--98--

19th Congress.]

No. 268.

[1st Session.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, WITH THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE, SHOWING THE OPERATIONS OF THAT DEPARTMENT IN 1825.

COMMUNICATED TO CONGRESS WITH THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE OF THE 6TH OF DECEMBER, 1825.

Navy Department, December 2, 1825.

The Secretary of the Navy respectfully submits to the President of the United States the following statements respecting the concerns of the Navy Department, during the present year.

The vessels in commission, for active service, at sea, have been the same as they were at the close of the last year, with the following exceptions:

The frigate Brandywine, then on the stocks at the navy yard in this place, has been launched and fitted out, and is now a part of the Mediterranean squadron. The schooner Nonsuch has been sold, because she was so far decayed that it was not "for the interest of the United States to repair her." The schooner Ferret was lost, in a gale, on the coast of Cuba, on the 4th February last. The Beagle and Terrier have been sold, under the law of the last session, entitled, "An act to authorize the building of ten sloops of war, and for other purposes." The latter recently arrived at Wilmington, North Carolina, in distress, and was disposed of, at public auction at that place. The proceeds of the sales of the vessels sold have been carried to the fund designated by law. The Decoy is still used, as a storeship, but will be sold on her return to the United States. The Sea Gull has been profitably converted into a receiving vessel at Philadelphia. Some of the barges have become useless, by decay, and the rest are retained on the Florida station.

The Fox, a schooner of fifty-three tons, is the only cruising vessel remaining, of those purchased under the "Act authorizing an additional naval force for the suppression of piracy."

The paper marked A, exhibits the vessels in commission, and the station on which each is employed.

The West India squadron now consists of the frigate Constellation, corvette John Adams, sloop Hornet, brig Spark, schooners Grampus, Shark and Fox, and the storeship Decoy, with the barges. The duties assigned to it have been signally accomplished. Several captures of pirates were made, in the early part of the year, of which the documents annexed furnish an account. See papers marked B. Since that time, the principal places where piracy existed have been diligently watched, and no complaints on the subject have been made, to the knowledge of the Department, for several months past.

Captain Warrington, an active, systematic and enterprising officer, commands in that quarter, and, seconded as he is, by a commendable zeal and skill in his subordinate officers, it is believed that he will continue to repress that evil, which has, heretofore, produced so much anxiety and distress.

--99--

There have been thirteen deaths among the officers attached to that squadron, occasioned by diseases, contracted either in the vessels, or in the ports of the West Indies.

Against danger, from this cause, the commanding officer was particularly instructed to be upon his guard, and has, no doubt, been attentive to his orders [missing] exposures are incident to the service, and where so many officers are subjected to them, it must be expected that they will prove fatal to some; especially to those who are not very cautious in guarding their health. We have been, however, so far fortunate, as to suffer less, from this cause, in the present, than the preceding years; arising probably, in part, from a change in the size and character of the vessels employed; and steady attention is paid to the subject, and such arrangements made, as give the best hopes of lessening the evil. Although sickness has prevailed at Thompson's Island to a distressing extent, it has been less severe than heretofore. Two officers have died there, and their deaths are probably not to be attributed solely to the climate.

The station at that place having been found unhealthy, a surrender of the buildings occupied by the War Department, at Pensacola, was obtained for the purpose, and arrangements made, early in the spring, for the removal of the stores, &c., to them. An order for the transfer was issued on the 24th May, to be sent by the Decoy; but an unexpected accident delayed the sailing of that vessel, until the 13th July, and she had an unusually long passage, of between forty and fifty days. The order is annexed, and marked C. The transfer has since been made, and Pensacola is now the rendezvous of the squadron, and will continue so; the site for a navy yard and depot having been selected, at that place, under the act of Congress, entitled, "An act authorizing the establishment of a navy yard and depot on the coast of Florida, in the Gulf of Mexico."

Immediately after the passage of that law, on the 3d March last, measures were taken to obtain such information, not then in the possession of the Department, as was necessary to a safe execution of the power, and this being procured, arrangements were made to send out Captains Bainbridge, Warrington and Biddle, to make the selection of a site.

They sailed from Norfolk on the 13th October, and arrived at Pensacola, after a very short passage, on the 25th; lost no time in completing a full examination of the places which were considered most likely to answer for such an establishment; and have made such a selection as their intelligence and discretion dictated. Their report was received at the Department on the 1st December, and has been transmitted to, and approved by you.

The orders under which they acted, together with their report, are annexed, and marked D.

The experience of the department, and personal observation during the last year, have entirely satisfied me that the greater part, if not the whole, of our navy yards, are badly located; and that a very large proportion of the public money, which has been, and continues to be, expended upon them, might have been saved, by a wiser location at the commencement. A desire to avoid the recurrence of this evil induced me to adopt the mode of selecting a site for the Florida navy yard; a mode in which the best skill would be exercised, in the absence of all private interests and feelings.

Under the law of last year, entitled "An act authorizing an examination of the harbor of Charleston, in South Carolina, of St Mary's, in Georgia, and of the coast of Florida, and for other purposes," surveys have been made of the harbors mentioned, and such examinations and surveys of Pensacola and the coast of Florida procured, as seemed necessary to accomplish the objects of that law. The expediency of establishing a "naval depot" on the Gulf of Mexico, was determined at the last session of Congress, and an appropriation made for the purpose. What has been done by the Department, on that subject, will be seen by the preceding part of this report.

A detailed statement of the surveys of Charleston and St. Mary's, to be accompanied by a chart, is now preparing, by the officers who were employed on that duty, may be communicated in the progress of the session, should it be wished, and will be some guide in forming an opinion "on the expediency of establishing a navy yard at either of those places, for the building and repairing of sloops of war and other vessels of an inferior class."

There are still, perhaps, one or two places on the coast of Georgia and South Carolina, which it would be proper to survey, but the appropriation is expended. These surveys, with others which have, from time to time, been made, under the direction of the Department, have, to a certain extent, been useful, but they have also been very expensive, in proportion to their usefulness. Made under special appropriations, and special acts of Congress, the officers and other means for their execution were to be collected at the time, and all the expense of organizing those means to be encountered at the commencement of every survey, and to be disposed of at its termination. A large part of the appropriations has necessarily been expended for this purpose; and I would respectfully suggest, that a more regular and systematic, and, therefore, economical plan, should be adopted. Our whole coast ought to be surveyed. The acquaintance with it, of our best informed men, both on land and water, is much more superficial than it ought to be. There is scarcely a mile of it which is thoroughly known. Hence our commerce, and the interests of our navy, suffer greatly, even in time of peace, and, in war, are unnecessarily hazarded. The last war exhibited, in many instances, in the enemy, a knowledge on this subject not inferior to that possessed by ourselves. It seems due to the character of the nation, and to the interests of commerce, and of the naval service, that a more systematic and scientific mode of making these surveys should be adopted; that they should extend over the whole coast; and that means, commensurate with the object, should be placed under the control of this or some other Department. A naval school would, in a short time, furnish cheap and valuable means of accomplishing them.

The Mediterranean squadron, at this time, consists of the North Carolina 74, frigates Brandywine, and Constitution, and sloops Ontario, and Erie, and is still under the command of Commodore Rodgers. A slight temporary alarm existed in the course of the summer, respecting its health, resulting from accidental causes, but from communications recently received from Commodore Rodgers, appears to have passed by, and it may be said that its general health during the year has been, and that it now is, as good as is common with our squadron in that sea. Three only of our officers, and very few of the men, have died, and no extensive sickness has prevailed among them.

The general objects of the squadron have continued the same as in former years, but additional importance has been given to its presence, in the eastern part of the Mediterranean, by the nature of the contest between Greece and Turkey, and the inconvenience to our commerce, likely to result from it. Some injuries must necessarily be anticipated, and some have actually been felt, from the unauthorized abuse of the flag of one of the contending parties to the purposes of plunder. The presence of the whole

--100--

squadron there for a short period, and the continuance of a portion of it for a much longer time, have, no doubt, prevented numerous trespasses upon our rights.

The commanding officer has been directed to yield a suitable protection to our commerce with Smyrna, and other places on the borders of that sea, and will, with his usual correctness and energy, discharge the trust confided to him. The squadron will rendezvous at Mahon for the winter, the Spanish government having granted permission to deposit, there, without charge, the stores necessary for its use. No positive exertion of force has been required to maintain our rights, nor has any incident, calling for particular mention, occurred, in preserving the discipline and health of the squadron. The whole is now in a state which merits approbation.

The Cyane lately returned from that station, and is about to perform a short cruise on the coast of South America, bordering on the Atlantic, having in view the general interests of our commerce, and a communication with the public agents of the government in that quarter. She is commanded by Captain Elliot.

The schooner Porpoise will sail in a few days, to join the squadron, and will carry orders for the frigate Brandywine to return to the United States, with a view to prepare her for a cruise in the Pacific, to relieve the frigate United States, in the course of the coming summer. It would, probably, be better not to lessen the force now in the Mediterranean, but it cannot be avoided, unless such an appropriation should be made as to enable the Department to put another frigate or ship of the line in commission.

Our naval force in the Pacific still consists of the frigate United States, the sloop of war Peacock, and the schooner Dolphin, under the command of Captain Hull. Our commerce, in that ocean, having suffered severely from the war between Spain and South America, being alternately the prey of those who used the flag of both parties, a determination was formed to recommend such an increase of our force as would be sufficient to command respect, and security for our interests, on every part of the extensive coasts of Chili and Peru, and enable the commanding officer, occasionally, to send a vessel to cruise along the coast of Mexico, California, and to the mouth of the, Columbia river. But this addition is not considered indispensably necessary at this time. The war in Chili and Peru is nearly closed, and there is no Spanish naval force on the water. This state of things has relieved entirely from the depredations of one party, and taken from the other all those excuses which are usually found under the claim of belligerent rights. Our interests and commerce are, therefore, comparatively safe, and do not require a large augmentation of force to protect them. Papers, marked F, are copies of letters from Commodore Isaac Hull.

It is nevertheless thought proper to add one vessel, a sloop of war, to the squadron; and when the extent of the coast, and the islands and ocean, and the variety and magnitude of our commerce upon them, is considered, no hesitation is felt in assuming it as a fact, that our interests require at least four vessels for their protection, even in a state of peace between all the powers, whose rights and commerce extend to that portion of the globe. It is proposed, therefore, in the course of the ensuing summer, to send another sloop of war to the Pacific, and also to relieve the frigate United States by a vessel of the same class.

Orders were given, on the 24th May last, to Commodore Hull, to visit, at a convenient and proper time, the Society and Sandwich Islands, for the purpose of looking to the interests of our navigators, and to endeavor to relieve some of the latter islands from a number of American seamen, who, having deserted, have given great annoyance both to our vessels and to the inhabitants. It is hoped he will be able to make that visit before he returns to the United States, and that it will have a salutary effect.

The distance to our squadron in the Pacific, and the length and uncertainty of the passages around Cape Horn, render it extremely inconvenient to make the necessary communications between the Department and the commanding officer. In some instances, within the last two or three years, it has been found necessary to send special messengers for the purpose. It is believed that a regular line of communication, through Panama and the Isthmus, may be established at small expense, so as to furnish a periodical conveyance in both directions, as often as once in four or six weeks. It is wished by the Department to have such a plan in operation in the course of the ensuing spring. Should the wish be gratified, great benefit will result to the public service, and the effect on the mercantile interests of the country may be estimated by those who best understand the extent of our commerce in the Pacific, and the difficulty of corresponding with commercial agents there

Inconveniencies having been, heretofore, felt, in the fisheries to the north, particularly in the Bay of Fundy, and on the coast of Newfoundland, it was thought that the presence of a public vessel might be useful there. The schooner Porpoise, under the command of Master Commandant Parker, was, therefore, sent, early in June; and, after making an examination, throughout the line of fisheries, as far north as 55 deg. 9 min. of latitude, returned to New York October 25. The reports of Captain Parker have been satisfactory, and the cruise beneficial. The only injury to our fishermen, of which information was received, was, that a small number of them had been, in the early part of the season, and before the arrival of the Porpoise, ordered away from Higurath Bay, by the French, who claim a right to the use of that bay, exclusive of all other nations; a right to which our government has not assented.

It is proposed that a similar cruise be made during the fishing season of the next year.

Due attention has been paid to the agency for recaptured Africans, and vessels, from time to time, sent to it, and to accomplish the objects of the laws for the suppression of the slave trade. No information has been received of our flag being used in that trade, although it continues to exist, and it is to be feared that some of our citizens are engaged in it. The situation of the agency has not been materially changed since the last communication respecting it.

The expenditures during the year, so far as yet known, are $12,900.31, and it will be necessary to make an additional appropriation for its support, in the course of the present session. The number of Africans sent to it will be greatly increased in the next three or four months. A decision of the Supreme Court in the case of the General Ramirez, placed under the control of the government from 125 to 130, who were brought into Georgia, and arrangements are making to send them to the agency.

The paper G shows the naval officers who have died since the 1st December, 1824. It contains the names of some of the most promising, active, and meritorious, at the head of whom is that of Commodore M'Donough. His loss is to be deeply deplored, both on account of the splendid services he has performed, and the useful example of private and public worth which he exhibited to his brother officers.

Paper H shows the resignations during the present year.

Paper I is a report of the expenditures for the naval service during the year.

--101--

The estimates for the ordinary service of the ensuing year will be found in papers marked K.

Should any, or all of the objects recommended in this report find favor with Congress, additional appropriations, to a small amount, will be required. The form of the estimates is the same as that of last year, both being dictated by the understanding which the Department has of the wishes of Congress on the subject. The reasons for any change which exists in the amount of any of the items, will be found in this report.

