Ship names!

--209--

20th Congress.]

No. 370.

[2d Session.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OP THE NAVY, SHOWING THE CONDITION OF THE NAVY IN THE YEAR 1828.

COMMUNICATED, WITH THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE TO CONGRESS, DECEMBER 2, 1828.

Navy Department, November 27, 1828.

The Secretary of the Navy respectfully submits the following report to the consideration of the President of the United States:

The various laws and resolutions, which were passed at the last session of Congress, connected with the duties of this Department, have received attention and been executed, as far as the means within its control would permit.

The act for the relief of William Barton was executed soon after its passage, viz., on the 21st May, 1828, by the payment to him of $3,357.54.

The second section of the act of the 26th May last, for the relief of Francis H. Gregory and Jesse Wilkinson, was executed on the 4th June following, by the payment of $13,237.48.

The appropriation of the 24th May last, for the naval hospital fund, has been nearly expended on the erection of buildings mentioned in the last annual report, and on other objects connected with navy hospitals; a detailed report of which will be made by the commissioners of the fund. Those buildings may be completed in the course of the next year, and will be creditable to the country, and eminently useful to the navy. Heretofore no houses have been erected and no system formed for the accommodation and management of sick and disabled seamen. Yielding constantly, through many successive years, a portion of their monthly pay for this object, they have seen no benefit result from it, and have found only temporary and uncomfortable abodes provided for them, in old age, disease, and distress. For the future, they may look forward to accommodations worthy of the service in which they have labored and bled. But much yet remains to be done. More buildings ought to be erected, and further appropriations made, by the justice and humanity of the nation. I beg to refer to the considerations presented in former reports.

Difficulties have arisen in executing the law of the 24th May last, for the better organization of the medical department of the navy, arising from what is supposed to have been an error in the wording of

--210--

the law. The first section prescribes the manner of admission to the rank of assistant surgeon, and requires an examination by a board of naval surgeons, of all the candidates for that office, and an approval by the board. It also requires a service at sea of two years, as assistant surgeon, and an examination before promotion to the rank of surgeon. These provisions of the law are in strict conformity with the previous rules and practice of this Department, since May, 1824. The fourth section declares "that every surgeon who shall have received his appointment, as is hereinbefore provided for, shall receive fifty dollars" a month, and two rations a day; after five years' service he shall be entitled to receive fifty-five dollars a month, and an additional ration a day; and after ten years' service," &c. In acting upon this law, the words "as is hereinbefore provided for," have been construed to apply only to those who have received their appointments after the examination prescribed in the first section, which excluded from the increased pay all the surgeons now upon the list. The first examinations were in 1824, and there are none who have been examined previous to their promotions who have been five years in the service. None have, therefore, received the increased pay, except when at sea, and paid under the fifth section. It is confidently believed that Congress did not intend either to require those who were already commissioned surgeons in the navy to undergo an examination, or to deprive those who have faithfully served the public for many years of the additional pay, while it was allowed to younger officers. Legislative explanation will he necessary to insure them the advantages which the law was probably intended to confer.

The act making appropriation for the erection of a breakwater near the mouth of the Delaware Bay received your prompt attention; and the execution of the law, under your supervision, was confided to the Secretary of the Navy. Immediate measures were taken to advance the work. C. C. Biddle, of Philadelphia, was appointed the agent for the disbursement of the money, and instructions were given for his guidance and direction. He has executed a bond, with sufficient sureties, for the faithful performance of his duties, in the penalty required of navy agents, and will receive the compensation allowed by law to them. His accounts will be transmitted to and settled quarterly by the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury. The fund, and. the expenditures under it, will be kept separate and distinct from all others.

On the 9th of June Commodore Rodgers, General Bernard, and William Strickland, Esq., were appointed commissioners to select a site and prepare a plan and estimates for the work, for the approval of the Executive; and naval officers placed under their control to make the necessary soundings and surveys. They have been employed in discharge of the duties assigned to them, and their report is daily expected, and will be submitted for approval. William Strickland has been appointed the engineer to superintend the erection of the work. Advertisements have been issued and contracts are now under consideration for a part of the materials. These contracts will, in a few days, be executed. Preparations will be made during the winter, and in the course of the spring and summer materials will be delivered, and the work progress to the extent of the appropriation. An additional appropriation will be required during the ensuing session.

Out of the sum of $30,000, appropriated by the "act making an appropriation for the suppression of the slave trade," passed 24th May, 1828, $8,009.20 were paid to the representatives of Taliaferro Livingston, under the authority of the second section of that act. Of the balance, the sum of $19,903.55 have been expended in the support of the agency on the coast of Africa, and on other objects. (See paper A.) There are claims still pending and unsatisfied, which will probably consume the residue. It was my intention to have annexed to this report a full and minute statement of all the expenditures connected with this agency, from its establishment; but Mr. Ashmun, who has several times been the acting agent, and by whom the greater part of the expenditures have been made, and especially since the death of Dr. Peaco, died during the last summer, on his return to this country. The condition in which his papers were left, and the want of verbal explanations, have created obstacles to the prompt settlement of his accounts, but the Fourth Auditor is now employed in adjusting them; when this is completed, the claims upon the appropriation can be more accurately stated.

The concerns of the agency are believed to be in a prosperous condition. There are few, if any, Africans at it, who occasion expense to the government. The houses and other property are in a good state of preservation, and will hereafter require but small expenditures.

On the death of Mr. Ashmun, Dr. Randall was appointed agent. He sailed from New York for the agency on the 12th of November. So many of the agents had died, and so many difficulties had arisen from that cause, both in the proper care of the business and property of the agency, and in rendering and settling the accounts, that it was thought expedient to appoint an assistant agent, at a small salary, to accompany Dr. Randall. Dr. Mechlin was selected for this purpose.

There are at this time in the United States only two persons coming within the description of our laws, subjecting them to removal to the agency. These were brought into the port of Mobile, in the year 1819, and being very young, were, by the then Secretary of the Treasury, placed under the care of the collector of that port. Orders have recently been given to send them to Baltimore, with a view to their transportation under the law.

On the 30th April last a message was sent by the President of the United States to Congress, giving information that 121 Africans had been landed at Key West, from a Spanish slave-trading vessel, stranded within the jurisdiction of the United States, while pursued by an armed schooner in his Britannic Majesty's service, and to which it was not believed that the law of March 8, 1819, or any of the other acts prohibiting the slave trade, applied. No provision was made by Congress for removing them from the territory of the United States, or disposing of them in any other manner. They still remain in the custody of the marshal of Florida. He was advised to hire them out, or otherwise dispose of them, in such manner as to cause least expense, until legal provision should be made on the subject. It is presumed that he has done so. In the course of the present fall he presented to this Department a claim to the amount of $-----, for their maintenance and support. The amount seemed to be unreasonably large; but no effort was made to adjust and settle it, because the Africans did not come within those provisions of the law which entrust this Department with the direction and control of Africans brought within our jurisdiction, and direct them to be sent to the agency on the coast of Africa. The Secretary of the Navy does not feel authorized to devote to this object any portion of the money appropriated for the suppression of the slave trade. It is important that some authority be given, by law, to dispose of these Africans, and settle the accounts of the marshal.

