--1003--

18th Congress.]

No. 249.

[2d Session.

CONDITION OF THE NAVY AND MARINE CORPS.

COMMUNICATED TO CONGRESS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, DECEMBER 7, 1824

Navy Department, December 1, 1824.

Sir:

I have the honor to present to you the following report, exhibiting the administration of this Department during the present year.

There are now in commission for the sea service the vessels named in paper A, subjoined to this report.

Nothing worthy of particular observation has occurred with our squadron in the Mediterranean. It has been maintained at the extent which was proposed in the report of last year, and has afforded the necessary protection to our commerce there.

The unfriendly relations, however, which exist between Algiers and some of the Governments of Europe, and the effects not unlikely to be felt upon our political and commercial interests in that quarter, with other important considerations, have been supposed to render it expedient to augment our force. With this view, the North Carolina has been prepared, and will sail in a few days. The squadron will then consist of the ship of the line North Carolina, frigate Constitution, corvette Cyane, the sloops of war Erie and Ontario, and schooner Nonesuch, and will

--1004--

be under the command of Commodore Rodgers, who has been for several years past the President of the Board of Navy Commissioners, and whose high qualifications are so well known and justly estimated by the nation.

Our naval force in the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico has continued under the command of Commodore Porter. By direction of the Department, he has, from time to time, despatched one of the vessels of his squadron to the coast of Africa, to touch at Cape Mesurado, minister to the wants of the agency there, and return by the usual track of the slave ships. None of these or any other of our public ships have found vessels engaged in the slave trade under the flag of the United States, and in such circumstances as to justify their being seized and sent in for adjudication; and, although it is known that the trade still exists to a most lamentable extent, yet as it is seldom if ever carried on under our own flag, it is impossible, with the existing regulations and instructions, to afford very efficient aid in exterminating it. That object can only be accomplished by the combined effort of the maritime nations, each yielding to the others the facilities necessary to detect the traffic under its own flag. The agency for recaptured Africans has been maintained in the same manner as in the last year. The eleven negroes who were taken from Captain Chase at Baltimore, and sent to the agency, were restored to their homes under circumstances very gratifying to humanity, and calculated to produce a good effect upon their several tribes. The near relations of some of them were on; the shore when they arrived, manifested much sensibility at their unexpected return, and furnished safe means of restoring them to their families.

The agent, Dr. Ayres, was compelled, by enfeebled health, to return to the United States, and left Mr. Ashmun as acting agent. He likewise was obliged, by the same cause, to be absent for a time; inconveniences necessarily resulted, and it was thought expedient to send the Rev. Mr. Gurley to examine into the situation of the agency, with directions to make certain arrangements, should circumstances require them. His report, marked B, with other papers, will be annexed, should his health enable him to make it in time, and will show the condition and prospects of the agency. The principal difficulties which have been encountered there have arisen from the want of a fit position and suitable accommodations for the agent and the recaptured Africans, on their arrival at the coast These difficulties have been, in a great degree, overcome, and will, with the expense, be regularly diminished, as the establishment made by the Colonization Society increases, and is rendered more permanent and well regulated, furnishing facilities for all the objects for which the agency was created. The expenditures during the year, so far as they are yet known, of the appropriation for the prohibition of the slave trade, have amounted to $15,326 02, and there remains of that fund a balance of $47,391 39.

The manner in which the force assigned to the protection of our commerce and the suppression of piracy in the West Indies has been employed, will be seen by the annexed letters and reports of Commodore Porter, marked C. The activity, zeal, and enterprise of our officers have continued to command approbation. All the vessels have been kept uniformly and busily employed where the danger was believed to be the greatest, except for short periods, when the commander supposed it necessary that they should return to the United States to receive provisions, repairs, and men, and for other objects essential to their health, comfort, and efficiency. No complaints have reached this Department of injury from privateers of Porto Rico or other Spanish possessions, nor have our cruisers found any violating our rights. A few small piratical vessels and some boats have been taken, and establishments broken up, and much salutary protection afforded to our commerce. The force employed, however, has been too small constantly to watch every part of a coast so extensive as that of the islands and the shores of the Gulf of Mexico, and some piratical depredations have therefore been committed; but they are of a character, though, perhaps, not less bloody and fatal to the sufferers, yet differing widely from those which first excited the sympathy of the public and exertions of the Government. There are few, if any, piratical vessels of a large size in the neighborhood of Cuba, and none are now seen at a distance from the land; but the pirates conceal themselves, with their boats, in small creeks, bays, and inlets, and, finding vessels becalmed, or in a defenceless situation, assail and destroy them. When discovered, they readily and safely retreat into the country, where our forces cannot follow, and, by the plunder which they have obtained, and which they sell at prices low and tempting to the population, and by the apprehensions which they are able to create in those who would otherwise give information, they remain secure, and mingle at pleasure in the business of the towns and transactions of society, and acquire all the information necessary to accomplish their purposes. Against such a system no naval force, within the control of this Department, can afford complete security, unless aided by the cordial, unwavering, and energetic co-operation of the local Governments—a co-operation which would render their lurking places on land unsafe, and make punishment the certain consequence of detection. Unless this co-operation be obtained, additional means ought to be intrusted to the Executive, to be used in such manner as experience may dictate.

The health of the squadron and of Thompson's Island has been much better than during the last season; yet many of our officers, and among them Commodore Porter, have suffered severely from disease, and several have died; most of the latter have fallen victims to the necessity, real or imagined, of visiting unhealthy places upon shore, which they were warned as much as possible to avoid, and which a sense of duty, no doubt, induced them to visit. A list of those who have died during the year, on that and other stations, will be annexed, marked D.

Some improvements have been made, and others are proposed, at Thompson's Island, by cutting the timber, clearing and draining the ground, and building store-houses; and, if the means are afforded, it is confidently believed that it will be made both comparatively comfortable and healthy before the next summer and fall. A balance of twenty-eight thousand seven hundred and eighty-four dollars and sixty-nine cents still remains of the appropriation of December, 1822, "authorizing an additional naval force for the suppression of piracy;" but claims exist against it, to a large amount, which have not yet been presented.

Two of the small schooners, the Greyhound and the Jackall, purchased under the authority of that act, have been found "so much out of repair, that it was not for the interest of the United States to repair them," and were disposed of; and one other, the Wild Cat, it is feared, is lost, with her officers and crew, in a passage from Havana to Key West.

The force on that station has been in this way somewhat reduced, and it has been considered expedient to augment it by the addition of the frigate Constellation, which will be ready to join it as soon as men can be enlisted for the purpose. One of the sloops of war now in the Mediterranean will probably be ordered there in the spring, should circumstances permit.

The surveys directed by the act entitled "An act authorizing an examination and survey of the harbor of Charleston in South Carolina, of St. Mary's in Georgia, and of the coast of Florida, and for other purposes," have not yet been completed. Competent naval officers have been ordered upon the service. It was thought useful to unite with them, in a part of the examinations, one or more of the corps of engineers, which could not be effected. On application to the War Department, it was found that all the officers of that corps were so engaged as to prevent the Secretary from detailing even one for this service. It is hoped, however, that such information has, in the mean time, been procured respecting the places named, except St. Mary's, as will accomplish the purpose for which the law was passed, should Congress act upon the subject at this session. Should it be proposed, however, to fix upon a site for a naval depot in the Gulf of Mexico, I would respectfully suggest the propriety of intrusting the selection and purchase to the Department, after further and satisfactory surveys shall have been made.

Commodore Stewart, in the Franklin, arrived at New York in the month of August, having left Commodore Hull, with the frigate United States, the sloop of war Peacock, and the schooner Dolphin, in the Pacific. It is hoped that this force will be able to prevent depredations on our important commerce in that sea, and secure respect for our flag. Our commerce, however, has increased so rapidly there, and is scattered over so large a space, that an addition of one or more vessels would be made, if they were within the control of the Department. This audition will become indispensable, should the Government be disposed to make permanent provision for the protection of our commerce and other interests in the neighborhood of Columbia river and on the northwest coast. Constant experience shows the importance of such augmentation of the number of our vessels as will enable the Government to add to the force both in the Atlantic and Pacific. Inconveniences are felt and losses are sustained by our citizens in both oceans, which might be prevented, were the means for their protection enlarged.

In the course of the year several regulations have been adopted to promote efficiency and economy in the medical and other departments of the service, and some good is anticipated from them. It is impossible, however, to do all

--1005--

which is desired without the aid of Congress. Several laws seem necessary to render the establishment economical and efficient Among them are those which were under consideration at the last session, for building ten sloops of war, and re-organizing the navy. To these ought to be added a revision of the law for the better government of the navy, and the system of courts-martial; but especially some provision should be made for the education and instruction of the younger officers. We have now the light of experience on this point in the army, and its salutary effects are very manifest. Instruction is not less necessary to the navy than to the army. I refer to the views taken of some of these subjects in the reports made during the last session, and it will be my duty to develop them more fully in answer to a resolution of the Senate now before me.

The expenditures of the year are submitted in a report from the Second Comptroller, marked F, and the estimates for the next year in one from the Commissioners of the Navy, marked G. In the latter it will be found that estimates have been made of the expense of certain necessary improvements at Thompson's Island, and for the repairs of four of our frigates, which policy and economy require to be placed in such a situation that their services can be commanded whenever they shall be necessary.

We have, at present, no frigate which could be sent to sea without large repairs, creating a delay, which, under certain circumstances, might be injurious to the public interest.