One of the most serious inconveniences under which the Department labors in the administration of the concerns of the navy, is the time at which the appropriation bills are passed by Congress. They are passed, in the short session, late in February, and, in the long session, generally in May, so that, during a period of from one-fourth to a third of the year, the Department is left with funds previously appropriated, and must, of necessity, permit expenditures not yet legally authorized. Another evil results: It is the will of Congress often to change the wording and character of the appropriation, and, after the bill is passed, it is a month or six weeks before the instructions under the new appropriation can be given to and acted upon by the agents. It consequently follows, that, for nearly one-half of the year, the Department acts in perfect ignorance of the law under which it is bound to act. Expenditures are made, under one form, when they ought to have been made under another. The law is, necessarily, not complied with, because it is passed after the act is performed. Infinite confusion is created in settling the accounts, and it is impossible for any talent or any industry ever to have them rendered and settled, in that plain and simple manner in which they ought always to be exhibited, and in which they must be exhibited if any efficient control is to be had by Congress or the Department, over that branch of the service. The accounting officers do all that capacity and labor can accomplish, but they cannot settle an account according to the forms of a law not yet in existence; nor can they, every year, alter the items, open new books, meet the errors resulting from this cause, in accounts transmitted from a distance, and yet settle the accounts of the year within the year. A remedy might be found in two circumstances:

1st. An earlier passage of the appropriation bill, or by making the year end on the 1st April, and always passing the bills before that day. If the latter mode be taken, the first appropriation should be for fifteen or eighteen months.

2d. By reducing the number of heads, under which the appropriation for the service is made, and continuing those heads permanently.

It would be more practicable, under this arrangement, than it now is, to make the investigation and preserve a rigid accountability.

The appropriation, so far as the contingent is concerned, has been, within the two last years, changed, and the sum appropriated, ordered to be expended only on the contingencies of the year in which the bills were passed.

Two difficulties have arisen, which it is my duty to mention:

1st. Much of the year had expired before the law was passed, and the agents and pursers informed of it; they, of course, had, until that time, paid the money and transmitted the accounts, under the old forms. An effort has been made to correct this unavoidable error, and to settle the accounts by the principle laid down in the law, but it has proved very ineffectual. It is next to impossible to retrace the items, and place them under their proper heads; and, where money has been paid, on debts really due by the government, for the preceding years, it could not be recovered.

In the second place, many of our officers are on foreign stations, and at such a distance from the seat of government that their claims in preceding years could not be transmitted for settlement, until after the passage of the existing law, and therefore, when presented, payment was denied to them. The Department had no right to use the appropriation for the satisfaction of any claims which originated before the beginning of the year.

Yet the claims were just; the government owed the money; the debt was honestly and fairly contracted under the law, as existing and known to the Department and officer. The effect on the service, and the individual, has been severely felt.

Another difficulty which has been encountered, and to which legislative attention will, no doubt, be directed at no distant period, is that of procuring and enlisting seamen. Our vessels are sometimes detained by it an inconvenient length of time, occasioning much additional expense, and depriving us of their active service at sea. The higher wages, and stronger inducements, held out by the merchant service, and the temptations presented by other governments, are the active causes which produce this state of things, at this time.

The Department has endeavored to escape the evil by such arrangements, as, being within its power, promised to have most effect. Among them, is that of placing, at each of the principal recruiting stations, a vessel not calculated for the sea, but fitted up with the same comfort, and officered and governed in the same way as if in actual commission, to which the recruit can be sent, and there kept, until he can be transferred to the vessel in which he is to sail. One or two have already been prepared for the purpose, and others will be, without delay. This arrangement is still matter of experiment, and the effect may not prove beneficial. The benefits promised are, that the seamen, assured of immediate comfort, will more readily enlist; their health will be promoted, and the diseases contracted on shore removed; they will be disciplined and trained, so as to be, at once, useful; fewer desertions will take place; they can be employed in the yards, should circumstances call for it; and our vessels, when they arrive, and discharge those whose service has expired, be again manned, without delay. But the arrangements of the Department, however useful, must be comparatively inefficient to remove the evils suggested. The remedy rests with the power which can establish permanent regulations, which will tend both to increase the number of seamen, and bind them more permanently to our public service. This object will be found, in the progress of our naval history, to be of high importance. Our naval power, in all other respects, has its limits only in the will of the nation. Our free institutions interpose a barrier to a compulsory augmentation of the number of our seamen, and a system must be devised which will ensure voluntary enlistments sufficient to meet our increasing wants. Two of the features of this system will probably be, to admit more boys, in the character of apprentices, and enlist robust and healthy landsmen, in the interior, who will soon acquire the habits and skill of seamen, and form a most valuable portion of our force.

Other difficulties have arisen, from the present disposition of the building arrangements at our yards. They have, heretofore, been improved by temporary expedients, and the buildings erected and arranged with reference only to existing necessities, and without regard to the future and growing wants of our

--102--

navy. Many and serious evils have resulted; much public money has been unnecessarily expended; many losses sustained by the change, removal, and alteration of the several erections; timber exposed to decay; stores requiring immense labor to deposit and preserve them; a much larger number of hands required to perform the work; unpleasant, and sometimes injurious delays in fitting out our vessels. It is a mortifying fact, yet there is no doubt of its truth, that one-third of the money expended at our yards, has been lost from this cause. The remedy is manifest, and it is earnestly hoped that means may be provided to apply it. A commission of prudent and intelligent officers should be selected, to examine minutely and carefully all our navy yards, and to make a plan for each, suited to its location, and the future wants of the service at it; prescribing the buildings which will be required, and the location and character of each building, together with such improvements in the ground and form of the yard as will be most beneficial. This plan, after being submitted to the Department, and amended if necessary, and approved, should be the guide in all future expenditures. The expense of making such a plan, and erecting the buildings necessary to execute it, would cost a large sum of money, and increase the present expense of our naval establishment; but the future saving to the nation, by adopting and pursuing it rigidly, may be counted by hundreds of thousands, perhaps by millions of dollars; and the promptitude which would be created by it in all our works, and especially in the fitting out of our vessels, be felt in the efficiency of every part of the service. A board of officers could form such a plan, to be submitted to the Department in the course of one season, and would be established; but it will demand some expenditure of money, and the present form of the appropriation forbids it; and, as it must be completed by legislative aid, it is now proposed to you, in the performance of my duty, that if approved, it may be adopted.

An allowance book for all the wants of each vessel of the several classes, has been prepared with great care, by the Board of Navy Commissioners, and approved by the Department; a copy of which will be sent to each of the yards, and be the invariable guide in preparing our vessels for sea. If to this were added, a proper arrangement of the buildings, materials, and stores, in the yard, a very small portion of the time now spent in port, would be required, and our vessels be able to render much more service at sea. Statement, marked E, in paper K, shows the progress made under the law for the gradual increase of the navy.

The annexed letter to the Commissioners of the Navy, marked L, and their report, marked F, in paper K, will show the progress that has been made in executing the law, passed on the 3d March last, "to authorize the building of ten sloops of war, and for other purposes." It will be perceived, that orders were issued to the respective commandants at Portsmouth, Philadelphia, Washington, and Gosport, for the construction of one sloop of war at each of the yards under their command; and, also, to the commandants at Charlestown and Brooklyn, to make arrangements to commence, immediately, the construction of three sloops of war at each of those yards. Three of the ten sloops will be launched within the present year, two at Charlestown, and one at Brooklyn, one of those at Charlestown will be ready for sea before the first January next.

Contracts for the timber and other materials, for all the sloops authorized by law, have been made upon terms favorable to the government, to be delivered at the several places of building, within the ensuing year: in which time, it is believed, the entire number may be afloat, should Congress think proper to make the appropriation for that purpose. It will be recollected that the estimate for building these vessels was $850,000, and that $500,000 only were appropriated by the law authorizing their construction. The remaining $350,000 will be necessary before they can be completed. The Department was urged to build some of these vessels by contract, with a view to occasion a portion of the expenditure at places other than our navy yards. But as all the expenditures of the Department, except the expenses of building, are made by public contract, and thus equally open to all parts of the Union, this consideration was believed to be of inferior moment, and other reasons seemed to render it both inexpedient and illegal. If built anywhere but in our public yards, it must have been by contract, or by the establishment of temporary yards. Building by contract has been abandoned, as inexpedient and expensive, for many years past, and ought not to be resumed but by the express direction of Congress. This direction has been, more than once, attempted, and always refused, thus indicating strongly the legislative opinion on the subject. The law itself, is in the same form as that for the gradual increase of the navy, and it was, therefore, to be presumed, that Congress meant it to be executed in the same mode. In addition to which, the appropriation was for a part only of the cost: and if contracts for completing the whole, had been made, a refusal by Congress to provide the means, at the time required by the contracts, would have created serious inconvenience to both parties.

The other mode, of establishing temporary yards for the purpose, collecting officers, materials, and machinery, and disposing of them when the work was completed, was surrounded by so many objections,

both as to convenience and. economy, as permitted no hesitation in rejecting it. It was not doubted, therefore, that the proper execution of the law required that the contracts for materials should be made in the usual mode, and the building be done at our public yards.

Under the authority given by the second section of this law, sale has been made of the whole of the public vessels upon Lakes Erie, Ontario, and Champlain, except the ships of the line New Orleans and Chippewa, at Sackett's Harbor, and the schooner Ghent at Erie. Almost the whole of the public property at those places has also been sold or ordered to be transported to the navy yards on the Atlantic, and the stations will be broken up as soon as those orders can be executed, leaving only an officer and one or two men at each, to look after such property as it may be found impossible or inexpedient to remove. For the expense attending these operations, no appropriation was made during the last session of Congress, the estimates having been presented before the law for the sale of the vessels on the lakes was passed, or the direction given for the removal of the stores. It has therefore diminished the contingent fund to an unexpected extent, and created a necessity for an addition to the appropriation of the present year. It is, however, a temporary expense, and less than is required for the support of

those stations, and will avoid the necessity of making estimates for them, after the present year, saving annually about $25,000. (See statement H in paper marked K.)

In this first annual report to you, I would respectfully call your attention to the wants of the service, in relation to discipline, efficiency, and economy. These matters have been presented and urged by me in reports to your predecessor and to Congress. To repeat my views on them would be superfluous; I therefore respectfully refer you to the reports, particularly those which are dated 24th January, 1824, and 1st January, 1825.

Without an organization of some kind, without a revision of our penal code, and of our rules and

--103--

regulations, and without a naval school, tardy amendments may be made in the naval service, and in its administration, but it is in vain to hope for speedy, useful, and very practical changes. The power of the Department is unequal to such objects. Even the exercise of the power properly belonging to it, without legislative aid in other respects, would produce unpleasant excitement and complaints. With the aid which has been heretofore earnestly entreated from Congress, it is confidently believed that a system more prompt, more efficient, and more economical, could readily be introduced.

The experience of the present year has confirmed, most strongly, the views taken on all the subjects mentioned in the reports to which 1 refer you.

Very respectfully, &c., SAM. L. SOUTHARD.

A.

List of vessels of the United States navy in commission, and their stations.

Name.

Rate.

Station.

North Carolina

74

Mediterranean.

Brandywine

44

Mediterranean.

Constitution

44

Mediterranean.

United States

44

Pacific.

Constellation

36

West Indies.

Cyane

24

Coast of Brazil.

John Adams

24

West Indies.

Erie

18

Mediterranean.

Ontario

18

Mediterranean.

Peacock

18

Pacific.

Hornet

18

West Indies,

Boston

18

Will be put in commission early next year.

Spark, brig

12

West Indies.

Porpoise, schooner

12

Mediterranean.

Grampus, schooner

12

West Indies.

Shark, schooner

12

West Indies.

Dolphin, schooner

12

Pacific.

Fox, schooner

3

West Indies.

Decoy, storeship

6

West Indies.

Barges

West Indies.

B.

Thompson's Island, February 15, 1825.

Sir: I regret very much that my first official report should be of an unpleasant nature.

The United States schooner Ferret, commanded by Lieutenant Charles H. Bell, was unfortunately lost on the coast of Cuba, between Matanzas and Havana, on the afternoon of the 4th inst.

The letter of her commander, (which will be communicated to you by Commodore Porter,) giving a clear and concise account of this untoward occurrence, renders it unnecessary for me to add anything on the subject.

I am greatly pleased to find the loss of human life is but small, and unmarked by the death of any officer, although the crew were twenty hours on the wreck in a high sea, without food or water. Five sailors only, (whose names are mentioned in the list accompanying Lieutenant Bell's letter,) were drowned. The active exertions of Lieutenant Commandant M'Keever of the Sea Gull, and of acting Sailing Master Porter, (who had been dispatched in a small vessel to Cuba,) rescued the remainder from impending death, when hope was nearly destroyed.

I am, with great respect, your obedient servant, L. WARRINGTON.

Hon. Samuel Southard, Secretary of the Navy.

U. S. Steam Galliot Sea Gull, Matanzas, March 10, 1825.

Sir: Since the departure of the John Adams, nothing material has occurred on this station. No piracies have been committed for several months past, nor have we the least intelligence that should induce us to believe there are any preparations making at the present moment, for their commission. The Sea Gull was sent up to the eastward a few days since, with orders to search a particular part of the coast very carefully, which duty she performed, and returned without seeing or hearing anything that could excite suspicion.

The presence of one or more of the small vessels constantly at and off this harbor, is, however, the cause of their inactivity.

I am fearful that the barge commanded by Lieutenant Pearson of the John Adams, which was missing at the time that ship sailed, is lost; as we have not heard of her, since the 10th of February. The following is the present distribution of the squadron: The Hornet, Captain Kennedy, cruising on the south side of this island. The Porpoise, Lieutenant Commandant Skinner, cruising in the Gulf of Mexico. The Grampus, Lieutenant Commandant Sloat, cruising off the Island of St. Thomas.

--104--

The Sea Gull, Lieutenant Commandant McKeever, and Terrier, Lieutenant Paine, stationed off this place for the protection of the commerce of this port.

The Shark, Lieutenant Commandant Gallagher, stationed at Havana for the same purpose. The Decoy, Lieutenant Commandant Mix, at Thompson's Island awaiting orders. 1 am, very respectfully, &c.

L. WARRINGTON.

The Hon. Samuel L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy.

