--753--

21st Congress.]

No. 429.

[2d Session.

 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, SHOWING THE CONDITION OF THE NAVY IN THE YEAR 1830.

COMMUNICATED, WITH THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE DECEMBER 1830.

Report of the Secretary of the Navy.

Navy Department, December 6, 1830.

The following report of the transactions of the navy of the United States, during the present year, with a view of the several subjects connected with its interests, is respectfully laid before the President of the United States.

The state of the navy, since the communication made to you in December last, has been, generally, favorable to its active exertions in the important pursuits in which it has been engaged. No distressing casualty or marked calamity has, assailed it since the loss of the sloop-of-war Hornet, information of which lamented event was received prior to the adjournment of the last session of Congress.

The active force employed within the year has not been essentially varied from that kept in service for several years past. This consists of five frigates, ten sloops-of-war, and four schooners; of these, the most efficient squadron, composed of two frigates and four sloops, has been required to cruise in the Mediterranean sea, where, from the large interest engaged in mercantile adventures to the several States on its coasts, its presence was deemed of most importance. This has continued under the command of Commodore Biddle. Two of the vessels composing it have been relieved, their terms of service having expired, and their places supplied by the sloops-of-war Concord and Boston; the former being first ordered to convey the United States minister to Russia, and the latter to take the United States consul general to the Barbary powers.

The state of these vessels has been represented to be, in point of order and preparation for service, every way worthy of approbation, and the discipline exact, without rigor, promising all required efficiency in its force. Under the command of this able and vigilant officer, all the necessary protection has been given to the trade in that quarter, no case having come to the knowledge of the Department of injuries from piratical attacks; and, with the several States and sovereignties bordering on its coasts, the best understanding has been preserved. This squadron continues to rendezvous at the port of Mahon, in the Island of Minorca, a privilege which has been conceded by the government of Spain, affording great conveniences to the United States squadrons, especially at seasons when their safety would be endangered by remaining at sea. Here they enjoy a respite from the labors and dangers of the ocean, in climate mild and favorable to the restoration of the health of their crews, after long and laborious service at sea.

Other changes in the vessels employed in this sea are contemplated during the next year, but the force is not proposed to be diminished; nor, in the present agitated condition of the contiguous States, could this be done without subjecting the commercial enterprises of the country to the casualties attending a state of warfare, should such be the unhappy result of the present hostile indications in that quarter.

The squadron appointed to cruise on the coasts of Brazil and Buenos Ayres, and the Pacific ocean, has been steadily engaged in guarding the United States mercantile interests on these coasts. This service has been performed with fidelity and success; and the flag of the Union now gives full security to the merchandise it is authorized to introduce and exchange with the respective countries to which it is carried.

The cessation of hostilities between the States of Chili and Peru and the mother country, and between Brazil and Buenos Ayres, has greatly favored the advances of trade, and diminished the hazards of mercantile adventure with every part of the South American continent. But the unstable and inefficient governments of a part of these States forbid the idea that this can be long enjoyed, without embarrassments and vexatious interruptions, unless it shall be sustained by the presence of an active protecting force. It cannot, consequently, be believed to be consistent with good policy to lessen the efficiency of this force.

Several of the vessels composing these two squadrons will be relieved in the course of the next year, preparations for that purpose being in active progress. It is also contemplated to make some changes in the description of force to be employed on the Atlantic coast of South America, adapting it better for the harbors it is forced to look to for security against the tempestuous weather so often experienced on these coasts.

In a former communication made to you, it was noticed that the sloop-of-war Vincennes, commanded by Captain Finch, which had composed one of the squadron in the Pacific ocean, had been directed (after the expiration of the term limited for the cruise on the coast of Chili and Peru) to touch at the Marquesas, Society and Sandwich Islands; and, after spending the necessary time in looking to the United States commercial concerns in that quarter, to take Canton, &c., in the way, and thence, by the Cape of Good Hope, to pursue the usual route to the United States.

This order has been faithfully executed; the ship has returned in good condition, with its crew well disciplined and in excellent health.

The particulars of this voyage are given in the report of Captain Finch. These have a claim to the attention of the public, from the information afforded on many points relating to the character and habits of a people just emerging from a state of simplicity and ignorance, and, from their peculiar locality, necessarily controlling the comforts of a large number of United States citizens who annually visit them.

The great amount of tonnage and capital employed in the whale fisheries, in the adjoining seas, makes its convenient prosecution a matter of no inconsiderable concern to the nation.

The necessity, also, for repose after the long voyages required by this trade, and the want of supplies for health and convenience, and repairs of the vessels, render these islands places of general rendezvous; and it is consequently of great importance that the most friendly intercourse be maintained with the

--754--

inhabitants. Captain Finch, by his judicious and conciliatory deportment, has probably secured a long continuance of kindly treatment to his countrymen from these people, and has added greatly to the prospects of a successful termination of their enterprises.

Some extracts from this report are hereby transmitted, marked A.

The squadron which has been maintained in the West Indies and Gulf of Mexico consists at present of four sloops-of-war and three schooners, under the command of Commodore Elliott. Several changes have been made in the vessels employed on this station, in consequence of the expiration of the terms of service of the crews, or the want of repairs of the vessels. No causes are supposed to exist making it necessary to add to this force; nor can it be safely diminished, although the energy and activity with which it has guarded the United States trade may be said, for the present, effectually to have suppressed piratical aggression.

The great facilities afforded by the inlets and harbors of the islands in the Mexican Gulf for the resort and concealment of the vessels engaged in the commission of piracies; the class of population with which these islands abound, composed of refugees and outlaws, escaped from the punishment due for crimes committed in other countries, give advantages for piratical enterprises scarcely known in any other quarter of the globe. Nothing short of the exertion of positive and continued force can be expected to keep these marauders in check, and give the desired security to trade.

The invasion which took place, during the last year, of the territories of the Mexican States, by an armament from the Island of Cuba, having given ground for apprehension that the United States trade to these States might suffer from the pretexts afforded by this state of conflict between the two countries, an act was passed at the last session of Congress authorizing the employment of some additional force upon that station. In conformity to the provisions of that act, the frigate Brandywine, under the command of Captain Ballard, was equipped and dispatched for that coast, and continued for several months to cruise in its vicinity. Whatever danger might have threatened the trade in that quarter has been effectually parried by the means taken for its protection; and this ship, after returning- to the United States for necessary refitments, has since sailed to join the Mediterranean squadron and relieve the frigate Java.

It is believed that great advantages might be derived from changing, to a certain extent, the description of naval force employed in the West Indies, especially for the suppression of piracy.

The proposed change would consist of the substitution of three schooners in lieu of one of the sloops-of-war now employed in that service.

Vessels of this force would be fully able to cope with and capture any piratical cruiser which might be expected to be encountered on this station; and they would possess the greater advantage of multiplying, by the increased number of the squadron, the chances of discovering the enemy, while their structure and inferior size would diminish the risk of being known in their approaches. Their lighter draft of water would favor the pursuit into the obscure recesses and haunts of these cruisers, and give the important facility of entering many of the harbors on the Mexican Gulf, for security against the frequent hurricanes prevailing in tropical climates

It is respectfully recommended that an appropriation be made for building the proposed number and description of vessels.

The health of the officers and crews of the United States vessels-of-war has been generally good, and uninterrupted by the attacks of the epidemic and malignant fevers which are so readily engendered in tropical climates, and which exert such fatal influence on the Constitutions of persons not familiarized to a residence in them. This may be ascribed, in some degree, to the improved system of ventilation, and the great neatness observed in the economy of vessels-of-war, and the adaptation of the diet and dress of the crews to the temperature of the coasts and countries where their duties are to be performed. The modern discoveries in chemical science have also been resorted to, to preserve the mariner from the attacks of these fatal maladies. Several communications have been received from the surgical department of the navy, by whom experiments on the chloride of lime were ordered to be made, giving the results of their observations on its powers in preventing the generation of such diseases.

From these a few extracts have been taken, and are herewith transmitted, marked B.

These furnish subjects for congratulation to the friends of the improvement of the condition of the seaman's life, and indicate that the period is not remote when a service in the climates of the torrid zone will no longer be the terror of nautical men, but will be performed with as fair a prospect of exemption from disease as is now experienced in the temperate latitudes.

It is to be regretted that an exception to this general healthfulness of the navy has been experienced in one of the vessels of the West India squadron.

From the communications of Commodore Elliott, it appears that the yellow fever made its appearance on board the sloop-of-war Peacock, some time in the month of June last, and that it continued to harass the crew of that vessel after its return to Pensacola, in September; nor were its attacks intermitted until it had deprived the service of four valuable officers and of several seamen.

It is worthy of remark, that on board this vessel the powerful preventive agent above mentioned was not used, the surgeon relying, for the preservation of the health of the crew, on the superior cleanliness and well ventilated state of the vessel.

The Commissioners of the Navy Board, interpreting the act making an appropriation for the repairs of vessels in ordinary, and the wear and tear of vessels in commission, as admitting a greater latitude in its application to naval purposes than, it is believed, was contemplated by the framers of the law, or was admissible by a fair construction of its terms, have caused to be built, out of that fund, a new sloop-of-war, in the place of the "John Adams," which had been found defective in the model, and otherwise unfit for repair.

This subject was referred to your consideration, and, in conformity to your decision, an order has been issued, requiring that in future the application of this fund shall be confined to the repairs of vessels in ordinary, and the wear and tear of vessels in commission; and that no vessels shall be built or rebuilt, unless authorized by a specific appropriation.

The condition of the navy hospitals at most of the navy yards in the United States is entirely deficient in the means of giving accommodation to the invalids of the navy, who may be so unfortunate as to require it. At most of these places the only provision made for their comfort, during illness, is some temporary shelter or old building, possessing no one of the requisites necessary for this purpose. The mariner, who returns after a long and faithful service in distant and uncongenial climates, finds no asylum prepared for his reception and recovery from disease, incident to such service, but is compelled to linger

--755--

out his life in crowded and confined apartments, even less favorable to his restoration than the hold of the vessel from which he has been discharged.

The funds which have accrued from the monthly deductions of the pay of the navy, and the several appropriations made by Congress, have been expended in the erection of two magnificent buildings, neither of which has been finished, and but one of them (at Norfolk, Virginia) is applicable to or designed for the accommodation of the sick. For several years to come, there cannot be such an accumulation of navy hospital capital as will enable the commissioners of that fund to engage in the construction of other useful and permanent buildings for these objects.

At Pensacola, to the mild and salubrious climate of which the invalids of the navy look with so much anxiety as a place of refuge and restoration from tropical pestilence, there is no building which will even protect the sufferers from the inclemencies of the weather, much less secure to them the conveniences and comforts which their situation demands.

At New York, and at Charlestown, Massachusetts, the necessary lands have been purchased, with the navy hospital funds, for the erection of buildings for the use of the sick, and are in every respect favorably situated for affording the advantages which such establishments should possess.

These sites, in the vicinity of stations which are of so much importance to the navy, from the number of efficient recruits enlisted at them for its service, remain unimproved, and unprovided with the buildings that are indispensable for the welfare of the invalid.

The laws passed at the last and preceding sessions of Congress for the gradual improvement of the navy, the protection of the ships in ordinary, and for the preservation of the materials for naval purposes collected at the different navy yards, have received a due share of the attention of the Department.

The construction of the two dry docks, authorized under the first of those acts, at Boston and Norfolk, is progessing. The one at Boston is now in such a state of advancement as to induce the expectation that it may be brought into operation during the ensuing year, or early in 1832. The completion of these two laborious and expensive works will mark an important advance in the progress of our naval improvements. Repairing the ships-of-war of the larger classes, hitherto a work of so much labor, expense, and hazard, will, by the conveniences afforded by these docks, be rendered comparatively easy, and may be executed, not only without risk and at far less cost than formerly, but in a manner better securing both the strength and durability of the ship. Paper marked C, annexed, contains information in detail on this subject.

Extensive houses have been prepared for the reception of materials provided under this act, and other buildings are in progress, which will give complete protection to the large stores now deposited at the different yards, and those which are to be delivered under existing contracts.

The necessary examinations required by this act, to determine the practicability and expediency of erecting a marine railway at the Navy yard, Pensacola, have been made by one of the United States engineers.

The views of this officer on this subject were laid before the Board of Navy Commissioners, and they have expressed the opinion that it is not expedient or proper, under the restrictions and conditions imposed by the act, to cause the construction of this desirable improvement to be attempted.

It is indispensable, however, that some facility should be afforded at this most convenient position for the repairs of the vessels-of-war engaged in the West India service. It is proposed that a wharf suitable for these purposes should be built, in place of the contemplated railway; and the necessary estimates for its erection are in readiness to be transmitted.

Further efforts have been made for the execution of this act as far, as it relates to the preservation of the live oak growing on the coasts of the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico.

By the fourth section of this act, the President is authorized to provide for the preservation of this timber; but it seems to have been intended that the power should be limited to that object. An interpretation of the law has, heretofore, been entertained, extending this power not only to the planting of the acorns, and the cultivation of plantations of young trees, but to the purchase from individuals of lands producing them. The paper accompanying this, marked D, shows the amount which has been expended on these plantations, and the sums which have been paid to individuals for the purchase of tracts of such land.

When it is considered that this timber is the natural product of the coast of the United States from the St. Mary's to the Sabine; that the greater part of this belongs to the United States, and is proposed to be retained with a view to preserving a supply of this important material for the navy, it can scarcely be necessary for the present to engage in its artificial propagation or. culture.

Under an impression that this system is neither expedient, nor in conformity to the intentions of the act, an order has been given to discontinue the works after the expiration of the present year.

But the preservation of this timber is an object of great importance, and should be prosecuted with an active and undeviating purpose.

