--125--

22d Congress.]

No. 477.

[1st Session.

REFUGE AFFORDED BY A VESSEL OF UNITED STATES TO THE VICE-PRESIDENT OF PERU AND GENERAL MILLER, DURING A REVOLUTION IN THAT COUNTRY, AND CLAIM OF CAPTAIN SLOAT GROWING OUT OF THE SAME.

COMMUNICATED TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES APRIL 4, 1832.

Washington, April 4, 1832. I transmit, herewith, to Congress, a report from the Secretary of State, showing the circumstances under which refuge was given on board of the United States ship St. Louis , Captain Sloat, to the Vice-President of the republic of Peru and to General Miller; and the expense thereby incurred by Captain Sloat, for the payment of which there is no fund applicable to the case.

I recommend to Congress that provision be made for this and similar cases that may occur in future.

ANDREW JACKSON.

Department of State, April 2, 1832.

Sir:

The annexed dispatch from the chargé d'affaires of the United States in Peru, and the papers accompanying it, detail the circumstances under which refuge was given on board of the United States ship St. Louis , Captain Sloat, to the Vice-President of the republic and to General Miller. The conduct of Captain Sloat had the sanction of our minister, gave no cause of offence to the prevailing party in Peru, and has since received the approbation of his own government; and he incurred an expense, on this and a similar occasion, amounting to one thousand and fifty dollars, for which he presented an account to the Secretary of the Navy, who having no fund applicable to the case, it was referred to this Department. Here the same objection occurs; although Captain Sloat's account ought, on every principle of justice, to be paid, yet there is no specific or general appropriation out of which, in strictness, the amount can be paid. I, therefore, respectfully suggest the propriety of recommending to Congress the making of provision for this and similar cases that may occur in future.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant, EDW. LIVINGSTON.

The President.

Extract of a letter from Mr. Samuel Larned, chargé d'affaires of the United States at Lima, to the Secretaryof State.

Lima, September 2, 1831.

Sir:

Annexed, I have the honor of transmitting copies (numbered from 1 to 1, inclusive,) of a correspondence between the minister of foreign relations of this government, Commodore Thompson, and myself, on the subject of an application from the former for the use of one of our public vessels to convey the Chilian mediator to Islay, in the prosecution of his mediatorial office between Peru and Bolivia. I have only to add, in this relation, that the service therein rendered to this government has been very gratefully felt by it.

A.

United States Ship St. Louis, Callao Roads, April 22, 1831.

Sir:

I have the honor to report that since your departure from this roadstead I have found it necessary, from the political state of the country, to remain constantly here.

On the night of the 16th instant a revolution took place at Lima, and an attempt to assassinate General La Fuente, the Vice-President of the republic of Peru, was made by about one hundred and fifty soldiers, which failed. He made a most miraculous escape, in his shirt only, from his bed, where he lay ill. Fortunately in firing at him on the roof of the house they shot their own officer, which produced a momentary consternation, during which they lost sight of him, and he reached a place of safety, where he remained until the next evening, when he succeeded in passing the gates, and reached the coast of Chorrillos, where he embarked in a canoe at 10 o'clock, and reached this ship at 5 A, M. of the 18th, when I received him on board, and have since afforded him protection against the mob, and provided him with clothes and all other comforts. As soon as circumstances would permit, I communicated with the chargé d'affaires of the United States, stating to him what I had done and what I proposed to do, all of which he has highly approved, as you will see by the enclosed copies of the correspondence, (marked Nos. 1 and 2) which will show you the conditions upon which I received him.

The principle upon which I have acted has been not to allow him to make use of the protection of our flag in any manner to disturb the tranquillity of the country. Therefore I have not permitted him to communicate with any person, except through the chargé d'affaires of the United States, who should see his communications, nor has he been allowed to receive any except through the same channel, which arrangement is perfectly agreeable to him. Indeed, he says he would prefer Mr. Larned to see and know all he does. In all other respects I have endeavored to treat him in a manner due to a person who has filled the elevated station he has, and so that I hope neither myself or my country will suffer in reputation for want of hospitality, I have also received on board General Miller, who embarked with a written permission from the head of authority, and is also still with me. I enclose you the note from him to me, and my reply, marked 3 and 4.

The St. Louis is ready for any service you may think proper to order her upon, provisioned for three

--126--

months, with the exception of some bread, which I would not purchase until your arrival, and a few trifles.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant, &c.,

JOHN D. SLOAT.

To Commodore Charles C. B. Thompson, commanding U. S. Naval Forces, Pacific.

No. 1.

United States Ship St. Louis , Callao Roads, April 18, 1831.

Sir:

I presume you are already informed that I have received on board this ship, at five o'clock this morning, the Vice-President of Peru, with a perfect understanding that I am only to afford him an asylum against the mob, but, if demanded by the regular government, to be delivered up; and that he should not have any communication with his partisans on shore or receive any from them.

He is now very desirous to place himself at the disposition of Congress, which is now in session, and wishes to present to them, through the minister of state, the enclosed communication; but as I do not feel myself competent to judge of the propriety of the course, being entirely without information from you of what is passing on shore, I have thought proper to enclose it to you, unsealed, that you may dispose of it as you think proper. I have also received. General Miller on board, with the written permission of the prefect of the department, who was very much astonished to find here the Vice-President.