The general estimate comprehends the several heads of expenditure, in the form supposed to be best fitted for keeping the accounts with plainness and accuracy, most easily explained, best adapted to a rigid investigation of the expenses of the naval service, and, as far as practicable, conformed to the views of the House of Representatives at the last session, as understood at the Department. It is accompanied by explanatory statements of the several items, in great detail, exhibiting the propriety of the estimate and the necessity of the appropriation.

The estimates for the marine corps, with the explanatory statements, are added, and marked H.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, your most obedient servant,

SAMUEL L. SOUTHARD.

To the President of the United Stales.

A.

Vessels of the United States' navy in commission, in 1825.

Names.

Rate.

No. of guns.

Station.

North Carolina,

Ship of the line.

74

Mediterranean.

Constitution,

Frigate,

44

Mediterranean.

United States,

Frigate,

44

Pacific.

Constellation,

Frigate,

36

West India sea.

John Adams,

Corvette,

24

West India sea.

Cyane,

Corvette,

24

Mediterranean.

Erie,

Sloop,

18

Mediterranean.

Ontario,

Sloop,

18

Mediterranean.

Hornet,

Sloop,

18

West India sea.

Peacock,

Sloop,

18

Pacific.

Spark,

Brig,

12

West India sea.

Porpoise,

Schooner,

12

West India sea.

Grampus,

Schooner,

12

West India sea.

Shark,

Schooner,

12

West India sea.

Dolphin,

Schooner,

12

Pacific.

Nonesuch,

Schooner,

12

Mediterranean.

Decoy,

Store ship.

6

West India sea.

Sea Gull,

Brig,

3

West India sea.

Ferret,

Schooner,

3

West India sea.

Beagle,

Schooner,

3

West India sea.

Weasel,

Schooner,

3

West India sea.

Fox,

Schooner,

3

West India sea.

Terrier,

Schooner,

3

West India sea.

B.

Extract of a letter from Doctor Ely Ayres, agent under the law for the prohibition of the slave trade, to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

Washington, March 15, 1824.

Sir:

Agreeably to your instructions, I proceed to give you a statement of the proceedings of the agency for captured Africans on the western coast of Africa. On the 25th of July, 1821, I was appointed a surgeon to that agency, and arrived on the coast in the November following. On my arrival at Foura Bay, where the captured Africans and laborers then were, I found Mr. J. B. Winn, the United States' agent, had deceased. A few days before the death of Mr. Winn, he had authorized Christian Wiltberger, in case of his death, to take charge of his papers and effects, and to act as United States' agent, until one should be appointed by the Government to supply this place. Mr. Wiltberger was acting under this authority when I arrived in Africa.

The situation at Sherbro', which was selected for a permanent settlement in the first place, had been formally renounced by Mr. Winn, and no other obtained.

Mr. Wiltberger's health did not admit of his proceeding on to the examination of the coast. I therefore took upon myself so much of the United States' agency as respected the examination of the coast, procuring a permanent establishment, removing the laborers, and making the necessary preparations for receiving their families, agreeably to the instructions of the Navy Department to Mr. Winn, dated December 1, 1820, which say: "In making a settlement at Sherbro', or elsewhere, as circumstances shall point out to be most expedient, the first object of your attention will be to make the necessary arrangements with the Government of the country for such other places as you may select, with a full and candid exposition of all the objects contemplated, in which you will be guarded against all possible deception or bad faith; and then proceed to make preparations for building, to shelter the captured Africans, and to afford them comfort and protection until they can be otherwise disposed of."

On the 8th of December, 1821, I proceeded, agreeably to the above instructions, down the coast, in the schooner Augusta, in company with Lieutenant Stockton, of the Alligator, and contracted with the natives of Montserado for a tract of land in their neighborhood. After which I returned to Foura Bay, and, on the 1st of January, 1822, sailed from that place with the laborers, to take possession, and prepare the necessary buildings for the reception of their families.

After this object was accomplished, I returned again to Foura Bay for the remainder of the laborers and their families.

--1006--

On the 2d day of April, 1823, Mr. Wiltberger made arrangements to return to the United States; and, after that date, all the duties of United States' agent devolved on myself.

While I was absent from the settlement on this occasion, a serious disaster occurred to the laborers at the Cape, which, for a time, involved us in a war with the natives, and totally interrupted the progress of their proceedings until my return.

A British prize vessel, with thirty-five slaves, was cast away on the bar, at the mouth of Montserado river. The exertions of our laborers to relieve the sailors on board the vessel, and prevent the natives from plundering, was the cause of their hostilities.

One of the British sailors, by firing a cannon at the natives, communicated fire to our store-house, and consumed nearly all the stock of provisions and clothing then on hand. This accident made it necessary for me, after restoring peace with the natives, to return to Freetown, and procure provisions and clothing for the use of the laborers and captives, until they could procure a supply from the United States.

I could respectfully suggest to the Department the importance of having a deposite on the settlement, of such articles as will be necessary for the United States' vessels of war, when on the coast, as they can be furnished much cheaper direct from the United States than they can be purchased in the British settlements.

The company which was formed in Baltimore for that purpose being about to dissolve, owing to obstacles thrown in their way, the colony will now be left destitute of such aid.

Respectfully, your most obedient servant,

E. AYRES.

To the Hon. S. L. Southard, Secretary of United States' Navy.

C.

Copy of a letter from Commodore David Porter to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

U. S. ship John Adams, Norfolk, January 20, 1824.

Sir:

In reference to your letter of the 15th instant, enclosing one from Mr. Cambreleng, I have the honor to state that I despatched the United States' schooner Shark, on or about the 1st of this month, to cruise in the neighborhood, of La Vera Cruz, Tampico, and Alvarado, until the 1st of March, for the protection of our commerce in that quarter, and to be relieved at that time by the United States' brig Spark and schooner Weasel, which vessel sailed two days since, with instructions to scour the West Indies for piratical vessels said to be out previous to going there.

The Spark will be relieved by the Grampus and another small schooner by the middle of May, and I shall give regular and constant protection to the persons and property of our citizens in the Gulf of Mexico, so long as I am honored with my present command, unless I receive orders from you to the contrary. I contemplate, by a constant routine, giving equal protection to our colony on the coast of Africa and guarding against the slave trade, provided it meets with your approbation.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

D. PORTER.

Hon. Samuel L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy.

Copy of a letter from Commodore David Porter to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

U. S. ship John Adams, off Havana, April 8, 1824.

Sir:

I have the honor to inform you that, in ray route to this place, I have touched at St. Bartholomew's, St. Christopher's, St. Thomas's; examined the south coast of Porto Rico, looking in at the Dead Man's Chest and Ponce, two noted places for Porto Rico privateers; touching at Mona, St. Domingo, Beata, and Kingston, making diligent inquiries and examinations for piratical vessels, and offering convoy and protection to vessels of all nations from piratical aggressions.

In the course of this long route, although we have visited places formerly the rendezvous of pirates, and saw evidences of their having been recently there, we have not been so fortunate as to capture any, nor have we seen any vessels of a suspicious character, until two days since, when we pursued a small schooner, which took shelter among the Colorados reefs, and, from every circumstance, there cannot be a doubt that she is a pirate.

I shall, as soon as I can place the vessels now under convoy in safety, hasten to Thompson's Island, to despatch the barges and small vessels in pursuit, and hope, in a few days, to have her in possession.

It appears that an attempt has been made to revive, on the south side of Cuba, that system of piracy which had so long prevailed. The British have lost some men in attempting to suppress it; and the fortunate assemblage of a large British force at the Isle of Pines has, I have been informed, caused a dispersion of the gang. Nothing but the presence of a strong and active force can keep them in order.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

D. PORTER.

To the Hon. S. L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy.

Copy of a letter from Commodore David Porter to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

U. S. ship John Adams, Port Rodgers, Thompson's Island, April 24, 1824.

Sir:

I have the honor to transmit to you a copy of Captain Wilkinson's report of the expedition after the piratical schooner.

I shall immediately despatch vessels to the coast of Yucatan, in pursuit of the vessel of which he gives information.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

D. PORTER.

Hon. Samuel L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy.

Copy of a letter from Captain J. Wilkinson to Commodore David Porter, Commander-in-chief of the United States' naval forces in the West Indies, Gulf of Mexico, and on the coast of Africa, communicated to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

U. S. steam-galliot Sea Gull, April 24, 1824.

Sir:

I have the honor to report to you my return with the steam-galliot Sea Gull and four barges, having given a thorough examination of the coast of Cuba, inside the Isabella and Colorados, in search of pirates, agreeable to your orders of the 12th instant.

--1007--

The Sea Gull and one barge entered at Cape Antonio, and progressed eastward; and with three barges I commenced at the river Ortigosa, and progressed westward, examining minutely every part of the coast until I met the Sea Gull with the whole of the forces.

I then proceeded to the spot designated by you for the anchorage of the Greyhound, where I arrived on the 20th instant, took in a supply of wafer and provisions, and sailed the same evening for Thompson's Island, with the Greyhound and Fox in company. I despatched the Greyhound for Havana. It being calm at 7 o'clock yesterday morning, made signal for the Sea Gull to take the barges in tow, and also for the Fox to make the best of her way to Thompson's Island.

I ascertained, from several concurrent statements, that the celebrated pirate Diableto sailed from Cape Antonio about ten days previous to our arrival there; his destination unknown, but supposed to be for the coast of Yucatan, (from the coast he steered off,) to increase his armament, having at that time but eight men, and nothing but small arms. The schooner he commanded he had captured but a short time before on the coast of Cuba.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

J. WILKINSON.

Commodore David Porter,

Commander-in-chief of the U. S. naval forces in the West Indies, Gulf of Mexico, and coast of Africa.