In aid of those measures which have been heretofore resorted to, a vessel of such draft of water as was adapted to the navigation of the rivers and creeks of the coasts of Florida and the Gulf of Mexico has been selected and fitted out, and the command given to a vigilant and enterprising officer of the navy, who has been required to visit, from time to time, as the seasons or circumstances would permit, every section of these coasts, and to use the utmost efforts to suppress further depredations upon the public interests. Surveyors and agents have also been directed to explore such parts of the coast as abound with the live oak, to designate the boundaries between private and public claims to land, and to mark out such tracts as they may think it most conducive to the public interest should be reserved from sale.

The accompanying report of the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, marked E, shows the several sums which have been paid in carrying into effect the act of 3d March, 1819, and other acts, making appropriation for supporting and removing certain persons of color from the United States to the coast of Africa. It appears from this statement, that, under authority of these acts, 252 persons of this description have been removed to the settlement provided by the Colonization Society on the coast of Africa; and that there has been expended therefor the sum of two hundred and sixty-four thousand seven hundred and ten dollars.

These several acts appear to have been passed in a spirit of justice and benevolence, to repair, as far as possible, the injuries inflicted by the citizens of the United States upon the defenceless persons who are the subjects of the African slave trade; and the appropriations have been made with a liberality corresponding with the humane intentions of the framers of the laws.

--756--

The terms of these acts are sufficiently defined to be readily intelligible. It would seem that the authority given to the President was limited to the support of the negroes or persons of color during their stay in the United States, to their removal to the coast of Africa, and to the delivering of them to the care of an agent, &c. There is no power expressly vested in the Executive to provide, after such delivery, either for their support or protection. A liberal interpretation of the law might permit some allowance to be made for their maintenance after being landed, until they could find employment by which it might be earned. But this even would be authority from inference only, and should be cautiously exercised.

The practice has been to furnish these persons with provisions for a period of time, after being landed in Africa, varying from six months to one year; to provide them with houses, arms, and ammunition; to pay for the erection of fortifications; for the building of vessels for their use; and, in short, to render all the aids required for the founding and support of a colonial establishment.

This latitudinous interpretation of the law has resulted in the heavy expenditures detailed in the annexed report. Understanding the law in the limited acceptation represented above, it will, in future, be executed accordingly, and every effort made by the Department to confine the application of this fund within the pale of its provisions.

The term for which the crew of the frigate Java had been enlisted having nearly expired, that vessel has been ordered to return to the United States; in doing which, the commander has been required, in furtherance of the humane policy pursued by the government, to touch at the settlement at Liberia, and to aid in enforcing the laws which have been enacted for the suppression of the slave trade.

In a communication heretofore made to you, the opinion was expressed, that the number of navy yards now established and in operation was greater than was required for the present wants of the naval service, and that a part of them were liable to the further objection of inconvenient location, both from their great distance from the ocean, and the deficiency in the depth of water for the larger classes of vessels.

This opinion has not been changed by any information since obtained, or by subsequent consideration of the subject.

Should it, however, become the necessary policy of the government to make a great addition to its naval force, it is possible they may all be found useful, especially for the repairs of the smaller classes of vessels, and as depots for materials for the navy, collected from the contiguous country.

Whatever course may be pursued in relation to these establishments, it is believed to be of the utmost importance to the security and general interests of the navy that other positions be sought for, possessing greater advantages, and not liable to the objections which have been mentioned.

Few positions on our maritime frontier offer all the requisites for such purposes. But where these are found, it cannot be good policy to neglect the measures necessary to secure the possession and improvement of them.

The advantages believed to be possessed by the Dry Tortugas, in the Gulf of Mexico, for such establishment, have heretofore been represented to Congress, and it is much to be desired that the opinions of the intelligent naval officers who have recommended this position, should be tested by the more minute examinations of engineers, possessing the scientific knowledge necessary for its accurate determination.

Pensacola, as a place of depot and resort for vessels-of-war requiring supplies or repairs, has much to recommend it, being contiguous to that part of the United States coast which, it may be presumed, it will long be necessary should be guarded, particularly by that class of vessels which can safely enter its harbor, possessing a healthful climate, and the country in its neighborhood abounding with the best materials for the construction of vessels-of-war. But, as a place of general rendezvous, for fleets or squadrons composed of ships of the largest classes, it cannot, in the present state of the entrance into its harbor, be regarded as offering the required facilities.

From a report made by the Department of War to the House of Representatives on the 5th February, 1830, it appears that a survey was made of this harbor during the preceding year, with a view of determining the practicability of deepening the channel of the entrance into this harbor, and thus adapting it to the great purposes of a naval depot for the United States navy.

The result of this survey was entirely favorable to the expectation of success from such an undertaking, and at an expense not estimated to exceed $107,000. Whether the work, if it could be accomplished, would secure a permanent facility of entrance, uninfluenced by the operations of the tides and storms, can only be determined by the experiment. The object, however, was one of deep interest to those sections of the United States embraced within the valley of the Mississippi, as well as to those engaged in conveying their productions to market.

The communication made by the Commissioners of the Navy, dated 19th October, 1829, and addressed to you, with the report on naval affairs, at the commencement of the last session of Congress, afforded some views in relation to the fitness of the harbor of Newport, Rhode Island, or some place in the Narraganset Bay, for a naval depot and rendezvous for the United States navy.

From this it appears that the general advantages of this harbor or bay, for such purposes, are, in some respects, superior to any position east of the Chesapeake Bay. In addition to the information furnished by this document, it will be found, on reference to the surveys of Captains Evans and Perry, made by order of the Navy Department in 1815 and 1817, that the places referred to combine almost every advantage desirable for such an establishment; especially a facility of ingress and egress, with a sufficient depth of water for ships of the largest classes, and of a capacity to permit the largest fleets to ride within their waters, in security from storms, or obstructions from accumulations of ice; that its proximity to the ocean gives all the advantages of convenient attack or retreat from an enemy; and that, from the number and nature of the channels of entrance and departure, a fleet could not be blockaded within it without an application of force incomparably greater than the one intended to be shut up; and that it is believed to be defensible at an expense far less than that which has been incurred for similar objects. In addition to these important advantages, it is described by the officers above named as admitting of the entrance of vessels with the wind blowing from points of the compass during the prevalence of which it would be impossible to make a port in any harbor on the eastern coast of the United States. This peculiar facility might, if the harbor was properly defended, result in the security of a fleet from the attacks of a superior enemy, and affords the strongest inducements to provide for its scientifical survey, and the determination of all the points connected with the subject.

It is respectfully recommended that an appropriation be made, authorizing such survey, by the proper

--757--

engineers, of the harbor of Newport, or other positions on Narraganset Bay, with a view to the selection of a site offering the greatest number of these advantages, and susceptible of defence at the least expense to the nation.

Some difference of opinion having taken place between the commissioners of navy yards, who were appointed to examine the sites at the Navy yard in Brooklyn and Governor's Island, to determine which of the two positions was more eligible for a naval depot and a building yard, no selection had been made for the buildings which were required for the several purposes of the establishment. This yard had consequently remained unimproved, to the great injury of the store of materials which had been collected there, as well as the general operations of building and repairing.

The subject having been referred to your consideration, and all the documents explaining the relative advantages of the two sites having been laid before you, it has, in conformity with your opinion, been ordered that the timber-houses shall be erected at the old establishment at Brooklyn until further surveys can be made, affording such minute information as will justify a final disposition of the subject.

The papers herewith transmitted, marked F, furnish statements communicated by the Board of Navy Commissioners.

No. 1 shows the number of vessels-of-war in ordinary at the different stations, their present condition, and the progress which has been made in protecting them from the effects of the weather, and the expense which must be incurred for their thorough repair.

No. 2 shows that there are now on the stocks, well protected from the weather, and in a very advanced stage of preparation, five ships of the line and seven frigates. These can be readily finished and put in commission whenever the exigencies of the service may demand an increase of the naval forces.

An important circumstance attending this condition of the vessels alluded to, is that they may be retained for any length of time in their present situation, without material injury from any cause of decay, and that this is effected at an expense scarcely worth estimating.

No. 3 exhibits the measures taken for the protection of the vessels in ordinary from further decay.

The list marked 4, giving a view of the quantity of materials for the navy collected at the several places of depot, shows that, making all due allowance for that portion which has been rendered unfit for use by their long exposure to the weather, there is still remaining a large supply of the most valuable qualities.

The great loss which has been suffered from the causes mentioned above, has made it necessary to urge the adoption of measures to prevent its future occurrence; and instructions have been issued to provide in time the necessary houses and timber sheds, so as to guard against the injurious exposure of the materials to the weather after they shall have been deposited at the respective navy yards.

The accompanying extracts of letters, marked G, addressed to the Department by the officers of the navy, who have had opportunities of witnessing the employment of canvas made from cotton on board their respective vessels, are herewith presented for your consideration.

The results of their observations go far to confirm the favorable anticipations which have been entertained of the value of this kind of canvas. And the opinion may now, with some confidence, be offered, that this article of domestic production will ultimately supersede the necessity for the importation of foreign hemp for the manufacture of a large portion of the canvas required for the United States navy.

The laws for the government of the navy are believed to require revision. Under the vague and indeterminate "provisions of these laws, it can scarcely happen that similar degrees of punishment will be awarded for similar degrees of offence.

The tribunals invested with the power of trying persons charged with violations of these laws may, in many cases, (if the party has been found guilty,) sentence the offender to suffer the severest penalty of the law, or dismiss him with the mere nominal punishment of reprimand—the words of the law, in several of its most important articles being, that the offender shall, on conviction, &c., "suffer death, or such other punishment as the court shall adjudge."

Amongst the evils and odious features of the law, as an institution, this very uncertainty has been cited as one justly meriting the opprobrium which has been attached to it; and pervading, as it does, almost every part of this system, it furnishes, independently of other defects, an urgent motive for a reconsideration of the subject by the national legislature.

Believing that the usefulness and the reputation of the navy are connected essentially with its obedience to the laws and regulations enacted for its government, the Department has been most assiduously endeavoring to promote their proper observance, and to cause the duties of its officers, especially of its junior members, to be discharged in alternate routine, thus imposing on each a share of the burdens, and giving to all the advantages to be derived from a practical attention to them.

In a communication made to the honorable chairman of the Committees on Naval Affairs in the Senate and House of Representatives, on the 16th February last, proposing a peace establishment, some remarks were offered, supporting the opinion that it was just and expedient that an increase in the rank of its officers should constitute a part of the naval system.

While the United States marine was confined to a few frigates and smaller vessels, no advantage could have been gained, in any point of view, from higher grades in the naval service than that of captain. But since the great increase in the number and size of the United States vessels-of-war, and as occasions arise in the service for their combinations into fleets or squadrons, other duties, arduous and responsible, and requiring the possession of superior nautical science and general intelligence, devolve upon their commanders. These higher degrees of qualification for the service, the fruit of long and unremitting devotion to their requirement, merit a correspondent elevation in professional rank and distinction.

It has been supposed, also, that superior rank has a tendency to secure the enforcement of discipline, inasmuch as the orders of a superior are more readily and faithfully observed than those of one of equal grade.

The increase may certainly obviate some causes of irritation in the intercourse of the officers of the navy with those of foreign nations, the least powerful of which have higher grades than are known in this service, and universally claim honors and precedence according to their rank. These must either be yielded or intercourse suspended; and this could not but result injuriously, should it be necessary for the United States vessels to co-operate with those of other nations in any difficult naval enterprise.

The subject of an increase of the pay of the officers of the navy has heretofore been brought to your consideration, and you are again respectfully referred to the suggestions offered in the report made to you on the 1st December last.

--758--

In anticipation that this measure will receive favorable consideration, estimates, founded on the scale of increased compensation proposed at the last session of Congress, are herewith transmitted.

The authority which is given to the Department to make allowances out of the contingent fund, to cover the expenses of the officers of the navy for various incidental purposes, forms an important item in its duties and powers. The disposition of this large fund is wholly within the control of the Secretary of the Navy, and its application only limited by his sense of justice and expediency.

Without urging that this discretion has, at any time, been improperly or unjustly exercised, it may be said that it unquestionably offers the means of committing great abuses by extravagant grants or allowances to some, while these benefits may be wholly withheld from others.

As far as it is practicable, these allowances, now contingent, should be specifically designated, securing, without the abuse of the fund, a just return to the parties for the sums necessarily expended for such incidental purposes.

This, in many cases, may be effected by legislative enactments, particularly as relates to traveling expenses, attendance on courts-martial, either as members or witnesses, the pay of judge advocates, and to officers engaged on extra duty beyond the limits of their stations, &c.

In the absence of precise legal provision on these points, the allowances in future will be confined strictly to the sums believed to be necessary to meet the expenses of officers so employed.

In the report made to the honorable the chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs in the House of Representatives, on the 21st of January last, a recommendation was offered, proposing some modification in the powers and duties of the Board of Commissioners of the Navy.

The Department has not found cause to change the opinion then expressed, that a division of the duties of the Navy Board would have a tendency to secure the discharge of its various duties more for the public benefit; that it would especially favor this, by directing "the undivided attention of the officer to the class of duties which may be confided to his management;" "that this exclusive devotion of his time and talents to a single train of services would enable him to attain a more intimate knowledge of their interests," to adopt a better system for their execution; and "that it would secure a stronger individual responsibility for their faithful discharge."

The considerations enumerated above offer their own recommendation; and being in concurrence with the sentiments of the board itself, a body which from experience has derived the means of forming correct opinions on the subject, it may be fairly presumed that the adoption of the measure will result in much public utility.

The documents marked H, I, K, show the number of deaths, dismissals and resignations, which have occurred within the present year.

The estimates for the year 1831 are herewith transmitted, marked L.

The appropriations for the present year have been found more than sufficient for its current expenditures; and there will remain of them an unexpended balance, probably exceeding one million of dollars.

It has been doubted by many able and observant officers of the navy whether the marine corps, as constituting a part of the naval force, might not be dispensed with, without materially diminishing its efficiency. On this point, the opinions of many of the superior officers of the navy were called for, and presented to the honorable chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs of the Senate, during the last session of Congress. These, it appeared, were by no means in accordance with each other; and this diversity of sentiment amongst persons best qualified to determine the question has induced the Department to withhold any recommendation on the subject.

