may remove the powder from any of them which he may find defective.

To turn the barrels once in three months. To remove powder out of defective barrels and cartridges.

8. When powder of various qualities shall be sent on board, he is to be very attentive in using them in the order which shall be prescribed.

Powder of different kinds.

9. When any extra quantities of stores or ammunition is supplied for foreign service, he is to be careful to use those first which have been the longest time on board, unless he shall receive particular directions to the contrary.

Oldest stores to be used first.

10. He is frequently to examine into the state of the guns, their locks and carriages, that they may be immediately repaired or exchanged, if found defective, and he is frequently to examine the musketry, and all the other small arms, to see that they are kept clean and in every respect fit for service.

To examine frequently the guns, musketry, small arms, &c.

11. He is to be attentive in keeping the shot racks full of shot, the powder horns, and boxes of priming tubs full, and a sufficient quantity of match primed, and ready for being lighted at the shortest notice.

To keep the shot racks, powder horns, &c. full.

12. Guns received from the ordnance stores shall be scaled before they are loaded for service, and if it shall be necessary to scale them at any other time, the gunner shall represent to the captain, who is to give an order for that purpose, in which the cause of its being done is to be particularly specified.

New guns to be scaled.

13. When a ship is preparing for battle, he is to be particularly attentive to see that all the quarters are supplied with every thing necessary for the service of the guns, the boarders, firemen, &c. He is to see all the screens thoroughly, wetted, and hung round the hatchways, and from them to the magazine, before he opens the magazine doors.

His duty on preparing for battle.

14. He is, during an action, to take all opportunities of filling powder, that there may be no cessation of firing for want of ammunition; and he is to be attentive to send out cartridges with the quantity of powder reduced or increased as the captain shall have directed.

His duty in action.

15. After an engagement, he is to apply to the captain for a survey on the powder, shot, and other stores,

After an action.

--82--

remaining under his charge, that the quantity expended in the engagement may be ascertained.

Hand grenades and grape shot, to be kept in dry places, &c.

16. He is to be careful in keeping the boxes of hand grenades, and grape shot in dry places, and to expose frequently the grape shot to the sun and wind, to prevent the bags from being mill-dewed. He is never to start the hand grenades, but is to return those which are not used in the boxes in which he received them.

No match to be burnt in the day, nor more that two lengths at the same time at night.

17. He is never to allow any match to be burnt in the day, nor more than two lengths at the same time in the night, without an order from the captain. When match is burning, it is always to hang over water in tubs, and the gunner's mate of the watch is to attend it.

In cases of arms sent with detachments from the ship.

18. If a detachment of seamen or marines, shall, at any time, be sent from the ship, the gunner is to make out an inventory of the arms, ammunition, and stores, which are sent with it, which is to be signed by the officer appointed to command the detachment, and to be witnessed by the captain's clerk, who is to examine the quantity supplied, and on the return of the detachment, the gunner, in presence of the officer who commanded it, and the captain's clerk, is to examine the arms, &c. which are brought back, and to report the deficiency, if any, in each article to the captain, who, from the manner in which the officer shall account for such deficiency, will determine whether it be proper to allow the articles to be expended by the gunner in his accounts, or charged against the pay of the officer or any person under him. by whose carelessness or misconduct, the whole, or any part of them was lost or destroyed.

When a salute is fired.

19. When a salute is to be fired, the gunner is to be very attentive to take such precautious in drawing the guns as may ensure there not being a shot in any of them, and if vessels of any description be so near as to risk their being damaged by the wads, he is to draw them also, and he is to lay up and point the guns so as to prevent their doing any mischief, although a wad or shot, notwithstanding the precautious taken, may have been left in one of them.

To prevent any ball among blank cartridges.

20. He is to take every possible precaution to prevent any ball cartridges being given to the men, among the blank cartridges issued for exercise.

On striking guns into the hold.