Copy of a letter from Commodore David Porter to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

U. S. galliot Sea Gull, Matanzas, June 1, 1824.

Sir:

I have the honor to enclose you a copy of a letter from Lieutenant Commandant John H. Lee, who was sent by me in pursuit of the pirate that escaped from the Colorados. I shall not cease the pursuit until I hear of his capture or destruction.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

D. PORTER.

Hon. Secretary of the Navy.

Copy of a letter from Lieutenant Commandant John H. Lee to Commodore David Porter, commanding United States' naval forces on the West India station, Gulf of Mexico, and coast of Africa, dated

 U. S. schooner Jackall, Sisal, May 12, 1824.

Sir:

I have the honor to report to you that, for the purpose of executing your orders to me on the 25th of April, the Jackall and Wild Cat sailed on the 26th of that month from Thompson's Island. On the following day we made the coast of Cuba, (Bahia Honda,) and, passing Cape Antonio in the night, we were unable to look in there, although I felt a great desire to do so. On the 29th arrived off Cape Catoche, and, on the same afternoon, anchored between the island of Contoy and the main land. This island is small and thinly wooded, so that it required but a few hours to examine every part of it. We could discover no traces of any persons living there, or even of any persons having been there, except two thatched huts in a very decayed state.

Early on the morning of the 30th we left that island, and, approaching as near the shore as the safety of the vessels would permit, we proceeded to the island of Mugeres, and in the night anchored between its southwest end and the main land. On the following morning, having found the watering place, the vessels were removed to it; and, at the same time, detachments of men were sent on shore for the purpose of commencing an examination.

This island is larger, more thickly wooded, and much more difficult of access, than Contoy; and we were, consequently, compelled to proceed at a comparatively slow rate. But, sir, I can safely say that, at the expiration of two days, almost every foot of Mugeres had been traversed.

We found here six Indians from the vicinity of Sisal. They stated that they made annual visits to this island for the purpose of making salt, large quantities of which were piled up on the borders of the salt ponds in the interior. While at Mugeres we were visited by several parties of Indians from the main and the islands of Cankum.

I could glean nothing satisfactory from these men respecting piracy. The stories they told were so very contradictory, and seemingly without foundation, that it was impossible to reconcile them with each other or with truth; but, from all I could hear, and from my own observations, Mugeres has not, for the last two years, been the resort of pirates.

A severe gale detained us at anchor three days longer than was necessary, and this circumstance afforded an opportunity of visiting the main land, which was done by Lieutenant Commandant Legare and Lieutenant Piercy, though without discovering any thing more than a few uninhabited fishing huts. On the 7th of this month we sailed from Mugeres, and, passing again by Contoy, anchored near Cape Catoche; and here, sir, our researches were as little to our satisfaction as they had been hitherto; nothing was to be seen but an old dilapidated church and a fishing hut. From thence we continued our course towards New Malaga, examining the coast as we went along, and arrived there on the afternoon of the 8th. Some of the Indians had informed me that a piratical vessel was fitting out at that place; but, sir, no such vessel was there on our arrival; and the commandant, who is apparently a respectable man, assured me that the Fox was the last vessel he had seen.

On the 9th we left New Malaga, and coasted it along within two miles of the shore, looking info all the inlets communicating with almost every settlement between Malaga and Sisal, until our arrival at the latter place, late on the 11th. From the time we commenced our examination of the coast, we have never sailed during the night, except once in chase of a schooner, which proved to be a privateer fitted out at Sisal; and then, sir, I returned with the Jackall to the place I discovered her, and waited until the following morning.

At this port the commandant has been barely civil to us, and the inhabitants generally appear to view us more in the light of spies than friends.

You will perceive, from this report, sir, the manner in which we have performed our duty, and I sincerely hope it will meet with your approbation. To the prompt and active exertions of Lieutenant Legare I feel much indebted; and I assure you, it would have afforded me great pleasure to have been associated with him for a longer time.

From this place I shall proceed with all possible despatch to execute your further orders.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, sir, your most obedient servant,

JOHN H. LEE.

Com. David Porter,

Commanding U. S. naval forces on the West India station, Gulf of Mexico, and coast of Africa.

Extract of a letter from Lieutenant Commandant John D. Sloat to Commodore David Porter, commanding the United States' naval forces in the West Indies, Gulf of Mexico, and coast of Africa, communicated to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

United States' schooner Grampus, Matanzas, May 29, 1824.

Sir:

In conformity with your orders of the 24th January, 1824, I sailed from Hampton Roads on the 28th February, and proceeded to the coast of Africa. On the 4th of April I anchored at Cape Mesurado, and visited the

--1008--

colony of free people of color, where I remained eight days, and have the satisfaction to report that I found them comfortably settled, and at peace with all the neighboring nations; although they apprehend that the tribe they had the difficulty with previous to the visit of the Cyane is not friendly to them, yet they do not believe they will venture to attack them again, particularly since my visit, as I gave the natives to understand that I should return there shortly, and they know that I supplied the colony with ammunition, provisions, &c. &c.; a return of which I enclose. The appearance of the Grampus on the coast has been of essential service to the settlement. The trade with the natives in their immediate vicinity had been stopped for some time; but when they found the Grampus to be a vessel of war, the King sent in word that he would open the trade; and before I left there the natives began to come in with provisions and other articles in considerable numbers. The agent for the United States, as well as for the Colonization Society, had left the settlement some time before my arrival; they have appointed acting agents—Mr. Waring for the United States, and Mr. Johnson for the society, both colored men. By their advice, the people have elected a council of twelve to assist in managing the affairs of the colony, and, by what I could discover, they appear to be doing very well; but they are extremely desirous to have the advice of good agents; they say they do not yet feel themselves competent to manage the establishment. Their settlement is very pleasantly situated on a narrow peninsula, the sea on one side and Mesurado river on the other, on high ground; and they have for its protection a tolerable good fort built of stone, at one end of the village, on which are mounted at present one long eighteen pounder and two eighteen pound gunnades; at the other extremity is a block-house with one nine pounder and one six. They also have mounted one brass four pound field-piece and one two pound swivel, besides several other guns not mounted, and about one hundred muskets, eighty of which are in good order, and the others they will be able to repair with the tools and materials I gave them. The number of inhabitants is two hundred and thirty-seven; seventy-eight of them capable of bearing arms, who are formed into a company, and muster for exercise every Saturday. They all have very good houses, and some of them begin to cultivate gardens. They have also cleared a considerable piece of ground intended for cultivation. They catch in the river a variety of fish, and plenty of oysters. They have an abundance of fine timber, and the soil is very good; and they all appear to be quite contented with their situation. They probably enjoy as good health there as they would in any part of the world. Of the last emigrants, one hundred and five, all have gone through their seasoning. Three young children only have died, and they with complaints incident to every climate and country. I have made this detailed report, believing it would be agreeable to you, to the society, and to all those friendly to the settlement, to know exactly how these people are situated, as I have been informed at St. Thomas's that there are very discouraging reports in circulation in the United States. We sailed from thence on the 12th of April, and I am sorry that I am obliged to add, on the eighth day several cases of malignant bilious fever occurred on board, three of which proved fatal. A particular description of the character and progress of the disease, by Dr. Halse, I beg to enclose. No person has been permitted to go on shore, except when necessity required it; and no persons were attacked with this disease, except those who had been thus exposed. After leaving Cape Mesurado, I beat up the coast to the northward of Rio Grande, but did not meet with any vessels coming within the limits of my instructions. From thence I proceeded in the execution of your further orders, and on the 10th of May anchored at Martinico, to obtain information, fill my water casks, and obtain other supplies, all of which were nearly exhausted. Sailed thence on the 16th, and anchored at St. Bartholomew's on the 18th; sailed again on the 19th, and anchored at St. Thomas's on the 20th; sailed thence on the 21st; called off St. John's, Porto Rico, on the 22d, and communicated with the American consul. The next day I stood close into the town of Aguadilla, where I found a Dutch man-of-war brig; communicated with the commander, who informed me he had been there some days, and had not heard of any piracies or suspicious vessels in the Mona passage lately. Remained in the Mona passage all night, and then made the best of my way to the island of Cuba.

I have examined the north coast closely, as far down as Sugar Key, where I anchored, in consequence of seeing several tents on the key. I however found them to be the crew of a Spanish brig of war from Cadiz, cast away there twelve days previous. From there the weather did not permit me to approach the keys along the Cuba shore. I examined Ginger Key, but found no person there, nor any indication of any having been there recently.

I am, sir, your most obedient servant,

JOHN D. SLOAT.

To Com. David Porter,

Commanding U. S. naval forces in the W. Indies, Gulf of Mexico, and coast of Africa.

Extract of a letter from Lieutenant Commandant James M. Mcintosh to Commodore David Porter, communicated to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

Allenton, Thompson's Island, July 12, 1824.

Sir:

I have the honor to inform you that the Terrier, with the barge Diableta in company, returned here yesterday. Lieutenant Paine reports the brig robbed off Escondido to have been the Acasta, of Portland. They robbed her of two thousand dollars in cargo, her sails and anchors, beat the commander and crew severely, and then suffered her to proceed to Havana.

Could 1, sir, have received the information one day earlier, the Diableta would have completely succeeded in recapturing the property, and probably have detected the pirates in the very act. The property stolen has been carried to Havana, at which place Mr. Paine saw and conversed with the master of the Acasta. The appearance of the barge at so early a period after the transaction, together with the very strict search, I trust will have a good effect.