The laws authorizing the establishment of this corps provide that it shall be governed by the "same rules and articles of war as are prescribed for the military establishment of the United States, according to the nature of the service in which it shall be employed," &c. Under this provision, it has been determined that marines, while serving at navy yards, shall be governed by military regulations. By this decision, two systems of discipline are brought into operation on persons employed on duty at the same establishment. The inconveniences of such an arrangement must be apparent. The perfect preservation of good order at the navy yards demands that the commander should have the exclusive government of all persons employed in service within the limits of his command.

As a measure tending to give reputation and efficiency to the navy, the cultivation of the minds of those who are to compose its active members is a subject of great national interest. It is a fact which will not be questioned, that the early education of the officers of the navy is entirely unequal to the character they have subsequently to sustain.

Few appointments under the government involve a necessity for more general and scientific attainments. As officers of the navy, they are required to act as judges of the law and evidence, on trials of their brother officers, for offences affecting the lives and characters of the accused; as commanders of ships, they should possess not only a practical acquaintance with seamanship, but an accurate knowledge of those branches of mathematics connected with the science of navigation, with astronomy and geography; and, as commanders of fleets or squadrons, they must be well informed on all points of international law, having reference to the rights of neutrals and belligerents, the often recurring question of the rights of blockade, and other interdictions of intercourse between powers standing in this relation to each other; to possess an accurate acquaintance with the modern languages, to enable them to enter into discussions on points of difference which may arise with the representatives of foreign States speaking such foreign language; and it may often happen that the communications can only be advantageously made in the language of the party with whom the subject of dispute may exist. The sons of the wealthy may obtain these advantages from the bounty of their parents; but, without the aid of public instruction, how are the sons of the less affluent to become qualified to command in the naval service?

It may be further remarked, that while a school, on the most liberal and comprehensive plan of instruction, has been provided for the military talent of the country, and has been endowed with every attribute for the advancement of the education of the youth who aspire to a share in the toils or honors of a military life, the only provision which has been authorized by law for the instruction of the midshipmen in the navy is to be found in the allowance of $25 per month to the schoolmasters retained on board the larger vessels-of-war.

The reports on the concerns of the navy hospital and navy pension funds will be transmitted as soon as the accounts of the several agents are received. The remoteness of the residence of some of the agents of the pension fund makes it difficult and inconvenient to obtain complete statements of their transactions to be rendered within the time prescribed by the act of 23d April, 1800.

--759--

In presenting views of the policy which it may be for the public interest should be pursued in reference to the naval establishment, it may be observed, that the rapid increase of the population and general resources of the nation, which has already taken place, and is daily advancing, leaves little to be dreaded from invasions of its territory by an external foe, detached as it is from the great warlike powers of the world.

It will be on the ocean, and in the transit of its mercantile enterprise to distant markets, that the nation may be regarded as most vulnerable; and to this point should its efforts for defence be chiefly directed.

The great expense attending the support of so large a naval force as may be occasionally required to give security to the commercial pursuits of the country, and to protect the accessible portions of the coasts from invasion and attacks of a foreign foe, makes it a matter of leading importance that a system be pursued which shall place the resources of the country in a condition to be readily brought into action whenever the necessity presents itself, without incurring the expense of maintaining such large force when its services are not wanted.

This, doubtless, will be found to be a task of much difficulty. It may, however, it is believed, in some measure be attained by steadily adhering to the course suggested to you in a former communication: to provide for the collection of supplies of all the materials for the construction of a navy, which require much time to put them in a condition for use, and which can be preserved without material deterioration or decay; to the preparation of these by seasoning and other processes, and the preservation of them after being so prepared, until required to be used; to retain no more vessels-of-war in commission than are required for the immediate wants of the service, and to cause those which it may be judged proper should be built to be reserved on the stocks, properly sheltered, until their services are called for by the national wants; to provide for the effectual repair and preservation of the vessels in ordinary; to appoint to the service no larger number of junior officers than can be kept actively employed, either at sea, at the stations on shore, or in the acquirement of a knowledge of the various branches of their professional education. On this latter point it may be remarked, that to keep in the pay of the government a greater number of these officers than can be usefully employed, is not only a prodigal waste of the public money, but a prodigal abuse of the character of the youth of the country. When thus appointed to the navy, and taken from the guardianship of their natural friends, and thrown, without restraint or occupation, upon society, it can rarely happen that they escape the dissolute and enervating habits incident to a life of idleness and indulgence.

Every day's experience gives confirmation to the opinion, that the worst effects to the moral and professional characters of the midshipmen of the navy result from this state of emancipation from parental guardianship, unrestrained by the active discipline of the service to which they nominally belong.

Should the exigencies of the nation demand a sudden increase of the corps, it would be far safer to resort to appointments made for the occasion than to rely upon supernumeraries thus become negligent and insubordinate, and who, if brought into service, would rather tend to weaken than to augment its strength.

Other subjects believed to have a claim to consideration are, the state of the unsettled accounts of the disbursing officers, a general survey of the coasts, harbors, &c. The former was brought to your notice during the last session of Congress; the latter, as a measure affording- information on the geographical positions of the principal capes and promontories, the depth and direction of the channels of the bays and harbors, &c., is a subject intimately connected with the security and prosperity of the United States navy. To these your attention is again respectfully invited.

JOHN BRANCH.

DOCUMENTS COMMUNICATED TO CONGRESS BY THE PRESIDENT AT THE OPENING OF THE SECOND SESSION OF THE TWENTY- FIRST CONGRESS, ACCOMPANYING THE REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY.

List of papers accompanying the report of the Secretary of the Navy, December 6, 1830.

A. Nos. 1 and 2. Extracts from the report of Captain Finch, &c.

B. Extracts from the reports made by the surgical department of the navy, in relation to the use of the chloride of lime.

C. Paper in relation to the construction, &c., of dry docks.

D. Statement of expenditures, &c., on account of live oak plantations.

E. Statement of expenditures, &c., for the removal of Africans to Liberia.

F. Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4. Statements in relation to the number and condition of the vessels in ordinary, and building, at the respective navy yards; quantity of materials collected at the several depots, means taken for their preservation, &c.

G. Nos. 1, 2, and 3. Statement in relation to cotton canvas. H.)

I. & K. List of deaths, dismissals, and resignations.

L. Estimates for the service during the year 1831.

A, No. 1.

Extracts from a summary of the cruise of the United States sloop-of-war Vincennes, under the command of Master Commandant Wm. B. Finch.

In the fulfillment of my orders, I pursued the route most familiar to commerce since the days of the earliest navigators; of course nothing original has been elicited by it in a geographical way. I was not on a voyage of discovery; my instructions were distinct and specific; and the unlooked for extension of an already long cruise forbade delay at any point where I should touch, or any deviation in attaining the

--760--

respective goals appointed at the quickest period, both in regard to the apposite season for the respective passages, and good faith and observance of the renewed terms of engagement with the ship's company.

Yet, professionally, the result is a confirmation, in part, of the remarks and information communicated by Captain Catesby Jones, in so far as our tracks were similar; and the independent ascertainment of the non-existence of Caroline Island, north of the Society cluster, in the situation assigned to it upon Arrowsmith's chart of 1798, and of two other nameless ones, in east longitude, to the westward of Sandwich group, supposed recent discoveries, which are important facts. Had they existed as described, the Vincennes must have met them; for she literally passed over the space which is assigned to their occupancy. So, further onward in the Indian ocean, she passed within a few miles of a supposed shoal mentioned as having been seen from the ship Suffolk, in 1827.

These islands and shoal, it is to be remembered, are stated as being in the way in which a vessel has unavoidably to go in performing the circuit which the Vincennes has accomplished; and alone furnish, separate from other considerations, an almost sufficient inducement for our government to fit out an expedition for the exclusive determination of doubtful islands on those routes pursued by our numerous and enterprising merchants and traders. If islands exist, there may be also reefs, shoals, and breakers. The removal of uncertainty on these heads would relieve navigators from some solicitude, which, under most favoring circumstances, from the nature of the hazardous calling, is already sufficiently great; and would facilitate, also, the voyages in which they might be engaged. The doubtful existence of a spot of land in one's route produces a perplexing circumspection, which often causes a deviation from the direct path, reduction of canvas, rate of sailing, loss of favorable winds, exhaustion of supplies, and probably disappointment in a market, &c., &c.

The Vincennes' voyage will serve to correct a very general and common error, that it is an easy one to a vessel, and of a duration to be computed with precision: neither is the fact. None is more trying to a ship's qualities, bull, rigging, and spars; and only such vessel as is most perfect, in every respect, ought to undertake it. The winds are not to be relied upon with any confidence, either as to the actual points whence they may blow, when or where to be met with, or their strength and continuance: in this opinion and assertion, my diary bears me out fully.

We may have been unfortunate in the season; (however, old sailors at Woahoo said it was the best;) for truly I never saw rougher seas or stronger blows anywhere than we frequently met to the westward of the Ladrone Islands, in the northern part of the China seas, to the westward of Java Head, and near the Banks of Aguthas. If the weather had been freezing temperature, the ship could scarcely have been taken care of or managed

The opportunity which has been enjoyed by the officers, of personal acquaintance with places, inspection of coasts and ports, and the knowledge acquired as to the stores, supplies, and refreshments to be obtained, are considerations of weight, and, in the event of war, or other enterprises, may avail the nation greatly. Another result is, the demonstration of the practicability of preserving, for a long period of confinement at sea, a crowded crew in an accustomed state of health. A free and unrestrained use of fresh water has been permitted throughout the period of the cruise."

A, No. 2.

Extracts from a letter of John C. Jones, jr., consul of the United States for the Sandwich Islands, to Captain William B. Finch, dated—

October, 30, 1829.

You have requested me to give you such information as I may be possessed of, relative to the state, extent, value and wants of the American commerce at these islands, in consequence of the Government of the United States having evinced a lively interest for its better protection and more successful prosecution.

In complying with this request, I shall endeavor to be as concise as possible, and give you such information only as shall be conceived may be most desirable for our government to be informed of. Since the discovery of the whale fishery on the coast of Japan, and the Independence of the republics of the western coasts of North and South America, the commerce of the United States, at the Sandwich Islands, has vastly increased. Of such importance, have these islands become to our ships, which resort to the coast of Japan for the prosecution of the whale fishery, that, without another place could be found, possessing equal advantages of conveniences and situation, our fishery on Japan would be vastly contracted," or pursued under circumstances the most disadvantageous.

The importance, also, of the Sandwich Islands, to ships bound from the western coast of North and South America to China or Manilla, has, of late years, been fully tested; the number of such vessels is annually increasing which visit these islands, and they have been found to afford them every advantage for repairing, refreshing, &c., and generally a market for parts of cargoes, which such vessels commonly have remaining unsold at the time of leaving the coast of western America; these vessels, also, generally obtain from these islands a freight of sandal wood, either for Canton or Manilla, which is quite an inducement of itself to attract them to these isles.

The commerce of the United States which resorts to the Sandwich Islands may be classed under five heads, viz: first, those vessels which trade direct from the United States to these islands for sandal wood, and from hence to China or Manilla, and return to America; second, those vessels which are bound to the northwest coast on trading voyages for furs, and touch here on their outward bound passage, generally winter at these islands, and always stop on their return to the United States by the way of China; third, those vessels which, on their passage from Chili, Peru, Mexico, or California, to China, Manilla, or the East Indies, stop at these islands for recruits or repairs, to obtain freight, or dispose of what small cargoes they may have left; fourth, those vessels which are owned by Americans resident at these islands, and employed by them in trading to the northwest coast, to California and Mexico, to China and Manilla; fifth, those vessels which are employed in the whale fishery on the coast of Japan, which visit semi-annually. Of the first class of vessels, which visit these islands annually, the number may be estimated at six, the amount of tonnage eighteen hundred, and the value of vessels and cargoes at three hundred and twenty thousand dollars; of the second class, the number may be estimated at five, the tonnage one thousand, and the value of vessels and cargoes two hundred and fifty thousand dollars; of the third class, the

--761--

number may be estimated at eight, the tonnage at two thousand five hundred, and the value of vessels and cargoes at five hundred thousand dollars; of the fourth class, the number may be estimated at six, the tonnage one thousand, and the value of vessels and cargoes at two hundred thousand dollars; of the fifth class, the number may be estimated at one hundred, the tonnage thirty-five thousand, and the value of vessels and cargoes at four millions; thus making the commerce of the United States, which annually visits the Sandwich Islands, amount to one hundred and twenty-five vessels, estimated at forty thousand tons, and valued at five million two hundred and seventy thousand dollars. This estimate is made from the average number of vessels which have visited these islands during the last three years, and will, I believe, be found to be very near the extent and value of our commerce at these islands.

The importance of the Sandwich Islands to the commerce of the United States which visits these seas, is, perhaps, more than has been estimated by individuals, or our government been made acquainted with. To our whale fishery on the coast of Japan, they are indispensably necessary; hither those employed in this business repair, in the months of April and May, to recruit their crews, refresh and adjust their ships; they then proceed to Japan, and return in the months of October and November. It is necessary that these ships, after their cruise on Japan, should return to the nearest port; in consequence, a large majority resort to these islands, certain here to obtain anything of which they may be in want. A small proportion, however, of these ships have proceeded, for supplies and refreshments in the fall, to ports on the coast of California; but as the government of Mexico have now imposed a duty of two dollars and one- eighth per ton on every ship that shall anchor within their waters, whether in distress or otherwise, this will, of course, prevent our whale ships from visiting that coast, and the Sandwich Islands will then remain the only resort for them after their cruise on the coast of Japan,

As the governments of the republics of South America become settled, and peace established on their shores, our commerce with those nations will, undoubtedly, increase; and the result will, of course, have a tendency to bring more commerce to these islands. Here all vessels bound to China, Manilla, or the East Indies, will stop on their passage; and the more the advantages which these islands afford to such vessels are known, the more they will become frequented.