21. Whenever he shall be directed to strike any guns into the hold, he is to pay them all over with a thick coat of warm tar and tallow mixed together, ami having washed the bore of the gun with fresh water and very carefully sponged and dried the inside, he is to put a good, full wad, dipped in the same mixture, about a foot within the muzzle, and to see that the tompion is

--83--

well driven in and surrounded with putty, and he is to drive a wooden stopper tight into the vent, and secure it there.

22. He is to be extremely attentive in examining all the guns, in seeing them carefully drawn and thoroughly sponged before they are returned into store. He is also to examine very carefully, the magazine, to see that no loose powder remains in any part of it, after the powder has been returned into store; he is also to be careful that there are no cartridges left in the cartouch boxes, when they are sent on shore.

On returning guns and powder into store.

23. He is to be very attentive to the conduct of the armorer and his mates, to see that they discharge their duty properly; that they keep the muskets and other small arms clean and in good order; always repairing them when they are defective; and not suffering them through neglect to become too bad to be repaired.

To be attentive to the conduct of the armorer and his mates, and see that they do their duty.

24. If, from any extraordinary circumstances, when a ship is on a foreign station, the small arms should be so damaged that they cannot be cleaned or repaired by the armorer, the gunner is to represent their condition to the captain, who is to direct a lieutenant and the master to survey, them, and if the report shall confirm the representation of the gunner, he is to apply to the commander in chief to give orders for their being repaired; but if the commander in chief be not present, the captain is himself to get them repaired by workmen on shore, being very careful not to pay more for their repairs than the established price of the country. The gunner is to attend frequently, and the armorer constantly, to see that the work is properly done.

Small arms that cannot be repaired by the armorer,

to be repaired on shore.

Gunner and armorer to attend while they shall be repairing.

25. As the brass sheaves and iron pins of blocks, for gun tackles, from being much exposed to salt water, are frequently set fast with rust, he is to be particularly attentive, when this is the case, to cause the iron pins to be knocked out, and to be oiled or greased.

Iron pins of blocks of gun-tackles to be oiled.

SURVEYS.

1. All applications for surveys shall be made in writing, to the captain, by the officer who has charge of the provisions or stores to be surveyed, and shall be transmitted by the captain to the flag officer commanding the division of the fleet or squadron to which he belongs, who is to order the surveys applied for to be taken, except in cases which the commander in chief shall reserve for his particular directions. But captains, not serving in a fleet or squadron, or, if serving in a fleet or squadron, not being at that time in com-

How to be applied for and obtained.

--84--

pany with the flag officer commanding the fleet or squadron, or division to which they belong, are to transmit such applications to the senior officer present.

What officers are to be employed on surveys.

The master of the ship and officer having charge of the stores to be present.

2. The officers employed on surveys are to be, one master and two officers of the class of him whose stores are to be surveyed. They are all, if possible, to belong to other ships than that to which the stores to be surveyed belong; but the master of that ship, and the officer who has charge of these stores are to be present to give what information may be required, and to prevent partiality or injustice, or to represent it to the captain, if they perceive without being able to prevent it. But if there be a necessity for an immediate survey, when there are not a sufficient number of ships present to furnish, or when the sickness of their officers prevents other ships from furnishing the number of officers required, the master of the ship may be ordered to assist at such survey; but if the ship be alone, such survey is to be taken by one of the lieutenants, the master, and one of the master's mates; but in this case a survey shall be taken again, if other ships join company before the surveyed stores, &c. have been disposed of.

What the report of survey must contain.

3. The report made by officers appointed to survey stores, &c. is to specify by whose order it is taken, and for what purpose; what are the articles ordered to be surveyed; the quantity and quality of those articles remaining on board, or the actual state of any which shall be particularly represented as deficient or defective. The number or quantity is always to be written in words at length, and if any stores complained of, be found no longer fit for their proper use, the report is to specify whether they be fit for any other, and for what, or whether they be no longer fit for their proper use, the report is to specify whether they be fit for any other, and for what, or whether they be no longer fit for any purpose whatever.

Appearance of neglect to be particularly noticed.