U. S. Schooner Grampus, St. Thomas, March 12, 1825.

Sir: I have the honor to report, for the information of the Department, that, having learned that several vessels had been robbed by pirates, near Faxardo, and that two sloops of this place, and one of Santa Cruz, had been taken by them, and two of them were equipped and cruising as pirates, I obtained two small sloops at this place, free of expense, by the very cordial co-operation of his excellency Governor Von Sholtens, of St. Thomas, who promptly ordered the necessary documents to be issued, and imposed a temporary embargo, to prevent the transmission of intelligence to the pirates, which sloops I manned and armed, under the command of Lieutenants Pendergrast and Wilson, for the purpose of examining all the small harbors of Crab Island, and the south coast of Porto Rico. We sailed on the first of March, and examined every place as far to the westward as Ponce, without success, although we got frequent information of them. We anchored at Ponce on the evening of the 3d, and took our men and officers on board; the next morning at 10 o'clock a sloop was seen off the harbor, beating to the eastward, which was very confidently supposed to be one of those fitted out by the pirates. I again got one of the sloops and manned her, under the command of Lieutenant Pendergarst, accompanied by Acting Lieutenant Magruder, Doctor Biddle, and Midshipman Stones, with twenty-three men, who sailed in pursuit. The next day, at 3 o'clock, they had the good fortune to fall in with her in the harbor of "Boca del Inferno," which is very large, and has many hiding places, where an action commenced that lasted forty-five minutes, when the pirates ran their sloop on shore and jumped overboard; two of them were found killed, and ten of those which escaped to the shore were taken by the Spanish soldiers, five or six of whom were wounded, and amongst them the famous piratical chief Cofrecinas, who has long been the terror of the coast, and the rallying point of the pirates in this vicinity. As near as we can ascertain, he had fifteen or sixteen men on board, and was armed with one four-pounder, and muskets, pistols, cutlasses, and knives, for his men.

The sloop was got off, and arrived safe with our tender at this place last evening, and I am happy to add, that none of our people received any injury, and all have returned in good health, notwithstanding their exposure to the sun and rain for eleven days, without the possibility of getting below. I have much pleasure in stating to you, that I received every assistance from the authorities of Ponce, whilst there, and that they showed every desire to promote the success of the expedition. I have the honor to enclose you a copy of a letter sent by them to Lieutenant Pendergrast, thanking him, and the other officers and men, for the service rendered the country in the capture of the pirate.

The success of the enterprise, against skillful and cunning adversaries, is the best proof I can offer you of the good conduct of the officers and men engaged in it, and renders superfluous any eulogium from me.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

JOHN D. SLOAT.

To the Hon. Samuel L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy, Washington.

To Lieutenant Pendergrast, the officers and crew of the shop Dolphin, now in the service of the U. S. of America:

The alcade of Ponce, Don Jose Torres, and the military commandant, Colonel Don Tomas Renovales, request me to say to you, that, in the name of the governor of this island, and of the Spanish nation, they present you their thanks for the important service you have rendered them in capturing the piratical vessel commanded by the noted Cofrecinas.

They have written to the chief authority an account of your gallant and successful expedition, and hope your future exertions may meet with equal success.

In them you will always find friends and brother officers in an honorable cause, and all the assistance they may have in their power.

They request you to accept the refreshments now sent off, and regret that your short stay deprives them of the pleasure of showing you more particular attention. They are also happy to say that Captain Manuel Marcam has also been successful in securing some of the pirates who swam to the shore after you captured their vessel.

Wishing you success, health, &c., I am, gentlemen, your friend and servant,

JAMES J. ATKINSON.

Ponce, March 6, 1825.

United States Schooner Grampus, St. Thomas, March 19, 1825. Sir: On the 12th of this month, I had the honor to report the capture of a piratical vessel on the south side of Porto Rico, by an expedition fitted out from this vessel, and her safe arrival at this place; also, my having given her over to the governor, to be returned to her former owner, an inhabitant of St. Thomas. I subsequently learned, that the pirates who swam on shore had been taken and sent to the city of St. John's, the seat of government of Porto Rico, at which place I called to offer our testimony against them. Enclosure No. 1 is my letter to the captain general. No. 2 his reply, which I have forwarded for the

--105--

information of the Department. Our testimony was not required, as they have confessed sufficient to convict them.

The capture of this vessel, I find, is considered of much more importance, by the governments of Porto Rico, St. Croix, and St. Thomas, than I had any idea of, as the leader, Cofrecinas, has for years been the terror of this vicinity, and his career has been marked by the most horrible murders and piracies; and, for some time, a large reward has been offered by the government of Porto Rico for his head. Although wounded when he got on shore, he would not surrender until he received the contents of a blunderbuss, which shattered his left arm, and he was brought to the ground with the but of it.

I have seen him in prison, and he declares that he has not robbed any American vessel for the last eighteen months, only, however, for want of an opportunity. Several persons on shore, heretofore considered respectable, have been arrested as accomplices of the gang. Six of them were brought to St. John's and committed to prison whilst I was there. The captain general has promised me that these desperadoes shall have summary justice; that he will not wait for the civil court, but will order a court-martial immediately, to try them.

I have great pleasure in stating to you, that the captain general appears to have every disposition to prevent all piracies from the coast of Porto Rico, and to co-operate with me by all the means in his power; and for which purpose he gave me a circular letter to all civil and military officers on the coast, requiring them to give me every assistance and information in their power, whenever the Grampus or her boats may make their appearance on the coast, or in any of the harbors of the island; a copy of which is enclosed, No. 3.

I have also the honor to enclose you a note from me to the Governor (Von Sholton,) of St. Thomas, No. 4, requesting him to give the necessary orders to receive the sloop, and to have her restored to. her original owner, and his reply, No. 5. Also, a letter from J. J. Atkinson, Esq., in behalf of the alcalde and. military commandant of Ponce, No. 6. When I left St. John's, the fiscal was taking the declaration of Cofrecinas, and the captain general promised me a copy of it, but having a large convoy to take to sea on Sunday (to-morrow) from this place, I could not wait for it; it will be sent to me in a few days, when I shall send it to you for the information of the government, as I have no doubt it will throw much light on the subject of piracies.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

JOHN D. SLOAT.

To the Hon. Samuel L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy, Washington.

(No. 1.)

U. S. Schooner Grampus, St. John's, Porto Rico, March 14, 1825. Sir: I have the honor to inform your excellency that I have arrived in this harbor with the U. S. schooner Grampus, under my command; the object of my visit, at this time, is to inform your excellency that a small sloop, a tender to this vessel, met with a piratical sloop in the harbor of "Boca del Inferno," under the command of the famous piratical chief Cofrecinas, on the 5th day of the present month, and, after a desperate resistance, drove her on shore; the pirates that were not killed jumped overboard, and got on shore, where ten of them, I understand, have been taken by the troops in that vicinity, and sent to this place. Should your excellency consider the testimony of the officers of the Grampus at all necessary in bringing those enemies of mankind to justice, it will be cheerfully afforded. The sloop I took to St. Thomas, and gave her to her former owner.

I have the honor to be, with the greatest respect, your excellency's most obed't serv't,

JOHN D. SLOAT.

His excellency S. D. Miguel de la Torre, Capt. Gen. of the Island of Porto Rico.

(No. 2.)

[Translation.]

Government and Captain Generalship of the Island op Porto Rico,

Puerto Rico, March 11, 1825.

I have received the official letter which you were pleased to direct to me, under date of 14th ult., informing me of the object of your visit to this port, and offering, if necessary, the declarations of your officers and crew (who fought with so much bravery against the pirates in the "Boca del Inferno,") in case they should be found necessary for the conviction of these criminals, in the process instituted against them by this captain generalship. I return you my most grateful thanks, as well for this offer, as for the effectual assistance you have rendered in the pursuit and capture of these wicked wretches, of which good service I was already informed, by the military commandant and other authorities of Ponce. Be pleased to accept the tender of my acknowledgments, and also be the organ of communicating them to the officers and crew of the schooner under your command, for their co-operation, which confers so much honor on the navy of the United States; and as regards their declaration, (considering that the pirates do not deny the principal facts, and that they have already convicted themselves,) I do not think it necessary to put them to the inconvenience you were pleased to offer, and which goodness would have been accepted, had it been found necessary. This captain generalship, in renewing to you its acknowledgments, flatters itself that you will be pleased to continue your good services in the pursuit of this scourge of humanity, that, in case there should still be any remaining, they may be brought to suffer the condign punishment which their captured comrades will not fail to receive. To effect this the most energetic orders have been issued, that all the authorities of the coast should hold themselves unanimously in readiness to

--106--

co-operate with you, in the most efficacious manner, for the attainment of this result. Accept, Senor Commandant, the assurance of my respect, and of the consideration with which I pray God to preserve you many years.

MIGUEL DE LA TORRES.

To the Commander of the U. S. Schooner Grampus, in the bay.

(No. 3.)

[Translation.]

Puerto Rico, March 16, 1825. The captain of the U. S. American schooner Grampus, (Lieut. John D. Sloat,) goes in pursuit of pirates, for which purpose he will visit all the ports, harbors, roads, and anchorages, which he may find convenient; in consequence, you will give him all the necessary aid and notice for discovering them, and in case of meeting with them, the authorities of the coast, both civil and military, will join themselves unanimously with the said commandant to pursue them by land while he does the same by sea; and in case any of these wicked wretches should seek refuge in the territory of any part of the island, they will pursue them briskly until they have possessed themselves of their persons. The government expects, from the known zeal of the authorities referred to, that they will display the greatest activity, efficacy, and energy, in this important service, assuring each in particular of the lively interest which it feels for the total extermination of such vile rabble, the disgrace of humanity. Those who shall distinguish themselves, in the opinion of the government, will be reported to his Majesty, giving to each one justice, according to his merits.

God guard you many years.

MIGUEL DE LA TORRES. To the Military Commandants of the Quarters, Royal Alcaldes, and other civil and military authorities and functionaries of the coast of this Island.

(No. 4.)

U. S. Schooner Grampus, St. Thomas, March 12, 1825.—8 A. M. Sir: Having been informed by the captain of a vessel that arrived in this port, that the piratical vessel which the Danish man-of-war and myself had for some time been in search of, was in the vicinity of Crab Island, and had captured and plundered several small vessels belonging to this place, and no Danish man-of-war being at the moment in port, I did not hesitate to request of your excellency permission for the three Danish sloops, (whose captains had volunteered their services) to assist me in pursuit of her. Your excellency immediately granted the request, on the sole condition that I should pledge myself as an officer and gentleman that the vessels should not be used for any other purpose than searching for pirates. I can assure your excellency that they have been used by me for no other; the sloop which arrived this morning is the last of the three which were under the command of Lieutenant Pendergrast, who was so fortunate as to fall in with, and capture the piratical vessel we have been so long in search of, commanded by the famous chief Cofrecinas, who is badly wounded: the most of his crew were killed or wounded, and the survivors are all, I believe, now prisoners in Porto Rico, where the government afforded every assistance to the expedition whilst on that coast, and in capturing those that swam on shore. I herewith return your excellency the documents placed by you in my hands, to be used by the sloops engaged in the expedition. I cannot forbear to recommend to your excellency, Captain Perrelty, master and owner of the Danish sloop Dolphin, who rendered great assistance by his knowledge of the coast, and his good conduct during the cruise, and whom I beg leave to recommend to your particular notice.

I have great pleasure in restoring to the rightful owner the sloop captured from the pirates, and request your excellency to give the necessary orders to have her delivered to him. I also enclose several sets of Danish papers, taken on board the piratical vessel.

I have the honor to be, with great consideration and respect,

Your excellency's most obedient servant,

JOHN D. SLOAT.

To his excellency Governor Von Scholten, of St. Thomas, St. John's, &c., &c.

(No. 5.)

Government House, St. Thomas, March 12, 1825. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of this instant, and am extremely happy at the successful result of the expedition.

I shall take a pleasure to lay your communication before my government, and beg you will be assured how much the community, and I, feel obliged to you for the assistance you, on every occasion, so readily afford this island.

I have the honor to remain, sir, your most obedient servant,

P. SCHOLTEN.

To Lieutenant Commandant, Sloat, commanding the U. S. Schooner Grampus.

--107--

(No. 6.)

Ponce, March 12, 1825.

Dear Sir: I have the pleasure of communicating to you the agreeable information (at the request of Colonel Renovals) that the chief of the pirate you saw passing in front of the port, and in pursuit of whom you despatched the expeditions, under the command of Lieutenant Pendergrast, has been captured, with twelve of his associates, on shore, near Guayama, all desperately, if not mortally wounded, particularly the leader, Cofrecinas; who landed wounded, and then fought Captain Marcanos until he had three bullet and two sabre wounds; he cannot survive.

The commandant and alcalde present you their sincere and warm thanks for the service and aid you have rendered this place in capturing this pirate, and wish to be remembered to yourself, Lieutenant Pendergrast, and the other officers of your expedition. They wish soon again to see you, and hope you will remain in port long enough for them to show you some particular attention. Your friend and servant,

JAMES J. ATKINSON.

Captain J. D. Sloat, of the U. S. Navy.

Many of Cofrecinas' confederates on shore are arrested; five from here sent to St. John's.

U. S. Schooner Shark, Thompson's Island, April 3, 1825.

The enclosed report from Lieutenant Commandant Isaac McKeever, of the U. S. steam galliot Sea Gull, which I have the honor to transmit, gives an account of the successful result of an expedition on which I had sent that vessel, with the barge Gallinipper, on the 20th ult.

On the 21st ult., Lieutenant McKeever fell in with a party sent by Captain Maude, of H. B. M. frigate Dartmouth, for a similar purpose, and having made an arrangement to act in concert, they, thus united, proceeded to the accomplishment of their object, viz., the capture or destruction of a piratical schooner and boat, which I had been confidently informed had committed a piracy but a short time before, and was then equipping for another cruise.

Although the schooner, when captured, had on board a paper professing to be a license for her as a cruiser on the coast, yet, from the want of the captain general of Cuba's signature, or that of the general of marine, to this document, her complete state of preparation for action, the training of her guns on the boats as they approached, the abortive attempts to fire on them, several times repeated, the actual commencement of a fire of musketry, and the quantity of American property found on board and in their lurking places on shore, with the erasure of all the marks by which either its owners or the vessels in which it had been embarked, could be ascertained, I have not the least doubt of her piratical character.

The vessel, and a boat which was the next day captured (all the crew of which escaped on shore), were on the 30th ult. lost in a violent squall on the beach. I have directed the prisoners to be sent to Havana, there to be delivered up to his excellency the captain general, with all the papers which were found, and a succinct account of the circumstances attending the capture.

Before closing this, I must be allowed to express the great satisfaction I feel at the destruction of these vessels, and the capture of so many persons prepared to prey upon the commerce and sport with the lives of our unprotected fellow countrymen engaged in the pursuit of a lawful and peaceable occupation.