Copy of a letter from Acting Lieutenant Alexander B. Pinkham to Commodore David Porter, communicated to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

U. S. schooner Beagle, Quarantine Ground, N. Y., August 4, 1824.

Sir:

I have the honor to acquaint you of the arrival of the Beagle at this place, in eleven days from Thompson's Island, and have also the painful duty of announcing to you the death of the late commander of this vessel. Lieutenant N. L. Montgomery, who died on the 30th ultimo, in latitude 35° 23' north, longitude 74° 30', in consequence of which I considered it my duty to acquaint you with the events of our cruise, in continuation of a report commenced by Lieutenant Montgomery, found among his papers, and hereto attached.

The convoy from St. Jago de Cuba consisted of the brigs Susan of Philadelphia, Jane and Boston Packet of Kennebunk; we also fell in with, off Cape Donna Maria, and took, under convoy, the English ships Glasgow and Caledonian from Jamaica. Having accompanied the convoy through the Crooked Island passage, as far as Maitland's Island, we returned to St. Jago (having touched at Crooked Island to fill up our water) on the 21st of June. We sailed from thence on the 22d, and arrived at Trinidad on the 27th. Sailed from thence on the 4th July, having under convoy the brigs Florida of Boston, Mary and Eliza of Sandwich, schooner Hannah of Boston, and the French brig Duc d'Angoulême. Parted company with the convoy on the 9th, off Cape Antonio, in order to make the best of our way to Havana, in consequence of the sickly state of the officers and crew; the yellow fever having made its appearance on board on the 6th, of which disease six persons, including Lieutenant Commandant Montgomery, have died. More than half the crew were attacked, but most of them have recovered. On the 20th we arrived at Havana, filled up our water, and sailed same day. On the 32d arrived at Thompson's Island, and, having received the necessary supplies of provisions, sailed from thence on the 24th. You may rest assured, sir, that the disease did not originate from any local cause. The general regard to cleanliness observed on board the vessel, and Lieutenant

--1009--

Commandant Montgomery's attention to the comforts of the crew, would impress a belief that it originated from the unhealthiness of the climate and of the ports we lay in.

I have the honor to enclose you a correspondence between Lieutenant Commandant Montgomery and the Governor of Trinidad, with other papers; also, a list of the officers and crew of the Beagle.

In consequence of the disability of my right arm from the effects of a violent attack of the yellow fever, from which I am yet much debilitated, I am not able to sign my name, but I have the honor to be, very respectfully.

Your most obedient servant,

ALEXANDER his + mark B. PINKHAM, Acting Lieutenant.

Commodore David Porter, &c.

Copy of a communication from Lieutenant Commandant N. L. Montgomery to Commodore David Porter, communicated to the Secretary of the Navy, headed

United States' schooner Beagle, &c.

Sir:

I have the honor to report to you my arrival in this port from Thompson's Island in ----- days. In pursuance of your order of the ----- April, I proceeded to Kingston, Jamaica, looking in at the Havana, Cape St. Antonio, and searching out every bay and inlet on the south side of Cuba, as far to the eastward as St. Jean de Huago, a few miles to the leeward of which I fell in with His Britannic Majesty's frigate Hussar, Captain Harris, from whom I carried despatches to Admiral Sir L. W. Halstead, and for whom I had the honor to be intrusted with communications from yourself. On the evening of that day, off the Isle of Pines, I chased a very suspicious two-topsail schooner, which succeeded in making her escape during the night. I, however, had the good fortune to protect (which the suspicious sail was then in chase of) the English schooner Bristol, Captain Thomas, and convoy her safely to Kingston.

After receiving the answer to your communication from Sir Lawrence W. Halstead, I proceeded to St. Jago de Cuba on the ----- of May, to ascertain what protection our commerce required at that port. On the 5th of June sailed from St. Jago with vessels under convoy.

Extract of a letter from Lieutenant Commandant McIntosh to Commodore David Porter, communicated to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

Allenton, Thompson's Island, August 8, 1824.

The Terrier, Lieutenant Paine, returned yesterday morning with the medical stores which I had the honor to inform you were necessary for the station on the 2d instant. She has been longer executing this service than could have been contemplated, in consequence of continued calms since she sailed from here, and considerable drift to the eastward. She sails again to-day for Matanzas, with orders to give convoy to any of our vessels requiring it, and then to proceed and examine minutely the key in the vicinity of Point Yeacos and the bay of Suagassa, from thence to run down the north coast of Cuba to Bahia Honda, at which place piratical depredations are said to be almost daily committed.

Copy of a letter from Commodore David Porter to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

 Washington, August 9, 1824.

Sir:

I have the honor to transmit you the enclosed copy and translation of a correspondence between Lieutenant Commandant John Ritchie and the commandant of Tampico; and, in reply to your instructions of the 20th ultimo, requiring protection to the citizens of the United States, engaged in commerce with that port, have to state, that the Shark and two of the small schooners have been sent to the Gulf of Mexico, to afford the protection required.

This, under existing circumstances, is all the force which, at present, can be sent on that service. The sickly condition of some of the vessels that have returned to the United States, which has caused them to be placed under quarantine, the want of repairs in others, the revival of piracy about Cuba and elsewhere, and the reduced state of my squadron, from these and other causes, prevent my affording, with the means at my disposal, as much protection to the citizens of the United States engaged in commercial pursuits, within the limits of my command, as I could wish.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, &c.

DAVID PORTER.

Hon. Secretary of the Navy.

Copy of a letter from. Commodore David Porter to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

 Washington, August 10, 1824.

Sir:

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 29th ult enclosing a copy of a letter from W. Neilson, President of the American Insurance Company of New York, complaining of the capture of the Mercator, near the port of Matanzas, when some of our vessels of war were stationed there, reflecting on the Government of Cuba for permitting the seizing of "numerous and valuable vessels and cargoes sailing under our flag," charging it with connivance or imbecility, and justifying the Government for taking decisive measures for the protection of our trade. I have also received your letter enclosing an application from the merchants of Matanzas for further protection to our commerce in that port, as well as your letter of the 28th July, enclosing a copy of a letter from the master of the brig John, of Newport, recounting the circumstance of the robbery of that vessel near the harbor of Matanzas, asserting that there were no United States' vessels on that side of the island of Cuba, and stating that there had been six captures between Matanzas and Havana. In the various letters accompanying these statements it is enjoined on me to use my efforts, and make such disposition of the force under my command, as will render piratical aggressions of this description less frequent, if it is possible. The whole history of my operations, in conjunction with the authorities of Cuba, against the pirates, renders any defence of my conduct, or the conduct of those under my command, against any imputations of neglect, from any quarter, unnecessary, as it is well known to the Department that we have been devoted to the inglorious service, sacrificing health, comfort, and personal interests, for the sole object of suppressing a system of long continuance, the existence of which was disgraceful to the civilized nations whose citizens and subjects were victims to it, and which the peculiar state of the Government of Cuba, arising from the various changes in Spain, and the numerous facilities to piracy, arising from the nature of the population of the island, and various other causes, originating in the suppression of the slave trade, and progress of the South American revolutions, put it out of the power of the local authorities to suppress, without aid from other quarters, which was no sooner obtained, by our presence, than the most zealous co-operation was commenced on the part of the Government of Cuba, which has ever since continued, and has changed entirely

--1010--

the character of piracy, from the bloody and remorseless manner in which it was conducted to simply plundering of property, and the means from large cruising vessels to open boats. This latter mode of carrying on their depredations renders it extremely difficult to detect them, and is calculated to baffle the efforts of the most vigilant, from the ease with which they are enabled to possess themselves of boats along the coast of Cuba, the certainty of being enabled to escape to the unsettled coasts of the island, and the certainty, for some hours, in the early part of every day, that merchant vessels may be found becalmed near the land.

Nothing but resistance on the part of those who call on us for protection can put down the present system; and from the small force employed by them, the mere show of resistance, in a few instances, is all that is required. We have seen it stated, that one of the vessels robbed was taken possession of by a boat with seven men, and plundered, the crew beaten, and confined below. Surely, sir, blame should not be attached to us, or to the Government of Cuba, for the dastardly conduct of those who, with the most ordinary means of defence, which every merchant vessel affords, could permit such an act: as well might this, or any other Government, be charged with imbecility, and its officers with neglect, for not detecting every highway robber, housebreaker, incendiary, or counterfeit. The charge of imbecility must rest on those who fail to defend themselves against their petty aggressions, and the cause is attributable almost entirely to the parsimony of the owners, who fail to furnish a few weapons to put into the hands of the crews of vessels destined to Cuba.

Those robberies are committed most frequently by the persons employed in loading the vessels, who are well acquainted with their destitution of fire-arms at the time of sailing.

I have taken the liberty of enclosing you reports from Lieutenant McIntosh, the commandant of Thompson's Island, by which you will perceive that every vigilance has been exercised by him in endeavoring to recapture the vessels taken, and punish the offenders; that at the very time that William Norris states that no United States' vessels were on the north side of Cuba, the Terrier, Lieutenant Paine, and Diableta, were cruising there; and I have also to state, that the Ferret, Lieutenant Farragut, was on that coast, and had been daily (until a few days previous) employed in giving convoy in and out of the harbor, sometimes with his vessel, and sometimes with his small boats. I have further to state, that the John Adams corvette, the brig Spark, the schooner Grampus, the Jackall, Weasel, and the Beagle, have, a short time since the date of Mr. Norris's letter, all visited the coasts and ports of Cuba, zealously employed in the protection of our commerce; in the performance of which duty, I regret to state that Lieutenants Montgomery and Cumming, with several others, have fallen victims.