Appearance of fraud to be noticed and reported.

4. If any appearance of neglect shall be discovered by the surveying officers, it is to be particularly noticed in their report, whether it be the officer who has charge of the stores, or any other person who may have been guilty of it. But if an appearance of fraud be discovered, the surveying officers are not only to notice it in their report, but they are also to deliver to the captain a separate report, stating their suspicions of such fraud having been committed, and their reasons for suspecting it.

Three copies always, and, in certain cases,

5. There are to be three copies of all reports of stores, provisions, &c. which are surveyed, each signed by all the surveying officers; one of which reports, writ-

--85--

ten on the hack of the order for survey, is to be delivered to the officer who has charge of the stores, &c. which are surveyed, one other copy to the captain of the ship to which the stores belong, and the other copy is to be delivered by the captain to the officer by whose order the survey was taken. But when the stores, &c. surveyed, are to be transferred to the charge of another officer, a fourth copy, signed in the same manner, is to be delivered to the officer to whose charge the stores, &c. are to be transferred.

four copies of reports to be taken.

6. The surveying officers are not to direct any stores or provisions to be thrown overboard, except such as by their putrid state may be prejudicial to the health of the ship's company; whatever they find in such state they are themselves to see thrown into the sea before they leave the ship, and they are to mention their having done so in their report; all other stores, not covertible to any use, they are to direct the officer having charge of them to return into store, whenever the ship shall enter a port where there is a storekeeper, or other officer, authorized to receive them.

What articles may be thrown over board.

7. If any officer shall wilfully sign any false report of the quantity or condition of the stores or provisions he is ordered to survey, or shall discover any fraudulent practices in the management of such stores or provisions without making proper mention of them in his report; or if any person shall give any false account of stores or provisions, by which the surveying officers may be deceived and be led to make out an improper report he is to be immediately suspended, and his misconduct reported to the commander in chief, or to the Secretary of the Navy, that he may be tried by a court martial.

False reports, false information, proceedings in such cases.

8. Surgeon's instruments, medicines, and necessaries for the sick, are to be surveyed by the physician of the fleet or squadron, and two surgeons; or by three surgeons, as the commander in chief shall direct, who are to be very particular in specifying the quantity, quality, and condition, of each of them. If among the medicines they should find any not fit to be administered, they are to see them thrown overboard. If there shall be a necessity for a survey, when three surgeons cannot be obtained, the commanding officer present may order a surgeon's first assistant to attend as one of the surveying officers.

Surgeon's instruments, &c.

how and by whom to be surveyed.

CONVOYS.

1. The commander of a squadron, or a single ship, appointed to convoy the trade of the United States,

To give instructions in

--86--

writing to the convoy

must give the proper and necessary instructions in writing, from under his own hand, to all the masters of such ships and vessels as he shall be directed to take under his protection.

Taken list of the ships and send a copy to the Secretary of the Navy.

2. He is to take an exact list in due form of all the ships and vessels under his convoy specifying their respective names, and send a copy thereof to the Secretary of the Navy before he sails.

Not to chase out of sight in time of war.

5. He is not, in time of actual war, to chase out of sight of his convoy, but on the contrary to be watchful of and defend it from attack or surprise; and in case any of the ships or vessels should be distressed, he is to afford them all necessary assistance. He is also to extend the same protection to his convoy, when the United States are not engaged in war.

To report misconduct.

4. If the master of a ship shall misbehave, by delaying the convoy, abandoning or disobeying the established instructions, the commander is to report him, with a narrative of the facts, to the Secretary of the Navy, by the first opportunity.

To carry a toplight.

5. The commander is to carry a toplight in the night, to prevent the separation of the convoy unless on particular occasions he shall deem it improper.

His signals to be repeated.

6. He may order his signals to be repeated by as many ships under his command as he may think fit.

Convoys to keep company. Officers to command them by seniority.

7. When different convoys set sail at the same time, or join at sea, they are to keep together so long as their courses lay the same way; and when this happens, the eldest commander shall command in the first post, the next eldest in the second post, and so on according to seniority.