When we come to reflect that, only a few years since, these Sandwich Islands were known to exist, and no more; that but lately they were visited by a few ships bound to the northwest coast of America, and they merely stopped to procure a few yams or potatoes; and that there now annually come to this remote corner of the globe forty thousand tons of American shipping, and the prospect is sure that, in no long protracted period, this number will double; we are led to conclude that the Sandwich Islands have been, and will continue to be, immensely more important to the commerce of the United States which visits these seas.

The annual, if not semi-annual, visit of one of our ships-of-war to these islands is conceived to be necessary, and would, no doubt, be attended with the best advantages, affording to our commerce in these seas, protection, assistance, and security.

For this station a sloop-of-war would be sufficient for every purpose required; and, if so arranged as to visit these islands in the months of March, April, and May, and again in October and November, every desired object would then be effected, and the result be that our merchantmen and whalers would come to these islands with perfect security, their stay here be made safe, and many abuses and inconveniencies with which they are now shackled would be done away. The very knowledge that a ship-of-war would semi-annually be at the Sandwich Islands, would be of infinite service to our commerce in general which enters the waters of the North Pacific ocean. Since my residence on these islands, as an officer of the government, I have repeatedly, and oftentimes in the discharge of my official duties, felt the want of protection and aid from the power of my government. *I have been compelled to see the guilty escape with impunity, the innocent suffer without a cause, the interests of my countrymen abused, vessels compelled to abandon the object of their voyage in consequence of desertion and mutiny, and men who might be made useful to society suffered to prowl amongst the different islands, a disgrace to themselves and their country, and an injury to others, whom they are corrupting and encouraging to do wrong. From such sources our commerce in this quarter of the globe has suffered much, and I have the confidence to believe that the regular visits of our ships-of-war to these islands (their commanders being clothed with sufficient power to act) would have the best tendency to regulate all things, and secure to our commerce everything which it now so importantly feels the want of.

B.

Extracts from a communication made to the Secretary of the Navy by George S. Sproston, surgeon of the West India, fleet, dated—,

October 26, 1820.

Since the date of my last (30th April) the use of chloride of lime, as therein mentioned, has been steadily persevered in on board of this ship, (the Erie,) and, in conjunction with other judicious measures of health police adopted since the commencement of the summer, has procured for us, under Providence, an exemption from epidemic disease.

That it has done so, is a fact more strongly corroborative of its efficacy than might seem apparent, were I not to mention that, during the first six months of our service on the West India station, many circumstances in relation to the climate, the ship, and the crew, conspired with great force towards the production of general disease. Such were, in the early months, much rainy and boisterous weather; afterwards, excessive and continued heat, to a degree unusual, even in the West Indies; the crowded and imperfectly ventilated state of the hold and berth deck; the laborious and harassing duties of the crew, their clothing illy regulated, with a small allowance of water, and a paucity of those comforts which are calculated to ameliorate the nature and effects of sea diet. These and many other unfavorable circumstances existing during the first cruise, gave to the cases of fever which occasionally did occur (about forty in all) a high grade of character, and powerfully predisposed to the development of general disease. That epidemic malignant fever was not produced, I unhesitatingly ascribe to the unremitted use of chlorine, and such other measures of precaution as it was in the power of the medical officers to adopt.

--762--

On board of the other vessels of this squadron, where the chloride of lime has been used, still happier results have been obtained. I believe that a case of fever of any description has not occurred in any of them. On board the Peacock, however, the chloride of lime, or chlorine in any form, had not been used. The high order and supposed general sweetness of this vessel were deemed to render it unnecessary. The fact, therefore, stands in high relief, that there has not yet occurred in our navy an instance of malignant disease where the chloride of lime has been steadily used as a preventive.

C.

Statement showing the progress which has been made in the erection of the dry docks at Boston and Norfolk, and in the procurement of timber, under the law of the 3d of March, 1827, for the "gradual improvement of the navy."

The operations attendant on the construction of the dry docks have progressed satisfactorily during the past year, under the directions of the attentive and able engineer to whose superintendence their construction has been confided. The progress has been as great as could have been expected, from the limited space and amount of heavy materials to be used. Nothing has occurred to interrupt or embarrass the works on the dry dock at Boston, except, perhaps, the want of stone, which has not been supplied so fast and as regularly as was desired; but, under the most favorable circumstances, masonry of this kind, and for such purposes, does not, to obtain substantial and good work, admit of the dispatch with which works rising above ground can be prosecuted. Some very slight interruption of the work took place on account of the extraordinary high tide on Friday, the 26th of March last. About three feet of water found its way into the dock, but was cleared, so that the work was recommenced on the following Monday. This tide was one and a half inches higher than the tide of 1786, which was ten inches higher than any previous tide within the memory of the oldest inhabitant then living. From these facts it appears the height fixed for the coping of the dock is level with the great tide of 1786; one inch and a half below the great tide of March last; eight inches above the tide of March, 1825, and. ten inches above the high tide of October, 1829.

From an inspection of the plan, it is estimated that a little more than three-fourths of the whole masonry is laid; about one-half of the hammered part of the remaining fourth is ready dressed on the ground, and a good deal more will be laid the present fall, if the season continues favorable; and, by the first of August next, it may be presumed, the whole stone masonry, including the coping, will be completed.

The site intended for the great wells and engine house has hitherto been necessarily occupied by the stone and stone hammerers, so that, without great inconvenience and embarrassment, these parts of the works could not be taken in hand; preparations, however, are now making for commencing them; they will be prosecuted during the winter, and early in the next spring they will be finished.

Various attempts have been made, both by written contracts and verbal agreements, to procure timber for the turning gates, which have proved unsuccessful, owing to great difficulty in procuring timber of the required form and size. Should it prove impracticable to obtain the curved pieces, the ribs must be formed or composed of planks bent and bolted together to the required curvature. Should the weather continue favorable a few weeks longer, the whole masonry of the head and chamber of the dock will be raised to within fourteen feet of the top; and, during the winter, the banking up to the same height will be effected. This circumstance will greatly facilitate all the labor of the remaining part of the masonry; and there is no doubt that, during the next season, the whole banking up and leveling the ground about the dock, even with the coping, can be accomplished. The turning gates, if an early supply of timber should be obtained next spring, may be nearly erected in the coming year; after which, the floating gate, removal of the coffer-dam, clearing out the entrance to the dock, &c., &c., will be the principal objects of expense.

The following are the principal parts of the work which remain to be executed, with an estimate of the probable cost of each; the first seven items will probably be completed during the ensuing year, and the three last will remain till the dock is finished.

No. 1.

Finishing masonry will probably cost

$30,000

No. 2.

Engine house

15,000

No. 3.

Wells, tunnel, cisterns, &c., &c.

7,000

No. 4.

Pumps, &c., &c.

21,000

No. 5.

Turning gates, &c.

10,000

No. 6.

Small gates, &c.

3,000

No. 7.

Banking up

4,000

No. 8.

Removing coffer-dam, opening channel

5,000

No. 9.

Floating gate

20,000

No. 10.

Removing steam engine, restoring wharf, &c.

3,000

$118,000

There has been expended on this dock, up to the 31st October, for materials, $60,221.28, and for labor, $71,497.34, making the sum of $131,718.62, disbursed since November, 1829; add to which, $111,853.94| for materials, and $138,531.53 1/2 for labor, previously expended, making the total amount of disbursements on this dock, from its commencement, $382,104.10 1/6.

The work on the dock at Norfolk, during the past year, has been carried on successfully. The whole foundation floor has been completed, and nothing which deserves particular notice has occurred, either from the accumulation of water or caving of the banks, to embarrass the works. A considerable mass of rough masonry, as well as some of the hammered stones at the entrance, and a part of the mitre sill, have been laid. The average height of the rubble work, or rough masonry, is sixteen feet; and the banking up has progressed so far as almost to prevent any future caving of sliding of the banks. Upwards of

--763--

five thousand cubic yards of rubble work have been laid, and a new boiler for the steam engine has been engaged, which there is no doubt will, by its improved form, cause a saving in fuel that will nearly if not quite cover this additional cost.

Examinations of the coffer-dam have been often carefully made, to see what effect the worms had upon the piles. During the last summer, it was ascertained that the sheathing originally put down for their protection had completely answered the purpose, and the dove-tailed timber piles were found to be sound. Some of the heads of the great tie-bolts, which rested against the coffer sheathing of ribbons or guide timbers, have been corroded, and it is expected that others must be substituted; in other respects, the coffer-dam appears to be firm and safe.

The delay and embarrassment which took place early in the past season have been avoided since, by allowing persons to deliver rubble stones at a stipulated price per cubic yard as they measure in the work, without entering into formal written contracts for stipulated quantities; and there is now a good supply, with a fair prospect of not being again in want of stone of this description. Of dimension stone, about 3,500 cubic yards have been received, and a large supply is on hand, in readiness to make considerable advances in that part of the masonry this winter. Some interruption in parts of this work has happened, on account of the loss of two vessels by shipwreck; but other parts of the masonry were carried on at the same time, so as to produce but little detriment to the work. It is doubtful whether this dock can be ready for use quite as soon as stated in, the last report, although the great mass of the work will be finished; during the summer of 1832, it may doubtless be completed.

On this dock there has been expended, up to the 31st ultimo, for materials          $109,802 15

For labor                           80,819 17

Making                              $190,621 32

disbursed during the past year; add to which, $62,763.82 for materials, and $117,428.92 for labor, previously expended, making the total amount of disbursements on this dock, from its commencement, $370,814.06.

Under the several contracts which have been made under the act of 3d of March, 1827, for the live oak frames of five ships of the line, five frigates, and five sloops-of-war, deliveries have been made of three hundred and twenty-one thousand seven hundred and fourteen cubic feet, at the following yards, viz:

 

For 74s.

For 44s.

For sloops.

Portsmouth

 

2,882

5,675

Boston

70,939

47,439

9,753

New York

 

13,757

 

Philadelphia

 

36,940

7,736

Norfolk

69,891

20,319

8,778

Washington

 

18,593

9,012

74s

140,830

139,930

40,954

44s

139,930

 

 

Sloops

40,954

 

 

Making, together

321,714 cubic feet,

 

 

for which has been paid the sum of three hundred and sixty-eight thousand three hundred dollars and fifty-five cents.

The timber delivered since the 3d of March, 1827, under the contracts with Teas & Van Hook, Waller & Taber, and R. F. Scofield, is embraced in the foregoing statement of live oak for frigate frames.

D.

Statement exhibiting the expenditures on account of the gradual improvement of the navy, under the act entitled "An act for the gradual improvement of the navy of the United States," approved March 3, 1827, from the passage of that act to September 30, 1830, designating, as far as practicable, the year and the object of expenditure.

Object of expenditure.

1827.

1828.

1829

1830.

Aggregate.

Live oak timber.—Purchase of live oak, cut to moulds

$45,219 13

$110,895 00

$150,173 59

$47,184 36

$352,972 09

Live oak lands.—Purchase of a plantation in East Florida, for the culture of live oak

 

10,261 11

 

 

10,261 11

Live oak plantation.—Expenditures in preparing and cultivating the plantation, and agent's salary

 

 

5,081 64

4,383 38

9,465 02

Live oak examination and surveys.—Salaries of the agents for examining and surveying the live oak lands in Louisiana, Florida, &c., including their per diem allowance and traveling expenses

2,147 63

4,952 14

7,110 52

433 98

14,644 27

Live oak protection.—Salary of agent in protecting the live oak on the public lands in Louisiana

 

300 00

425 00

 

725 00

Dry docks.—Expenditures for materials and labor, in building dry docks at Gosport, Virginia, and Charlestown, Massachusetts, including the salary of the engineer and his assistants

45,239 63

183,923 21

260,587 82

135,738 79

630,489 45

Dry dock lots.—Purchase of sundry lots or pieces of ground at Gosport, Virginia

16,376 00

500 00

 

 

16,876 00

--764--

D.—Statement—Continued.

Object of expenditure.

1827.

1828.

1829.

1830.

Aggregate.

Dry dock examinations.—Per diem and traveling expenses of the Commissioners of the Navy

$285 90

$1,859 60

$624 61

 

$2,770 11

Timber sheds.—Expenditures for the erection of sheds for the preservation of timber in navy yards

 

36,318 26

31,440 06

$2,033 37

49,791 69

Boat sheds.—Expenditures for the erection of sheds for the preservation of boats

 

 

2,356 11

9,159 73

11,515 84

Magazine.—Expenditures for building a magazine and bridge at Gosport, Virginia

 

 

6,581 50

 

6,581 50

Miscellaneous.—Purchase of stone, glass, timber, iron, copper, bricks, shingles, &c., and for labor performed; the vouchers for which do not specify the particular object of expenditure

6,124 53

18,099 21

8,982 13

621 67

33,827 54

 

$115,301 82

$351,608 53

$473,363 98

$199,555 29

$1,139,918 62

AMOS KENDALL.

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office, December 4, 1830.

E.

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office, August, 1830.

Sir:

Upon the accounts of Joseph Mechlin, Esq., agent for the reception of recaptured Africans upon the coast of Africa, by you referred to me, I have the honor to report the following facts:

This agent derives his official existence and powers from the act of Congress, passed March 3, 1819, entitled "An act in addition to the  acts prohibiting the slave trade."

The first section authorizes the President to employ any of the armed vessels of the United States in cruising upon the coast of the United States and of Africa, with the view of capturing any vessels employed by citizens or residents of the United States in the slave trade, and delivering over to the marshals, or other persons appointed to receive them, all negroes found on board, destined for slaves.

The second section provides "that the President of the United States be, and he is hereby, authorized to make such regulations and arrangements as he may deem expedient for the safe keeping, support, and removal beyond the limits of the United States, of all such negroes, mulattoes, or persons of color as may be so delivered and brought within their jurisdiction; and to appoint a proper person or persons, residing upon the coast of Africa, as agent or agents for receiving the negroes, mulattoes, or persons of color delivered from on board, vessels seized in the prosecution of the slave trade by the commanders of the United States armed vessels." The act further provides for the transportation of such negroes, &c., as may have been illegally imported into the United States, and appropriates $100,000 to give effect to its provisions.