The reports of Captain Dallas, Lieutenant Commandants Newton, Sloat, Lee, and Zantzinger, and Acting Lieutenant Farragut, with which you have already been made acquainted, will show the arduous duties they have performed; and the report of Acting Lieutenant Pinkham, the successor of Lieutenant Commandant Montgomery, will show the result of his arduous, useful, and disastrous cruise. There are at this time, on the coast of Cuba, and on their way there, the ships Hornet and Decoy, the schooners Shark, Wild Cat, and Terrier, and six barges; and in a short time the force will be augmented by the departure of others of the schooners, large and small. The charge, then, or intimation in any shape, of neglect, on the part of myself or officers, to the interest of the merchants, who have no feeling but for their own pecuniary concerns, is, as you perceive, unfounded. It is true that, warned by the dreadful mortality of last year, and by approaching disease, I left the West Indies, and ordered home the greater part of the force under my command; and the only cause of regret to me now is, that I did not remove them earlier, by which many valuable lives would have been saved, and that there should be a necessity for their return at this unfavorable season, which will undoubtedly cause the death of more.

I beg you to excuse my going so much into detail; but as the frequent applications to the Department, from the merchants concerned in the Matanzas trade, for protection, might induce the belief of neglect on my part, I have felt that this explanation is necessary,

I cannot conceal to you, however, my mortification at their conduct, after the devotion we have all shown to their particular interests, which entitled us to their warmest gratitude.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

D. PORTER.

Hon. Samuel L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy.

Extract of a letter from Lieutenant Commandant James M. McIntosh, to Commodore David Porter, communicated to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

Allenton Thompson's Island, August 25, 1824.

The United States' schooner Wild Cat, Lieutenant Commandant Legare, arrived here on the 20th instant from Matanzas. By Lieutenant Legare I received your instructions of the 14th, 15th and 16th ultimo, and shall avail myself of her sailing this evening to comply with the order of the 16th.

The Wild Cat, from the representation of her commander, was permitted to heave out and overhaul; every exertion, however, has been made to get her ready for sea; she is now in good order, and will, with the Terrier, I hope, be enabled to protect our commerce in the vicinity of Havana and Matanzas.

Lieutenant Legare spoke the Terrier the night previous to his going into Matanzas, to windward, where I had ordered her for the purpose of examining Point Yeacos and Suagassa Bay; and it is with pleasure I inform you that he stated the Terrier to have been successful in the capture of a pirate, a launch, with from eight to ten men. I expect the Terrier, Lieutenant Paine, every hour; on her arrival I will embrace the first opportunity of giving you the particulars of this pleasing information.

Copy of a letter from Lieutenant Commandant John Gallagher to Commodore David Porter, communicated to the Secretary of the Navy.

United States' schooner Shark, Havana, November 6, 1824.

Sir:

I had the honor to address you from Thompson's Island, dated 8th of September last, giving an account of our proceedings up to that date.

The wind being from the southward, and squally, we did not sail from Thompson's Island until the 10th, and arrived at Havana on the 12th. After remaining at the Havana three days, not finding any vessels bound into the Gulf of Mexico, or desirous of convoy, we left the harbor, and stretched over for Thompson's Island, for the double purpose of landing $2,000, taken on board at Havana for Purser Thornton, (which money I was requested to land there, it being much wanted for the station,) and ascertaining if Lieutenant Varnum, in the barge Gallinipper, and the schooner Terrier, had sailed on the expedition to Point Yeacos.

I arrived at the island on the 16th of September, landed the specie, (Lieutenant Varnum had sailed four days previous,) and sailed again on the next day, shaping our course for the Gulf of Mexico.

After arriving in the Gulf, we cruised about six weeks, touching off Campeachy, and communicating with the town. Not finding any American vessels here, nor hearing of any pirates, or recent piracies, we proceeded to the westward, cruising from Roca Partido up with Alvarado; after which, anchored off the harbor of Alvarado, and communicated with the town, offering convoy and protection to our commerce. There being only three American vessels in port, none of which were ready to sail immediately, my further services being unnecessary at that time,

--1011--

I proceeded to Vera Cruz, at which place we remained at anchor three days; the Weasel in company, bound to Alvarado. There was not a single American vessel in port; consequently, my services were not necessary at that place. We got under way, and cruised to the northward, as far as Tampico, where we anchored and communicated with the town, offering protection and convoy to any vessels bound out. We remained off Tampico, and in the neighborhood, ten days; from thence cruised to the southward, and off Vera Cruz and Alvarado, but were unable to communicate with the shore, in consequence of bad weather.

The term of our cruise in the Gulf having nearly expired, we shaped our course for Yacatan Bank, where we cruised in sight of Alacram, and in the neighborhood, a few days, stretching off Capes Catoche and Antonio; from thence to this port, where we arrived to-day. It affords me great satisfaction to state that the officers and crew have enjoyed health since leaving New York, not having lost a man by sickness, nor have we had a single case of malignant fever on board.

I have the honor to be, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant,

JOHN GALLAGHER.

To Commodore David Porter,

Commanding the United States' squadron in the Gulf of Mexico and West Indies.

D.

Deaths in the United States' navy since December 1, 1823.

Names.

When died.

State.

CAPTAINS.

Samuel Evans,

June, 1824,

New Jersey.

Joseph Bainbridge,

November, 1824,

New Jersey.

Edward Trenchard,

November, 1824,

New Jersey.

Joseph S. Macpherson,

April, 1824,

Pennsylvania.

LIEUTENANTS.

Richard G. Edwards,

December, 1823,

North Carolina.

Francis B. Gamble,

September, 1824,

New Jersey.

Nathaniel L. Montgomery,

July, 1824,

New Jersey.

William Berry,

July, 1824,

Maryland.

Charles Lacey,

June, 1824,

New Jersey.

John L. Cummings,

July, 1824,

New Jersey.

SURGEONS' MATES.

William F. Rogers,

August, 1824,

Virginia.

John D. Armstrong,

September, 1824,

Ireland.

Joseph Kenz,

Louisiana.

PURSERS.

Richard C. Archer,

June, 1824,

Maryland.

George S. Wise,

November, 1824,

Virginia.

J. C. De Hart,

New Jersey.

MIDSHIPMEN.

William Rice,

February, 1824,

Maine.

J. H. Clinton,

June, 1824,

New York.

Charles E. Cutts,

New Hampshire.

James Hodge,

March, 1824,

Pennsylvania.

Gregory Purcell,

June, 1824,

New Hampshire.

Ebenezer Reyner,

June, 1824,

Pennsylvania.

William Shaw,

August, 1824,

Pennsylvania.

Resignations since December 1, 1823.

SURGEONS.

1823.—Joseph G. T. Hunt, Charles Cotton, George T. Kennon, William Barnwell, Jun.

1824.—Amos A. Evans, James Page, Robert R. Barton, R. E. Randolph, C. M. Reese.

SURGEONS' MATES.

1823.—Francis S. Beatie.

1824.—Manuel Phillips, R. F. Dandridge, R. F. Falconer.

LIEUTENANT.

1824.—James F. Curtis.

MIDSHIPMEN.

1824.—David Conyngham, Thomas Hayes, A. A. Alexander, J, M. Allen, J. H. Amory, John T. Bird, B. F. Bache, T. Gordon, John E. Heron, John W. Hunter, Oscar Irving, James P. Kid, Wm. B. M'Lean, N. Marchand, E. C. Pinckney, Henry Potter, William Pollard,

SAILING-MASTER.

1824.—William W. Sheed.

Dismissals since December 1, 1823.

Captain Samuel Angus, Lieutenant William A. Weaver, Midshipmen James Bradford, Robert B. Bell,

RECAPITULATION,

Deaths.

23

Resignations,

32

Dismissals,

4

Total,

59

--1012-

F.

Treasury Department, Second Comptrollers' Office, November 25, 1824.

Sir:

I have the honor herewith to furnish the statement requested by your letter of the 20th instant, showing the expenditure of the appropriations for the support of the navy during the three first quarters of the present year.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

RICHARD CUTTS.

Hon. Samuel L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy.

Statement of the expenditure of the appropriations for the support of the navy, from the 1st January to the 30th September, 1824.

Appropriations.

Amount of requisitions drawn on the Treasury.

Amount of refunding requisitions drawn.

Amount expended.

Pay, &c. of the navy afloat,

$850,087 55

$151,870 10

$698,217 45

The same, shore stations,

169,221 06

169,221 06

Provisions,

297,069 80

69,167 92

227,901 88

Contingent expenses prior to 1824,

102,447 67

1,595 50

100,852 17

The same, for 1824,

88,038 87

530 48

87,508 39

The same, for objects arising in the current year, not enumerated.

44 45

44 45

Improvement of navy yards, &c.

61,538 38

7,009 97

54,528 41

Ordnance,

21,193 53

1,176 05

20,017 48

Medicines, &c.

33,224 97

45 31

33,179 66

Repairs of vessels,

312,397 90

8,789 89

303,608 01

Gradual increase of the navy,

235,336 59

9,792 01

225,544 58

Pay of superintendents, &c.

4,701 41

1,519 31

3,182 10

Pay of laborers, &c.

7,741 92

308 95

7,432 97

Ship houses,

33,699 85

2,313 25

31,386 60

Docks and wharves in connexion with the inclined plane.