Commanders to wear the lights of their respective

8. Commanders of different convoys are to wear the lights of their respective posts, and repeat the signals in order, as is usual in such cases.

MASTERS AT ARMS AND SHIP'S CORPORAL.

Exercise ship's com-

1. They are daily, by turns, as the captain shall direct, to exercise the ship's company.

pany.

Put out fire and candles.

2. To see the fire and candles put out in season and according to the captain's order.

Visit vessels coming to the

3. To visit all vessels coming to the ship, and prevent the seamen from leaving the ship without permission.

ship.

Report irregularities.

4. To acquaint the officer of the watch with all irregularities in the ship, as they shall come to his knowledge.

Corporal, subordinate to the master at arms.

5. The corporal is to act in subordination to the master at arms, and to perform the same duty under him, which he is to perform himself in cases where a master at arms is not allowed.

--87--

MIDSHIPMEN.

1. No particular duties can be assigned to this class of officers. They are promptly and faithfully to execute all the orders for the public service which they shall receive from their commanding officers.

2. The commanding officers will consider the midshipmen as a class of officers, meriting in an especial degree their fostering care. They will see, therefore, that the schoolmaster performs his duty towards them, by diligently and faithfully instructing them in those sciences appertaining to their profeesion, and that he use his utmost care to render them proficients therein.

3. Midshipmen are to keep regular journals and deliver them to the commanding officer at the stated periods in due form.

4. They are to consider it as a duty they owe to their country, to employ a due portion of their time in the study of naval tactics, and in acquiring a thorough and extensive knowledge of all the various duties to be performed on board of a man of war.

CHAPLAIN.

1. He is to read prayers at stated periods; perform all funeral ceremonies over such persons as may die in the service, in the vessel to which he belongs, or, if directed by the commanding officer, over any person that may die in any other public vessel.

General duty.

2. He shall perform the duty of a schoolmaster; and to that end he shall instruct the midshipmen and volunteers in writing, arithmetic, and navigation, and in whatsoever may contribute to render them proficients. He is likewise to teach the other youths of the ship, according to such orders as he shall receive from the captain. He is to be diligent in his office.

Perform the duty of schoolmaster.

3. He shall, when it is required of him, perform the duties of secretary to the commodore.

Secretary to the commodore.

COOK.

1. He is to have the charge of the steep tub, and is answerable for the meat put therein; he is to see the meat duly watered and the provisions carefully and cleanly boiled and delivered to the men, according to the practice of the navy.

2. In stormy weather he is to secure the steep tub, that it may not be washed overboard, but if it should be

--88--

inevitably lost, the captain must certify as to the loss, and the cook is to make oath as to the number of pieces so lost, that it may be allowed in the purser's account.

BOATSWAIN.

To get his stores on board without delay.

Examine them carefully.

1. When a ship of the United States is commissioned, the boatswain is to exert himself to get on board all the stores committed to his charge as expeditiously as possible; he is to examine them very carefully, and to inspect very minutely all rigging fitted in the flock yard, and to report to the captain such defects as he may discover in them.

Cut rigging of the proper length.

2. When fitting out the ship, and at all other times when it may be necessary to cut out rigging, he is to be extremely careful to cut every rope of the precise length allowed by the establishment, unless some particular circumstance appertaining to the ship shall make it necessary to alter it, in which case he is to inform the captain and to receive his orders for such alteration.

Examine the state of the rigging daily.

3. He is, once at least every day, to examine the state of the rigging, to discover as soon as possible any part which may be chafed, or likely to give way, that it may be repaired without loss of time; he is, at all times, to he very careful, that the anchors, booms, and boats be properly secured.

To have ready at all times mats, plats, &c.

4. He is to be very particular in having ready at all times, a sufficient number of mats, plats, knippers, points, and gaskets, that no delay may be experienced when they are wanted.

Attend to the working up of junk.