All the powers possessed by the agent on the coast of Africa are derived from the 2d section of the act above quoted. By a literal interpretation of the provision, it would seem that the person to be appointed agent must be residing upon the coast of Africa previous to his appointment, and that his official duties are performed when he has received the negroes from the commanders of the vessels in which they may be transported. It is by inference only that he is entitled to any compensation for his services, or any remuneration for the expenses which may attend the disposition of the negroes after they are received.

Connecting this act with the fact that the Colonization Society was then preparing to effect a settlement on the coast of Africa, with the view of affording an asylum for free people of color and emancipated slaves, it is probable Congress expected that some person or persons residing in the proposed settlement would be appointed to receive the recaptured negroes, and that the final disposition of them, when they did not immediately return to their own countries, would be embraced in the benevolent plans of the Colonization Society. It might have been supposed that the society, which was preparing to transport and provide for numerous Africans freed from bondage in the United States, would not hesitate to provide for those whom the government had saved from slavery, and delivered to them without charge in their own colony. In so doing, they would have been acting in accordance with the original objects of their institution—the lessening of the evils of slavery in the United States, and the suppression of the slave trade. It may have been thought that the government had done all it legitimately could, when it returned the captured negroes to the shores of their native continent.

It would seem that the terms of the act were hardly sufficient to authorize the establishment of a colony, owing allegiance to the United States, and entitled to protection, if even Congress itself possesses a right to authorize such an establishment. In the simple grant of power to an agent to receive recaptured negroes, it requires broad construction to find a grant of authority to colonize them, to build houses for them, to furnish them with farming utensils, to pay instructors to teach them, to purchase ships for their convenience, to build forts for their protection, to supply them with arms and munitions of war, to enlist troops to guard them, or to employ the army or navy in their defence.

There appears to have been difficulty in construing this act immediately after its passage. At the next session of Congress, President Monroe sent a message to both Houses, (see Senate Journal, page 33, Doc. 20, 1819) from which the following are extracts:

"Some doubt being entertained respecting the true intent and meaning of the act of the last session, entitled "An act in addition to an act prohibiting the slave trade," as to the duties of the agents to be appointed on the coast of Africa, I think it proper to state the interpretation which has been given to the act, and the measures adopted to carry it into effect, that Congress may, should it be deemed advisable, amend the same before further proceeding is had under it." "On due consideration of the

--765--

several sections of the act, and its humane policy, it was supposed to be the intention of Congress that all the persons above described, who might be taken under it, and landed in Africa, should be aided in their return to their former homes, or in their establishment at or near the place where landed. Some shelter and food would be necessary for them there as soon as landed, let their subsequent disposition be what it might. Should they be landed without such provision being previously made, they might perish. It was supposed by the authority given to the Executive to appoint agents residing on the coast of Africa, that they should provide such shelter and food, and perform the other beneficent and charitable offices contemplated by the act. The coast of Africa having been little explored, and no persons residing there, who possessed the requisite qualifications to entitle them to the trust, being known to the Executive, to none such could it be committed. It was believed that citizens only, who would go hence well instructed in the views of their government, and zealous to give them effect, would be competent to these duties, and that it was not the intention of the law to preclude their appointment," &c. "On this view of the policy and sanctions of the law it has been decided to send a public ship to the coast of Africa, with two such agents, who will take with them tools and other implements necessary for the purpose above mentioned. To each of these agents a small salary has been allowed—fifteen hundred dollars to the principal, and twelve hundred to the other." "Special instructions will be given to these agents, defining in precise terms their duties in regard to the persons thus delivered to them; the disbursement of the money by the principal agent, and his accountability for the same. They will also have power to select the most suitable place on the coast of Africa, at which all persons taken under this act shall be delivered to them, with an express injunction to exercise no power founded on the principle of colonization, or other power than that of performing the benevolent offices above recited, by the permission and sanction of the existing government under which they may establish themselves."

Nothing was done by either House of Congress to explain the act of the preceding session. The President, accordingly, in pursuance of his own construction, appointed Samuel Bacon principal agent, and John P. Bankson assistant agent. The agent was authorized "to form an establishment in the Island of Sherbro, or elsewhere on the coast of Africa, by an amicable arrangement with the government of the island, or such other place as he might select;" to build barracks for the accommodation of three hundred persons, and to prepare provisions, clothing, tools, and implements. "It is distinctly understood," say his instructions, "that you are not to connect your agency with the views or plans of the Colonization Society, with which, under the law, the Government of the United States has no concern. You are not to exercise any power or authority founded on the principles of colonization, but to confine yourself to that of performing the benevolent intentions of the act of Congress of the 3d March, 1819."

As it had been determined that provisions and accommodations might, under the act of Congress, be prepared in advance for the Africans who might be returned to their own continent, it was construed also to admit the sending out of mechanics and laborers to build barracks or houses for them. The agent accordingly took out with him thirty-three men, eighteen women, seventeen male children, and twenty female children—in all eighty-eight persons. As the men went out as mechanics and laborers for the United States, and the women "as cooks, seamstresses, nurses, and washerwomen," the act of Congress was construed to admit of sending out provisions for the support of themselves and families.

They must have tools as well as provisions; and therefore the agent took out "one wagon, several wheelbarrows, ploughs, iron work for a saw and grist mill, a fishing seine," and a variety of farming utensils.

They must be protected from the violence of enemies; and therefore the act was construed to admit the sending out of arms and munitions of war for their use. The agent was accordingly authorized to take out "two six-pounders with shot, one hundred muskets with accoutrements, ten kegs of common powder, and two of priming powder."

They must carry on some intercourse with their neighbors; and therefore the act was construed to admit the sending out a "four-oared barge," the property of the United States.

Thus accompanied and prepared, the agent sailed for Africa, and was safely landed at Sierra Leone, with his stores, munitions, and people. At Sierra Leone he purchased a schooner for the use of the contemplated establishment, and, after some delay, transported his people and effects to the Island of Sherbro. There the agent and his assistant soon sickened and died. Many of the mechanics and laborers, and their families, perished; most of the residue were scattered abroad, and the provisions and stores sent out chiefly wasted and destroyed.

On the 1st December, 1820, Jonathan B. Winn was appointed agent, and Ephraim Baron assistant agent. The new agent took out sixteen men, twelve women, and ten children, to supply deficiencies among the mechanics and laborers first sent out, caused by death and dispersion. He also took out four liberated Africans. He landed with his company at Sierra Leone, collected as many as possible of the first company, and of the stores sent out with them, and, after considerable delays, occasioned by difficulties in selecting a site for the establishment of the agency, finally transported his company to Cape Mesurado, which had been selected and purchased by the Colonization Society, in concert with the agent of the government. They landed there in January, 1822, and were left by the agent in June, living in comfortable dwellings erected by themselves. The schooner Augusta, purchased by Mr. Bacon, being much out of repair, another schooner, called the Calypso, had been purchased by the new agent for the use of the establishment.

In May, 1822, the Secretary of the Navy directed that ten liberated Africans should be delivered to J. Ashmun, for transportation to Africa, who also took out fifteen men, twelve women, and ten children, to be attached to the agency. The Secretary also authorized him to take out, at the expense of the government, 15,000 hard red bricks, 5,000 feet assorted lumber, thirty barrels ship bread, eight of tar, four of pitch, four of rosin, and two of turpentine.

On the 15th May, 1822, Doctor Eli Ayres, who, on the 21st of the preceding July, had been appointed "a surgeon, for the purpose of affording medical assistance to the United States agents, and the mechanics, laborers, and families employed under their direction, and to the negroes and persons of color who may be delivered," &c., was appointed principal agent, with a salary, as agent and surgeon, of $2,000. He was authorized to take out, at the public expense, a frame for a house, boards, scantling, shingles, &c., four window frames, with glass, nails, bolts, locks, &c., two carts, and a hand-mill to grind corn and rice, with powder, cannon, shot, lead, &c.

Previous to the arrival of Doctor Ayres, and subsequent to his departure from Liberia, where his stay was short, the management of the agency was in the hands of Jehudi Ashmun, agent of the Coloni-

--766--

zation Society. Ten liberated Africans, sent out in 1823, were returned to their own country, which was within forty or fifty miles of the settlement.

In March, 1824, Doctor Ayres resigned the agency, and Mr. Ashmun received a temporary appointment. To him a large quantity of provisions, clothes, leather, axes, lumber, and various other goods, were sent in 1824.

Fortifications had been built, guns mounted, and the arms and munitions furnished by the United States employed in the defence of the settlement. To the government, also, were charged all the supplies employed in repelling sundry attacks of the natives upon the settlement.

In June, 1824, R. R. Gurley was appointed agent; but the management of the agency was soon devolved again upon Mr. Ashmun.

In January, 1825, the Secretary of the Navy authorized the erection of "a building for the residence and instruction of the recaptured Africans, and a superintendent." He also directed the agent to "make application to the proper officers of the Colonization Society for an allotment of a certain portion of their land, as may be fixed upon, for the use of the recaptured Africans, that they may be instructed in agriculture," &c.

In the same month, Mr. Ashmun reported that he had appointed "a superintendent of captured Africans," "a secretary pro tempore," a "storekeeper," and "a conductor of ordnance;" and that he was erecting two buildings, containing "a residence for the superintendent, a school room, and chapel," together with apartments for liberated Africans. He had repaired the old agency house, and was building a new one; had built a small building, to be attached to the agency house, to be temporarily employed as a rice granary and storehouse; was collecting materials for a storehouse; was proceeding to build a stone pier at the landing; was about to repair a tower for defence; and, by building and repairing, had two boats "employed in transporting rice." He had organized a regular guard, and enlisted "seven men for the service." He had previously had on his ration list two hundred persons, but they were then reduced to sixty-eight. He expected, however, to furnish rations for about eighty. He had fifteen pieces of cannon and three swivels, besides small arms.

"The salaries and allowances of all the officers appointed, the men enlisted, and persons employed in these improvements, together with the cost of the materials, were charged to the United States.

The number of liberated Africans then under charge of this formidable agency, was fifteen. "Nine," says Mr. Ashmun, "are in possession of plantations of their own; the remaining six, whose age and acquaintance with agriculture forbid a separate allotment of lands, cultivate a small farm in common, under their superintendent."

In the same month the Secretary directed a considerable quantity of provisions and goods to be sent out, with a quantity of lumber, a parcel of carpenter's tools, "ten dozen porter, ten gallons Madeira wine," and seeds to be distributed in the colony.

In November, 1825, an additional quantity of provisions was directed to be sent out, and, in December, an additional supply of arms and munitions of war.

In the instructions of Doctor John W. Peaco, who was now appointed agent, he was authorized to employ the colonists "in labor and defence," at the expense of the government. It is observed: "The necessity of keeping a military force in the pay of the government is not sufficiently apparent to authorize such a step in the present advanced condition of the colony, or without further evidence of its utility," &c. The right to keep up such a force is here clearly recognized. It is further observed: "It is very desirable that the recaptured Africans should remain at the agency so long as to acquire some knowledge of the arts and comforts of civilized life; but should any of them discover their nation and country, and desire to return to their homes, you will not oppose their wishes, but facilitate and promote them."

The principles upon which Mr. Ashmun had thus far practiced were thus recognized by the Secretary of the Navy. The act of 1819, which authorized the appointment of an agent or agents to receive liberated Africans on the coast of Africa, was construed to admit the building- of school houses and chapels for them, of paying teachers to civilize and christianize them, superintendents to teach them agriculture and "the arts and comforts of civilized life." In fine, the act which seems intended merely to facilitate the return of liberated Africans to their own countries and families, was, by construction, made to authorize the appropriation of the power and means of the government to their civilization, and to their location and protection in a new community.

In 1825, and early in 1826, the agent, who had introduced an efficient military organization into the settlement, was involved in hostilities with certain slave dealers, and others, in his neighborhood, and, in various expeditions, liberated and carried to the agency about 170 slaves. These, also, he supported and instructed at the expense of the government, until he was informed by the Secretary of the Navy that they could not be brought within the provisions of the law, and must cease to be a public charge.

In February, 1827, there were no liberated Africans under the care of the agent, but he was building a new town for a number who were expected.

Dr. Peaco, who went out and returned, leaving the agency still in the care of Mr. Ashmun, reported, from Philadelphia, January 1st, 1827, the "persons constantly employed at Liberia, who received their pay, &c., from the government," as follows, viz:

"Henry Nelson, carpenter and house joiner, and four apprentices, in finishing the buildings for the Africans expected from Georgia, and other buildings, at (an annual salary of)

$600

"Anthony D. Williams, superintendent

300

"James Thompson, assistant superintendent

300

"Elijah Johnson, storekeeper

200

"W. L. Weaver, assistant to United States agent

300

"To these may be added, W. Draper, house joiner, employed at the agent's house per job, and from three to five boat builders; besides which, blacksmiths, caulkers, extra carpenters, masons, sawyers, laborers, seamstresses, nurses, &c., are frequently employed, who receive goods from the public stores for their services."

In August, 1827, one hundred and forty-two liberated Africans were received at the agency, sent out by the government from Savannah, in Georgia. The buildings erected there were not then completed, and a schooner was building at the expense of the United States.

On the 2d April, of that year, instructions were sent to the agent, that "in no case are the supplies now or hereafter to be furnished to be distributed among the liberated Africans at the agency, or among

--767--

the colonists;" and he was directed to "discharge all the superintendents and agents of every description who have been and are under pay, except those whose services are absolutely necessary." On the 12th December he was instructed "not to expend any more money on the public buildings."

In October, 1828, Dr. Richard Randall was appointed agent. All the recaptured Africans previously sent out had ceased to be a charge upon the agency, and he was informed that he would have little to do but to take care of the public property.

Dr. Randall died in April, 1829, and Dr. Joseph Mechlin, who had gone out as assistant agent, succeeded him as principal. In March, 1830, he received from Florida ninety-one liberated Africans, sent out by the government.