The law of the last session, for extending the term of certain pensions chargeable to the navy and

--211--

privateer pension funds, has created some embarrassments, and rendered it necessary to strike many names from the list of pensioners. In doing this, the only construction has been placed upon the law of which its words seemed naturally susceptible.

For the history and condition of the privateer fund, I beg leave respectfully to refer to a letter from the Secretary of the Navy to the chairman of the Naval Committee of the House of Representatives, dated February 21, 1828, document No. 244, and to the reports referred to in that letter. The laws upon the subject are dated 26th June, 1812, which create the fund; 13th February, 1813; 2d August, 1813; 4th March, 1814; 16th April, 1818; 9th and 26th April, 1824; and 23d May, 1828, which describe the persons to be admitted to pensions; and are the same, in substance, except as relates to children after the age of sixteen years Numerous pensions were granted and renewed under each of the acts of 1814, 1818, and 1824. There were 203 granted under the acts of 1814, and they generally expired in or before 1820. Under the act of 1818, 186 were granted, and they expired in or before 1825; under the acts of 1824, 159 were granted, which will expire in or before 1830.

It will be perceived by this statement, that at the date of the act of last session (23d May, 1828), and for one year preceding it, there were no persons in the receipt of a pension under the acts of 1814 and 1818, the pensions under those acts having expired two or three years preceding. Now the second section of this law provides for the renewal of pensions only to those who received them under those last-mentioned acts, viz., of 1814 and 1818, and does not provide for those receiving them under the acts of 1824.

The commissioners of the fund have, consequently, refused to renew any pensions which were not received under the acts of 1814 and 1818. By this decision much complaint has been excited. The law holds out the expectation of a renewal of pensions to widows, and by this necessary construction of it, that expectation has been disappointed. It is not known whether the omission to recite the acts of 1824 was intentional or accidental. The effect of the omission is to exclude widows from any further benefit from the fund, and to leave the balance which now remains for the comfort and enjoyment of the seamen who were actually wounded and still survive. For them it would be sufficient. It amounts to $63,270.50, and there are but 107 of them now surviving. Their situation demands the first attention, and these pensions may be continued probably during their lives, if the omission of the acts of 1824 was intentional, as the commissioners have presumed that it was, and have so constructed the law; although, by this construction no pension to any widow can be renewed. If the omission was accidental, and it was intended to renew the pensions to widows, then the fund would be destroyed within the first and second year, and nothing remain for the surviving seamen, unless Congress make an appropriation for that object. Of the 159 pensions granted under the acts of 1824, 41 expired in 1827; 26, in 1828; 20 will expire in 1829; and 72 in 1830. The effect of renewing them all will be the destruction of so small a fund as $63,270.30. It may, perhaps, be proper to add that the widows have already received, or will receive under the law, as it is now construed, pensions for fifteen years. It is for Congress to decide whether they will make an appropriation that they may be further renewed.

The usual reports respecting the navy pension fund will be made. The laws regulating navy pensions have given rise to some doubts, which it would be satisfactory to have removed. With a view to exhibit the construction which has been placed upon them, that error may be corrected if it exist, the following points of practice on this subject are stated: 1st. The law of 3d March, 1817, provided pensions for the widows and children, under 16 years old, of officers, seamen, and marines, who should die hereafter, or should have died since 18th June, 1812, in consequence of disease contracted, or of casualties or of injuries received while in the line of their duty. This law was repealed by the second section of the act of 22d January, 1824. Since the repeal, deaths by disease, casualty, or injury have not been considered causes for granting pensions to widows and children, except in cases where the deaths occurred during the last war. Applications, which have been numerous, have therefore been uniformly refused, except in the cases specified. 2d. By the terms of the law of the last session (23d May, 1828), pensions are to be renewed "to the widows and children of officers, seamen, and marines who were killed in battle, or who died in the naval service of the United States during the late war," so that they may receive 20 years' pension. The words apply only to the cases of those who died "during the late war." The widows and children of no others can, under it, receive pensions. Under other laws some pensions have been granted and renewed to widows and children of those who have died since the war. These remain in the hope of some expression of legislative opinion on the point. No new ones will be granted. 3d. The pensions to children in all cases terminate when they arrive at the age of 16. The navy pension fund now amounts to about $900,652.14.

By the 3d section of the act making appropriations for the support of the navy, for the year 1828, the sum of $10,000 was directed to be taken out of the fund for the gradual improvement of the navy, for the purchase of such lands as the President might think necessary and proper to provide live oak and other timber for the navy. In virtue of this provision purchases have been made of several adjoining tracts of land on Santa Rosa Sound, and in the rear of the Navy yard at Pensacola, amounting, in all, to about 3,650 arpens, and costing about $9,000. A part of this land has been placed under the care of suitable persons, and arrangements have been made to prosecute the planting and cultivation of the live oak upon it. Inquiries have also been made respecting other tracts, which it might be supposed the interest of the government to retain from sale or purchase. Examinations have also been continued on the western coast of Florida, with a view to the same object.

Trespasses continue, in some extent to be made on the timber on the public lands. Every means has been taken, both by this and the Treasury Department, to repress them, and with some success. But the inlets are so numerous and the coast of Florida so extensive, that the vessels in the navy and revenue service are not competent to watch every part of it without an entire neglect of other duties.

On the 21st of May, 1828, the House of Representatives passed a resolution requesting the President of the United States "to send one of our small vessels to the Pacific ocean and South sea, to examine the coasts, islands, harbors, shoals, and reefs in those seas, and to ascertain their true situation and description;" and authorizing the use of such facilities as could be afforded by the Department, without further appropriation during the year. To this resolution in was your earnest wish that early and full attention should be paid.

There was no vessel belonging to our navy which, in its then condition, was proper to be sent upon this expedition. The Peacock was therefore selected and placed at the Navy yard at New York, to be repaired and supplied with conveniences suited to the object. Her repairs and preparation are now nearly completed, and she will be ready to sail in a few weeks.

--212--

In looking to the great purpose for which this resolution was passed, and the difficulties and dangers which must necessarily be encountered, it seemed to be both unsafe and inexpedient to send only one vessel. But the Department did not feel that it had the authority, either to purchase another or to detach one more of the small vessels of the navy to be joined with the Peacock. Nor, indeed, is there another in the service suited to this peculiar employment. But the opinion and wish of the Department being known, an offer was made to it of such a vessel as was desired, being of about 200 tons burden, and calculated for cruising in the high southern latitudes, and among the ice islands and reefs which are known to exist there. This vessel has been received and placed at the navy yard, upon express agreement that a recommendation should be made to Congress to authorize its purchase, and if the recommendation was not approved, that it should be returned to its owner. No money has been expended under this arrangement. That satisfactory evidence might be had, both of the fitness of the vessel and its value, directions were given to Mr. Eckford, of New York, and Mr. Hartt, the naval constructor at Brooklyn, to examine it and report on these points. Their report fixes the value at §10,000. I cheerfully discharged my obligation under the agreement by an earnest recommendation that Congress authorize the price to be paid. Should this not be done the vessel will be returned.