To Lieutenant McKeever, and the officers and crew of the Sea Gull, great credit is due for their constant and unremitted exertions, in defiance of fatigue and hunger. The ability of the first named officer has been conspicuously displayed on this occasion, and we are under no small obligations to Lieutenant Ward, the officers and men of H. B. M. ship Dartmouth, for their efficient co-operation, and their strenuous endeavors to effect our common object.

Nineteen prisoners have been brought in, of whom six are wounded. Eight or ten were killed, and the remainder escaped to the shore, where they effectually concealed themselves from pursuit. I am, with very great respect, your obedient and very humble servant,

L. WARRINGTON.

U. S. Steam Galliot Sea Gull, Thompson's Island, April 1, 1825.

Sir: I have the honor to give you a detailed account of the late cruise on which I sailed from Matanzas, immediately after the reception of your orders of the 19th ultimo, taking with me the barge Gallinipper.

At Stone Key, I met H. B. M. ship Dartmouth, under the command of the Hon. Captain Maude, and was informed by him that some of his boats were then cruising to windward, in company with his B. M. schooners Union and Lion; continued our course, and fell in with them the next evening at Cadiz Bay.

As they were also in search of pirates, but without any particular or certain information of their haunts, of which I was possessed, I deemed it proper to propose a co-operation; it being perfectly understood that I was to have the conducting of the enterprise. This proposition was cheerfully acceded to, and requesting that the schooners should not leave Cadiz Bay to go to windward within three days, I left the Sea Gull under charge of Lieutenant Rudd, and took with me, independent of the barge, which was well manned, two small cutters, with five men in each, and, in company with a British barge and two cutters, under charge of Lieutenant Ward, of the Dartmouth, we made the westernmost point of the entrance of Sagua la Grande, where we were detained forty-eight hours in consequence of strong head winds. The day after we arrived there, our water being nearly expended, the British barge, and Gallinipper, Lieutenant Cunningham, sailed in quest of some, although it was blowing a heavy gale from the eastward, and on the evening of the same day, the Gallinipper was capsized in a squall, but, with the assistance of Lieutenant Ward and his crew, our officers and men were saved, and the vessel righted; she rejoined me, with the intelligence of the accident, a few hours after it happened, having lost part of her arms, ammunition and provisions.

--108--

Notwithstanding this very serious misfortune, after pledging myself to procure provisions, we determined not to abandon the pursuit of our object, but upon the very last extremity; accordingly, the next morning (the 25th ult.), the wind abating, we made another effort, and gained the mouth of the river Sagua la Grande about noon; at this place I found a fisherman, and compelled him, much against his inclination, to pilot us to the Key of Jutia Gorda, one of the places of our destination, and at about 4 P. M. descried the masts of a vessel lying nearly concealed by the bushes under said Key. We immediately pushed for her, and when we approached within hail she hoisted Spanish colors, and ordered us to keep off or she would fire into us, having her guns trained and matches lighted, with which they made several ineffectual attempts to fire the gun pointed upon the advancing boat; the channel being very crooked and narrow, the boats grounded several times; at length, one of the British cutters succeeded in passing the bar, and as two boats abreast could not approach, the officers and crews of the others were ordered to jump overboard and wade to the shore; where, taking a commanding position on the bank of the inlet in which she was anchored, and within twenty yards of her, I ordered her commander instantly to come on shore, and not fire at his peril. After much hesitation, and reiterated threats to fire upon us, he obeyed; by this time every one on board was in great confusion. Instead of coming to me, he and a man who had accompanied him, attempted to make their escape; the commander, however, was seized, but his companion fled to the mangrove bushes. I now directed him to order his colors to be hauled down, and to surrender his vessel and crew. He did order his colors to be struck, but at the same moment a musket or pistol was fired at the cutter then close alongside, which was immediately returned, and a general fire ensued; the leader of the band, availing himself of the confusion, attempted flight; I fired at and wounded him; he fell, but rising very soon and attempting to fight his way through our men with a long knife, he received several other wounds, and was retaken. Many of the pirates, in endeavoring to make their escape by jumping overboard to gain the mangrove bushes, were shot; whilst others, seeing no chance of escape, were driven below by the boarders and musketry from shore.

On taking possession of her, she proved to be a schooner mounting two six-pounders on pivots, four large swivels, and several blunderbusses, and completely equipped for a complement of thirty-five men, which was the least number she could have had on board, as we took nineteen persons, and can account for eight killed. Several effected their escape into the mangrove bushes, and we are induced to believe that others were killed, whose bodies are supposed to have floated out to sea unobserved, as there was a strong ebb tide. Among the prisoners are six wounded, one of whom is their chief, and calls himself Antonio Ripol. We were fortunate in having but one man wounded, a British marine, who received a slight cut in the arm.

After securing the prisoners, we searched the schooner, and discovered that, with the evident intention of blowing us up, they had placed lighted cigars in and near the magazine, which were soon carefully removed. We also found many articles on board, of American produce, (and to all appearance but recently taken, as the cases were quite new and clean:) New York hats, shoes, flour, rice, cheese, butter, lard, &c., &c., and to confirm their character, if there had been the least shadow of doubt remaining, we found the counterpart of these articles concealed in a thicket about twenty yards from the vessel, which was approached by a meandering path, and could only be discovered by careful search, so cautious were they in their operations. The following morning at daylight, Lieutenant Ward and myself took with us three boats and proceeded to windward, leaving Lieutenant Cunningham in charge of the prize, prisoners, &c. We soon after discovered a large schooner, rigged "Regla boat," gave chase, and, at 11 A. M., the crew, finding we were gaining fast upon them, made for the nearest mangrove island, jumped overboard, and effected a precipitate retreat to the bushes, leaving everything standing, with a keg of gunpowder open near the galley fire, and quantities of it strewed all over the vessel. The powder was instantly thrown overboard, and the fire extinguished. She proved to be the boat whose crew had murdered the five men belonging to the American brig Betsey, that was wrecked on the Double Headed Shot Keys, in December last. After a long and ineffectual search among the mangrove bushes, for the fugitives, we took the boat in charge, and pushed on to the Key la Cosinerra, where they sailed from in the morning, being their place of resort and establishment; this we burnt, and returned to Jutia Gorda at midnight, the officers and men being nearly exhausted, the latter having been at their oars from daybreak.

The schooner and boats being laden with the property found secreted in the woods and elsewhere, we set fire to the buildings on the Key, consisting of two very large huts, and some outhouses.

At this place was an old man, of more genteel appearance than the rest, whose situation was so suspicious, that I thought proper to bring him with me. I have since discovered that he is the commandant of Sagua la Grande, and, in some way, intimately connected with these pirates. His papers I transmit to you separate from those found on board the vessel. Having distributed the prisoners on board the different boats, we got under way, together with the prizes, and sailed for Sagua la Grande, where, according to previous arrangement, we met H. B. M. schooner Lion, Lieut. Liardet commanding, who politely offered to receive the prisoners on board his vessel, to relieve us of the inconvenience of having them in deeply laden boats, and they were accordingly removed. We now continued our route to Cadiz Bay, and rejoined H. M. schooner Union and this vessel, reached Key Mona in company, on the evening of the 29th ultimo, where we found the Dartmouth still at anchor. Captain Maude, when informed of the capture in which his boats had assisted, expressed a strong desire to communicate with you, previously to the prisoners being disposed of for trial; I in consequence repaired to Matanzas to inform you of his wish, but finding that you had sailed for this place, I instantly returned to the Dartmouth, and made application for the prisoners, upon which they were removed to this vessel.

I regret to have to add that, in a heavy squall on the evening of the 30th, the prize schooner parted both her cables, and having the "Regla boat" in tow, they were both driven ashore on Stone Key, and bilged. The property, however, was taken out the same night, and the greater part of it saved, by the united efforts of H. M. schooners Union and Lion, and this vessel, after which the wrecks were fired.

The handsome manner in which we were seconded by the officers and crews of the boats of H. M. ship Dartmouth, merits our highest approbation; nor can I, in justice, omit mentioning the cheerfulness and alacrity with which Lieutenants Cunningham and Engle, Doctor Dubarry, and Mr. Barron, secretary, and the men throughout, performed their several duties; manifesting a degree of enterprise and zeal, amidst all their privations and fatigues, highly creditable to them.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration and respect, sir, your obedient servant,

I. M'KEEVER.

To Com. Lewis Warrington, Com. U. S. Naval Forces in the West Indies, &c.

--109--

Extract of a letter from Commodore L. Warrington to the Secretary of the Navy, dated —

U. S. Steam Galliot Sea Gull, Mantanzas, April 27, 1825.

Their present plan of operations confines them to their hiding places, on the shores and keys of this island, until the appearance of merchant vessels induces them to go out, and a certainty of the absence of our cruisers, or their boats, enables them to consummate their intentions, by the capture of the vessel and destruction of the crew. No sooner is this effected, their plunder secured, and the vessel disposed of, than their position is changed, and a new rendezvous, far removed from the scene of their late exploit, is selected. If to this method of carrying on their depredations, we add the fact, that many open boats and small vessels, apparently coasters, are also engaged in this business, you can readily perceive the difficulty, if not impossibility, of suppressing piracy on these shores. The most certain, and I may add, the only sure way to end it, is to explore often those parts of the coast where you have reason to believe them to be, to harass them by frequent excursions, and to seize for examination all boats or vessels which are of a suspicious character. It not unfrequently happens, that vessels having a commission to cruise for a certain time, for the protection of the island trade, commit piracies; and the schooner called "El Socorro," lately captured by the Sea Gull, &c., is an instance of it. If she had been suffered to pass unmolested, the injury done our commerce, and the loss of our citizens' lives would have been doubtless, very great.

Extract of a letter from Commodore L. Warrington to the Secretary of the Navy, dated —

U. S. Ship Constellation, Matanzas, July 1, 1825.

There are several Colombian privateers cruising off this island, which gives rise to the many accounts of piratical vessels which are published in our newspapers. One of them is a small schooner of thirty-five tons, and might easily be taken, at a distance, for a vessel of that character.

U. S. Ship Constellation, Thompson's Island, June 22, 1825. Sir: I have the honor to inform you that the United States ship Constellation arrived at this place, where she will remain for a few days, on the 14th, after landing Mr. Poinsett at La Vera Cruz, as you have been already informed. Your letters by her have been received, and shall be attended to. I shall be compelled to send the Sea Gull to Norfolk for repairs, as she is in a crazy condition. The Grampus I shall also send to the same place, early in August, to procure a new mainmast; and, as the Hornet also requires a considerable quantity of stores and sails, which we have not here, I shall direct her to repair to the same place in July. The two first of these vessels will have been out ten months, and the last twelve months. Their equipments and repairs will not delay them more than two or three weeks, and when the Porpoise, which I am daily expecting, arrives, we shall be able to watch the coasts of Cuba narrowly, and, I trust, effectually. The John Adams, Spark, Terrier, and Grampus, are now cruizing off different parts of that island. The Sea Gull is on an expedition with the barges, and the Fox, on her arrival from the Main with Mr. Bolton, will be put on the convoy and barge service with the Terrier. I shall, as soon as I can complete my arrangements in this quarter, proceed to St. Domingo, as directed by you some time since.

I am, with great respect, your obedient servant,

L. WARRINGTON.

I have directed Lieutenant Thomas B. Barton, of the marine corps, who goes home on a sick ticket, to report himself to you.

The Hon. Secretary of the Navy, Washington.

C.

Navy Department, May 24, 1825.

Sir: Circumstances connected with the health and efficiency of the squadron under your command, have induced the determination to make, at least, a temporary removal of so much of the forces and stores, now at Thompson's Island, as can be effected without inconvenience and loss to the public.

Pensacola has been selected as the place to which they will be transferred; and I enclose to you copies of communications received from the War Department, ordering the surrender of the fort, and adjoining barracks and houses, for the use of the navy. You are, therefore, hereby authorized to receive the possession from the military officer in command there, and if it be not convenient for you to go to that place, you will order some officer under your command to receive it for you. The stores, now at Thompson's Island, you will, as far as convenient, receive on board the vessels, thus preparing them for as long a cruise as their size and condition will permit. If, after this, any stores remain, you will send them to Pensacola, in the Decoy, or such other vessel as you may provide for the purpose. The marines now at the island you will dispose of as your discretion may dictate, and as they may be most useful in vessels, and at Pensacola.

It is believed that you will find full accommodation, both for men and stores, in the fort, barracks, and houses which the War Department has ordered to be transferred.

You will place the public property left upon the island in the best and safest situation, so that it may be kept from injury: and its possession and use resumed, whenever it shall be found expedient.

--110--

It is not intended that you shall altogether desert Thompson's Island. The public interests there will require you, or one of the vessels under your command, to visit it frequently, so as to afford every necessary protection and security to those who are upon it, and the commerce which passes by or is connected with it.

In the disposition of your force, after leaving Thompson's Island, you will exert that sound discretion on which the Department so confidently relies; protecting our commerce, watching attentively the movements of the pirates, and guarding vigilantly the health of those under your command. All these objects will, no doubt, be best promoted by the vessels continuing as constantly at sea as possible, touching seldom, and remaining a very short time, at any of the ports either of the islands, or on the shores of the gulf.

I repeat, for your consideration, the suggestion that you place your vessels at convenient distances from each other, directing each one to cruise backward and forward on a given position of the coast, and looking very frequently into the creeks, inlets, &c.

After effecting the changes mentioned in this letter, you will communicate fully, and minutely, to the Department the situation of all your vessels, and your wants as to officers, men, and stores, and make such suggestions respecting the whole as you may suppose useful to the public interests, and especially to the principal objects for which the squadron is maintained in the West Indies and the Gulf of Mexico.

I am, respectfully, &c., SAML. L. SOUTHARD.

Com. Lewis Warrington, commanding U. S. Naval Forces, West Indies.

Department of War, May 16, 1825. The Secretary of War's compliments to the Secretary of the Navy, and transmits duplicates of orders issued in relation to the delivery of possession of the fort of Barancas, near Pensacola, to the Navy Department, until the further orders of the War Department.

Quartermaster General's Office, Washington City, May 13, 1825. Sir: An order will this day be sent from the Adjutant General's Office for the removal of the troops from Barancas to Cantonment Clinch.

You will transfer the post, with the barracks at and near it, to such officer, either of the navy or marine corps, as the Navy Department may designate; and, if there is no building there suitable for a store house, you will, if practicable, furnish one of the public buildings in Pensacola for that purpose. I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

TH. S. JESUP, Brigadier General, and Quartermaster General. Captain D. E. Burch, Assistant Quartermaster, Pensacola, Florida.