The accounts of Dr. Mechlin are those now under consideration. I have entered into the foregoing detail for the purpose of showing what principles have been adopted and acted upon heretofore, by those in the administration of the government, relative to the affairs of this agency. Whatever the government itself can lawfully send out for the use of the recaptured Africans, the agent may lawfully purchase for their use in case of necessity. Accordingly, in the accounts of the various agents heretofore settled, charges have been allowed for the purchase of, perhaps, every species of article which has been shipped from the United States for the use of the establishment. From a comparison of Dr. Mechlin's vouchers with those passed to the credit of his predecessors, there is, I believe, not one without precedent to support it, so far as it regards the principle of the claim. Indeed, it would, perhaps, be difficult to imagine an expenditure incident to the business of human life, which is not in principle embraced in the settlements heretofore made of the accounts of the agents for the reception of liberated Africans at Liberia.

Nothing is more evident to my mind than the proposition that a large portion of these expenditures is not justified by the language or object of the act of 1819. Yet a different construction has been put upon that act by the government itself; that construction has prevailed through a series of years; it has governed the settlement of all the agents' accounts. Mr. Mechlin was appointed agent with the same powers as his predecessors; he expected, and had a right to expect, that his accounts would be settled upon the same principles; indeed, a large portion of his payments is for services rendered under their management. If the message of the President, the instructions given to the agents, and the precedents set in the settlement of their accounts, are not law, it could not be otherwise than that the agent should consider them a sure guide in his official acts, and fully explanatory of the meaning of the law as understood by his superiors. To apply another construction and new rules to the settlement of his accounts, and make them operate retrospectively, would certainly be a great hardship, if not unjust.

It seems to me right and proper that his accounts should now be adjusted upon the principles heretofore settled by the instructions and acts of the government; and that, for his future guidance, a new set of instructions be given, conformable to the opinion entertained by the present Executive.

It appears to me that the whole business of this agency requires remodeling. Its expenses far exceed those of such an establishment as would be fully competent to all the objects embraced in the acts of Congress.

The whole number of negroes transported to Africa by the government since the passage of the act of 1819, is, according to the best information I can collect, less than 260. The appropriations for their support in the United States, transportation to Africa, and superintendence there, have amounted to $264,710. Every liberated negro has, therefore, cost the United States near one thousand dollars. But immensely the greater portion of this money has been paid, not for the direct support and comfort of the negroes themselves, but for the salaries, compensation, and subsistence of those who have been employed to keep, provide for, superintend, and teach them; for buildings, vessels, implements of industry, arms, munitions of war, and supplies in defence. To say nothing of the principles involved in the Navy Department building, arming, and maintaining forts on a distant continent, where there is no naval station, and raising and maintaining an army, or an armed force, in a foreign land, certainly such an extensive and costly establishment is not necessary for the accomplishment of every object contemplated by the acts of Congress.

It is not, however, my province to recommend any measure of curtailment to the Navy Department. "In relation to the accounts of the agency, the whole object of this report maybe summed up in two points:

First. From necessity and the justice of the case, I think the accounts of the present agent ought to be settled upon the same principles which have been recognized and acted on in the accounts of his predecessors.

Secondly. I solicit for the agent a new set of instructions, conformable to the views entertained by you of law and policy in relation to that agency, and so specific as to obviate all future difficulties in relation to the powers, duties and accounts of the agent.

If it meet your approbation, I shall feel at liberty to proceed with the settlement of the accounts, until the new instructions take effect, according to the rule above suggested.

On reference of the case to the Attorney General, as now presented, I am confident that he would be of opinion that this course is admissible and just, whatever he might think of the powers granted by the law of 1819, if the question were one of first impression.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

AMOS KENDALL.

John Branch, Esq., Secretary of the Navy.

F, No. 1.

Statement showing the number, name, state, and condition of the vessels-of-war belonging to the United States now in ordinary; the station at which each is placed; the amount estimated for the thorough repair of each, including stores of every description, with the exception of extra spare stores and provisions; and the time requisite for effecting such repairs.

AT BOSTON.

The number of ships in ordinary at: this yard is three, viz: Constitution, frigate of the first class; Independence, ship of the line; and Columbus, ship of the line.

--768--

Constitution.—The frame of this ship is sound. She requires new plank from the lower edge of the wales to the rail; new berth, orlop, and spar decks; new ceiling in the hold; channels and galleries new; to be newly coppered and caulked, and some repairs in the different departments. Time necessary to effect the repair, 120 days. Cost, exclusive of stores, as above                               $128,081 05

Independence.—The frame of this ship is sound. She requires to be planked anew from the lower edge of the wales to the rail; new ceiling, new decks, and magazine; platforms, new head and cutwater; stern new planked; and to be caulked and newly coppered. Some repairs, also, in the several departments. Time necessary to effect the repairs, 200 days. Cost           226,706 77

Columbus.—The frame of this ship is generally sound. Her wales require to be partly renewed, her decks and sides to be caulked, and her bottom and copper repaired, with other slight repairs in the hull. Time necessary to effect the repairs, 80 days. Cost            101,141 67

AT NEW YORK.

The ships in ordinary at this yard are five, viz: Ohio, Franklin, and Washington, of the line; United States, frigate of the first class, and sloop Falmouth.

Ohio.—The outside plank from the water to the rail, part of the ceiling, clamps, and waist, on the lower and upper gun and spar decks, is decayed; deck frames are good, but some knees require to be removed, to replace the decayed clamps and waist plank; the copper, which has been taken off from light water, requires to be replaced; bulkheads of the wing passages and store rooms to be put up; magazines, light, and bread rooms are to build. The masts and spars, boats and gun carriages, are nearly all yet to make. This is a new ship that has never been fitted out. Time requisite to repair and fit her for sea, 200 days. Cost: 171,072 69

United States.—In this ship, the wales, three streaks of the waist, the ceiling in the spirit room, and under the magazine and filling room, the after orlop, and part of the fore, with the ceiling under it, must be renewed; the store rooms and magazine must be rebuilt; copper repaired; the main and foremasts, and several smaller spars must be replaced by new ones; four new boats are required, and the gun carriages to be repaired. Time requisite to effect repairs, 70 days. Cost: 82,164 49

Franklin.—The outside plank from the water to the rail, the channels and rails, part of the keelson and mast steps, all the ceiling below the orlop, part of the clamps of all the decks, the spirketting and waist of the upper gun deck, the waist above the spar deck, the sides and breast hooks in the hold, part of the waterways, and thick work upon them, all the plank of the spar deck, and part of the other decks, the plank and beams of the magazine, platform, a few of the deck knees and beams, and that portion of the frame timber which is of white oak and mahogany, are all in bad condition, and require to be replaced with new; the bottom requires caulking and coppering anew; the joiners' work requires to be nearly all new, and a new set of masts and spars; five new boats are required, and the others repaired; gun carriages on the spar and main decks must be new, and the residue require slight repairs. Time required to effect the repairs, 200 days. Cost, exclusive of stores            192,185 16

Washington.—The state and condition of this ship is the same as that of the Franklin, nearly throughout. Time requisite to effect her repair, 200 days. Cost, exclusive of stores                                    186,054 94

Falmouth.—This ship is generally in good condition, and requires but slight repairs in the hull, masts and spars, boats, &c. The copper on the bottom is much worn, and requires to be renewed. She also requires caulking throughout. Time requisite to effect her repair, 20 days. Cost, exclusive of stores           29,401 81

AT PHILADELPHIA.

There is but one ship in ordinary at this yard.

Cyane, corvette.—The knightheads and hawse pieces, the bow or forward cant timbers, the two lower breast hooks, the keelson knee, and the hooks which secure the heels of the after cants, are quite rotten. A part of the after cants, the upper transoms, the corner counter timbers, and a part of the midship ones, are defective. The ceiling plank in the hold, particularly forward and aft, the forward pieces of waterways on the gun deck, and much of the plank between the ports, are defective; as also the waterways and battery plank of the spar deck, and the plank of the gun, berth, and orlop decks. On the outside, the principal part of the wales, strings, and plank, between the ports and the hooding ends, from the water upwards, are more or less rotten. With some exceptions the frame of this ship is sound; as are also the clamps, beams, knees, and ledges of the spar and gun deck. In the berth deck, two or three beams are defective, otherwise the frame of this deck is sound; so, also, is the orlop deck and keelson. The plank on the bottom appears to be good. Time requisite to effect the repairs, not returned. Cost, exclusive of stores         71,103 61

AT WASHINGTON.

Potomac.—Frigate of the first class: is the only ship in ordinary at this yard. This ship has never been fitted out, and is in good condition; the masts and spars, and boats, are nearly finished. The former require slight repairs. Per letter of Commodore Hull, of 29th June, 1830, the time requisite to fit out this ship is 90 days. Cost, exclusive of stores 70,349 66

AT GOSPORT.

The ships in ordinary at this yard are in number six, viz: John Adams, Macedonian, Delaware, North Carolina, Congress and Warren.

--769--

John Adams.—This ship has been rebuilt, is just launched, and can be completed in a few days. Cost of completing her, exclusive of stores     $33,057 44

Macedonian.—The whole of this ship, except her lower futtocks and floors, are in a state of decay, and requires to be rebuilt. Time required to perform the work, not returned. Cost, exclusive of stores: 173,133 00

Delaware.—In this ship, some of the beams, deck planks, clamps, waterways, and spirketting on all the decks, are defective in spots. Some defects are also discovered in the ceiling, and the lower after diagonal riders. Before the condition of the bottom can be stated, the ship must be hove down. Time requisite to effect the repairs, 60 days. Cost, exclusive of stores                                    103,892 00

North Carolina.—In this ship, inside, on the spar and orlop decks, a few beams are decayed; and on all the decks the clamps, waterways and spirkettings are in spots decayed. Outside, the wales and channel wales are generally decayed. Several streaks below the wales, and one streak of the counter plank, are also decayed. New main and mizzen channels are requisite. Time necessary to effect her repairs, 120 days. Cost, exclusive of stores: 149,083 00

Congress.—In the lower hold, the ceiling is generally decayed, and about one-fourth of the frame timbers have been discovered to be defective in the bilge, and the trenails are generally decayed. On the berth deck, the plank and waterways are generally decayed; on the gun deck, the plank are decayed at the butts and nail heads, and are otherwise defective; three beams are also decayed; on the spar deck, considerable defects appear, as well as decay in the plank and waterways. Outside, the plank from the rail to the water is very much decayed, and the timbers cut with auger holes, and shivered with fastenings. To haul this ship up, and give her a thorough repair, the time requisite, one year. Cost         148,247 00

Warren.—In this ship, the dry rot has attacked the battery plank inside and outside, as well as some of the timbers. The wales and berth deck clamps, in the neighborhood of the dry rot, are also decayed. The copper is defective at the water's edge, and it is supposed that she will require new copper and caulking all over. Time requisite to effect her repair, not returned. Cost, exclusive of stores: 52,239 00

RECEIVING VESSELS.

At Philadelphia, the Sea Gull; Baltimore, the Fox. For the amount of repairs required on these vessels, to suit them for the service in which they are employed, provision has been made in the general estimate, of $200 each, say 400 00

F, No. 2.

Statement showing the number of vessels now on the stocks, their state of preservation, the yards where stationed, and the time and expense necessary to prepare them for launching.

PORTSMOUTH.

There are at this yard, on the stocks, two ships, the Alabama, ship of the line, and Santee, frigate of the first class; they are both under houses, and in a good state of preservation. The Alabama can be prepared for launching in ninety days, at the probable expense for labor and materials, exclusive of joiners' work, of   $38,320 60

Santee.—Can be prepared for launching in seventy days, at an expense for labor and materials (exclusive of joiners' work)        29,341 42

BOSTON.

There are three ships on the stocks at this yard, viz: the Vermont and Virginia, ships of the line, and Cumberland, frigate of the first class. They are all in a good state of preservation; the time and expense necessary to prepare them for launching will be, for the:

Vermont, ninety days, at an expense of 48,726 00

Virginia, ninety days, at an expense of 54,334 00

Cumberland, ninety days, at an expense of 49,565 00

NEW YORK.

On the stocks at this yard are the Sabine and Savannah, frigates of the first class, both under houses; the former is in a fine state of preservation, and could be launched in sixty days, at an expense of 46,357 00

The frigate Savannah is in a good state generally, but from exposure to the weather previous to the house being built, and from having been caulked, some parts were injured; she is now protected from further decay by a tight covering, and could be launched in one hundred and twenty days, at an expense of 46,435 00

PHILADELPHIA.

At this yard there are two ships on the stocks, viz: the ship of the line Pennsylvania, and the frigate Raritan. The timbers, plank, beams, knees, &c., of both ships appear as sound as when first put together, and both are in a good state of preservation; it will require to prepare the Pennsylvania, six mouths, at an expense of       33,754 00

It will require to prepare the Raritan for launching three months, at an expense of 15,500 00

--770--

WASHINGTON.

The frigate Columbia is the only ship on the stocks at this yard; she is in a good state of preservation, is protected under a ship house, and can be prepared for launching in sixty days, at an expense of $42,576 49

NORFOLK.

At this yard the line of battle ship New York and the frigate St. Lawrence are on the stocks: these ships are under permanent houses, but, on examination, the former is found to be decayed in her keel, deadwood, and keelson, and the inside planks of the bilge are decayed in many places, principally amidships. It would require ninety days to complete this ship, at an expense, exclusive of the materials on hand, of 37,775 00

The St. Lawrence is in a good state of preservation: some partial defects have been discovered in her keelson in boring; her steins and one of her gun deck beams is decayed. The ship could be completed in four months, at an expense, exclusive of materials on hand, of 40,085 24

F, No. 3.

The means which have been employed on each vessel in ordinary to protect them from further decay, and the time supposed to be required for completing the protecting measures.