Measures have been taken to procure information of the present state of knowledge in our country, on the subjects pointed out in the resolution, from our citizens who have been employed in the navigation of those seas, and who possess information derived from experience, which is confined very much to themselves and their log books and journals. An agent has been usefully and successfully engaged in this object, and has found few obstacles thrown in his way. Those who have been most acquainted, by business and interest, with that portion of the globe, feel the deepest solicitude for the success of the enterprise. The expedition will be enabled to sail with better guides than are usually possessed by those who embark in similar undertakings.

With a view to give the most useful character to the enterprise, it is important that persons skilled in the various branches of science should partake in it. Correspondence has, therefore, been held with scientific men, and some selections have been made, and others are now making, by the Department, of astronomers, naturalists, and others, who are willing to encounter the toil, and will be able to bring home to us results which will advance the honor and promote the interests of the nation.

Master Commandant Jones will command the Peacock, and other suitable officers have been designated.

The resolution was understood to authorize the use of the naval appropriations to furnish facilities for the expedition; and they have been used for all those objects which come within the terms in the bill of appropriation, as pay, subsistence, instruments, books, &c. But there are indispensable objects which do not come within any of the items of the bill, and for which provision is required. A bill on the subject was reported by the Naval Committee, at the last session of Congress, and placed on the list of business to be acted on, but was not reached before the close of the session. Its passage is necessary to accomplish the purposes designed by the resolution. It does not seem proper to detail the "facilities" which it is the intention of the Department to afford. One of them should be, a vessel to carry provisions, in order that upon the arrival of the expedition at the scene of operation, the exploring vessels may be supplied in such a manner that they may not be driven from their employment at too early a period, and that they may subsequently, from time to time, be further supplied from distant stations, so that no cause. but the elements may arrest their labors, but they may, at all times and seasons, be at liberty to pursue their investigations without interruption. Other and obvious uses may be made of such a vessel, in the relief which it will afford should disease or death make serious inroads on their numbers. A vessel suited to this object is within the control of the Department, and will be either chartered or purchased, as the means furnished by Congress may permit. The importance of the expedition, in all its aspects, and especially in its commercial relations, has augmented, in the view of the Department, by all the inquiries and investigations which have been made; and an anxious desire is felt that nothing should be omitted which can tend to its ultimate success.

Several resolutions have at various times been passed, directing the Department to cause surveys to be made, to ascertain the practical facilities of Charleston, Beaufort, Savannah, and Brunswick, for naval purposes. They have been made during the last three years, and the results communicated to Congress as they were received. They are now completed, and it will be my duty to make a report upon the whole. These surveys, although executed as well as the circumstances in which the officers were placed would allow, and have probably been sufficient to answer the object of the resolution, yet they do not afford materials for an accurate chart of the harbors, and the approaches to them, and assist but little towards a perfect knowledge of our coasts, which can only be acquired by that scientific survey of the whole, the importance of which I have heretofore ventured to urge, and would again respectfully suggest.

All these harbors may, at times, in the future progress of our country, afford protection and comfort to a portion of our cruising vessels; but they are not believed to be places where large naval establishments can advantageously be made. Nor is it believed that it would be wise to increase the number of those establishments which we now have. These are already sufficient for the building, repairs, and equipment of our navy, as authorized by law, and such as it will probably be for many years to come. It would be productive, both of economy and efficient action, if our means were more concentrated at two or three well selected positions. A great error was committed in the early part of our naval history, in selecting, without adequate caution, our numerous navy yards; estimating them rather for temporary and local objects, than as permanent and extensive sources of defence. Immense sums of money have been wasted upon them, and necessarily so, for want of a regular system for their improvement. It will be recollected, that this evil induced an appropriation, on the recommendation of the Department, the object of which was to secure well arranged plans, by which all future improvements should be made.

The board of officers appointed to examine the navy yards, and prepare these plans, have executed their duties at Norfolk, Washington, Philadelphia, Charleston, and Portsmouth. Their work has been examined by the Secretary of the Navy and the Board of Naval Commissioners, and approved by the President. If these plans be well filled up, all of them will promote convenience and economy; some of them will exhibit establishments inferior to none in the world. It is probable experience will show, that some additions and improvements may be made to them, which will add to their value. Among these, it is believed that the one at Gosport may be rendered more important, by the introduction of the water of Lake Drummond, either directly from the lake or from the Dismal Swamp canal. Desirous to ascertain the practicability and expense of doing it, a skillful engineer was requested to make the necessary examin-

--213--

ations, surveys, and estimates. His report will be received in a short time. Should it be found practicable, at a moderate expense, and I do not doubt that it will, the use of that water for the docks, the machinery, all the wants of the yard, and for watering our ships, will be a rich remuneration.

In examining the Navy yard at Brooklyn, it was found that the nature of the soil, the confined limits, the narrowness of the channel, and the claims of individual landlords who adjoin it, were such that a plan could not be prepared which promised such usefulness; and that it would be especially difficult to form, at some future period, when Congress should see fit to authorize it, docks suited to the future and growing wants of the navy in that neighborhood. The board was therefore directed to omit forming a plan of that yard; and examinations were instituted for another location. The result was unsatisfactory. Under these circumstances, application was made to the War Department for a transfer of Governor's Island, which was believed not to be, in any respect, essential to the army. This transfer being made, the present navy yard, and that island, will afford all the accommodation which is required. And no further delay will take place, in forming and executing a plan which will promote both convenience and economy.

The Navy yard at Pensacola is the only remaining one for which a permanent plan is to be formed. Its distance from the seat of government, and the state of the yard, have heretofore prevented, not only this, but also the examinations required to decide on the expediency of erecting a railway, which the President has been authorized to cause to be erected, if he considered it proper and expedient. The yard was established only two years ago, and is at the distance of six miles from the town of Pensacola, and from all comfortable accommodation for the officers and others employed at it. It was therefore necessary in the first place to erect buildings for their accommodation, that they might be where their duties called them; and such wharves, &c, as were required by our vessels upon the West India station, when they entered the port for repairs or other objects. The improvements there have not progressed rapidly, but they are now in a state in which it would be proper that the plan should be made. It is the intention of the Department that fit persons shall, in the course of the next month, execute this duty, and make report, both as to the navy yard and the marine railway.

Those parts of the service which are under the direction and control of the Board of Navy Commissioners have been economically and judiciously managed. The reports called for, from them, will be found annexed, marked G. In the building, equipment, and preparation of our vessels for sea, increasing skill and economy are manifested; and although further improvements will no doubt continue to be made, we have the satisfaction of believing that we suffer no disgrace, when our vessels are compared with those of the most maritime and naval nations. Our navy is yet small in numbers, though we hope not feeble in efficiency. Including the vessels built, and building, and for which provision has been made by law, there are twelve ships of the line, twenty frigates, sixteen sloops-of-war, and four schooners. These are sufficient for the present wants and interest of the nation; and their increase, to any great extent, will probably not be required for a long period in our future history. No condition of either our commercial or political relations will permit its diminution. No probable change can demand a large augmentation. Under wise and efficient administration, our coasts and commercial interests may always be protected by an active force, not much, if anything, beyond eighteen ships of the line, twenty frigates, thirty sloops and smaller vessels, and ten or twelve steam batteries. Our safety lies in our peculiar position, and in having our small navy in the most perfect state of efficiency and action. It is gratifying to add, that the best hopes are afforded by its present condition, and that a gradual advance in the improvements now making in the erection of docks, and in other respects, will enable it, with certainty, to reach that state at a period not very distant.