(Orders No. 31.)

Adjutant General's Office, Washington, May 13, 1825.

The troops stationed at Fort Barancas will be immediately removed to Cantonment Clinch, and the stores on hand belonging to the Quartermaster General's and Ordnance Departments, will also be removed. The post will then be delivered over to such officer as the Secretary of the Navy may designate.

Communicated by order of Major General Brown.

R. JONES, Adjutant General.

D.

Navy Department, September 15, 1825.

Gentlemen: You are hereby appointed to select a site for a naval establishment at Pensacola, and the United States ship Hornet has been ordered to be prepared immediately for sea, under the command of Capt. Woodhouse, to take you to that place.

You will assemble at Norfolk, Va., on or about the 1st of October, and proceed to Pensacola as soon as convenient; and on your arrival enter upon the discharge of this duty, which has been confided to you with a full reliance on your judgment and discretion.

You are already aware of the disadvantages which have resulted from the injudicious location of other yards; and, in making a selection in this instance, you will take into view the actual expense and conveniences, as well as the practicability of defence.

After having made choice of the site which may appear most suitable, you will enter into an agreement with the proprietor or proprietors, for the purchase of the land, subject to the approbation of this Department; if, however, this cannot be obtained, and you deem it important to the public interests to complete the contract without such sanction, you are authorized to make the purchase unconditionally. You will take care to secure not only as much land as will be required for present purposes, but as much also as may, at any time hereafter, be wanted.

Any maps, charts, or other documents, in the possession of the Department, which may be considered necessary, will be furnished upon application. You have herewith an outline of the fortifications contemplated to be erected by the War Department for the protection of the harbor.

--111--

After accomplishing this important object, Capt. Warrington will either remain at Pensacola, or proceed wherever his duties as commander of the naval forces in that quarter may require his presence; the others will return in such manner as may be found most expedient.

It is presumed that the whole may be completed, and your report upon the subject made to the Department, previously to the meeting of Congress.

I am, respectfully, &c., SAML. L. SOUTHARD.

Wm. Bainbridge, Esq.,

Lewis Warrington, Esq.,

James Biddle, Esq.,

Captains U. S. Navy.

Pensacola, November 4, 1825.

Sir: Pursuant to your instructions to us of the 15th September, we embarked at Norfolk on board the United States ship Hornet, as soon as she was ready for sea. We arrived here on the 25th ultimo, and since our arrival, have been engaged in the necessary examinations and inquiries for ascertaining the most eligible position within these waters for a navy yard.

The Bay of Pensacola is extensive and capacious, easy of access from sea, and affording secure anchorage for any number of vessels of the largest class. The depth of water on the bar, as laid down by Major Kearney, of the topographical engineers, is twenty-one feet. From the report to us of Lieutenant Pinkham, of the John Adams, whom we directed to sound, and from all the information we have been enabled to collect, at least this depth of water, we believe, will always be found on the bar, even after a long continuance of northerly winds. The northerly winds sensibly affect the waters on this part of the coast; they, however, seldom continue long. The ordinary tides do not rise more than three feet; but these tides run with considerable rapidity; thus affording facilities to vessels working in or out of the harbor against an unfavorable wind.

The position which we have selected as in our judgment combining the greatest advantages for a navy yard, is in the vicinity of the Barancas, and to the northward and eastward of Tartar's Point.

Here we found the necessary depth of water nearest the shore; an important consideration in respect to the expense to be incurred in carrying out the wharves required for naval purposes. Here too the works erected for the defence of the navy yard, would give additional security to the harbor, while its vicinity to the Barancas would admit of assistance to it in case of need, from the troops stationed there. Here, we are, in our opinion, susceptible of complete defence, at a less expense than elsewhere within the bay. The position is wholly protected, by Tartar's Point, against the swell of the sea, which strong southerly winds set over the bar.

It is favorably situated for rendering prompt assistance to vessels approaching the harbor. Its healthiness is not surpassed by any other part of the bay, and fresh water is there abundant, and of a wholesome quality.

Other positions, in other parts of the bay, have engaged our attention; but, upon mature consideration, we are unanimously of opinion that the position which we have designated, is the most eligible under all circumstances, and combines the greatest advantages.

The accompanying sketch exhibits the position which has been selected, and embraces the quantity of land we recommend to be retained for a naval establishment.

That part of your instructions which directs us to purchase the land, we are not necessitated to act upon, as the site we have selected already belongs to the government. It appears from the report of the commissioners appointed to examine the land claims in West Florida, that Mr. Roseblane claimed 800 arpens, which embraced Tartar's Point. This claim, however, was rejected by the commissioners, and is therefore presumed to be not valid.

It was our intention to have returned by land, as being preferable to taking a public vessel from the station; but it has been deemed necessary that the John Adams, now lying here, should leave the West Indies, on account of the debilitated state of her crew; we shall, therefore, embark in that ship as soon as she is ready for sea, and proceed in her to the Chesapeake.

We have the honor to be, very respectfully, your most obedient servants,

WM. BAINBRIDGE. L. WARRINGTON. JAMES BIDDLE.

Hon. Saml. L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy, Washington.

Navy Department, December 2, 1825. Sir: The instructions which were given to Captains Bainbridge, Warrington, and Biddle, to select a site for a navy yard and depot on the coast of Florida, in the Gulf of Mexico, have heretofore been submitted to yon, and I have now the honor to present to you a copy of their report, with a sketch exhibiting the position, which is, in their opinion, best calculated for the object.

Great pains have been taken to acquire the most correct information and safest guides, in making a location for this establishment, and no doubt is entertained that the one recommended by these officers is the best within the range prescribed by the law.

Should it meet your approbation, immediate measures will be taken to erect the necessary buildings, and make the improvements.

With the highest respect, I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient servant,

SAMUEL L. SOUTHARD.

The President of the United States.

Approved December 3, 1825. J. Q. ADAMS.

--112--

E.

Extract of a letter from Commodore John Rodgers to the Secretary of the Navy, dated —

U. S. Ship North Carolina, Gibraltar Bay, July 5, 1825.

I contemplate leaving here to-morrow, with all the vessels of the squadron, consisting of the North Carolina, Constitution, Erie, and Ontario, for the head of the Mediterranean, touching at Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli, on my way up; and shall probably not reach this again before some time about the 1st of October. Our relations with the Barbary States continue on the same friendly footing as they have heretofore done.

Extract of a letter from Commodore John Rodgers to the Secretary of the Navy, dated —

U. S. Ship North Carolina, Gibraltar Bay, July 1, 1825.

Just at the moment of unmooring, to proceed up the Mediterranean with the squadron, I have received a communication from Mr. Pulis, our consul at Malta, of which the enclosed are copies. It is, I find, the opinion of the best informed people in this quarter, that, in the event of the failure of the Greeks to establish their independence, a large portion of their present marine will become pirates, and that they will, it is most likely, as in former times, prey upon every defenceless merchant vessel that falls in their way. The noble cause in which they are engaged, would almost forbid such an idea; yet, as the like has happened heretofore, at different periods of their history, it may happen again; and for this reason I shall keep an eye to that quarter; particularly as our commerce to Smyrna, at this time, is very considerable, and I am told, progressively increasing. Should the winds prove favorable, I shall, it is likely, be in the vicinity of Scio by the last of this month. The appearance of the squadron about this time in the Archipelago, will no doubt have a good effect; and should anything occur, before I leave there, to render it necessary, I may probably leave one of the sloops there, to protect our commerce against any lawless depredations that appear likely to happen.

Extract of a letter from Commodore John Rodgers to the Secretary of the Navy, dated —

U. S. Ship North Carolina, Gibraltar Bay, October, 1825.

I wrote you from Smyrna, on the 30th of August, by the brig Cherub, of Boston, informing you of the movements of the squadron up to that date. At that time there was some cause for alarm, on account of the prevalence of a bowel complaint with which many of the officers and men of the squadron were affected: but, by the early and judicious applications, and unremitting attentions, of the medical officers, the virulence of the disease was soon arrested. In addition to this, there have been some cases of fever on board each ship, by which the service has lost a valuable young officer in Midshipman Pleasanton, who was, at the time of his death, attached to the Erie; and Mr. Adam Marshall, the schoolmaster of this ship, whose exemplary deportment had gained him the esteem of all who knew him. The officers and crews of the several vessels of the squadron are again very generally in the enjoyment of good health: and the returns herewith sent you will show, that, although there might have been cause for alarm, at one time, the proportion of deaths for the last six months, considering the number of men, and season of the year, has been very small.

In my last, I mentioned that I should probably put myself in the way of seeing the Greek and Turkish fleets, before my return to Gibraltar: and with this intention I accordingly left the Gulf of Smyrna, on the 9th ultimo, shaping my course for Napoli di Romani, (the present seat of the Greek government,) at which place I arrived on the 12th ultimo. Here we were received by the government in the most friendly and courteous manner.

The present embarrassed condition of the Greek government is such as to prevent its authority being much regarded by the licentious part of the community; the consequence of which is, that already several piracies have been committed in the Archipelago, principally, however, upon Austrian and French vessels. The morning previous to my leaving Smyrna, the commander of the Austrian naval forces sent into that place seven Greek boats, which he had captured for alleged piracies committed.

Piracies are carried on now by such boats only; but, it is feared in the event of a dissolution of the government, and which some think is not at all improbable, that their misery, and the want of the common means to support life, will necessarily oblige a large portion of the Greek sailors to become pirates, to avoid starvation; and in this event, that many of their larger vessels will be employed in this way.

Under this state of things, I have left the Ontario at Smyrna, for the protection of our commerce in the Archipelago, with orders for her commander to join me, at Gibraltar or Mahon, by the middle of December, provided a necessity for his long continuance in that quarter should cease, but that, in the event of such a change taking place as to render the presence of a greater force necessary, to apprise me of it without delay.

Our relations with the Barbary powers continue on the same friendly footing as heretofore. On leaving the Archipelago, I shaped my course for Tripoli, with the intention of calling at that place; but was prevented doing so, in consequence of meeting one of the Bashaw's cruisers, to the southward of Malta, returning home with two Neapolitan vessels, his prizes, which he had captured on the coast of Calabria; from the commander of which vessel I learned that our consul was absent from Tripoli, and had been for some time. Prom this I steered for Algiers, and after looking into the bay, directed the Erie to anchor, for the purpose of communicating with the consulate there; and after doing so, made sail for this place, where I arrived on the 9th instant.

The Erie has just arrived from Algiers, which affords me an opportunity of enclosing to you Captain Deacon's report, and of closing this communication.

--113--

F.

United States Frigate United States, Callao Bay, October 2, 1824.

Sir: By Mr. Hunter, I had the honor to forward a copy of a commission and other papers, furnished a privateer fitted out by General Rodil, Governor of Callao, previous to the departure of the Franklin from this station; and, as Commodore Stewart will lay before you his correspondence with the vice King on the subject of those vessels and the legality of the papers under which they sailed, I have no doubt but I shall be furnished, without delay, with your instructions what course I am to pursue towards vessels sailing under the Spanish flag, without their commission being signed by the vice King, and commissioned only by a governor of a province, holding only the rank of a general in the army. One of the vessels commissioned by General Rodil, and fitted out at this place, has been burnt by Admiral Guise, after having lost her topmast, and otherwise injured, whilst this ship was in chase of her.

There is now lying in this bay two other brigs and a ship, ready for sea, no doubt furnished with the same papers that they sailed under on a former cruise; and, notwithstanding I have the assurance of the governor that they have orders not to capture neutral ships, I have no doubt but they will capture our ships should they fall in with them, particularly those that have provisions on board. I cannot, therefore, but hope, that the force on this station will be increased, either by sending out a line of battle ship or one of our large frigates and one or two schooners, as it is impossible to protect our commerce on such an extent of coast as Chili and Peru; indeed, we have valuable ships in most of the ports on the coast, from Valparaiso to Panama, and, in most of the ports, ships can be taken out by the smallest privateers, as they generally lie at anchor where there is no fort to protect them; it therefore requires a force to be constantly moving up and down the coast, and it is absolutely necessary that one vessel should remain constantly in this bay, and another at Valparaiso, and others moving along the coast with convoy.

Our force in this sea is now much less than that of any other nation, and our commerce is greater than that of any other, except the English; indeed, the English and Americans have the exclusive trade; not a flag is to be seen on board a merchant ship but those of England and the United States.

The Peacock is now at Quilca, to protect our commerce at the Intermedios, under orders to join this ship, after being absent six weeks. The Dolphin is at Valparaiso for the purpose of giving convoy to ships bound to this place. I have this day given orders for her to join me at this place without delay, that I may have force sufficient to watch the movements of the Spanish forces now ready for sea. With great respect, I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

ISAAC HULL.

Hon. Sam'l L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy.

U. S. Frigate United States, Callao Bay, November 2, 1824.

Sir: I have the honor to inform you that the Peacock arrived in this bay on the 25th ultimo, from Quilca, where I had ordered her to protect our commerce. She was absent six weeks, which was the time limited by my orders given to Lieutenant Commandant Kennon.

At the time the Peacock arrived I was absent with this ship, having left this bay for Huacho, for the purpose of convoying to this place several vessels which had been ordered off by the Peruvian squadron, under Admiral Guise; those vessels, such as wished to enter the bay, are now here.

Immediately on my arrival, I dispatched the Peacock to cruise for a few days off Pisco, to gain intelligence, if possible, of the course the Spanish squadron had taken, and what part of the coast they were destined for; as I consider it necessary to watch their movements as closely as it can be done, without giving them cause to suspect the object for which the Peacock is sent out.

The Dolphin is now at Valparaiso for the purpose of giving convoy to such of our merchant ships as may be there, and wish to avail themselves of it. I however received information last evening from Valparaiso, and find that there is not more than one or two vessels that are bound to this part of the coast.

As the Spanish squadron is out, and it has not been ascertained where they are bound, and there being several valuable ships at Truxillo, and other small ports on the coast to the northward, I shall dispatch the Peacock to Truxillo for their protection, and to convoy down two American vessels that will be ready to sail in three or four days; she will probably be absent twenty-five days, when she will return to this port, touching at the small ports on the coast, to give convoy to such vessels as may wish to join her.

With very great respect, I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

ISAAC HULL.

Hon. Samuel L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy, Washington.