Boston.—The whole of the necessary materials have been procured at this yard, and the frames of the roofs of the Columbus and Independence, ships of the line, are in their places. Half of the roof and side hurdles of the latter ship are in their places, and the covering of this ship is probably completed ere this. Two-thirds of the hurdles of the roof and half the side hurdles for the Columbus are made, and her covering will probably be completed by the 25th current. The whole of the materials, except the iron, have been procured for covering the Constitution; the roof rafters are half framed, and the covering will be completed by the 5th of December.

New York.—The materials for covering the ship of the line Ohio and the frigate United States are now delivering, and their coverings will be completed in the coming month.

Philadelphia.—The only means which have been taken towards the preservation of the Cyane have been to keep her upper hatchways closed, to prevent the rain, &c., &c., getting into the ship, and occasionally giving the outside a coat of cheap paint.

Washington.—The frigate Potomac has not yet been covered; the materials for this work have been purchased, but, owing to the delay of the contractor in delivering timber, nothing has yet been done towards putting the roof on this ship. The commandant of the yard, however, remarks that the ship has sustained no damage at all for want of this covering, her decks and sides having been covered with a good coat of varnish and paint, and she is now receiving a coat of varnish for the winter. As soon as the timber is furnished her covering will be commenced.

Norfolk.—But little progress has been made at this yard in pursuance of the orders for building coverings over the ships in ordinary, owing entirely to the want of wood materials. A sufficient quantity, however, has now been received, so as to proceed with advantage. The roof of the Delaware is framed, and the whole of her covering can be completed in four or five weeks. The other ships can be covered in about six or eight weeks.

F, No. 4.

Table showing the amount of stores on hand at the respective navy yards, per survey of 1829.

 

Ports'th, N. H.

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Washington.

Norfolk.

Increase

$290,926 00

$399,133 40 1/2

$575,032 68

$299,117 80

$437,241 49

$253,927 99

Sloops

46,610 34

 

21,564 08

21,728 05

15,487 84 3/4

38,118 15

Repairs

36,171 65

347,127 58 1/4

811,523 83

87,310 85

194,726 85 1/2

232,006 86

Improvement

8,459 22

146,954 73

16,334 20

23,397 06

38,218 83

85,550 44 1/4

Provisions

 

12,565 60

11,166 17

170 25

156 25 1/4

8,448 56

Slops

 

986 43 3/4

 

 

 

12,867 75

 

$382,167 21

$906,767 75 1/2

$1,435,620 96

$431,724 01

$685,831 27 1/2

$598,609 75 1/4

RECAPITULATION.

Portsmouth

$382,167 21

Boston

906,767 75 1/2

New York

1,435,620 96

Philadelphia

431,724 01

Washington

685,831 27 1/2

Norfolk

598,609 75.1/4

 

$4,440,720 96 1/4

--771--

G, No. 1.

Extract of a letter from Commodore Elliott to the Secretary of the Navy, dated—

Pensacola, August 23, 1830.

On an examination of that part of the report of Master Commandant McCall, of this ship, and of Lieutenant Boerum, of the Erie, you will perceive that the experimental sails, manufactured of cotton, are in the full tide of successful operation; and I will here take occasion to suggest the propriety of having cotton for the wearing apparel of the seamen manufactured of the same materials, twilled, and dyed of a good indigo blue, for shirts, trowsers, and jackets. This cannot fail to be acceptable to them, and equally healthy in a climate which requires a better absorbent material than linen.

G, No. 2.

August 23, 1830.

Sir:

I have the honor to inform you that this ship has been now in commission twelve months, during which time she has been kept almost constantly at sea, and her sails, which are composed of cotton canvass, have been in constant use during that time, having stood the test of the north winds on the coast of Mexico, during the last winter, which are very severe, and often very violent; and during the rainy summer months, the squalls are frequently severe, but of short duration. They are, in a trifling manner, mildewed, and a little chafed.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. R. McCALL.

To Com. Jesse D. Elliott, commanding the United States West India squadron, West Indies, Gulf of Mexico.

G, No. 3.

Extract of a letter from Lieutenant Boerum to Commodore Elliott, dated—

August 23, 1830.

With regard to our cotton sails, I have to inform you, sir, that I am much pleased with them; and, so far as my experience may avail, I think they will stand every test. We found as little difficulty in managing them in heavy wet weather as the other sails; and that they hold wind better, nobody will deny.

H.

List of deaths in the navy of the United States, since December 1, 1829.

Name and rank.

Date.

Cause.

Place.

MASTERS COMMANDANT.

Otho Norris

September 10, 1829

Lost in the Hornet

Off Tampico.

Robert M. Rose

August 27, 1830

Enlargement brain

Pensacola.

LIEUTENANTS.

Henry D. Scott

February 16, 1830

 

Baltimore.

Daniel H. Mackey

September 10, 1829

Lost in the Hornet

Off Tampico.

Jesse Smith

do

do

do.

John L. Thomas

do

do

do.

John Hamilton

do

do

do.

Alexander M. Mull

July 19, 1830

 

New York.

William T. Temple

June 23, 1830

Yellow fever

At sea.

Cary H. Hansford

September 3, 1830

do

Pensacola.

Jona. W. Sherburne

November 20, 1830

 

Baltimore.

SURGEONS.

William Birchmore

September 10, 1829

Lost in the Hornet

Off Tampico.

Henry W. Bassett

August 20, 1830

Killed in a duel

Rio Janeiro.

ASSISTANT SURGEONS.

William Seal

December 18, 1829

 

Philadelphia.

John F. Whitehill

September 10, 1829

Lost in the Hornet

Off Tampico.

Jacob Jimeson

July 30, 1830

Brain fever

Mahon.

PURSERS.

Isaac Garretson

January 31, 1830

 

Baltimore.

Robert Pottenger

September 10, 1829

Lost in the Hornet

Off Tampico.

--772--

H.—List of deaths in the navy—Continued.

Name and rank.

Date.

Cause.

Place.

PASSED MIDSHIPMAN.

Edward Schermerhorn

September 10, 1829

Lost in the Hornet

Off Tampico.

MIDSHIPMEN.

H. J. Gaedicke

December 17, 1829

 

New York.

George Briard

December 15, 1829

Consumption

Portsmouth.

Lucius Miller

January 3, 1830

Cholera

Valparaiso.

Gust. R. A. Brooke

September 10, 1829

Lost in the Hornet

Off Tampico.

Charles A. Cannell

do

do

do.

James N. Forsyth

do

do

do.

Edwin Laub

do

do

do.

Riche R. Swift

do

do

do.

Richard L. Tilghman

do

do

do.

Samuel S. Washington

do

do

do.

Nelson E. Baker

June 22, 1830

Yellow fever

At sea.

Thomas Russell

August 28, 1830

do

Pensacola.

Wm. N. Peters

August 8, 1830

Consumption

Virginia Springs.

Alexander L. Dade

September 14, 1830

Drowned

Norfolk.

SAILINGMASTER.

Edward Barry

May 2, 1830

 

Washington.

BOATSWAIN.

Simon Jordan

June 10, 1830

Consumption

New York.

GUNNER.

John Burns

September 10, 1829

Lost in the Hornet

Off Tampico.

MARINE OFFICER.

Colonel William Anderson

June 13, 1830

 

Norfolk.

Navy Department, December 1, 1830.

I.

List of dismissions from the navy of the United States, since December 1, 1829.

Name and rank.

Date of dismission.

MASTER COMMANDANT.

John N. Clack

November 24, 1830.

LIEUTENANTS.

Edmund Byrne

March 31, 1830.

Hampton Westcott

March 31, 1830.

Charles Ellery

November 24, 1830.

PURSER.

William P. Zantzinger

March 31, 1830.

PASSED MIDSHIPMEN.

Charles H. Duryee

March 31, 1830.

Alexander Gibson

April 14, 1830.

MIDSHIPMEN.

Benjamin S. Slye

March 13, 1830.

Charles G. Hunter

March 31, 1830.

Edmund Burke

June 17, 1830.

Peter Johnson

July 26, 1830.

BOATSWAIN.

Edward Ingram

June 12, 1830.

CARPENTER.

George Peale

June 16, 1830.

MARINE OFFICER.

Lieutenant Colonel Richard Smith

February 23, 1830.

Navy Department, December 1, 1830.

--773--

K.

List of resignations in the navy of the United States, since December 1, 1829.

Name and rank.

Date of resignation.

PURSERS.

Gwin Harris

September 29, 1830.

John H. Carr

September 30, 1830.

CHAPLAIN.

Greenbury W. Ridgely

September 2, 1830.

MARINE OFFICERS.

Captain Richard T. Auchmuty

April 1, 1830.

Lieutenant Constantine Smith, (transferred to the army)

November 20, 1830.

MIDSHIPMEN.

Wm. C. G. Carrington

December 10, 1829.

Wm. H. R. Halsted

December 10. 1829.

Archibald Maclean

January 19, 1830.

Robert H. Colhoun

January 21, 1830.

Alexander H. Edwards

February 2, 1830.

Daniel L. Randolph

February 6, 1830.

Lawson C. Love

February 17, 1830.

Henry H. Watters

March 16, 1830.

Thomas J. Harris

March 27, 1830

James Heriot

March 20, 1830.

Edward Hoban

April 13, 1830.

A. H. Coleman

May 10, 1830.

Henry D. Maxwell

May 13, 1830.

Ezekiel Mulford

June 7, 1830.

Thomas Sands

June 17, 1830.

Ezra Read

June 28, 1830.

Sanford A. Street

July 7, 1830.

Jefferson Nailer

July 8, 1830.

Charles H. Roy

September 25, 1830.

Paul H. Trapier

September 28, 1830.

SAILMAKER.

William Mitchell

February 17, 1830.

Navy Department, December 1, 1830.

L.

General Estimate.—There will be required for the support of the navy, during the year 1831, the sum of $2,649,397.29, in addition to the unexpended balances that may remain on hand on the 1st of January, 1831:

For pay and subsistence of the officers of the navy, and pay of seamen

$1,278,694 03

For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishment of the several navy yards and stations

57,680 00

For provisions

173,463 00

For repairs of vessels in ordinary, and the wear and tear of vessels in commission

615,419 50

For medicines, surgical instruments, hospital stores, and other expenses on account of the sick

25,000 00

For improvement of navy yards, and for necessary repairs during the Year

244,140 76

For ordnance and ordnance stores. Under this head there will be no appropriation required, as there will be a balance on hand on the 1st January, 1831, sufficient to meet the demands of the year. For defraying expenses that may accrue during the year 1831 for the following purposes, viz:

--774--

For freight and transportation of materials and stores of every description; for wharfage and dockage, storage and rent; traveling expenses of officers, and transportation of seamen; house rent, chamber money, and fuel and candles to officers, other than those attached to navy yards and stations, and for officers in sick quarters where there is no hospital, and for funeral expenses; for commissions, clerk hire, and office rent, stationery and fuel, to navy agents; for premiums and incidental expenses of recruiting; for apprehending deserters; for compensation to judge advocates; for per diem allowances for persons attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, and for officers engaged in extra service beyond the limits of their stations; for printing and stationery of every description, and for books, maps, charts, and mathematical and nautical instruments, chronometers, models, and drawings; for purchase and repair of steam and fire engines, and for machinery; for purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, timber wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage; for cabin furniture of vessels in commission, and for furniture of officers' houses at navy yards; for taxes on navy yards and public property; for assistance rendered to vessels in distress; for incidental labor at navy yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; for coal and other fuel; for forges, foundries, and steam engines; for candles, oil, and fuel for vessels in commission and in ordinary; for repairs of magazines and powder houses; for preparing moulds for ships to be built, and for no other object or purpose whatever

$250,000 00

For contingent expenses for objects arising during the year 1831, not hereinbefore enumerated

5,000 00

 

$2,649,397 29

Estimate of the pay and subsistence of all persons in the navy, attached to vessels in commission, for the year 1831: part of first item of general estimate.

 

Frigates, 1st class.

Sloops, 1st class.

Schooners.

Total number.

Amount.

Captains

4

 

 

4

$10,640 00

Masters commandant

 

11

 

11

12,938 75

Lieutenants commandant

 

 

5

5

5,881 25

Lieutenants

24

44

15

83

80,095 00

Masters

4

11

 

15

9,937 50

Pursers

4

11

5

20

13,250 00

Surgeons of the fleet

4

 

 

4

8,045 00

Surgeons

 

 

 

11

13,303 24

Surgeons' mates

8

11

5

24

19,632 00

Chaplains

4

11

 

4

2,650 00

Midshipmen

96

132

20

248

56,544 00

Boatswains

4

11

 

15

4,968 75

Gunners

4

11

5

20

6,625 00

Carpenters

4

11

 

15

4,968 75

Sailmakers

4

11

 

15

4,968 75

Secretaries

4

 

 

4

4,000 00

Schoolmasters

4

11

 

15

5,868 75

Clerks

4

11

5

20

6 ,000 00

Boatswains' mates

12

22

10

44

10,032 00

Gunners' mates

8

11

 

19

4,332 00

Carpenters' mates

8

11

5

24

5,472 00

Sailmakers' mates

4

11

5

20

4,560 00

Quartermasters

36

55

20

111

23,976 00

Quartergunners

48

66

15

129

27,864 00

Yeomen

12

33

5

50

10,800 00

Captains' stewards

4

11

5

20

4,320 00

Captains' cooks

4

11

 

15

3,240 00

Coopers

4

11

 

15

3,240 00

Armorers

4

11

 

15

3,240 00

Armorers' mates

4

 

5

9

1,620 00

Masters-at-arms

4

11

 

15

3,240 00

Ships' corporals

8

 

 

8

1,344 00

Cooks

4

11

5

20

4,320 00

Masters of the band

4

 

 

4

864 00

Musicians, 1st class

16

 

 

16

2,304 00

Musicians, 2d class

12

 

 

12

1,440 00

Seamen

600

660

70

1,330

191,520 00

Ordinary seamen

480

330

35

845

101,400 00

Landsmen

200

220

15

535

41,760 00

Boys

108

132

25

265

19,080 00

 

1,760

1,914

280

3,954

$740,289 74

Fifty-four passed midshipmen, in addition to allowance as midshipmen, viz: $6 per month and one ration per day each

$8,815 50

 

Fifty-one midshipmen who may become entitled to be arranged as passed midshipmen after their examination, $6 per month and one ration per day each

8,325 75

17,141 25

 

$757,430 99

--775--

Estimate of pay for officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, and subsistence for the officers of the marine corps, for the year 1831.