The discipline in the service has generally been commendable, during the past year. In the few instances of a contrary character, the unfitness of the individual officers for the service has been exhibited, rather than a general relaxation or want of energy in the whole. The calls of the navy on this point, consist of a law for its organization; a law for its government, containing a criminal code, as a substitute for that now in force; a law establishing a naval school; and a revised body of rules and regulations. The three former have been presented to Congress in reports enclosing the substance of bills corresponding with the views of the Department; to which reference is now requested. The latter has been prepared, and, after leisure for examination and correction, will be approved.

The disbursing and accounting officers connected with this Department have performed their duties in a satisfactory manner; and, so far as information has been received, there has been no misapplication or squandering of the public money. In the settlement of the accounts, it often occurs that disbursing officers, and others, have claims resulting from the depreciation of Treasury notes during the last war. These claims generally arise from the notes having been placed in their hands as funds to be disbursed, and having been charged to them at their nominal value. When called to disburse them, it could, in many cases, be done only at a reduced amount. They were thus charged by the government with one sum, when, in reality, for all purposes of paying claims, making purchases, &c, they had received another. When their accounts have been presented for settlement, the Department has not felt itself authorized to make the allowances which the plainest evidence proved to be just. They thus stand as debtors on the books, and have been, I believe, in some instances published as defaulters. The records are in this mode encumbered, accounts remain unsettled, and inconvenience is created. Congress have passed acts, declaring that salaries or compensations should not be withheld when the balances against individuals were caused solely by the depreciation of Treasury notes; which has enabled those so situated to receive their salaries or compensations, and thus far afforded relief to them; but it does not relieve the accounting office from the difficulty created by this circumstance. Could authority be given, in some form, to adjust these claims, much benefit would result.

The organization of the disbursing department may be considered good, except, perhaps, in some matters relating to the pursers, in which a change would be useful. These, depending principally on the rules and regulations of the navy, ought to be remedied when they are revised.

In the active operations of the naval force during the year, there has been much to applaud, and but little to give pain. Health has prevailed, with few exceptions, and these not of an uncommon character. On this point, there is very slight, if any difference, in the several stations on which our vessels are employed.

Our squadrons have been kept on the footing indicated in the last annual report. A condensed view of them, both for the past and ensuing year, will be found in paper B. They have all accomplished the purposes for which they have been maintained.

In the Mediterranean, piracy, which excited the fears of our mercantile fellow-citizens, and induced

--214--

Congress, at the last session, to increase our force, has been diminished by various causes. The activity of our vessels; the presence of fleets belonging to several of the principal powers of Europe; the restraints of the existing authorities in Greece; and the system of convoy which has been pursued, have all operated to this desirable result. Still there is danger to be apprehended, and our squadron cannot be diminished. This danger does not arise so much from piratical cruisers, as from vessels being becalmed in the night, near the shores of some of the small islands, from which attacks are made in boats by the lawless inhabitants. Against this species of attack, it is impracticable, always, to guard by any assiduity in our naval officers. There is for it but one remedy, that of convoy, which cannot, in every instance, be afforded, and is not always sought by our merchant vessels, on account of the delay which it sometimes occasions. In other respects, our relations in that sea have called for no exercise of force.

Peace has generally prevailed among the nations on the western coast of South America, and no incident has occurred there worthy of particular notice. Our commerce is not molested on the ocean. There are no public ships to interrupt or annoy it. Should this state of things continue, our vessels will have an opportunity to extend their cruises to those portions of the Pacific most occupied by our merchant ships, and be useful to them in their pursuits. A relief squadron is now in preparation for that station, and orders will be sent to one of our vessels to return by the Society and Sandwich Islands and the Cape of Good Hope. Objects of much interest, connected with our seamen and commerce at those islands, call for the frequent presence of a portion of our armed force.

In the West Indies, no piracies have been committed. That scourge of our commerce has been entirely repressed. Occasional rumors of renewed acts of piracy, have created uneasiness; but in almost, if not entirely all the cases, these rumors were founded on misrepresentation. The annexed extracts from the commanding officer, mention some cases of this kind.* The only unpleasant occurrences have arisen from the condition of things on the land, and from vessels wearing an acknowledged and authorized flag. The commanders of two vessels, under Mexican colors, and belonging to the Mexican navy, have used the port of Key West as a place of rendezvous, from which to carry on their belligerent operations; and, in other respects, so conducted that they were ordered to depart, and a call was made on one of our vessels to enforce the order. Subsequent obedience rendered actual force unnecessary.

Another incident created some apprehension of injury to our commerce. In November, 1827, the commander of the Mexican naval forces issued a proclamation inviting those who were disposed to fit out privateers to cruise against the enemies of Mexico, to apply to him for commissions; and that every vessel on board of which might be found effects of the enemy should be conducted to Vera Cruz for condemnation or acquittal. Our commanding officer promptly communicated with this government, and with our minister in Mexico, and adopted efficient means to avoid the evil likely to result from this cause. Fortunately very few commissions were issued; and the treaty subsequently formed with Mexico, by adopting more liberal principles, relieved us from apprehended inconvenience.

The commanding officer of that squadron has expressed an opinion that the reduction of the Spanish naval force at Havana, which was said to be in contemplation, would discharge so many seamen who had been taken into service by impressment, and whose previous occupations had been in many instances those of depredation on the water, that there would be danger of the revival of piracy. Should this reduction be made, renewed zeal must be exercised and thereby serious calamities prevented.

The convulsions, also, in several of the countries bordering on the gulf, and the want of regularly organized governments in many of the ports, offer so many causes of apprehension for the safety of our commerce and property of our citizens, as to forbid any diminution of our force or relaxation in their exertions.

The continuance of the war, until very recently, between Brazil and Buenos Ayres, and the system adopted by the former in sustaining their blockades by a force at times inadequate to the object, and requiring bonds of those who entered their ports that they would not afterwards enter the ports of their enemy, have given unceasing employment to our naval force in the neighborhood of those nations. The commanding officer has been in almost daily correspondence with the existing powers respecting our vessels and seamen. A faithful view of this correspondence could not be presented without transmitting voluminous copies of letters. It is believed to embrace every instance of injustice, oppression and wrong to our citizens which was brought to his notice, and to have been productive of relief almost in every case which was not submitted to the organized tribunals of the country. Upon the ratification of peace between those governments, he returned home; a relief squadron being in preparation for that station. The continuance of our small force there, will be necessary; for, although interruption to our commerce will not arise from a state of war, the numbers who will be thrown out of employment, both on the land and on the water, will probably create injuries of a different character.

The distance from the United States at which all our vessels (except those in the West Indies) cruise, and the difficulty in transmitting money to them, induced the Department to establish a credit in London, so as to enable the commanding officers to draw, either on that city or on the Department, as should be found most advantageous. This provision has, during the present year, prevented any inconvenience to our squadrons on this point, and produced some saving of the public money.