9,769 53

2,057 00

7,712 53

Prohibition of the slave trade,

12,535 03

13,535 03

Suppression of piracy,

33,233 29

9,197 17

14,036 12

Surveying the coast of Florida,

4,052 04

3,196 37

855 67

Appropriation for the captors of Algerine vessels, (act of 27th April, 1816,)

56 59

56 59

Pay and subsistence of the marine corps,

129,989 55

84 89

129,904 66

Clothing of the marine corps,

19,592 43

19,592 42

Contingent expenses, marine corps,

5,288 41

5,288 41

Military stores, marine corps,

3,051 25

3,051 25

Fuel, marine corps,

3,775 93

3,775 93

Medicines, &c. for the marines on shore,

450 29

450 29

Repairing barracks and building new barracks at Portsmouth, -

5,631 81

5,631 81

Act for the relief of Benjamin King,

657 69

657 69

Act for the relief of John K. Carter,

901 57

901 57

Act for the relief of Jonas Duncan,

60 00

60 00

Rewarding the officers and crews of two gigs or small boats, under the command of Lieutenant Francis H. Gregory, for the capture and destruction of a British gun-boat called the Black Snake,

3,000 00

3,000 00

Rewarding the officers and crew of the Constitution frigate for the capture of the British sloop of War Levant,

66 63

Examining and surveying the harbor of Charleston in South Carolina, of St. Mary's in Georgia, and of Pensacola and the coast of Florida,

2,962 37

2,962 37

Building barges,

409 58

$2,441,751 72

$269,130 38

$2,173,097 55

Treasury Department, Second Comptroller's Office, November 25, 1824.

RICHARD CUTTS.

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office, December 1, 1824.

Sir:

I have the honor to hand you, herewith, a statement of the Navy Hospital Fund, to the 30th September, 1834, exhibiting a balance to its credit on that day, on the books of this office, of one hundred and thirty-two thousand five hundred and seventy-four dollars and eighty-eight cents.

On the 18th October, 1824, a requisition was drawn, in favor of Thomas Tudor Tucker, on account of the moneys passed to the credit of the fund during the preceding quarter, and with which it is charged, for five thousand nine hundred and ninety-three dollars and seven cents, which reduces the balance actually due to the fund on the 30th September, 1824, to one hundred and twenty-six thousand five hundred and eighty-one dollars and eighty-one cents.

It will be perceived that there is a difference of seventeen dollars and ninety-four cents, between the amount credited to the fund, in the present statement, for the third quarter of 1824, and that reported to you on the 1st of October last, owing to an error in posting the ledger, and not discovered until the books were examined.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

T. WATKINS.

Hon. Samuel L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy.

--1013--

Dr.

Navy Hospital Fund.

Cr.

 

May 21, 1824,

To requisition on the Treasury, for No. 2,223, in favor of Tho's T. Tucker, for

5,353 74

By amount standing at the credit of the Navy Hospital Fund, per the report transmitted 29th October, 1823,

117,074 34

 

By amount carried to the credit of said fund, for fourth quarter, 1823,

2,640 21

July 14, 1824,

To do. for No. 2,418, in favor of Tho's T. Tucker, for

2,026 99

By amount credited in first quarter, 1824,

12,238 74

To balance due Navy Hospital Fund,

132,574 88

By amount credited in second quarter, 1824,

2,026 99

 

$139,955 61

By amount credited in third quarter, 1824,

5,975 33

 

22,881 27

 

139,955 61

 

By balance to the credit of said fund, on 30th September, 1824,

$132,574 88

 

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office, December 1, 1824.

T. WATKINS.

G.

Navy Commissioners' Office, November 20, 1824.

Sir:

Agreeably to your directions, the Commissioners of the Navy have the honor to enclose—

Estimates of the expenses of the navy for the year 1825, marked G 1, with explanatory statements marked G. 2.

State of the vessels in ordinary, marked G 3.

Statement of the progress made under the law for the gradual increase of the navy, marked G 4, and an estimate of the expenses of the Navy Commissioners' Office for the year 1825, marked G 5.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, your most obedient servant,

JOHN RODGERS.

Hon. Samuel L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy.

G 1.

There will be required, for the support of the navy, during the year 1825, the sum of two millions two hundred and ninety thousand seven hundred and ninety-four dollars and sixty cents, viz:

1. For pay and subsistence of officers, seamen, &c. other than those at navy yards, shore stations, and in ordinary,

$783,554 37

2. For pay and subsistence of officers arid others, at navy yards, shore stations, and in ordinary,

279,365 33

For provisions,

355,875 00

4. For repairs of vessels, and wear and tear of vessels in commission,

450,000 00

5. For improvement and repairs of navy yards,

155,000 00

6. For ordnance and ordnance stores,

35,000 00

7. For medicines and hospital stores,

35,000 00

8. For defraying the expenses which may accrue during the year 1825, for the following purposes: For freight and transportation of materials and stores of every description; for wharfage and dockage; for storage and rent; for travelling expenses of officers and transportation of seamen; tor house rent or chamber money; for fuel and candles to officers, other than those attached to navy yards and shore stations; for commissions, clerk hire, office rent, stationary, and fuel, to navy agents; for premiums and incidental expenses for recruiting; for expenses of pursuing deserters; for compensation to Judge Advocates; for per diem allowance to persons attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, and to officers engaged in extra service, beyond the limits of their stations; for expenses of persons in sick quarters; for burying deceased persons belonging to the navy; for printing and for stationary of every description; for books, charts, nautical and mathematical instruments, chronometers, models, and drawings; for purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for purchase and repairs of steam and fire engines and machinery; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage; for cabin furniture of vessels in commission: for taxes on navy yards and public property; for assistance rendered to public vessels in distress; for incidental labor at navy yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; for coal and other fuel for forges, foundries, steam engines, and for vessels in commission and in ordinary, and for no other object or purpose whatsoever.

200,000 00

For contingent purposes,

5,000 00

$2,298,794 60

--1014--

G 2.

Explanatory statement of the first item of the general estimate, being an estimate of the pay and subsistence of all persons in the navy, other than those attached to navy yards, shore stations, vessels in ordinary, and hospitals, for the year 1825.

One ship of the line.

Two frigates, 1st class.

One frigate, 2d class.

Three sloops, 1st class.

Three sloops, 2d class.

Five brigs & schooners.

Eight small vessels.

Whole No. of officers, &c.

Amount of compensation.

Captains,

2

2

2

1

7

$13,121 25

Masters commandant,

1

2

3

6

6,510 00

Lieutenants commanding,

5

8

13

11,358 75

Lieutenants,

10

16

7

15

12

10

17

87

57,637 50

Masters,

1

2

1

3

3

3

8

21

11,996 25

Second masters,

1

1

360 00

Chaplains,

1

2

1

4

2,285 00

Surgeons,

1

2

1

3

3

5

1

16

11,060 00

Pursers,

1

2

1

3

3

5

1

16

9,140 00

Boatswains,

1

2

1

3

3

10

3,312 50

Gunners,

1

2

1

3

3

10

3,312 50

Carpenters,

1

2

1

3

3

1

11

3,643 75

Sailmakers,

1

2

1

3

3

10

3,312 50

Midshipmen,

34

40

15

36

30

30

27

212

48,336 00

Surgeons' mates,

3

4

3

3

3

-

10

25

11,281 25

Schoolmasters, -

1

-

-

-

-

1

391 25

Clerks,

1

2

1

3

3

5

15

4,500 00

Armorers,

1

2

1

3

3

5

15

3,240 00

Boatswains' mates,

6

8

3

6

6

10

8

47

10,716 00

Gunners' mates, -

3

4

2

6

3

5

8

31

7,068 00

Carpenters' mates,

2

4

1

3

3

5

10

28

6,384 00

Masters-at-arms,

1

2

1

3

3

5

15

3,240 00

Coxswains,

1

2

I

3

3

10

2,160 00

Ships' corporals,

2

4

1

7

1,512 00

Coopers,

1

2

1

3

3

10

2,160 00

Cooks,

1

2

1

3

3

5

8

23

4,968 00

Sailmakers' mates,

2

2

1

3

3

5

16

3,648 00

Quarter-gunners,

20

24

10

24

18

10

8

114

24,624 00

Quartermasters,

10

16

6

15

12

10

8

77

16,632 00

Yeomen,

3

6

3

9

6

5

32

6,912 00

Pursers' stewards,

1

2

1

3

3

5

9

24

5,184 00

Seamen,

268

332

129

201

201

50

53

1,234

177,696 00

Ordinary seamen,

350

340

131

135

135

 

24

1,115

133,800 00

Boys,

50

56

22

30

30

1

189

13,608 00

783

888

350

531

507

183

210

3,452

$625,120 50

G 3.

Statement of the vessels in ordinary and receiving vessels at the navy yards upon the Atlantic coast.

AT NAVY YARD, CHARLESTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS.

Independence and Columbus, ships of the line. These ships would require an examination of their copper, and some slight repairs, before going to sea.

Java, frigate. Used as a receiving vessel; is much decayed, but is worthy of repairs, which it is recommended to have made during the next year.

AT NAVY YARD, BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

Ohio and Washington, ships of the line. Their copper would require examination, and some repairs might be necessary, before sending them to sea.

Franklin, ship of the line. Has just returned from a three years' cruise, and would probably require considerable repairs before making another cruise.

Fulton, steam ship. Used as a receiving vessel, much decayed.

AT NAVY YARD, GOSPORT, VIRGINIA.

Delaware, ship of the line. Her copper would require examination, and some repairs would be necessary, before she went to sea.

Guerriere, Congress, and Macedonian, frigates. Require extensive repairs, which it is recommended to make during the next year.

Alert. Used as a receiving vessel.

Asp. A small hulk, used as a receiving vessel at Baltimore, much decayed, and unworthy of repairs.

Statement showing the state and condition of the vessels upon the Lake stations.

AT ERIE, PENNSYLVANIA.