5. He is to be very attentive in observing, while junk is working up, that every part of it is converted to all such purposes as it can possibly be made applicable to.

To be frequently upon deck, &c.

To see that the men go quickly upon deck when called.

His duty on preparing for battle.

He is to be very frequently upon deck, during the day, and at times, both by day and night, when any duty shall require all hands to be employed; he is, with his mates, to see that the men go quickly upon deck when called, and that when there, they perform their duty with alacrity, and without noise, or confusion.

7. When the ship is preparing for battle he is to be very particular in seeing that every thing necessary for repairing the rigging is in its proper place, that the men stationed for that service may know where to find immediately whatever may be wanted.

When the ship is paid off.

8. When the ship is ordered to be paid off, he is to be very attentive to prevent any of the rigging being damaged or cut, and he is to see every part of it properly tallied and stopped together, before he returns it in store.

--89--

SAILMAKER.

1. The sailmaker is very carefully to examine the. sails when they are received on board and to inform the boatswain if he discover any defects in them, or any mistake in their number or dimensions; he is to examine carefully whether they are perfectly dry when they are put into the sail room, and if any part of them be damp, the first proper opportunity must be taken to dry them.

His general duty.

2. He is to be attentive to see all the sails properly tallied, and so disposed of in the sail rooms, as to enable him to find immediately any that may be wanted.

To see the sails properly tallied.

3. He is to inspect frequently the condition of the sails in the sail room, to see that they are not injured by leaks or vermin, and he is to report to the boatswain, whenever it shall be necessary to have them taken upon deck to be dried; he is to repair them whenever they require it, and to use his bent endeavors to keep them always fit for service.

To inspect the sails frequently.

Report to the boatswain when necessary.

Repair and keep the sails ready for service.

CARPENTER.

1. When a ship of the United States is ordered to be commissioned, the carpenter is to inspect very minutely into the state of the masts and yards, as well those which may be in store in the dock yard, as those on board, to ensure their being perfectly sound and in good order; he is also to examine every part of the hull, the magazine, store rooms, and cabins; and he is to report to the master shipwright at the port, any defect which he may discover.

His duty when the ship is put in commission.

2. He is to make every possible exertion in getting his stores on board, and he is to be very particular in observing that they are all perfectly good, and that he receives his full allowance of every article.

To get his stores on board and see that they are good.

3. When the ship shall be at sea, he is, once at least, every day, to examine into the state of the masts and yards, and to report to the officer of the watch when he discovers any of them to be sprung, or to be in any way defective.

At sea, to examine masts, &c. daily and

report defects

4. In ships of two decks, he is frequently to examine the lower deck ports, to see that they are properly lined; and when they are barred in, he and his mates are frequently to see that they are properly secured.

To examine frequently the lower deck ports of two deck ships.

5. He is to be particularly careful in keeping the pumps in good order, always having at hand whatever may be necessary to repair them.

To keep the pumps in order.

--90--

To keep the boats, ladders and gratings in good order.

6. He is to keep the boats, ladders, and grating, in as good condition as possible, always repairing every damage they may sustain as soon as he discovers it, that when the ship shall return into port, the workmen of the dock yard may have only the material defects of the ship to repair.

To keep always ready, shot plugs, &c. His duty in action.

7. He is to keep always ready for immediate use, shot plugs, and every other article necessary for stopping shot holes, and repairing other damages in battle; and during the action, he is, with the part of his crew appointed to assist him, to be continually going about the wings and passages, and the hold, to discover where shot may have passed through, that he may plug up the holes, and stop the leaks as expeditiously as possible.

When stores lay in his way, to report to the captain.

8. If he should at any time find stores or any other articles stowed in the wings or passages, in such a manner as might interfere, with his working if required to cut out shot or stop leaks during an action, he is to report it to the captain that they may be removed.

On going into port, to make out an account of the ship's defects. To [oin] such reports are to be delivered.