Both in enlisting and discharging seamen, the usual difficulties have been found. The ordinary length of our cruises is three years; but in consequence of the slow manner in which they are enlisted, it is impracticable to send a vessel, especially a large one, to sea, manned with those who all have three years to serve. About one-fourth of all our crews, when they leave the United States, are bound to serve from three months to a year less than that period. The vessel must therefore be recalled before that time expires, or a portion of them be entitled to their discharge before its return. It is unpleasant, both to themselves and the government, to give them a discharge in a foreign country; but when they are entitled to it, our officers have been instructed to give it, if demanded, and there is an unwillingness to enter for the remainder of the cruise. Some are always so discharged, and others enlisted in their places. The only remedies are either enlisting for a longer, or recalling our vessels in a shorter period. The former would violate the law; the latter would create a large expense to the government. It is gratifying to state that no serious evil has, as yet, resulted from this cause, although it has sometimes placed our officers in an unpleasant situation, and should, as far as practicable, be avoided.

When seamen demand their discharges abroad, and their places are to be supplied, foreigners of every nation are taken; and from the manner in which our ordinary enlistments are made, many such

* The case of the Carraboo, of which reports have recently been received, may form an exception to these remarks.

--215--

are found among our crews at all times. They are a distinct class of people from those useful citizens who have sought protection under our institutions, and made our country their home. Very few of them have their interest located here, or are bound to us by one of all the ties which connect man with his country. They produce a large proportion of the offences and insubordination of which we have to complain; and, when their time expires abroad, seldom return—for their home is not here. Instructions have been given to avoid them in enlistments; and it is hoped that the time is not distant, when wise legislative enactments will raise up an abundance of seamen, acquainted with and attached to the service, whose interests and hopes are centred in our country. I have heretofore submitted my ideas on this subject, and respectfully refer to them. Legislative action upon it is demanded by high and imposing considerations.

The situation of all South America, for several years past, has offered temptations to some of our seamen to leave their country for a time, and adventure in the service of another. They have uniformly had cause to regret the folly of their course. A part of them have been found by our vessels in want and distress. An uniform course of kindness to them has been prescribed to and exercised by our officers, and many have been restored to the country, and will not be likely again to desert it.

A few years since, many complaints, some of them very unjust, found their way to the public, respecting the carrying of specie in our public vessels. The subject attracted the attention of the Department, and instructions were given, in 1824, designed to correct any error or misconduct which might exist in the exercise of the right admitted, and of the duty imposed by law in that matter. It is gratifying to state that, during the past year, no complaint on this point has reached the Department, and it is believed that in the few instances in which specie is now carried in our public ships, it is equally beneficial to the country and fair and legal in our officers.

The marine corps remains in the condition in which former reports represented it; and no new suggestions respecting its organization and interest will now be offered. The number of our navy yards and vessels in commission is so great, that the corps cannot supply full guards for them. An order was therefore prepared to withdraw those from the navy yards at Philadelphia and Portsmouth, and substitute watchmen. This order has been suspended for the present, but it will probably be found necessary to issue it after a short time.

A list of deaths, resignations, and dismissions is added. (Paper C.)

The usual estimates for the navy and marine corps are enclosed. (Papers D, E and F.) They embrace the same number of yards, stations, vessels, officers and men, as those of last year, and vary from them in very few particulars. Explanatory remarks on some of the items are added. In addition to those on the ninth item, it may be proper to suggest that the original estimates, for the number of vessels named in the law for the gradual increase of the navy, were made at a time when less accurate knowledge was possessed of the actual cost of the vessels than subsequent experience has afforded; that from the manner in which our navy yards were arranged, it was not practicable to keep separate the materials procured for different objects, so as always to prevent the incorrect use of them; that the wants of the service often demanded the use of materials on hand, (for whatever purpose procured,) to fit vessels for sea, and avoid an extravagant waste of public money by their detention; and that these materials could not always be promptly and accurately replaced. These inconveniences, it is confidently believed, may hereafter be entirely avoided, under the plans now in existence and the system which is in operation.

The amount of pay estimated is greater than it was last year, which arises from the laws increasing the pay of lieutenants, surgeons and surgeons' mates, and from the number of passed midshipmen. These classes of officers are the most numerous, and a small addition to their pay necessarily swells the estimate more than a like increase to the other grades would do. I would respectfully suggest that these laws, just in themselves, and meeting, as they did, the approbation of a large majority of Congress, have created an inequality which ought to be remedied. The pay of the oldest captain in the service, while in command of the largest squadron, is but $2,660; of a captain in command of a frigate, but $1,930; while the surgeon of a squadron, of twenty years' standing, receives $2,420; and of ten years $2,300. The youngest lieutenant receives, within a few dollars, as much as a master commandant; a surgeon of ten years more. Other inequalities, not less striking, will be perceived on an examination of the law. This advanced pay of the inferior ranks, though not complained of by others, cannot fail to produce unpleasant and painful feelings. It violates the only true principles upon which compensation is made to public officers—that it should be graduated by length of service, rank and responsibility. A proportionate addition to the pay of the other grades would increase the amount of the appropriations much less than it was increased by these laws, and is called for by justice and propriety. In no nation, not even in our own, has the pay of any officers, civil or military, been so low as that of some of the grades in our navy. It is unequal to their services and responsibilities. No officer can support his family at home and maintain himself upon it, without involving himself in difficulty; to avoid which there is a strong temptation to seek stations on land.

The form of the estimates in one respect is calculated to lead into error, and has heretofore produced some complaint. They embrace the least number of officers actually at sea and engaged at the yards, &c., and all others are stated to be waiting orders or on furlough. It is hence inferred that large numbers of them are idle and unoccupied. Such is not the fact. It almost always happens that more are necessarily employed than are stated in the estimates, even in our vessels at sea; the lowest possible number being named. The item for those waiting orders and on furlough embraces all who are not at sea and at the navy yards; all the sick; those who have returned from cruises of one, two or three years' duration; those who have short leaves of absence to attend to important private business; those who are preparing for active service at sea; those at the naval schools, and those preparing for and attending examinations; of which last number there are at this moment about seventy. It will, on inquiry, be found that in no service are there fewer officers who may be termed idle and unoccupied.

In closing this report, I beg leave again respectfully to call your attention to views heretofore presented, on several topics of deep and increasing interest to the navy. A survey of the coast; an organization both of the navy and marine corps; a criminal code; an increase of rank; a naval school; a change in the form, not the substance, of the appropriation; a suitable provision for naval hospitals; a passage across the isthmus to the Pacific; a system for forming and educating American seamen sufficient for our wants, are all subjects which hourly augment in importance. They have been so repeatedly presented by this Department, that it is feared a repetition of the considerations by which their

--216--

importance is sustained, might induce a charge of urgency unbecoming the nature of this report. But the greater part of them are so essential to the naval service, that a sense of duty impels me once more to suggest them; and I must seek in the conviction which I have of their value an apology for the repetition. They embrace interests much too dear not to be urged, even to the verge of importunity. Prudent regulations on those subjects would advance everything that is precious in our naval establishment. Our navy, during the short period of its existence, has rendered incalculable service to the defence, prosperity and glory of the nation, and never fails to find its place in our fondest anticipations of the future. It deserves to be sustained, by devoted attention to its wants, by wise laws and liberal appropriations.

Respectfully submitted. SAMUEL L. SOUTHARD.

A.

A statement of the expenditures under the appropriation for "the prohibition of the slave trade," since the 1st of December, 1827.

1827.

 

 

 

Dec. 18.