Lawrence, Detroit, Porcupine, Queen Charlotte, Ghent.—Much decayed, and believed to be totally unworthy of repair; it is recommended to break them up, or dispose of them, and to sell or transport the stores at Erie to New York, as may be most advantageous to the public interests.

AT SACKETT'S HARBOR, LAKE ONTARIO.

Chippewa and New Orleans, ships of the line. On the stocks, partly finished, and sound; under cover.

Superior, Mohawk, Pike, Madison, Jefferson, Jones, Sylph, Oneida, Lady of the Lake, fourteen gun boats. Originally built of green timber, and now so much decayed as to be deemed unworthy of repair. It is recommended

--1015--

to break them up, or dispose of them, and to transport the stores at Sackett's Harbor to New York, or sell them, as may be found most advantageous to the public interests.

AT WHITEHALL, LAKE CHAMPLAIN.

Confiance, Saratoga, Eagle, Ticonderoga, six galleys. Entirely decayed; recommended to dispose of them, or break them up, and transport the stores to New York, or dispose of them, as may be most advantageous.

G 4.

Statement of the progress made under the law for the gradual increase of the navy.

SHIPS LAUNCHED.

Columbus, Delaware, Ohio, North Carolina. Ships of the line.

SHIPS BUILDING.

One ship of the line, near Portsmouth, New Hampshire, might be launched in

60 days.

One frigate, near Portsmouth, New Hampshire, might be launched in

60

One ship of the line, at Charlestown, Massachusetts, might be launched in

30

One ship of the line, at Charlestown, Massachusetts, might be launched in

60

One frigate, at Brooklyn, New York, might be launched in-

30

One frigate, at Brooklyn, New York, might be launched in

90

One ship of the line, at Philadelphia, might be launched in

150

One frigate, at Philadelphia, might be launched in

30

Two frigates, at Washington, might be launched in

30

One ship of the line, at Gosport, Virginia, might be launched in

60

The equipment of these ships would require a considerably longer time than that given in which they might be launched.

Frames for three other frigates, and for three steam batteries, are deposited as follows:

For one frigate at Charlestown, Massachusetts.

For two steam batteries at New York.

For one frigate at Norfolk. A considerable part of the copper, iron, lead, two steam engines and boilers, and other imperishable articles, are procured for their completion.

For one frigate, and one steam battery, at Washington.

EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE FIRST ITEM-Continued.

For receiving vessels.

1—Boston

1—at New York

1—at Norfolk.

1—at Philadelphia.

1—at Baltimore.

Whole number.

Masters commandant,

1

1

1

3

$3,255 00

Lieutenants,

3

3

3

1

1

11

7,287 50

Pursers,

1

1

1

3

1,713 75

Masters,

1

1

1

3

1,713 75

Surgeons' mates,

1

1

1

3

1,353 75

Midshipmen,

2

16

3,648 00

Boatswains.

1

1

1

3

993 75

Gunners,

1

1

1

3

993 75

Carpenters' mates,

1

1

1

3

648 00

Stewards,

1

1

1

3

648 00

Cooks,

1

1

1

3

648 00

Able seamen,

4

4

4

2

2

16

3,304 00

Ordinary seamen,

8

8

8

2

26

3,120 00

Boys,

6

6

6

2

20

1,440 00

34

34

34

7

7

116

$29,803 25

For recruiting stations.

1—at Boston.

1—at New York.

1—at Philadelphia.

1—at Norfolk.

1—at Baltimore.

Whole number.

Masters commandant,

1

1

1

1

1

5

$5,425 00

Midshipmen,

2

2

2

2

3

11

3,652 00

Surgeons,

1

1

1

1

4

5,239 00

Surgeons' mates,

1

1

938 75

4

4

4

4

5

21

$15,254 75

--1016--

For ordnance duties.

1 Master commandant,

1

$1,176 25

Officers awaiting orders and on furlough.

Captains

Masters commandant.

Lieutenants.

Masters.

Surgeons.

Pursers.

Surgeon's mates.

Chaplains.

Midshipmen.

Sailmaker.

Whole number.

Amount of compensation.

Awaiting orders,

4

6

99

10

10

3

35

1

168

$100,902 50

On furlough,

1

12

9

1

1

1

21

48

11,297 12

4

7

111

19

1

11

1

3

56

1

214

$112,199 62

Recapitulation.

For cruising vessels in commission,

$625,120 50

For receiving vessels,

29,803 25

For recruiting stations,

15,254 75

For ordnance duty,

1,176 25

For officers awaiting orders and on furlough,

112,199 62

$783,554 37

Explanatory statement of the second item of the general estimate, being an estimate of the pay, subsistence, and allowances of every description of officers and others, attached to navy yards, shore stations, vessels in ordinary, and hospitals.

PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Number.

Rank and description.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cors of wood per annum.

Servants at $8 per month.

Servants at $6 per month.

Amount of pay and rations, including servants, &c. per ann.

CIVIL

DEPARTMENT.

TOTAL.

PAY.

Per day.

Month.

Year.

1

Captain,

$100

16

65

30

3

$3,466 75

1

Master commandant,

60

5

$300

40

20

2

2,010 75

1

Sailingmaster,

40

2

200

20

12

1

1,141 75

1

Surgeon,

50

2

200

20

20

1

1,309 75

1

Purser,

40

2

900

20

12

1

1,141 75

1

Boatswain,

20

2

90

12

9

1

741 75

1

Gunner,

20

2

90

12

9

1

741 75

1

Steward,

18

1

307 25

1

Carpenter's mate qualified as caulker,

19

1

319 25

5

Seamen,

12

1

1,176 25

5

Ordinary seamen,

10

1

1,056 25

$13,413 25

CIVIL.

1

Storekeeper,

$1,500 00

1

Clerk to storekeeper,

250 00

1

Clerk of the yard and commandant's clerk, -

600 00

1

Master builder and inspector of timber.

2,000 00

1

Clerk to do. and clerk of the check,

20

240 00

1

Porter,

20

240 00

1

Master blacksmith.

$2 50

782 50

1

Master joiner,

3 00

939 00

1

Master sparmaker

2 00

636 00

1

Master caulker,

2 25

704 50

1

Master sailmaker,

2 50

783 50

1

Master cooper,

2 00

626 00

1

Master boat builder,

1 75

547 75

9,838 00

$33,251 25

--1017--

BOSTON.

Number.

Rank And Description.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per ann.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8 per month.

Servants at $6 per month.

Amount of pay and
rations, including
servants, &c. per ann.

CIVIL DEPARTMENT.

Total.

PAY.

Per day.

Month.

Year.

1

Captain,

$100

16

65

30

3

$3,466 75

1

Master commandant,

60

5

$300

40

20

2

2,010 75

1

Lieutenant,

40

3

300

20

20

1

1,281 00

1

Lieutenant,

40

3

753 75

I

Master,

40

2

200

20

12

1

1,141 75

1

Master,

40

2

662 50

-

1

Surgeon,

50

2

300

20

20

1

1,309 75

1

Surgeon's mate,

30

2

145

16

14

1

950 75

1

Purser,

40

2

300

20

13

1

1,141 75

1

Chaplain,

40

2

250

913 50

3

Midshipmen,

19

1

957 75

1

Boatswain,

20

3

90

12

9

1

741 75

1

Gunner,

30

3

90

12

9

1

741 75

1

Steward,

18

1

307 25

1

Carpenter's mate, qualified as caulker.

19

1

319 25

10

Seamen,

13

1

2,352 50

10

1

2,112 50

Ordinary seamen,

10

1

$21,164 00

HOSPITAL.

1

Surgeon,

50

3

200

30

20

1

1,309 75

1

Surgeon's mate.

30

2

145

16

14

1

950 75

1

Steward,

18

1

307 25

3

Nurses,

10

1

422 50

2

Washerwomen,

8

1

374 50

1

Cook,

12

I

235 25

3,600 00

CIVIL.

1

Storekeeper,

200

$1,500 00

1

Clerk to storekeeper,

450 00

1

Clerk of the yard,

900 00

1

Clerk to commandant,

750 00

1

Clerk to commandant,

30

360 00

1

Master builder,

2,000 00

1

Clerk to do. and clerk of the check,

35

420 00

1

Inspector and measurer of timber,

$30

900 00

1

Porter,

360 00

1

Master boat builder,

$2 00

626 00

1

Master joiner,

3 00

939 00

1

Master blacksmith,

2 50

782 50

1

Master caulker,

2 50

782 50

1

Master sparmaker,

2 25

704 25

1

Master cooper,

2 00

626 00

1

Master sailmaker,

3 75

860 75

1

Master armorer,

3 81

879 50

14,040 50

$38,804 50

NEW YORK.

1

Captain,

$100

16

65

30

3

$3,466 75

1

Master commandant,

60

5

$300

40

30

2

2,010 75

1

Lieutenant,

40

3

300

20

30

1

1,281 00

1

Lieutenant,

40

3

753 75

1

Master,

40

3

200

20

13

1

1,141 75

1

Master,

40

2

662 50

1

Surgeon,

50

3

200

20

20

1

1,309 75

1

Surgeon's mate,

30

2

145

16

14

1

950 75

1

Purser,

40

2

200

20

12

1

1,141 75

1

Chaplain,

40

2

250

912 50

3

Midshipmen,

19

1

957 75

1

Boatswain,

30

2

90

12

9

1

741 75

1

Gunner,

30

2

90

12

9

1

741 75

1

Steward,

18

1

307 25

1

Carpenter's mate, qualified as caulker,

19

1

319 25

10

Seamen,

13

1

2,352 50

10

Ordinary seamen,

10

1

2,112 50

$21,164 00

HOSPITAL.