U. S. Frigate United States, Callao Bay, November 4, 1824.

Sir: I have yesterday been informed that the American ship China has been secured by the officers of the customs of Callao, for having transhipped a quantity of goods to the American brig Rimac without obtaining a permit to do so.

By the best information I can get, I have every reason to believe that the transhipment was made without a permit, and I much fear that the vessel and cargo will be condemned. The ship and cargo is said to be worth one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. I consider this seizure a very unfortunate one on many accounts, and more particularly so, as the China is well calculated for a vessel of war, and I have no doubt but she will be fitted out for that purpose, and be on a cruise in a few weeks.

I have already had the honor to apprise you that the Spanish squadron was at sea, and expressed my fear that they would capture neutral vessels; as yet, I have not received information that they have made any captures, but, from the temper and feelings of the Spaniards towards foreigners, and particu-

--114--

larly Americans, I have no doubt but they will detain our ships on the slightest ground, and send them in for trial, and the case of the Nancy and other vessels captured and condemned, is evidence of what may be the fate of others that may fall into their hands.

With great respect, I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

ISAAC HULL.

The honorable Secretary of the Navy, Washington.

U. S. Frigate United States, Ancon, November 14, 1824.

Sir: I have this moment received a letter from Mr. Tudor, our consul at Lima, under date of the 13th instant, an extract of which I have the honor to forward:

"I heard last evening that a bando would be issued to-day, declaring all the small ports, from Pisco to Truxillo, in a state of blockade, and that all persons transporting goods from Ancon, Chorillos, &c., would be shot."

I have not as yet received any confirmation of the above, but I have every reason to believe that the Spaniards will do all in their power to embarrass American commerce, and any measures that will do it most effectually I have no doubt will be adopted.

With great respect, I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

ISAAC HULL.

Hon. Sam'l L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy.

U. S. Frigate United States, Harbor of Callao, January 23, 1825.

Sir: Since the departure of Mr. Campbell nothing material has taken place. General Rodil still keeps possession of the castles of Callao, and is determined to defend them to the last extremity. He has from time to time postponed the trial of the China, in the expectation of the Spanish fleet returning to Callao. I have, in consequence, remained a greater part of the time in the bay, for the accommodation of Captain Goodrich, who has been alternately on board my ship and on shore,

I have no expectation of a favorable result in the case of the China. General Rodil is now closely invested by land and sea, and if his course was marked by such injustice when he was amenable to the authority of the vice King, it cannot be supposed that he will now relinquish anything in his power which would enable him to protract a siege.

The Chilian frigate O'Higgins, and two Columbian vessels, are in the bay; also four gun boats which were brought over from the Spaniards by the captain of the port a few nights since.

The China being endangered by the fire from these vessels, which approach the town every night, I wrote General Rodil, requesting that she might be sent out of danger until the trial was concluded; but I have received no reply; in fact, it is impossible to have any communication with him; my boats are allowed to approach only within a certain distance, and there met by a Spanish boat, into which Captain Goodrich is received, and no one but himself suffered to land.

The Dolphin arrived in this port last week from Valparaiso with a convoy of American vessels, having touched in with them at Coquimbo and Quilca. Judge Provost having requested a passage to Quilca, the Dolphin will leave to-morrow for that port, and having landed him, will proceed to Valparaiso.

So soon as the affair of the China is concluded I shall go down to Haunchas for a few days, and on my return shall stop at Santa to obtain a supply of wood, after which I hope the situation of affairs will enable me to go to Valparaiso, leaving the Peacock here.

I have great pleasure in telling you, sir, that the officers and crew of this ship are all in good health, and that I have from them the most cheerful compliance with my wishes.

I have the honor, sir, to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

ISAAC HULL.

To the Hon. Samuel L. Southard.

--115--

G.

List of deaths in the navy, since 1st of January, 1825.

Name.

Cause of death.

Place of death.

Time of death.

Captains.

 

 

 

Thomas Macdonough

Consumption

At sea

November 10, 1825.

Lieutenants.

 

 

 

Joseph Wragg

Consumption

Norfolk

April 18, 1825.

Samuel Hanley

Yellow fever

Matanzas

July 14, 1825.

William Laughton

Yellow fever

At sea

July 22, 1825.

Nelson Webster

Not known

Boston

August 24, 1825.

William M. Caldwell

Not known

Philadelphia

September 16, 1825.

Henry Ward

Not known

Near Boston

July 9, 1825.

Richard S. Hunter

Effects of fever

New Jersey

March 28, 1825.

Walter Abbott

Not known

Philadelphia

July 12, 1825.

Albert G. Wall

Liver complaint

Virginia

August 31, 1825.

Otho Stallings

Yellow fever

Key West

January 12, 1825.

Frederick Jarret

Hemorrhage

At sea

July 11, 1825.

Dulany Forrest

Yellow fever

At sea

October 1, 1825.

Benjamin S. Grimke

Drowned

At sea

November, 1825.

Surgeons' mates.

 

 

 

John Harrison

Not known

Washington

March 4, 1825.

Jos. B. Stillman

Yellow fever

Key West

March 28, 1825.

C. H. Van Brunt

Yellow fever

At sea

July 28, 1825.

Midshipmen.

 

 

 

J. B. Beckham

Yellow fever

At sea

September 11, 1825.

A. W. Baker

Yellow fever

At sea

 

L. A. Buchanan

Yellow fever

At sea

July 21, 1825.

Theo. Bland, jr

Yellow fever

At sea

September 13, 1825.

Robert F. Martin

Yellow fever

At sea

July 3, 1825.

C. F. Shoemaker

Killed in a duel

Old Point Comfort

September 23, 1825.

George F. Weaver

Yellow fever

At sea

October 5, 1825.

George B. Wilkinson

Yellow fever

Barrancas

 

John H. Pleasanton

Fever

Mediterranean

 

C. M. Hopkins

Fever

Mediterranean

 

Sailing masters.

 

 

 

Shubael Downes

Old age

Boston

June 13, 1825.

Simon Kingston

Old age

Philadelphia

July, 1825.

David Phipps

Old age

New Haven

April, 1825.

Boatswains.

 

 

 

John Welch

 

 

 

Gunners.

 

 

 

James Cosgrove

 

Rec'ving ship, N. Y.

October, 1825.

Marines.

 

 

 

H. W. Gardner, Lieutenant

Fever

Messina

April 25, 1825.

H.

List of resignations since 1st January, 1825.

Richard K. Hoffman, surgeon; W. D. Conway, surgeon's mate; Chever Felch, chaplain; R. S. Bullus A. Barnhouse, E. R. Childs, J. J. R. Flournoy, D. S. M'Cauley, Parmenio Shuman, Edwin Welsh Simon W. Walsh, John W. Hunter, jr., midshipmen; G. F. De la Roche, W. W. Polk, sailing masters; S. G. Clark, James Minzies, Thomas Ring, boatswains; John Fair, Samuel Butler, Elijah Whitten, gunners; S. B. Bannister, sail maker; J. Lowry, lieutenant of marines.

K.

Navy Commissioners' Office, October 1, 1825.

Sir: In obedience to your directions, the Commissioners of the Navy have the honor to transmit the following estimates and statements:

Estimate of the expenses* of the navy for the year 1826, marked A, with—

* The contingent expenses have been increased about $35,000 to defray the expenses of breaking up the stations on the lakes and at New Orleans and Barrataria, and transporting the articles from thence.

--116--

Statements, explanatory of the several items, marked B.

Estimate of the expenses of this office for the ensuing year, marked C.

Statement, showing the names, stations, salaries, and places of nativity, of all the persons in the office of the Navy Commissioners, marked D.

Statement of the progress made in executing the law for the gradual increase of the navy, marked E.

Statement of the progress made in executing the law for building ten sloops of war, marked F.

Statement, showing the names and force of all the vessels of the navy, when and where built, captured, or purchased, and the state and condition of the vessels in ordinary and on the lakes, marked G; and

Statement, showing the progress made in executing your instructions to break up the establishments at the lake stations, marked H.

All of which are respectfully submitted.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

WM. BAINBRIDGE.

The Secretary of the Navy.

Statement of the expenditure of the appropriation for the support of the navy, from the 1st January to 30th September, 1825.

Appropriations.

Amount of
requisitions
drawn on
Treasury.

Amount of
refunding
requisitions
drawn.

Amount
expended.

Pay, &c., of the navy afloat

$612,401 91

$104,489 07

$507,912 84

Pay, &c., of shore stations

233,932 76

9,130 83

224,801 93

Provisions

288,681 01

13,296 77

275,390 24

Contingent expenses, prior to 1824

25,744 61

25,276 81

467 80

Contingent expenses not enumerated, 1824

1,463 04

110 25

1,352 79

Contingent expenses for 1824

49,915 43

5,119 31

44,796 12

Contingent expenses for 1825

194,999 44

3,406 30

191,593 14

Contingent expenses not enumerated, 1825

1,128 16

1,128 16

Ordnance

26,235 48

33,859 74

Medicines

37,922 89

1,212 67

36,650 22

Repairs of vessels

257,685 99

1,508 57

250,177 42

Gradual increase

277,193 64

34,210 38

243,583 26

Pay of superintendents, &c

955 21

5,838 93

Pay of laborers, &c

2,490 32

Ship houses

4,019 70

1,344 96

2,674 74

Inclined plane

3,116 50

3,716 50

Prohibition of the slave trade

8,948 35

109 50

8,838 85

Suppression of piracy

8,314 90

8,374 90

Navy yard (old)

24,520 36

3,455 78

21,064 58

Navy yard at Portsmouth, N. H.

1,145 08

1,145 08

Navy yard at Charlestown, Mass.

14,111 90

14,111 90

Navy yard at New York

25,314 03

25,314 03

Navy yard at Philadelphia

1,509 04

7,509 04

Navy yard at Washington

8,809 29

8,809 29

Navy yard at Norfolk, Va.

12,398 44

12,398 44

Building ten sloops of war

78,594 22

78,594 22

Repairs, &c., sloops of war

1,502 97

Surveying Charleston, S. C.—St. Mary's, Geo.

5,093 40

3,199 12

1,894 28

Destruction of tools by fire

31 06

Surveying coast of Florida

93 11

19 50

73 61

Captors of Algerine vessels

161 53

161 53

Act for the relief of Joseph Smith

251 80

151 80

Act for the relief of Elias Glen

100 00

100 00

Act for the relief of Charles D. Brodie

1,000 00

1,000 00

Act for the relief of William Townsend

926 14

926 14

Act for the relief of John S. Styles

10,633 06

10,633 06

Pay, &c., of the marine corps

120,401 41

120,401 41

Clothing of the marine corps

19,382 14

19,382 16

Fuel of the marine corps

5,566 58

5,668 58

Medicines, &c., (on shore) marine corps

1,266 49

1,266 49

Contingent expenses marine corps

7,731 93

31 47

7,700 46

Arrearages of expenses marine corps

4,683 78

4,683 78

Military stores marine corps

1,345 25

1,345 25

Navy yard and depot on coast of Florida

$2,385,072 62

$255,704 31

$2,145,900 64

RICHARD CUTTS.

Treasury Department, Second Comptroller's Office, December 5, 1825.

--117--

A.

There will be required for the use of the navy during the year 1826, two millions two hundred and ninety thousand three hundred and twenty dollars:

1st. For pay and subsistence of officers, and pay of seamen, other than those at navy yards  shore stations and in ordinary.

$908,595 50

2d. For pay, subsistence, and allowances of officers, and pay of seamen, &c., at navy yards, hospitals, shore stations and in ordinary.

141,613 25

3d. For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishment at the navy yards and stations.

52,240 00

4th. For provisions.

377,871 25

5th. For repairs of vessels in ordinary, and for wear and tear of vessels in commission, exclusive of any unexpended balance that may remain under the appropriation for

350,000 00

6th. For repairs and improvement of navy yards.

170,000 00

7th. For medicines, surgical instruments, hospital stores, and all other expenses on account of the sick.

45,000 00

8th. For defraying the expenses which may accrue during the year 1826, for the following purposes:

For freight and transportation of materials and stores of every description; for wharfage and dockage; for storage and rent; for traveling expenses of officers, and transportation of seamen; for house rent or chamber money; for fuel and candles to officers other than those attached to navy yards and shore stations; for commissions, clerk hire, office rent, stationery, and fuel to navy agents; for premiums and incidental expenses of recruiting; for expenses of pursuing deserters; for compensation to judge advocates; for per diem allowance to persons attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, and to officers engaged on extra service beyond the limits of their stations; for expenses of persons in sick quarters; for burying deceased persons belonging to the navy; for printing, and for stationery of every description; for books, charts, nautical and mathematical instruments, chronometers, models, and drawings; for purchase and repairs of steam and fire engines and machinery; for purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage; for cabin furniture of vessels in commission; for taxes on navy yards and public property; for assistance rendered to public vessels in distress; for incidental labor at navy yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; for coals and other fuel for forges, foundries, steam engines, and for candles, oil and fuel for vessels in commission and in ordinary, and including the expense of breaking up the stations on the lakes, and at New Orleans and Barrataria, and for transporting the articles from

240,000 00

ADDITIONAL.

For contingent expenses for objects arising in the year 1826, and not hereinbefore enumerated.

5,000 00

$2,290,320 00

--118--

B.

Estimate of the pay and subsistence of all persons of the navy, attached to vessels in commission.

Rank or Station.

One ship of the line.

Three frigates, first class.

One frigate of the second class.

Six sloops of the first class.

Three sloops of the second class.

Five brigs and schooners.

Two small vessels.

Total.

Amount.