PAY.

One lieutenant colonel commandant, at $75 per month

$900 00

 

Four lieutenant colonels, by brevet, at $60 per month

2,880 00

 

One paymaster, at $60 per month

720 00

 

One quartermaster, at $60 per month

720 00

 

Four captains, at $40 per month

1,920 00

 

Twenty-three first lieutenants, at $30 per month

8,280 00

 

Sixteen second lieutenants, at $25 per month

4,800 00

 

One surgeon, at $60 per month

720 00

 

One sergeant major, at $10 per month

120 00

 

One quartermaster's sergeant, at $10 per month

120 00

 

One drum major, at $9 per month

108 00

 

One fife major, at $9 per month

108 00

 

Seventy-one sergeants, at $9 per month

7,668 00

 

Seventy-three corporals, at $8 per month

7,008 00

 

Twenty drummers, at $7 per month

1,680 00

 

Twenty fifers, at $7 per month

1,680 00

 

Seven hundred and fifty privates, at $6 per month

54,000 00

 

Extra pay to the adjutant and inspector, at $30 per month

360 00

 

Pay for five clerks, viz: one for the lieutenant colonel commandant, one for the paymaster, one for the adjutant and inspector, and two for the quartermaster, at $20 per month for each

1,200 00

 

 

 

$94,992 00

SUBSISTENCE.

One lieutenant colonel commandant, 12 rations per day, is 4,380 rations, at 20 cents

$876 00

 

Four lieutenant colonels, by brevet, 5 rations per day, is 7,300 rations, at 20 cents

1,460 00

 

One paymaster, 4 rations per day, is 1,460 rations, at 20 cents

292 00

 

One quartermaster, 4 rations per day, is 1,460 rations, at 20 cents

292 00

 

Four captains, 3 rations per day, is 4,380 rations, at 20 cents

876 00

 

Twenty-three first lieutenants, 4 rations per day, is 33,580 rations, at 20 cents.

6,716 00

 

Sixteen second lieutenants, 3 rations per day, is 17,520 rations, at 20 cents

3,504 00

 

One surgeon, 4 rations per day, is 1.460 rations, at 25 cents

365 00

 

 

 

14,381 00

 

 

$109,373 00

Paymaster's Office, Marine Corps, Navy Department, October 6, 1830.

JO. L. KUHN, P. M. M. C.

Estimate for expenditures in the Quartermaster's department of the United States marine corps, for the year 1381.

SUBSISTENCE.

For 461 non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, and washerwomen, serving on shore, at one ration per day each, is 168,265 rations, at 12 cents per ration, is

$20,191 80

CLOTHING.

For 938 non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, at $30 each

$28,140 00

 

For one hundred watch coats, at $6.25 each

625 00

 

 

28,765 00

FUEL.

For the officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, and washerwomen, and for the public offices, hospital, and armory

9,098 00

CONTINGENCIES.

For traveling expenses of officers and transportation of men; freight of stores from one station to another, toll, ferriage, wharfage and cartage; expenses of recruiting; per diem allowance for attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, and for officers on extra duty; compensation to judge advocates; house rent and chamber money where there are no public quarters assigned; incidental labor in the Quartermaster's department; expense of burying deceased persons belonging to the marine corps; printing and stationery, postage on public letters, forage, expenses in pursuing deserters, keeping in repair the barracks at the different stations, straw for the men, barrack furniture, spades, axes, shovels, picks and carpenter tools

14,000 00

MILITARY STORES.

For the pay of armorers, keeping arms in repair, armorer's tools, musical instruments for a band, drums, fifes, flags, and ordnance stores

2,000

--776--

MEDICINES.

For medicines, hospital stores, and surgical instruments for the officers and marines serving on shore

82,369 71

Amount

$76,424 51

Respectfully submitted,

E. J. WEED, Quartermaster. Head-Quarters of the Marine Corps, Quartermaster's Office, Washington, October 5, 1830.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy for the year 1831.

Secretary of the Navy

$6,000

 

Six clerks, per act of 20th April, 1818

$8,200

 

One clerk, per act of 26th May, 1824

1,000

 

One clerk, per act of 2d March, 1827

1,000

 

 

 

10,200

Messenger and assistant messenger

1,050

 

Contingent expenses

*3,000

 

 

 

$20,250

Estimate of the sums necessary to meet the contingent expenses for the navy buildings, and grounds, &c., attached thereto.

Pay of superintendent

$250

Pay of two watchmen

600

Pay extra for watching on Sundays

52

Expense of five lamps and posts complete, and oil

114

Pay of laborers

252

Fuel for watchmen during the winter

20

Two new lightning rods, and repairing old ones

92

Improving grounds, planting trees, &c.

250

 

$1,630

Estimate of the pay and subsistence of all persons in the navy attached to vessels in commission for the year 1831, conformably with the provisions of the bill to reorganize the navy of the United States, which passed the Senate 15th May, 1830.

 

Frigates, 1st class.

Sloops, 1st class.

Schooners.

Total number.

Amount.

Captains

4

 

 

4

$16,000 00

Masters commandant

 

11

 

11

27,500 00

Lieutenants

24

44

20

88

94,695 00

Sailing-masters

4

11

1

15

10,487 50

Pursers

4

11

5

20

13,250 00

Surgeons of the fleet

4

 

 

4

8,045 00

Surgeons

 

11

 

11

13,308 24

Surgeons' mates

8

11

5

24

19,632 00

Chaplains

4

 

 

4

2,650 00

Boatswains

4

11

 

15

7,900 00

Gunners

4

11

5

20

9,556 25

Carpenters

4

11

 

15

7,900 00

Sailmakers

4

11

 

15

7,900 00

 

 

 

 

 

$238,823 99

Add for petty officers, seamen, ordinary seamen, landsmen and boys, as estimated in paper B

 

 

 

 

$542,380 75

 

$781,204 74

* $2,000 would have been sufficient for the year 1831, as there will be a balance of the appropriation for 1830, on the 1st January, 1831, of $1,000 unexpended, had there not been outstanding claims, contracted by the former administration, yet to be adjusted.

--777--

Estimate for the pay, rations, and all other allowances of officers and others, at the navy yards and stations, for the year 1831, conformably with the provisions of the bill passed the Senate May 15, 1830.

PORTSMOUTH.

Naval establishment

$12,821 50

 

Ordinary

3,492 75

 

Civil

4,400 00

 

 

 

$20,714 25

BOSTON.

Naval establishment

$15,585 75

 

Ordinary

19,178 75

 

Hospital

3,902 50

 

Civil

8,250 00

 

 

 

46,917 00

NEW YORK.

Naval establishment

$17,920 00

 

Ordinary

49,168 75

 

Hospital

3,902 50

 

Civil

8,250 00

 

 

 

49,251 25

PHILADELPHIA.

Naval establishment

$13,506 00

 

Ordinary

4,577 75

 

Hospital

4,029 75

 

Civil

6,150 00

 

 

 

28,263 50

WASHINGTON.

Naval establishment

$12,777 40

 

Ordinary

5,686 75

 

Hospital

3,600 00

 

Civil

12,650 00

 

 

 

34,714 25

NORFOLK.

Naval establishment

$17,560 00

 

Ordinary

19,178 75

 

Hospital

3,902 50

 

Civil

8,880 00

 

 

 

49,521 25

PENSACOLA.

Naval establishment

$13,249 75

 

Ordinary

3,269 50

 

Hospital

3,600 00

 

Civil

6,100 00

 

 

 

26,219 25

Baltimore station

 

5,739 75

Charleston station

 

5,739 75

Sackett's Harbor

 

1,141 75

 

 

$268,222 00

Naval constructor

 

3,000 00

 

 

$271,222 00

Recapitulation.

 

Naval.

Ordinary.

Hospital.

Civil.

Aggregate.

Portsmouth

$12,821 50

$3,492 75

 

$4,400 00

$20,714 25

Boston

15,585 75

19,178 75

$3,902 50

8,250 00

46,917 00

New York

17,920 00

19,178 75

3,902 50

8,250 00

49,251 25

Philadelphia

13,506 00

4,577 75

4,029 75

6,150 00

28,263 50

Washington

12,777 50

5,686 75

3,600 00

12,650 00

34,714 25

Norfolk

17,560 00

19,178 75

3,902 50

8,880 00

49,521 25

Pensacola

13,249 75

3,269 50

3,600 00

6,100 00

26,219 25

Baltimore

5,739 75

 

 

 

5,739 75

Charleston

5,739 75

 

 

 

5,739 75

Sackett's Harbor

1,141 75

 

 

 

1,141 75

Naval constructor

 

 

 

3,000 00

3,000 00

 

$116,041 75

$74,563 00

$22,937 25

$57,680 00

$271,222 00

--778--

Estimate for officers, &c., required for five receiving vessels, under the bill passed the Senate 15th May, 1830

$37,779 25

Estimate for officers, &c., required for five recruiting stations, under the bill passed the Senate 15th May, 1830

26,267 50

Estimate for ordnance service, under the bill passed the Senate 15th May, 1830

3,465 00

Estimate for commission and warrant officers waiting orders, under the bill passed the Senate 15th May, 1830

174,702 09

Estimate for provisions required for the navy, under the bill passed the Senate 15th May, 1830

173,463 00

Estimate for fifty-four passed midshipmen, in addition to allowance as midshipmen, viz: $6 per month and one ration per day each, under the bill passed the Senate 15th May, 1830

8,815 50

Estimate for repairs of vessels in ordinary, and for the wear and tear of vessels in commission

615,419 50

Estimate for medicines and surgical instruments, &c.

25,000 00

Estimate for rebuilding the frigate Macedonian

121,421 91

Estimate for improvements and repairs of navy yards

244,140 76

Estimate for contingent enumerated

250,000 00

Estimate for contingent not enumerated

5,000 00

Grand total

$2,737,901 25

Estimate of the pay, rations, and all other allowances of officers and others, at the navy yards and stations, for the year 1831.

PORTSMOUTH.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 15

Master commandant

1

60

5

$300

40

20

2

 

2,010 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,612 25

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Midshipmen

3

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

957 75

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

 

651 75

Gunner

1

20

1

 

12

9

 

 

651 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$14,199 00

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$965 00

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Able seamen

4

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

941 00

Ordinary seamen

6

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,267 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,492 75

Civil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,200 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

Clerk to commandant, to do duty as clerk to master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

500 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,500 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$4,400 00

Whole amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$22,091 75

Note.—House rent is estimated for officers only in cases where no house is furnished by the government.

--779--

Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

BOSTON.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

 

40

20

2

 

1,710 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

30

1

 

1,292 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Surgeon

1

60

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,412 25

Surgeon's mate

1

30

2

$145

16

14

3

1

950 75

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

250

12

9

 

1

1,141 75

Midshipmen

4

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,277 00

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

 

9

1

741 74

Gunner

1

20

2

 

12

 

9

1

651 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$16,663 23

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

100

8

 

 

 

 

 

$1,930 00

Lieutenants

3

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

2,895 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Midshipmen

6

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,915 50

Carpenter

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Carpenter's mates, as caulkers

3

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

957 75

Boatswain's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319. 25

Able seamen

14

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

3,293 50

Ordinary seamen

26

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

5,492 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$18,630 25

Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

200

20

1

 

$1,612 25

Surgeon's mate

1

30

2

145

145

14

 

1

950 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses

2

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Washers

2

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

374 50

Cook

1

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

235 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,902 50

Civil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,700 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

500 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

750 00

Clerk to commandant

1

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

480 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,300 00

Clerk to master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

420 00

Inspector and measurer of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$8,250 00

Whole amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$47,446 00

NEW YORK.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

$300

40

20

2

 

2,010 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,492 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,612 25

Surgeon's mate

1

30

2

145

16

14

 

1

950 75

--780--

Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Purser

1

$40

2

$200

20

12

1

 

$1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

250

12

9

 

1

1,141 75

Teacher of mathematics

1

40

2

90

12

9

 

1

981 75

Teacher of languages

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Midshipmen

4

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,277 00

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Gunner

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$19,297 50

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

100

8

 

 

 

 

 

$1,930 00

Lieutenants

3

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

2,895 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Midshipmen

6

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,915 50

Carpenter

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Carpenter's mates, as caulkers

3

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

957 75

Boatswain's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Able seamen

14

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

3,293 50

Ordinary seamen

26

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

5,492 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$18,630 25

Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

$1,612 25

Surgeon's mate

1

30

2

245

16

14

 

1

950 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses

2

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Washers

2

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

374 50

Cook

1

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

235 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,902 50

Civil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,700 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

500 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

480 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

750 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,300 00

Clerk to builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

420 00

Inspector and meas. of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$8,250 00

Whole amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$50,080 25

PHILADELPHIA.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

$600

65

30

3

 

$4,066 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

300

40

20

2

 

2,010 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,492 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Surgeon

1

70

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,732 25

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

250

12

9

 

1

1,141 75

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Gunner

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$15,483 50

--781--

Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Lieutenant

1

$50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$965 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Carpenter

1

20

2

$90

12

9

 

1

141 75

Able seamen

4

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

941 00

Ordinary seamen

6

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,267 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$4,577 75

Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

$1,612 25

Surgeon's mate

1

35

3

145

16

14

 

 

1,102 00

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses

2

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Washers

2

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

374 50

Cook

1

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

211 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$4,029 75

Civil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,200 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

750 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,000 00

Clerk to builder

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

Inspector and meas. of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

700 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$6,150 00

Whole amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$30,241 00

WASHINGTON.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

75

6

 

40

20

2

</