9. When the ship is going into port, he is to prepare as correct an account as possible of the defects of the hull, masts, and yards, and of the repairs she may stand in need of, of which he is to deliver to the captain two copies, one of which, when signed by the captain, he is to deliver to the master shipwright of the dock yard. In making this report, he is to be very careful not to eaggerate any defect, by which there may appear to be a greater necessity for the ship being repaired than really exists, nor is he to conceal any which may require to be repaired.

To attend and report the negligence of others employed as artificers from other ships.

10. He is to be particularly attentive in observing the exertions and examining the works of artificers sent from other ships to assist in repairing the ship he belongs to, and he is to report to the captain when he discovers any, who, by their want of skill, or want of diligence, shall appear to be undeserving of the additional wages appointed to be paid them.

His duty when the ship is heeled.

11. Whenever the ship shall be, for any purpose, ordered to be heeled, he is to see that all the pumps are in good order, and ready to be worked; he is to station one of his mates to observe, by sounding the well, whether any material increase of water is occasioned; he is to attend to this frequently himself, and to observe also whether there be any extraordinary appearance of water in the hold; and in two deck ships, he is to be particularly attentive in seeing that the lower deck ports are well secured.

--91--

REGULATIONS RELATIVE TO RECRUITING.

1. Recruiting establishments should be made at Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore, and, in the event of a great call, at Norfolk. At each of these places an officer of the rank of master commandant should be stationed, assisted by a surgeon, or surgeon's mate belonging to the station, to attend the rendezvous, and a lieutenant, and master's mate or midshipman, to take charge of the men, on board of a receiving ship, which should be furnished with a guard of marines. The men, while on board of the receiving ship, should be employed under the direction of the commanding officer of the station, in making plats, gaskets, and other useful public works, which will not make it necessary for them to be put on shore; and every attention should be paid to their cleanliness and comfort while there. The receiving ship should be some distance from the port, and might be made to answer the purpose of a guard vessel.

Where recruiting establishments shall be. Who to command them.

Assistants. Receiving vessel.

How recruits are to be employed on board receiving vessel.

2. Officers engaged on the recruiting service should be enjoined to use every exertion to procure, as expeditiously as possible, the number of men required; to enter none but sound healthy men; to advance such amount of pay, as may be authorized from time to time; and to take good security in all cases of advance, except as hereafter excepted; to take receipts in duplicate for every payment made by him: to obtain recruiting moneys from the purser, or agent, as the case may be, and on the authority of the captain, or commanding officer; to account weekly for the expenditure of all recruiting moneys, to the purser, or agent from whom he may have received them, and to make to this department a report agreeably to form No. 1.

Duties of officers engaged in the recruiting service.

3. When a ship shall be in port where a rendezvous may be opened for her and there should be no recruiting establishment at such place, the captain of such ship should select a suitable recruiting officer. Should the captain select for such service, an improper officer, or, should he, being present, neglect to cause such recruiting officer to account weekly, and any evil should in either case arise, the captain should be held responsible to the department.

When a ship shall be in port where a rendezvous is opened, and when there is no recruiting establishment, how captain is to proceed.

4. When necessary to open a rendezvous for a ship, at any place, other than that where she may be lying, the captain should not be permitted to do so, without the consent of the Secretary of the Navy. His duty in such case, should be, to apprize the department of the necessity of opening such rendezvous, and, should

When necessary to open a rendezvous, at any place other than that where the ship nay be.

--92--

he think proper, recommend the officer employed; and the department should, judging it expedient, give the necessary order to the officer to be employed on such service. Should the officer, so ordered, be sent to any place, where there may not be a regular recruiting establishment, he should make his requisitions on the commanding officer of the station, who should cause the necessary supplies to be furnished, and a weekly account of his expenditures to be rendered; and when such rendezvous shall be closed, the vouchers should be delivered to the purser of the ship to which the men shall belong, and his receipt and certificate that the vouchers are correct, shall acquit the recruiting officer of all further pecuniary charge therefor.

Allowance to recruiting officers.