Captains

2

3

2

1

8

$16,900 00

Masters commandant

1

5

3

9

9,765 00

Lieutenants commandant

5

2

7

6,116 25

Lieutenants

10

24

7

30

12

10

4

97

64,262 50

Masters

1

3

1

6

3

3

2

19

10,853 75

Second masters

1

1

360 00

Chaplains

1

3

1

5

2,856 25

Surgeons

1

3

1

6

3

5

19

13,133 75

Pursers

1

3

1

6

3

5

19

10,853 75

Boatswains

1

3

1

6

3

14

4,637 50

Gunners

1

3

1

6

3

14

4,637 50

Carpenters

1

3

1

6

3

14

4,637 50

Sailmakers

1

3

1

6

3

14

4,637 50

Midshipmen

40

78

20

72

30

30

6

276

62,928 00

Surgeons' mates

3

6

2

6

3

2

22

9,927 50

Schoolmasters

1

1

391 25

Clerks

1

3

1

6

3

5

19

5,700 00

Armorers

1

3

1

6

3

5

19

4,104 00

Boatswains' mates

6

12

3

12

6

10

2

51

11,628 00

Gunners" mates

3

6

2

12

3

4

2

33

7,524 00

Carpenters' mates

2

6

1

6

3

5

2

25

5,700 00

Sailmakers' mates

2

3

1

6

3

5

20

4,560 00

Masters-at-arms

1

3

1

6

3

5

19

4,104 00

Coxswains

1

3

1

6

3

14

3,024 00

Ship corporals

2

6

1

9

1,944 00

Coopers

1

3

1

6

3

14

3,024 00

Cooks

1

3

1

6

3

5

2

21

4,536 00

Quarter gunners

20

36

10

48

18

10

2

144

27,104 00

Quartermasters

10

24

6

30

12

10

2

94

20,304 00

Yeomen

3

9

3

18

6

5

44

9,504 00

Pursers' stewards

1

3

1

6

3

5

2

21

4,536 00

Seamen

280

480

129

420

180

100

14

1,603

230,832 00

Ordinary seamen

260

510

131

240

150

40

6

1,337

160,440 00

Boys

40

60

22

60

30

30

242

17,424 00

Total

1,308

355

1,050

501

303

50

4,268

$752,890 00

Statement of the number and pay, &c., of officers, &c., &c., required for five receiving vessels, for the year 1826, explanatory of part of the first item of appropriation.

Rank or station.

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Norfolk.

Baltimore.

Total.

Amount.

Masters commandant

1

1

1

3

$3,255 00

Lieutenants

2

2

2

2

2

10

6,625 00

Pursers

1

1

1

3

1,713 75

Masters

1

1

1

3

1,713 75

Surgeons' mates

1

1

1

3

1,353 75

Midshipmen

3

3

2

3

2

13

2,964 00

Boatswains' mates

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,140 00

Carpenters' mates

1

1

1

1

4

912 00

Stewards

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,080 00

Cooks

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,080 00

Able seamen

2

2

2

2

2

10

1,440 00

Ordinary seamen

6

6

4

6

2

24

2,880 00

Boys

4

4

2

4

2

16

1,152 00

Total

25

25

16

25

13

104

$27,309 25

--119--

Statement of the pay, Sc., of officers attached to recruiting stations, together with one captain, as ordnance officer—explanatory of part of the first item of appropriation.

Rank or station.

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Norfolk.

Baltimore.

Totals.

Amount.

Masters commandant

1

1

1

1

1

5

$5,881 25

Midshipmen

2

2

2

2

2

10

4,232 50

Surgeons

1

1

1

1

4

5,239 00

Surgeons' mates

1

1

938 75

Total

4

4

4

4

4

20

$16,291 50

ORDNANCE DUTY.

One captain.

$1,930 00

Exhibit of the officers, &c., awaiting orders, and on furlough, explanatory of part of the first item of appropriation.

Captains.

Masters commandant.

Lieutenants.

Masters.

Chaplains.

Surgeons.

Pursers.

Midshipmen.

Surgeon's mates.

Carpenters.

Total.

Amount.

Awaiting orders

11

2

76

3

2

5

11

43

6

159

$97,945 75

On furlough

1

16

9

1

1

11

1

40

12,229 00

total

11

3

92

12

3

5

12

54

6

1

199

$110,174 75

Statement of the pay and rations of the naval part of the establishment at yards and stations, explanatory of part of the second item of appropriation.

Portsmouth.

Charlestown.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Washington.

Norfolk.

Baltimore.

Charleston, South Carolina.

New Orleans.

Sackett's Harbor.

Total

Amount.

Captains

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

10

$24,410 00

Masters commandant

1

1

1

1

1

1

6

7,057 50

Lieutenants

1

1

1

1

1

1

6

4,522 50

Masters

1

1

1

1

1

1

6

3,975 00

Masters

1

1

662 50

Master in charge of ordnance

1

1

662 50

Master keeper of magazine

1

1

662 50

Surgeons

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

8

6,260 00

Surgeons' mates

1

1

1

1

4

2,170 00

Pursers

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

8

5,300 00

Chaplains

1

1

1

3

1,987 50

Midshipmen

2

4

4

4

14

4,469 50

Boatswains

1

1

1

1

1

1

6

2,535 00

Gunners

1

1

1

1

0

5

2,112 50

Gunner as laboratory officer

1

1

422 50

Stewards

1

1

1

1

1

1

6

1,843 50

Carpenters' mates, as caulkers.

1

1

1

1

1

1

6

1,915 50

Total

92

$70,968 50

--120--

Statement of all allowances to officers, Sc., at yards and stations, other than pay and rations—explanatory of part of the second item of appropriation.

Portsmouth.

Charlestown.

Brooklyn.

Rank.

House rent.

Candles.

Cords of wood.

Number of servants.

House rent.

Candles.

Cords of wood.

Number of servants.

House rent.

Candles.

Cords of wood.

Number of servants.

Captains

65

30

3

65

30

3

65

30

3

Masters commandant

300

40

20

2

300

40

20

2

300

40

20

2

Lieutenants

200

20

20

1

200

20

20

1

200

20

20

1

Masters

200

20

12

1

200

20

12

1

200

20

12

1

Masters of ordnance

Surgeons

200

20

20

1

200

20

20

1

200

20

20

1

Surgeons' mates

145

16

14

1

145

16

14

1

Pursers

200

20

12

1

200

20

12

1

200

20

12

1

Chaplains

250

250

Boatswains

90

2

9

1

90

12

9

1

90

12

9

1

Gunners

90

2

9

1

90

12

9

1

90

12

9

1

Gunner's laboratory officer

Statement of all allowances to officers, &c.—Continued.

Philadelphia.

Washington.

Gosport.

Baltimore.

Rank.

House rent.

Candles.

Cords of wood.

Number of servants.

House rent.

Candles.

Cords of wood.

Number of servants.

House rent.

Candles.

Cords of wood.

Number of servants.

House rent.

Candles.

Cords of wood.

Number of servants.

Captains

65

30

3

65

30

3

65

30

3

300

65

30

3

Masters commandant

200

40

20

2

300

40

20

2

300

40

20

2

Lieutenants

200

20

20

1

200

20

20

1

200

20

20

1

Masters

200

20

12

1

200

20

12

1

200

20

12

1

Masters of ordnance

104

Surgeons

200

20

20

1

200

20

20

1

200

20

20

1

200

20

20

1

Surgeons' mates

145

16

14

1

145

16

14

1

Pursers

200

20

12

1

200

20

12

1

200

20

12

1

Chaplains

250

Boatswains

90

12

9

1

90

12

9

1

90

12

9

1

Gunners

90

12

9

1

90

12

9

1

Gunner's laboratory officer

12

9

1

Statement of all allowances to officers, &c.—Continued.

Charleston, S.C.

New Orleans.

Sackett's Harbor.

Rank.

House rent.

Candles.

Cords of wood.

Number of servants.

House rent.

Candles.

Cords of wood.

Number of servants.

House rent.

Candles.

Cords of wood.

Number of servants.

Amount.

Captains

300

65

30

3

600

65

30

3

400

65

30

3

$9,667 50

Masters commandant

4,551 00

Lieutenants

3,163 50

Masters

2,875 50

Masters of ordnance

104 00

Surgeons

240

20

20

1

4,258 00

Surgeons' mates

1,712 25

Pursers

200

20

12

1

3,470 00

Chaplains

750 00

Boatswains

1,915 50

Gunners

1,596 25

Gunner's laboratory officer

229 25

$34,292 75

--121--

Statement of the pay and rations, including all allowances, of the surgeons, surgeons' mates, &c., attached to navy hospitals—explanatory of the second item of appropriation.

Rank or station.

Portsmouth.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Washington.

Norfolk.

Total.

Amount.

Surgeons

1

1

1

1

4

$5,239 00

Surgeons' mates

1

1

1

1

4

3,803 00

Stewards

1

1

2

614 50

Nurses

2

2

4

845 00

Washers

2

2

4

849 00

Cooks

1

1

2

470 50

Total

20

$11,821 00

Statement of the pay, &c., of persons required for the ordinary, for the year 1826, completing the explanations of the second item of appropriation.

Yards.

Lieutenants.

Masters.

Carpenters.

Carpenters' mates.

Boatswains' mates.

Able seamen.

Ordinary seamen.

Total.

Total.

Portsmouth, N. H.

4

6

10

$1,296 00

Charlestown

1

1

1

1

1

12

24

41

6,629 00

New York

1

1

1

1

1

12

24

41

6,629 00

Philadelphia

4

6

10

1,296 00

Washington

1

6

8

15

2,052 00

Gosport

1

1

1

1

1

12

24

41

6,629 00

Total

3

3

3

3

4

50

92

158

$24,531 00

Statement of the pay of the civil establishment at the yards and stations—explanatory of the third item of appropriation.

Portsmouth.

Charlestown.

Brooklyn.

Philadelphia.

Per month.

Per year.

Per month.

Per year.

Per month.

Per year.

Per month.

Per year.

Storekeeper

$1,200 00

$1,700 00

$1,700 00

$1,200 00

Clerk to storekeeper

250 00

450 00

450 00

300 00

Clerk of the yard

600 00

900 00

900 00

600 00

Clerk to the commandant

730 00

750 00

600 00

Clerk to the commandant

$30

360 00

$30

360 00

Naval constructor

2,000 00

2,000 00

2,000 00

2,300 00

Draftsman

Master joiner and foreman of carpenters

1,200 00

Clerk to constructor and clerk of the check

$20

240 00

35

420 00

35

420 00

$25

300 00

Inspector of timber

900 00

900 00

700 00

Master chain cable and caboose maker

Porter

25

300 00

25

300 00

25

300 00

25

300 00

Keeper of magazine

Machinist

Master builder

Master plumber

$4,590 00

$7,780 00

$7,780 00

$7,500 00

--122--

Statement of the pay of the civil establishment, &c.—Continued.

Washington.

Gosport.

New Orleans.

Amount.

Per month.

Per year.

Per month.

Per year.

Per month.

Per year.

Storekeeper

$1,700 00

$1,700 00

$1,700 00

$10,900 00

Clerk to storekeeper

450 00

450 00

2,350 00

Clerk of the yard

900 00

900 00

4,800 00

Clerk to the commandant

1,000 00

750 00

3,850 00

Clerk to the commandant

$40

480 00

$30

360 00

1,560 00

Naval constructor

2,300 00

2,000 00

12,600 00

Draftsman

40

480 00

480 00

Master joiner and foreman of carpenters

1,200 00

Clerk to constructor and clerk of the check.

35

420 00

35

420 00

2,220 00

Inspector of timber

900 00

900 00

4,300 00

Master chain cable and caboose maker

1,500 00

1,500 00

Porter

25

300 00

25

300 00

1,800 00

Keeper of magazine

480 00

480 00

Machinist

1,500 00

1,500 00

Master builder

1,500 00

1,500 00

Master plumber

1,200 00

1,200 00

$14,030 00

$8,260 00

$1,700 00

$52,240 00

 

Estimate of provisions required for the navy for the year 1826.

For vessels in commission

4,268

For receiving vessels

104

For ordinary

158

For officers, &c., awaiting orders

159

4,689 persons,

At one ration per day each, mates

1,711 485 rations,

Estimated at 25 cents each, is

427,811 25

From which may be deducted, as a balance may probably remain on hand at the expiration of the present, year say

50,000 00

$811,871 25

Estimates for improvements and repairs of navy yards—explanatory of the sixth item of appropriation.

Portsmouth, N. H.—For launching-ways of frigates, for wharves, for buildings for accommodation of officers attached to the yard, for leveling and filling up the yard, for timber sheds to preserve the timber after being hewed out, for want of which, in all the yards, considerable loss

$10,000

Charlestown, Mass.—For stone wall to enclose the yard; for building and launching-ways of a frigate; for launching-ways of a 74; for causeway to connect the two building-ways with the blacksmith's shop; for cutting down and leveling the yard; for timber sheds; for boat houses; for mast houses; for buildings for the accommodation of officers attached to the

40,000

New York.—For cutting down and leveling the yard; for launching-ways for a frigate and sloop-of-war; for a mast house; for a boat house; for timber sheds; for buildings for the accommodation of the officers attached to the yard; for blocks for mooring ships; for

35,000

Philadelphia.—For launching ship commenced in 1821, which will be completed in the ensuing year, "the probable amount of $15,000;" for repairs of frigates' launching-ways; for sloop-of-war's building and launching-ways; for mast house; boat house; timber sheds;

30,000

Washington.—For repairing wharves and launching-ways; for buildings for the accommodation of officers attached to the yard; for timber sheds; for mast houses; for repairs of

15,000

Gosport.—For building and launching-ways for a frigate and sloop-of-war; for filling up the yard; for buildings for the accommodation of officers attached to the yard; for timber sheds;

40,000

$170,000

--123--

C.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Navy Commissioners, for the year 1826.

Commissioners of the Navy Board

$10,500

Secretary

2 000

Clerks, per act of April 20, 1818

3 550

Clerks and draftsman, per act of May 26, 1824

4,000

Messenger

700

Contingent expenses

1 800

$22,550

Navy Commissioners' Office, October 1, 1825.

Sir: Upon the subject of the estimate C, transmitted with our communication of this date, the Commissioners beg leave to observe, with respect to the compensation allowed to the clerks in this office, that a sense of justice impels them to remark, that the salaries generally are lower than those in other offices, and do not sufficiently compensate the clerks for the duties they actually perform, which are arduous, and require constant and indefatigable attention.

The following shows their present compensations, and those which the Commissioners respectfully propose, viz:

Present compensation.

Proposed compensation.

One

at $1,600 00

One

at $1,600

One

1,150 00

One

1,150

One

1,000 00

One

1 100

One

1,000 00

One

1 100

One

1,000 00

One

1,100

One

800 00

One

1,000

$6,550 00

$7,050

Averaging

$1,091 40

Averaging

$1,115

The draftsman's duties are also very arduous, and they are performed with great attention and the most minute accuracy. He well deserves additional compensation, and the Commissioners would respectfully recommend, as an act of justice, that his salary be raised from $1,000 to $1,100. I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, your most obedient servant,

WM. BAINBRIDGE.