John W. Peaco—Salary as principal agent, for the month of March, 1827

$133 33 1828

1828

 

 

 

Jan. 29.

Frederick Lewis—Compensation as assistant to the U. S. agent for recaptured Africans, from 11th June to the 18th of December, 1827, six months and eight days, at $400 per annum

$208 89

 

 

Traveling expenses, and expenses on shore

85 00

 

 

 

293 89

Feb. 11.

Miles King, navy agent—Gunpowder, &c

25 12

March 14.

John Hodges—Balance due for wages as boat builder, from 17th February to 18th August, 1826, at $75 per month

$323 17

 

 

Camwood and trade goods

178 05

 

 

 

501 22

April 14.

J. M. Berrien, proctor for J. Jackson, commander of revenue cutter—Bounty allowed by act of Congress of 3d March, 1819, on 54 Africans imported in the Ramirez, at $25 each

1,350 00

May 5.

Baring, Brothers & Co.—Commission on drafts at 2 ½ per cent

303 61

May 26.

John W. Peaco—Salary as principal agent, from 1st April to 24th May, 1827

$240 00

 

 

Passage from Monrovia to Holmes' Hole, 1826

100 00

 

 

Traveling from Philadelphia to Washington and back, in November, 1826

41 10

 

 

 

381 10

June 2.

T. Livingston, formerly marshal of Alabama—Maintenance of fifty-five Africans, (captured in the Constitution, Marino, and Louisa, in 1818,) from 27th February, 1821, to 1st January, 1824, 57,-090 days, at 15 cents per day

$8,563 50

 

 

 

Deduct received for hire

3,627 15

 

 

 

 

$4,936 35

 

 

Allowance for medicine, clothing, blankets, and hire of guard

3,072 85

 

 

 

 

8,009 20

June 17.

George P. Todson—Compensation from 11th June, 1827, to 14th April, 1828, ten months and four days, at $1,600 per annum

$1,351 11

 

 

Traveling from Washington to Norfolk, in June, 1827

34 35

 

 

 

 

1,385 46

July 5.

Miles King, navy agent—Shingles

 

89 12

August 2.  

Miles King, navy agent—Freight of 1,337 barrels flour, at $1.50

$2,004 50

 

 

Passage of 129 grown persons, including provisions, at $28 each

3,612 00

 

 

Passage of 14, under 10 years, at $14

196 00

 

 

Passage of Dr. Todsen out and home

200 00

 

 

Passage of assistant

100 00

 

 

Thirty days' demurrage, at $20

600 00

 

 

 

6,712 50

Sept. 6.

Freight to Liberia

200 00

Sept. 17.

James Laurie—Medical services rendered by Lott Carey to liberated Africans at Liberia, for 3 years, up to April, 1826, at $50 per year

150 00

Nov. 5.

George P. Todson—Allowance for stores and expenses on the voyage to Africa.

200 00

Nov. 11.

Richard Randall, principal agent—Medicine and instruments

$150 00

 

 

Stationery

20 00

 

 

 

170 00

 

 

 

$19,904 55

T. WATKINS.

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office, Nov. 26, 1828.

--217--

B.

List of vessels of the United States navy, in commission during the year 1828.         

MEDITERRANEAN STATION.

Delaware, 74 guns

Commodore W. M. Crane, since March.

Java, 44 guns

Captain J. Downes, the whole year.

Constitution, 44 guns

Captain D. T. Patterson, arrived at Boston about the 1st July.

Lexington, 18 guns

Master Commandant Hunter, the whole year.

Warren, 18 guns

Master Commandant Kearny, the whole year.

Fairfield, 18 guns

Master Commandant Parker, sailed from New York in August.

Porpoise, 12 guns

Lieutenant J. H. Bell, the whole year.

The squadron will remain the same during the next year, with the exception of the Constitution.

PACIFIC STATION.

Brandywine, 44 guns

Commodore J. Jones, the whole year

Vincennes, 18 guns

Master Commandant Finch, the whole year.

Dolphin, 12 guns

Master Commandant Rousseau, the whole year.

During the next year the squadron will consist of the—

Guerriere, 44 guns

Captain C. C. B. Thompson.

St. Louis, 18 guns

Master Commandant Sloat.

Dolphin, 12 guns

Lieutenant Zantzinger.

BRAZIL STATION.

Macedonian, 36 guns

Commodore J. Biddle, arrived at Norfolk in October.

Boston, 18 guns

Master Commandant Hoffman, will return early in the spring.

The squadron next year will consist of the—

Hudson, 44 guns

Commodore J. C. Creighton.

Vandalia, 18 guns

Master Commandant Gallagher.

WEST INDIA STATION.

Commodore Charles G. Ridgely.

Natchez, 18 guns

Master Commandant Budd, the whole year.

Erie, 18 guns

Master Commandant Turner, the whole year.

Hornet, 18 guns

Master Commandant Claxton, the whole year.

Falmouth, 18 guns

Master Commandant Morgan, sailed in March.

Grampus, 12 guns

Lieutenant Latimer, the whole year.

Shark, 12 guns

Lieutenant Adams, has lately sailed for the coast of Africa, and thence to the West Indies. The squadron will remain nearly or quite the same during next year.

EXPLORING EXPEDITION.

Peacock, 18 guns

Master Commandant Jones.

C.

List of deaths in the navy of the United States, since the 1st December, 1827.

Name and rank.

Date.

Cause.

Place.

CAPTAIN.

Robert Henley

October 7, 1828

 

Charleston, S. C.

MASTER COMMANDANT.

Benjamin W. Booth

July 26, 1828

Consumption

Gibraltar.

LIEUTENANTS.

Frederick W. Smith

June 4, 1828

 

New York.

William M. Robins

May 18, 1828

 

Baltimore.

Geo. B. McCulloh

December 31,

 

Mediterranean.

Allen Griffin

September 18, 1828

 

Baltimore.

SURGEONS.

A. M. Montgomery

January 3, 1828

 

New York.

Samuel R. Marshall

May 20, 1828

 

do

Benjamin P. Kissam

October 6, 1828

 

Portsmouth, N. H.

SURGEONS' MATES.

Henry C. Pratt

March 10, 1828

 

At sea.

Charles Wayne

August 19, 1828.

 

Cole's Ferry, Va.

--218--

C.—List of deaths—Continued.

Name and rank.

Date.

Cause.

Place.

PURSERS.

John B. Timberlake

 April 2, 1828

 

Mahon.

Nathaniel Lyde

 July 7, 1828

Fall from a gig

Portsmouth, N. H.

CHAPLAIN.

John Cook

 August 21, 1828

 

 

MIDSHIPMEN.

Frederick Rodgers

 April 5, 1828

Drowned

 Norfolk.

William J. Slidell

do

do

do

Robert M. Harrison

do

do

do

Henry K. Mower

do

 

Mediterranean.

Quinton Ratcliffe

 October 1, 1828

 

Baltimore.

Bushrod W. Turner

 September 30, 1828

Yellow fever

West Indies.

Terrill M. Crenshaw

 October 2, 1828

do

do

John Fisher

 November 11, 1828

do

do

SAILINGMASTERS.

Biscoe S. Doxey

 May 20, 1828

 

Baltimore.

Peter Carson

 

 

Norfolk.