5. Recruiting officers should be allowed, in addition to their pay and rations, in lieu of all charges and expenses, the sum of four dollars for each man recruited and mustered on board the receiving ship, the transport, or the ship to which he may belong. They should never be allowed credit for moneys lost by desertion before the delivery of the men on ship board. They should take good security, and hold such security accountable, until the men shall be mustered on board the receiving ship, the transport, or the ship to which they belong.

On desertions from the receiving ship, how officer is to act.

6. Should men desert from the receiving ship, or the transport, the officer having charge of them there, should make oath, as to the circumstance of their desertion: which oath should be forwarded to the department, and an order issued before the recruiting officer should receive credit on the purser's books for the amount attained: and if the officer having charge of such men, on board of such receiving ship, or transport, should not be able to prove to the satisfaction of the commanding officer, (a certificate from whom should be transmitted to this department, form No. 7.) that all due care and diligence were taken by him to prevent such desertion, he should be held accountable for the amount of moneys advanced to such deserters.

In cases when men are first entered on board the ships in which they belong.

7. When men are first entered, on board of the ship to which they belong, the certificate of the commanding officer should be taken, stating their number, grade, and condition; and if on examination it should appear that any of them should be infirm or unfit for the service, a survey should be held on them by the surgeon and principal officers of the ship; and if condemned as unfit for service, they should be turned on shore, and the recruiting officer should lose the amount advanced to them; unless he should produce the certificate of the surgeon, or surgeon's mate attending the rendezvous, that such

--93--

 

person or persons so condemned, were, at the time they were entered, sound and healthy; in which case such surgeon or surgeon's mate should account.

8. The surgeon or surgeon's mate appointed to attend the rendezvous, to examine persons offering to enter, is to reject those that may be decrepit, lame, blind, deaf, dumb, feeble, sickly or diseased, and to give the recruiting officer his certificate of such as may be sound and healthy.

Duty of the surgeon attending at the rendezvous.

9. Recruiting officers, at regular stations, should be allowed one officer from each of the ships, for which he may be recruiting; and such assistant officer, upon the certificate of the recruiting officer, should be allowed one dollar and fifty cents per day, for the time he may be employed at the recruiting station, and no longer. Such certificate must be countersigned by the commanding officer of the station; and upon such certificate, so countersigned, the purser of the ship, to which such assistant officer may belong, should pay him accordingly, keeping the certificate, with a receipt, as his vouchers in the settlement of his account with the Navy Department.

Recruiting officers to be allowed another from each ship for which he may be recruiting.

10. When men are to be transported from distant places, the recruiting officer should apply to the commanding officer of the station for the means, and if necessary, for an officer to take charge of them; and if the commanding officer should not have a public vessel at his disposal, he should direct the agent of the station to furnish private conveyance, to be paid by the agent and charged to the department.

In cases where men are to be transported from distant places.

11. In no case should a recruiting officer have more than one thousand dollars advanced to him at any one time: when the amount received shall be accounted for, he can, on his requisition, countersigned by the commanding officer of the station, obtain a further supply from the agent of the station, if an officer of the rank of master commandant, and employed at a regular recruiting establishment; and from the purser of the ship or station, if the recruiting officer be of an inferior grade.

Advances of money to recruiting officers.

12. While men are on board the receiving ship, they should receive no supplies of clothing, or other articles from the purser of the station, but on the requisition of the recruiting officer, countersigned by the commanding officer of the station; nor should such purser receive a credit for the same, from the purser of the ship to which he may belong, until the requisition so countersigned, the man's receipt for the articles, and the account therefor, approved by the recruiting officer, and by the commanding officer of the station, should be delivered to such ship purser.

How men many receive supplies of clothing while on board a receiving ship.

--94--

Guards against the rapacity of land lords.