1

Surgeon,

50

2

250

30

20

1

-

1,309 75

1

Surgeon's mate,

30

2

145

16

14

1

950 75

1

Steward,

18

1

307 25

3

Nurses,

10

1

422 50

2

Washerwomen,

8

1

374 50

1

Cook,

13

1

235 25

3,000 00

--1018--

NEW YORK—Continued.

Number.

RANK AND DESCRIPTION.

Pay per
month.

Rations
per day.

House rent
per ann.

Candles
per annum.

Cords
of wood
 per annum.

Servants at
 $8 per month.

Servants at
$6 per month.

Amount
of pay and rations,
 including servants,
 &c. per ann.

CIVIL DEPARTMENT.

TOTAL.

PAY.

Per day.

Month.

Year.

CIVIL.

1

Storekeeper,

$200

$1,500 00

1

Clerk to storekeeper,

450 00

1

Clerk of the yard,

900 00

1

Clerk to commandant,

750 00

1

Clerk to commandant,

$30

360 00

1

Master boat-builder,

2,000 00

1

Clerk to do. and clerk of the check,

35

420 00

1

Inspector and measurer of timber.

900 00

1

Porter,

30

360 00

1

Master boat-builder,

$1 75

547 75

1

Master joiner,

3 00

939 00

1

Master blacksmith,

2 50

782 50

1

Master caulker,

2 25

704 25

1

Master sparmaker,

2 00

626 00

1

Master cooper,

2 00

626 00

1

Master sailmaker,

2 50

782 50

1

Master armorer,

2 00

626 00

13,474 00

$38,238 00

PHILADELPHIA.

1

Captain,

$100

16

65

30

3

$3,466 75

1

Master commandant,

60

5

$300

40

20

2

2,010 75

1

Master,

40

2

200

20

12

1

1,141 75

1

Surgeon,

50

2

200

20

20

1

1,309 75

I

Purser,

40

2

200

20

12

1

1,141 75

1

Boatswain,

20

2

90

12

9

1

741 75

1

Gunner,

20

2

90

12

9

1

741 75

1

Steward,

18

1

307 25

1

Carpenter's mate, qualified as caulker,

19

1

319 25

5

Seamen,

12

1

1,176 25

5

Ordinary seamen,

10

1

1,056 25

$13,413 25

HOSPITAL.

1

Surgeon,

50

2

200

20

20

1

1,309 75

1

Surgeon's mate,

30

2

145

16

14

1

950 75

2,260 50

CIVIL.

1

Storekeeper,

$1,200 00

1

Clerk to do.

300 00

1

Clerk of the yard,

600 00

1

Clerk to commandant,

600 00

1

Constructor,

2,300 00

1

Master builder and

master joiner,

1

Clerk to do. and clerk of the check,

$25

1,200 00

300 00

1

Inspector of timber,

500 00

1

Porter,

20

240 00

1

Master boat-builder

$1 75

547 75

1

Master blacksmith,

2 50

782 50

1

Master sparmaker,

2 00

626 00

1

Master caulker,

2 25

704 25

1

Master cooper,

2 00

626 00

10,526 50

$26,200 25

--1019--

NORFOLK.

Number.

RANK AND DESCRIPTION.

Pay per
month.

Rations
per day.

House rent
per ann.

Candles
per annum.

Cords
 of wood
per annum.

Servants
at $8 per
month.

Servants
at $6 per
month.

Amount
of pay and
rations,
 including

servants, &c.

per ann.

CIVIL DEPARTMENT.

TOTAL.

Pay
Per
 day.

Pay
Per
Month.

Pay
Per
Year.

1

Captain,

$100

16

65

30

3

$3,466 75

1

Master commandant,

60

5

$300

40

30

3

3,010 75

1

Lieutenant,

40

3

300

30

30

1

1,381 00

1

Lieutenant,

40

3

753 75

1

Master,

40

2

300

30

13

1

1,141 75

1

Master,

40

2

662 60

1

Surgeon,

50

2

200

20

20

1

1,309 75

1

Surgeon's mate,

30

2

145

16

14

1

950 75

1

Purser,

40

2

200

20

12

1

1,141 75

1

Chaplain,

40

2

350

912 50

3

Midshipmen,

19

1

957 75

1

Boatswain,

20

2

90

13

9

1

741 75

1

Gunner,

20

2

90

13

9

1

741 75

1

Steward,

18

1

307 25

1

Carpenter's mate, qualified as caulker,

19

1

319 25

10

Seamen,

12

1

2,352 50

10

Ordinary seamen,

10

1

2,112 50

$21,164 00

HOSPITAL.

1

Surgeon,

50

2

300

20

30

1

1,309 75

1

Surgeon's mate,

30

2

145

16

14

1

950 75

1

Steward,

18

1

307 25

3

Nurses,

10

1

433 50

2

Washerwomen,

8

1

374 50

1

Cook,

13

1

335 25

3,600 00

CIVIL.

1

Storekeeper,

300

$1,500 00

1

Clerk to storekeeper,

450 00

1

Clerk of the yard,

900 00

1

Clerk to commandant,

750 00

1

Clerk to commandant,

$30

360 00

1

Master builder,

2,000 00

1

Clerk to do. and clerk of the check,

35

420 00

1

Inspector and measurer of timber,

900 00

1

Porter,

30

360 00

1

Master boat-builder,

$2 50

782 50

1

Master joiner,

3 50

782 50

1

Master blacksmith,

3 00

939 00

1

Master caulker,

3 35

704 25

1

Master sparmaker,

3 50

1,095 50

1

Master cooper,

3 50

782 50

1

Master armorer,

3 50

782 50

1

Master sailmaker,

2 50

782 50

1

Keeper of magazine,

40

480 00

14,971 25

$39,735 25

WASHINGTON.

1

Captain,

$100

16

$60

30

3

$3,466 75

1

Master commandant-

60

5

$300

40

20

2

2,010 75

1

Lieutenant,

40

3

200

25

30

1

1,281 00

1

Master,

40

2

200

20

12

1

1,141 75

1

Purser,

40

2

200

20

13

1

1,141 75

1

Surgeon,

50

3

200

20

30

1

1,309 75

1

Surgeon's mate,

30-

2

145

16

12

1

938 75

1

Boatswain,

30

2

90

12

9

1

741 75

1

Master in charge of ordnance.

40

2

104

766 50

1

Gunner, as laboratory

officer.

20

2

12

9

651 75

1

Master keeper of magazine.

40

2

662 50

1

Steward,

18

1

307 25

1

Carpenter's mate, qualified as caulker,

19

1

319 25

6

Seamen,

12

1

1,176 25

5

Ordinary seamen,

10

1

1,056 25

$16,972 00

HOSPITAL.

1

Surgeon,

50

2

200

20

20

1

1,309 75

1

Surgeon's mate,

30

2

145

16

13

1

938 75

2,248 50

--1020--

WASHINGTON—Continued.

Number.

Rank and description.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent
 per ann.

Candles
per annum.

Cords of wood
per annum.

Servants at
$8 per month.

Servants at
$6 per month.

Amount
of pay and
 rations,
including
servants, &c.
 per ann.

CIVIL DEPARTMENT.

TOTAL.

Pay Per day.

Pay Per Month.

Pay Per Year.

Civil.

1

Storekeeper,

$200

$1,500 00

1

Clerk to storekeeper,

450 00

1

Clerk of the yard,

900 00

1

Clerk to commandant,

1,000 00

1

Clerk to commandant,

$40

480 00

1

Naval construction,

2,300 00

1

Draughtsman,

40

480 00

1

Master builder,

1,000 00

1

Clerk to master builder, and clerk of the check,

35

420 00

1

Inspector of timber,

900 00

1

Master chain cable and cable maker,

1,500 00

1

Master plumber,

1,200,00

1

Porter,

30

360 00

1

Master anchor maker,

$2 24

701 12

1

Master shipsmith,

2 50

781 50

1

Master sawyer,

2 24

702 12

1

Master block maker,

3 00

939 00

1

Master joiner,

3 00

939 00

1

Master boat-builder,

3 00

939 00

1

Master caulker,

2 24

701 12

1

Master armorer,

2 24

701 12

1

Master cooper,

1,000 00

1

Master sailmaker,

3 00

939 00

1

Master engineer,

2 50

782 50

1

Master machinist,

1,500 00

23,815 48

$43,035 98

NEW-ORLEANS.

1

Captain,

$100

16

$600

$65

30

3

$4,066 75

1

Lieutenant,

40

3

240

20

20

1

1,321 00

1

Surgeon,

50

2

240

20

20

1

1,349 75

1

Purser,

40

2

200

20

12

1

1.141 75

1

Boatswain,

20

2

104

12

9

1

755 75

1

Gunner,

20

2

104

12

9

1

755 75

1

Carpenter,

20

2

104

12

9

1

755 75

1

Steward,

18

1

307 25

4

Seamen,

12

1

941 00

4

Ordinary seamen,

10

1

845 00

$12,239 75

CIVIL.

1

Storekeeper,

200

$1,500 00

1

Clerk to commandant,

S30

360 00

3,060 00

$14,299 75

SACKETT'S HARBOR.

1

Captain,

$100

8

$400

$65

30

3

$3,061 75

1

Lieutenant,

40

3

200

20

20

1

1,231 00

1

Surgeon,

50

2

200

20

13

1

1,231 75

1

Purser, to act as storekeeper.

40

3

200

20

12

1

1,111 75

1

Boatswain,

20

2

90

12

9

1

719 25

1

Gunner,

20

2

90

12

9

1

719 25

1

Carpenter,

20

2

90

12

9

1

719 25

2

Seamen,