Hon. Samuel L. Southard, Secretary of the Navy.

D.

Exhibit showing the names, stations, salaries, and places of nativity, of all the persons in the office of the Navy Commissioners, made conformably to the resolution of Congress, approved 21th April, 1816.

Names.

Stations.

Place of nativity.

Salaries.

Wm. Bainbridge

President of the board

New Jersey

$3,500

Jacob Jones

Commissioner

Delaware

3,500

C. W. Goldsborough

Secretary

Maryland

2,000

Wm. G. Ridgely

Chief clerk

Maryland

1,600

John Green

Chief clerk

Maryland

1,150

Jos. P. M'Corkle

Chief clerk

Delaware

1,000

James Hutton

Chief clerk

Pennsylvania

1,000

Robert A. Slye

Chief clerk

Maryland

1,000

B. S. Randolph

Chief clerk

Virginia

800

C. Schwartz

Draftsman

Germany

1,000

B. G. Bowen

Messenger

Maryland

700

--124--

E.

Statement of the progress made under the law for the gradual increase of the navy, showing the time of commencing and completing the several vessels, and (see paper, No. 1,) the expenditures for each.

SHIPS OF THE LINE--LAUNCHED.

Columbus, built at Washington, commenced May, 1816; launched March, 1819. Delaware, built at Gosport, commenced August, 1817; launched October, 1820. North Carolina, built at Philadelphia, commenced February, 1818; launched September, 1821. Ohio, built at New York, commenced November, 1817; launched May, 1820. Four ships launched.

SHIPS OF THE LINE--BUILDING.

One at Portsmouth, N. H., commenced June, 1819. Two at Charlestown, Mass.—one commenced September, 1818; the other commenced May, 1822. One at Philadelphia, commenced September, 1821. One at Gosport, commenced May, 1820. Five ships building.

Nine ships of the line built and building.

FRIGATES--LAUNCHED.

Potomac, built at Washington, commenced August, 1819; launched March, 1822. Brandywine, built at Washington, commenced September, 1821; launched June, 1825. Two frigates launched.

FRIGATES--BUILDING.

One at Portsmouth, N. H., commenced August, 1821. Two at Brooklyn, N. Y.—No. 8, commenced July, 1820; No. 10, commenced February, 1823. One at Philadelphia, commenced September, 1820. Four frigates building.

FRIGATES TO BE BUILT.

One at Charlestown, Mass.; the frame and principal materials are provided; the building ways nearly completed, and it is expected the keel will be laid this autumn. One at Washington; the frame and principal materials procured—the keel will be laid in the ensuing month, (November.) One at Gosport; the frame and principal materials procured—the building ways are constructing, and preparations making for laying the keel as soon as the ways are finished, which are expected to be completed during the present year. Three frigates to be built.

RECAPITULATION.

Built—four ships of the line, two frigates. Building—five ships of the line, four frigates. Three frigates to be built.

Note.—The ships of the line and frigates now building, except the ship at Philadelphia, are nearly in as finished a state as is deemed advisable, until there is a probability of their being required for service; by leaving them uncaulked, and giving a free circulation of air, and being under cover, entirely protected from the weather, their timbers are improved by seasoning, and without doubt will be more durable than if launched immediately on being built—they can be launched in about ninety days.

The ship at Philadelphia will require about five months.

Contracts have been made for all the anchors, water tanks, copper, iron, and other imperishable materials, except kentledge, to complete the vessels authorized under gradual increase. Contracts for kentledge will be made in the ensuing month.

Although there appears on the Treasurer's books a large unexpended balance for the gradual increase, yet it is not, in the opinion of the board, too much to meet the demands of existing contracts, and other expenditures to complete the vessels, necessarily growing out of the execution of the law for increasing the navy.

Owing to the difficulty in obtaining mechanics, particularly ship carpenters, it has not been in the power of the commissioners to report such progress in the various operations in the several building yards as they could have wished, although they feel confident that every exertion has been made by the commandants of the respective yards.

--125--

No. 1.

Exhibit of expenditures for labor and materials of every description, on the ships built and building under the law for gradual increase.

Description of vessels.

No. of days' work.

Am't of wages.

Materials.

Total cost of material.

Expenditures for materials and labor.

Wood.

Metal.

All other.

SHIPS OF THE LINE LAUNCHED.

* Columbus

109,325

$204,237 47

$70,458 84

$79,385 70

$72,849 10

$222,693 64

$426,931 11

* North Carolina

79,9305 ¾

115,938 03 ½

112,085 69

74,991 80

40,236 42

227,313 91

343,251 93 ¼

* Delaware

112,844

166,755 03 ½

94,526 38

74,230 26

40,223 45 ½

208,980 09 ½

375,735 13

* Ohio

75,588 ¾

110,036 37 ¼

119,328 00

62,145 86

17,010 04

198,483 90

308,520 27 ¼

375,688 ½

$596,966 91 ¼

$396,398 91

$290,753 62

$170,319 01 ½

$857,471 54 ½

$1,454,438 44 ½

SHIPS OP THE LINE BUILDING.

† At Portsmouth, N. H.

55,169 ¼

$66,601 92 ½

$97,615 60

$49,150 68

$3,976 72

$150,743 00

$217 344 92 ½

† At Charlestown, Mass.

39,751

55,012 01

83,260 21

40,401 80 ½

5,573 46 ½

129,235 46

184,247 47

† At Charlestown, Mass.

35,202 ½

47,822 34

81,309 32

34,904 17 ¾

871 46

117,08, 00

164,908 16 ¾

† At Philadelphia

40,427

55,583 40 ¾

94,109 53

11,980 37 ¼

184 52

106,274 40

161,857 80

† At Gosport

42,013 ½

55,617 93

73,873 61

11,299 60

2,846 95

88,020 16

143,038 09

212,563 ¼

$280,637 61 ¼

$430,168 27

$147,736 63 ½

$13,453 11 ½

$591,358 02

$871,996 45 ¼

FRIGATES LAUNCHED.

Potomac

65,379 ½

$87,039 036

$43,531 16

$46,145 89

$1,603 35

$91,280 40

$178,320 09

Brandywine

69,309 ½

84,990 02

59,541 51

61,244 023 ¾

56,100 70 ½

176,836 24 ¼

261,876 26 ¼

134,689

$172,029 71

$103,072 67

$107,389 91 ¾

$57,704 05 ½

$268,166 64 ¼

$440,196 35 ½

FRIGATES BUILDING.

§ At Portsmouth

32,930 ½

$39,472 95

$55,072 57

$24,036 65

$2,111 10

$81,220 32

$120,693 27

§ At New York

36,578 ½

47,865 83 ¾

68,691 38 ¾

23,114 53 ¼

3,823 50

95,629 42 ¼

143,495 26

§ At New York

16,756

25,276 76

65,119 52 ½

5,713 64 ¼

736 12 ¼

71,569 28

96,846 04 ½

§ At Philadelphia

29,009 ½

37,411 26 ½

64,764 83

17,198 97

1,991 11

83,954 96 ¼

121,366 22 ¾

115,274 ½

$150,026 81 ¼

$253,648 36 ¼

$70,063 79 ½

$8,661 83 ¼

$332,373 98 ½

$182,400 80 ¼

Grand Totals.

838,215 ¼

$1,199,661 04 ½

$1,183,238 21 ½

$615,943 96 ¾

$250,138 01 ¾

$2,049,370 19 ¼

$3,249,052 05 ½

F.

Statement showing the progress made under the law for building ten sloops-of-war.

Orders were issued from this office immediately after the passage of the law to the respective commandants of the several navy yards, at Portsmouth, N. H., Philadelphia, Washington, and Gosport, for the construction of one sloop-of-war at each of the navy yards under their command, and also to the commandants at the yards at Charlestown, Mass., Brooklyn, N. Y., to make arrangements to commence, immediately, the construction of three sloops at each yard, two of which, at the former, and one at the latter yard, will be launched, and one at the former ready for sea, within the present year.

Contracts for the timber, and other materials, required for all the sloops authorized by law, have been made upon terms favorable to government, to be delivered within the ensuing year, in which time, it is believed, the entire number may be afloat.

* From returns made up to 31st August

† From returns made up to 31st August. ‡ Under "all other materials" for this ship is included ordnance and stores, and embraces all the expenditures for equipments and outfits, so far as have been ascertained.

§ From returns made up to 31st August.

--126--

G.

Exhibit showing the names and force of the vessels of the United States navy; also, when and where built, purchased, or captured, and the present state and condition of the vessels in ordinary and on the lakes.

Names of vessels.

Force.

When built or captured.

Where built.

State.

Condition.

Independence

74

1814

Boston

In ordinary

At Boston; would require an examination of her copper, and some slight repairs, before going to sea.

Franklin

74

1815

Philadelphia

In ordinary

At New York; would require coppering, and considerable other repairs, to fit her for service.

Washington

74

1816

Portsmouth

In ordinary

At New York; her copper would require examination, and considerable repairs would be necessary to fit her for service.

Columbus

74

1819

Washington

In ordinary

At Boston; would require an examination of her copper and some slight repairs, before going to sea.

Delaware

74

1820

Gosport, Va

In ordinary

At Gosport; will require considerable repairs before going to sea.

North Carolina

74

1820

Philadelphia

In service     

Ohio

74

1820

New York

In ordinary

At New York; her copper would require an examination, and considerable repairs would be necessary to fit her for service.

United States

44

1797

Philadelphia

In service

Constitution

44

1797

Boston

do

Guerriere

44

1814

Philadelphia

Repairing

At Gosport.

Java

44

1814

Baltimore

do

At Boston.

Potomac

44

1821

Washington

Undercover

At Washington.

Brandywine

44

1825

do

In service

Congress

36

1799

Portsmouth

Repairing

At Washington.

Constellation

36

1797

Baltimore

In service

Macedonian

36

1812

Captured

Repairing

At Gosport.

Cyane

24

1815

do

In service

John Adams

24

1799

Charleston

do

Ontario

18

1813

Baltimore

do

Erie

18

1813

do

do

Peacock

18

1813

New York

do

Hornet

18

1813

Baltimore

do

Spark

12

1814

Purchased

do

Porpoise

12

1820

Portsmouth

do

Dolphin

12

1821

Philadelphia

do

Grampus

12

1821

Washington

do

Shark

12

1821

do

do

Fulton steam frigate

1815

New York

Receiving vessel

At New York.

Alert

1815

do

do

At Norfolk.

Suppression of piracy.

Names of vessels.

Tons.

Where built.

State.

Condition.

Fox

53

Purchased

In service

Terrier

61

do

do

Steam galliot Sea Gull

do

Receiving vessel

At Philadelphia.

Decoy transport

do

In service

Mosquito barge

Built

do

Gnat barge

Built

do

Midge barge

Built

do

Sand Fly barge

Built

do

Gallinipper barge

do

On the lakes.

Ghent, 4 guns

Erie.

Recommended to be sold.

Chippewa, 74 guns

Ontario.

Under cover at Sackett's Harbor.

New Orleans, 74 guns

Ontario.

Under cover at Sackett's Harbor.

--127--

H.

Statement of the progress made in executing the instructions of the honorable the Secretary of the Navy of the 14th February last.

On the 26th February the several officers commanding the naval stations at Sackett's Harbor, Erie, and Whitehall, were required to inform the Board of Navy Commissioners of the. best terms on which contracts could be obtained for the transportation of the ordnance and stores, &c., from the several stations to the Navy yard at Brooklyn, New York, and requiring them also to furnish the board with a list of such articles which, in their opinion, would be more advantageous to the public interest to sell than to transport, as well as at what prices the vessels at the several stations would sell for.

Mr. Robert Hugunin, on the 23d March, offered $8,000 for the eight vessels then lying sunk at Sackett's Harbor, stipulating to raise and remove them within eighteen months. The Commissioners accepted his offer, and his bonds, with security, have been received and transmitted to your Department.

An offer was also made for the Lady of the Lake and the gun boats at this place, which the Commissioners thought not equal to their value, and ordered them to be advertised for sale at public auction, together with such other articles as the board had determined to sell rather than have them transported, lists of which were furnished to the commandant of that station, and similar lists also transmitted to the commanding officers of the two other stations, who were directed to sell at auction, in addition to the articles embraced in those lists, all vessels, boats, launches, &c., &c., except the Ghent, at Erie.

Contracts to transport such articles as might be delivered for that purpose were made with Messrs. Dennison and Ely, from Sackett's Harbor, R. B. Heacock, from Erie, and Ezra Smith, from Whitehall, and their bonds, with security for the performance of their contracts, received, and, together with the contracts, have been transmitted to the Navy Department.

Paper No. 1, hereto annexed, will show the articles which have been transported under these contracts to the Navy yard at Brooklyn, up to the 15th September.

No. 2 will show the amount of sales at the several stations, so far as have been received, to have been $52,151.27.

It is believed that all the stores, &c., &c., at the several stations will have been sold or transported within the present year, so that all the persons now at each station may be transferred, except one captain or master commandant at Sackett's Harbor.

--128--

No. 1.—Exhibit explanatory of paper H.

Date

Number of receipts.

From Sackett's Harbor—articles transported.

Shot.

Cannon.

Carronades.

Sails.

Twelve pound.

Eighteen pound.

Twenty-four pound.

Thirty-two pound.

Forty-two pound.

Sixty-eight pound.

Twelve pounders.

Eighteen pounders.

Twenty-four pounders.

Thirty-two pounders.

Eighteen pounders.

Twenty-four pounders.

Thirty-two pounders.

Forty-two pounders.

Sixty-eight pounders.

Spankers.

Top-sails.

Stud-sails.

Main-sails.

Fore-sails

Square-sails.

Jibs.

Stay-sails.

Topgallant-sails.

Royals.

Gun-boat sails.

June 10, 1825

1

Cannon shot

575

2,423

52

1

June 15, 1825

2

Cannon shot

3,600

June 16, 1825

3

Cannon shot

3,000

June 16, 1825

4

Cannon and shot

4,000

2

June 17, 1825

5

Cannon, shot, and spikes

610

800

2

June 22, 1825

6

Shot

460

178

3,000

June 27, 1825

7

Shot and spikes

2,642

June 27, 1825

8

Shot

2,500

July 1, 1825

9

Cannon and shot

748

3,814

878

1

July 5, 1825

10