18. That seamen should be rescued, as far as practicable from the pangs of rapacious landlords, and others, who, frequently taking advantage of the habits of intoxication, and generally unsuspicous characters, swindle them of the whole amount advanced to them by the recruiting officer, and to the prejudice of the seamen, and of the service generally, leave them in a naked and destitute condition at the time of their appearance on board. To prevent these practices, recruiting officers should be directed, never to deliver the advance into the hands of any other than the man enlisted; to use every argument to induce all persons enlisting, to repair on board the receiving ship with his clothing; in which case he should be authorized to make the customary advance without taking security, and he should be particularly directed to attend to collecting and sending on board all the clothing and other effects of seamen and others, entered for the service, and take every means in his power to render the service as pleasing as possible.

 

Form A

 

 

Form B

 

 

Form C

 

Form D

 

Form E

 

F.

Articles.

Brigs.

Sloops of war.

Frigates. (36)

Frigates. (44)

Seventy-four.

No

lb

oz

dr

No

lb

oz

dr

No.

lb

oz.

dr

No

lb

oz.

dr

No.

lb

oz.

dr.

Calomel ppt.

-

8

-

-

14

-

2

-

-

2

8

-

-

3

8

Pulv. jalap

-

4

-

-

-

7

-

-

1

-

-

1

4

-

-

1

12

rhaei.

-

-

3

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

12

-

15

-

-

1

4

ipecac.

-

-

4

-

-

7

-

1

-

-

-

1

4

-

-

1

8

cantharidis

-

-

4

-

-

7

-

-

1

-

-

-

I

4

1

12

cinchon. flav.

-

6

-

-

-

10

8

-

-

20

-

-

-

25

-

-

-

35

colombae

-

1

-

1

12

-

-

4

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

7

semn lini

-

25

-

44

-

-

[160]

-

-

125

-

-

-

200

fol digitalis

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

7

-

-

2

-

-

2

-

-

-

3

sabinae

-

-

2

-

-

-

3

4

-

-

8

-

-

4[]

-

-

-

14

gum arabic

-

-

8

-

-

-

14

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

8

-

-

3

8

antimonialis

-

-

1

-

-

-

4

6

-

-

4

-

-

5

-

-

-

8

gallae

-

-

3

-

-

5

-

-

12

-

-

-

15

-

-

1

4

gentian

-

1

-

-

-

-

12

-

4

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

7

Sulphas sodae

-

10

-

-

-

17

-

-

-

40

-

-

-

50

-

-

-

60

alumen

-

1

-

-

-

-

12

-

-

3

-

-

5

-

-

-

7

cupri

-

1

-

-

-

1

6

-

-

3

-

-

4

-

-

6

ferri

-

1

-

-

-

1

6

-

-

4

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

8

zinci

-

-

8

-

-

-

14

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

8

-

-

3

8

 

Super tartris potassae

-

2

-

-

-

3

8

-

-

6

-

-

-

10

-

-

12

 

Nitras potassae

-

-

12

-

1

5

-

-

3

-

-

-

3

10

-

-

5

 

Tartris antimonii

-

-

1

-

-

1

6

-

-

3

-

-

-

4

-

-

6

 

Carbonas, potassae pur.

-

-

6

-

-

-

10

-

1

4

-

-

1

8

-

-

2

 

ammoniae

-

-

3

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

12

-

-

-

15

-

-

1

12

 

calcis

-

1

-

-

-

1

12

-

-

4

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

7

 

magnesiae

-

-

4

-

-

-

7

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

4

-

-

1

12

 

Murias ammoniae

-

1

8

-

-

2

10

-

-

6

-

-

-

7

-

-

-

10

 

Sub boras sodae

-

-

4

-

-

-

7

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

4

-

-

1

12

 

Rad. serpent. virg.

-

8

-

-

-

14

-

2

-

-

-

2

8

-

-

3

8

 

zinziber

-

-

4

-

-

-

7

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

4

-

-

2

 

senek

-

-

6

-

-

-

10

4

-

1

8

-

-

1

14

-

-

2

8

 

scillae mar.

-

-

3

-

-

5

-

-

12

-

-

-

15

-

-

1

4

 

Tinct. opii

-

1

-

-