D. S. Stellwagen

 

 

Philadelphia.

BOATSWAINS.

James Thayer

 January 9, 1828

Consumption

 Norfolk.

David Vestlery

 November 6, 1828

Dropsy

 do

CARPENTER.

Henry Whittington

 January 28, 1828

Sore throat

Portsmouth, Va.

NAVY AGENT.

Enoch G. Parrott

 June 15, 1828

 

Portsmouth, N. H.

Navy Department, December 1, 1828.

List of resignations in the navy of the United States, since the 1st December, 1827.

LIEUTENANTS.

Henry C. Newton

April 29, 1828.

Archibald R. Bogardus

October 21, 1828.

Edgar Freeman

November 14, 1828.

SURGEON.

W. W. Buchanan

December 8, 1827.

CHAPLAINS.

James Brooks

January 7, 1828.

John Addison

February 25, 1828.

MIDSHIPMEN.

Levi M. Harby

December 4, 1827.

Thomas S. Wayne

December 18, 1827.

James W. M. Jenkins

January 22, 1828.

John W. Hunt, jr

January 25, 1828.

Charles W. Gay

April 11, 1828.

John W. Palmer

April 15, 1828.

Robert J. Livingston

April 30, 1828.

Joseph Cohen

May 1, 1828.

James B. Sullivan

May 10, 1828.

Robert H. Nichols

April 1, 1828.

Henry Amelung

May 21, 1828.

John B. Muse

June 3, 1828.

Houghton B. Robinson

June 4, 1828.

Samuel N. Green

July 9, 1828.

Samuel Penhallow

September 6, 1828.

Allen Asher

November 1, 1828.

Francis Stone

November 27, 1828.

CARPENTER.

Charles P. Smith

December 4, 1827.

Navy Department, December 1, 1828.

--219--

List of dismissions from the navy of the United States, since 1st December, 1827.

MASTER COMMANDANT.

William Carter

December 5, 1827.

LIEUTENANT.

William Foster

December 21, 1827.

MIDSHIPMEN.

Charles B. Childs

May 1, 1828.

William S. J. Washington

May 1, 1828.

H. A. N. Morris

December 22, 1828.

Geo. B. Wingerd

November 6, 1828.

LIEUTENANT OF MARINES.

William A. Randolph  

October 17, 1828.

Navy Department, December 1, 1828.

D.

General estimate.

There will be required for the navy, during the year 1829, three millions six thousand two hundred and seventy-seven dollars and forty-nine cents, in addition to the unexpended balances that may remain on hand on the 1st day of January, 1829.

1.

For pay and subsistence of officers, and pay of seamen, other than those at navy yards, shore stations, and in ordinary

$1,212,592 07

 

Less this sum appropriated by act of Congress, of 24th May, 1828.

294,078 00

 

 

$918,514 07

2.

For pay, subsistence, and allowances of officers, and pay of seamen at navy yards, shore stations, hospitals, and in ordinary.

$209,191 67

 

Less this sum appropriated by act of Congress, of 24th May, 1828.

46,258 00

 

 

162,933 67

3.

For pay of superintendents, naval constructor, and all the civil establishment at the several navy yards and stations.

$59,552 50

 

Less this sum appropriated by act of Congress, of 24th May, 1828.

14,775 00

 

 

44,777 50

4.

For provisions.

$450,551 87

 

Less this sum appropriated by act of Congress, of 24th May, 1828.

126,250 00

 

 

324,301 87

5.

For repairs of vessels in ordinary, and for wear and tear of vessels in commission

$550,000 00

 

Less this sum appropriated by act of Congress, of 24th May, 1828.

118,750 00

 

 

431,250 00

6.

For medicines, surgical instruments, and hospital stores.

 $27,000 00

 

Less this sum appropriated by act of Congress, of 24th May, 1828.

6,750 00

 

 

20,250 00

7.

For ordnance and ordnance stores.

$50,000 00

 

Less this sum appropriated by act of Congress, of 24th May, 1828.

12,500 00

 

 

 

37,500 00

8.

For repairs and improvements at navy yards.

$429,291 00

 

Less this sum appropriated by act of Congress, of 24th May, 1828.

26,250 00

 

 

403,041 00

9.

For arrearages prior to 1st January, 1829.

$468,709 38

 

Less this sum appropriated by act of Congress, of 24th May, 1828.

3,750 00

 

 

464,959 38

10.

For defraying the expenses that may accrue during the year 1829, for the following purposes, viz:

For freight and transportation of materials and stores of every description; for wharfage and dockage, stores and rent; traveling expenses of officers and transportation of seamen; house rent, chamber money, and fuel, and candles to officers other than those attached to navy yards and stations; and for officers in sick quarters where there is no hospital, and for funeral expenses; for commissions, clerk hire, office rent, stationery, and fuel to navy agents; for premiums and incidental expenses of recruiting; for apprehending deserters; for compensation to judge advocates; for per diem allowance for persons attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, and to officers engaged on extra service beyond the limits of their stations; for printing and for stationery of every description, and for books, maps, charts, nautical and mathematical instruments, chronometers, models and drawings; for purchase and repair of steam and fire engines, and for machinery; for purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage; for cabin furniture of vessels in commission, and furniture for officers' houses at navy yards; for taxes on navy yard and public property; for assistance rendered to persons in distress; for incidental labor at navy yards, not applicable

 

 

--220--

 

to any other appropriation; for coal and other fuel for forges, foundries and steam engines;
for candles, oil, and fuel for vessels in commission and in ordinary;
for repairs of magazines and powder houses; for preparing moulds for ships to be built, and for no other object or purpose whatever.

$255,000 00

 

Less this sum appropriated by act of Congress, of 24th May, 1828.

60,000 00

 

 

$195,000 00

11.

For contingent expenses for objects arising in the year 1829, and not hereinbefore enumerated.

$5,000 00

 

Less this sum appropriated by act of Congress, of 24th May, 1828.

1,250 00

 

 

3,750 00

 

Total.

63,006,277 49

Estimate of the pay and subsistence of all persons of the navy, attached to vessels in commission, for the year 1829.

 

Ships
of
the
line

Frigates

Sloops.

Schooners

Total
each
grade.

Amount.

 

First
class,

First
class,

Second
class,

Number of vessels in each class

1

3

11

3

4

Captains

2

3

1

 

 

6

$14,022 50

Masters commandant

 

 

10

3

 

13

15,291 25

Lieutenants commanding

4

 

 

 

 

4

4,705 00

Lieutenants

10

18

44

12

12

96

92,640 00

Masters

2

3

11

3

 

19

12,587 50

Pursers

1

3

11

3

4

22

14,575 00

Surgeons of the fleet

1

3

 

 

 

4

8,350 00

Surgeons

 

 

11

3

 

14

15,190 00

Surgeons' mates

4

6

11

3

4

28

23,420 00

Chaplains

1

3

 

 

 

4

2,650 00

Midshipmen

34

72

132

30

16

284

64,752 00

Secretaries

1

3

 

 

 

4

4,000 00

Schoolmasters

1

3

11

 

 

15

5,868 75

Clerks

1

3

11

3

4

22

6,600 00

Boatswains

1

3

11

3

 

18

5,962 50

Gunners

1

3

11

3

4

22

7,287 50

Carpenters

1

3

11

3

 

18

5,962 50

Sailmakers

1

3

11

3

 

18

5,962 50

Boatswains' mates

6

9

22

6

8

51

11,628 00

Gunners' mates

3

6

11

3

 

23

5,244 00

Carpenters' mates

3

6

11

3

4

27

6,156 00

Sailmakers' mates

2

3

11

 

4

20

4,560 00

Quartermasters

12

27

55

12

16

122

26,352 00

Quartergunners

20

36

66

18

12

152

32,832 00

Yeomen

3

9

33

9

4

58

12,528 00

Captains' stewards

1

3

11

3

4

22

4,752 00

Captains' cooks

1

3

11

3

 

18

3,888 00

Coopers

1

3

11

3

 

18

3,888 00

Armorers

1

3

11

3

 

18

3,888 00

Armorers' mates

2

2

 

 

4

8

1,440 00

Masters-at-arms

1

3

11

3

 

18

3,888 00

Ships' corporals

4

6

 

 

 

10

1,680 00

Cooks

1

3

11

3

4

22

4,752 00

Masters of the bands

1

3

 

 

 

4

864 00

Musicians, 1st class

6

12

 

 

 

18

2,592 00

Musicians, 2d class

5

9

 

 

 

14

1,680 00

Seamen

300

450

660

150

56

1,616

5,704 00

Ordinary seamen

240

360

330

75

30

1,035

4,200 00

Landsmen

100

150

220

45

10

525

50,400 00

Boys

46

81

132

33

20

312

22,464 00

For two frigates, first class, for three months, as relief ships

878

37,058 37

 

5,600

$909,265 37

Add this sum for pay, &c, of lieutenants, allowed by act of May 24, 1828, to December 31

31,145 45

 

$940,410 82

For additional- pay to fifty passed midshipmen, (whose pay as midshipmen is
included in the preceding estimate,) at $6 per month and one ration per day

 

 

8,162 50

 

$948,573 32

--221--

C.

Estimate of the pay, rations, and all other allowances of officers and others, at the navy yards and stations, for the year 1829.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Amount of pay, rations and allowances per annum.

PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

$300

40

20

2

 

2,010 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,612 25

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Midshipmen

3

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

957 75

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Gunner

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$14,199 00

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$965 00

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Able seamen

4

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

941 00

Ordinary seamen

6

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,267 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,492 75

Civil department.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,700 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

Clerk to commandant, to do duty as clerk to master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

500 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,000 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$5,400 00

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$23,091 75

BOSTON.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

 

40

20

2

 

1,710 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Surgeon

1

60

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,412 25

Surgeon's mate

1

30

2

$145

16

14

 

1

950 75

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

250

12

9

 

1

1,141 75

Midshipmen

4

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,277 00

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Gunner

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$16,663 25

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$965 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Carpenter

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Boatswain's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Able seamen

14

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

3,293 50

Ordinary seamen

26

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

5,492 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$11,703 75

--222--

C.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Amount of pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

$60

4

$200

20

20

1

 

$1,612 25

Surgeon's mate

1

30

2

145

16

14

 

1

950 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses

2

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Washers

2

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

374 50

Cook

1

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

235 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,902 50

Civil department.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,700 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

450 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

75000

Clerk to commandant

1

30

 

 

 

 

 

 

360 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,300 00

Clerk to master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

420 00

Inspector and meas. of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$8,080 00

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$40,349 50

PHILADELPHIA.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

$600

65

30

3

 

$4,066 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

300

40

20

2

 

2,010 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,492 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Surgeon

1

70

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,732 25

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

250

12

9

 

1

1,141 75

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

1 741 75

Gunner

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Steward

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$15,483 50

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$965 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Carpenter

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

 

741 75

Able seamen

4

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

941 00

Ordinary seamen

6

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,267 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$4,577 75

Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

$1,612 25

Surgeon's mate

1

35

3

145

16

14

 

1

1,102 00

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses

2

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

22 50

Washers

2

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

374 50

Cook

1

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

211 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$4,029 75

Civil department.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,200 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

750 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,000 00

Clerk to master builder

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

Inspector and meas. of timber..

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

700 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$6,150 00

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$30,241 00

--223--

C.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

NEW YORK.

 Number.

 Pay per month.

 Rations per day.

 House rent per annum.

 Candles per annum.

 Cords of wood per annum.

 Servants at $8.

 Servants at $6.

 Amount of pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

$300

40

20

2

 

2,010 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,492 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,612 25

Surgeon's mate

1

30

2

145

16

14

 

1

950 75

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

250

12

9

 

1

1,141 75

Teacher of mathematics

1

40

2

90

12

9

 

 

1 981 75

Teacher of languages

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Midshipmen

4

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,277 00

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Gunner

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

 307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$19,297 50

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

 $965 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

 662 50

Carpenter

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Carpenter's mates

2

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

638 50

Boatswain's mates

2

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

638 50

Able seamen

14

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

3,293 50

Ordinary seamen

26

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

5,492 50

$12,432 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

$1,612 25

Surgeon's mate

1

30

2

145

16

14

 

1

950 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses

2

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Washers

2

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

374 50

Cook

1

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

235 25

$3,902 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civil department.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,700 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

450 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

750 00

Clerk to commandant

1

30

 

 

 

 

 

 

360 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,300 00

Clerk to master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

420 00

Inspector and meas. of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$8,080 00

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$43,712 25

WASHINGTON.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

75

6

 

40

20

2

 

1,982 00

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

20

12

1

 

 

941 75

Master, in charge of ordnance

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Chaplain

1

40

2

$250

12

9

1

 

1,141 75

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

1

 

741 75

Gunner, as laboratory officer

1

20

2

90

12

9

1

 

741 75

--224--

C.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Amount of pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Gunner, keeper of magazine

1

$20

2

$90

12

9

 

1

$741 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$14,126 25

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$965 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Boatswain's mates

2

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

638 50

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Able seamen

6

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,411 50

Ordinary seamen

8

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,690 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$5,686 75

Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

70

4

200

20

20

1

 

$1,732 25

Surgeon's mate

1

30

2

145

16

14

 

1

950 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurse

1

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

211 25

Washer

1

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

187 25

Cook

1

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

211 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,600 00

Civil department.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,700 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 450 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 1,000 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 480 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 2,300 00

Clerk to master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 420 00

Inspector and meas. of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 900 00

Master chain cable and caboose maker

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 1,500 00

Machinist

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 600 00

Engineer

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 782 50

Assistant master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 1,500 00

Master plumber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 1,200 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$14,032 50

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$37,445 50

NORFOLK.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

$300

40

20

2

 

2,010 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,492 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

 965 00

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,612 25

Surgeon's mate

1

40

4

145

16

14

 

1

1,253 25

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

250

12

9

 

1

1,141 75

Teacher of mathematics

1

40

2

90

12

9

 

1

981 75

Midshipmen

4

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,277 00

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Gunner

1

20

2

90

12

9

1

 

741 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$18,937 50

--225--

C.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Amount of pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Lieutenant

1

$50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$965 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Carpenter

1

20

2

$90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Carpenter's mate

2

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

638 25

Boatswain's mate

2

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

638 25

Able seamen

20

12

1