I send this by Lieutenant Humphreys, and I enclose also an unsealed note from him, and shall expect to hear from you by his return.

Most respectfully, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, &c.,

JOHN D. SLOAT.

To Samuel Larned, Esq., Chargé d'Affaires of the United States, Lima.

No. 2.

Legation of the United States, Lima, April 19, 1831.

Sir:

I have just received your note of yesterday's date, by Lieutenant Humphreys, informing me of your having afforded an asylum to the Vice-President of the republic on board the ship under your command. Under the circumstances of the case, you were undoubtedly justifiable in admitting him on board; indeed, in so doing you acted only in conformity to the sacred dictates of humanity. Your determination not to deliver him up, except at the demand of the regular government, is also perfectly correct, and in accordance as well with the principles of strict and universal justice as with those professed and practiced by our own government.

The Vice-President is not a criminal; certainly not in the sense in which we understand the term, for he has not yet been tried, much less found guilty. He is, then, to be considered as a persecuted magistrate, seeking safety from military violence under the neutral and protecting flag of the United States.

It is difficult at this moment to say to what authority you would be justifiable in giving him up as to a regular government. A few days will doubtless enable us to judge more accurately and advisedly on this subject. In the meantime, I am assured by the minister of state, on whom I waited this morning, immediately after the receipt of your note, that the present government have no intention of demanding him, and are well pleased at his having found protection on board your ship. Should an unexpected change in the administration produce a different determination on the part of the new government, it will be time, when this is properly signified, to consider of the propriety of complying with the demand; and on this subject I beg leave to be consulted before you act.

There could be no impropriety in permitting General La Fuente to communicate with the Congress of Peru, now in session, through the minister of state, who has been continued in office by the new chief magistrate, Mr. Reyes; such a course is necessary to his justification. I have accordingly presented to the minister the note directed to him by the Vice-President, and transmitted by you to me open for my perusal. It contained nothing whatever of an improper nature or tendency.

As Mr. Walker and Dr. Smith left here after the late movement was over, and would be able to inform you on the subject, and as nothing occurred to make any official communication thereon necessary, I forbore to address you in relation thereon.

With respect to your having received on board General Miller, as he came with the written permission of the prefect of this department, there was no impropriety in your doing so, nor will there be in your permitting him to remain there, unless regularly demanded. The open note from him came safe to hand.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL LARNED.

John D. Sloat, commanding the U. S. Ship-of-War St. Louis.

No. 3.

Callao, April 18, 1831.

Dear Sir:

There has been a change of government at Lima, and the new authorities have, at my request, given permission for me to remain on board a neutral vessel until affairs on shore shall be more decidedly settled.

In casting my eyes over the bay, I see no pendant I should feel so happy to place myself under as that of your vessel, nor do I know any person afloat that I would so willingly lay myself under such an obligation as yourself. If, therefore, my dear sir, you could, without inconvenience, receive me and one servant, for a few days, I need not say how obliged. I should feel.

I am, dear sir, very faithfully, yours,

WM. MILLER.

Captain Sloat, Commander of the U. S. Ship St. Louis.

--127--

No. 4.

U. S. Ship St. Louis , Callao Roads, April 18, 1831.

My Dear Sir:

I have this moment received your note of this date. I will, with great pleasure, receive you on board the St. Louis , and divide with you such accommodation as I have, provided it is agreeable to the authorities of the country.

Very truly, your obedient servant,

JOHN D. SLOAT.

To General William Miller, Callao.

B.

U. S. Ship Guerriere , Callao Roads, April 23, 1831.

Sir:

Soon after my arrival, on the evening before last, I received communications from Captain Sloat, informing me of the events, in the shape of a revolution, which had occurred at Lima on the night of the 16th instant, and of his having received, on the morning of the 18th, General La Fuente, the late Vice-President of Peru, who had been assaulted on the evening of the former day, in his house, by a party of one hundred and fifty soldiers, who attempted his life on the occasion; and from whom, having escaped, he sought an asylum on board the St. Louis . I was likewise apprised of the very proper stipulations and conditions upon which General La Fuente received protection under our flag, namely, that asylum should be afforded him only against the fury of the mob, and that he should be delivered, if demanded by the regular government; further, that he should not have any communication with his partisans on shore, or receive any from them.

I highly appreciate the motives which influenced Captain Sloat to afford protection to the general under the circumstances recited, and commend his conduct as honorable, benevolent and discreet in all its parts.

There are other considerations, however, that now present themselves for the government of my conduct; and, as that conduct may form hereafter the subject of the strictest scrutiny and animadversion, both of my own government and of the world, and may deeply involve not only principles of humanity and justice, but doctrines likewise of international law, and neutral rights and wrongs, I take the liberty to present them to your reflection, and to ask the free communication of your opinion on the subject.

Having bestowed on this matter the reflection which the case certainly deserves, I am convinced that, however properly the protection of our flag was offered to General Fuente at the time, and under the circumstances of his reception on board the St. Louis , his continuance on board that ship, or any other vessel of the United States within the jurisdiction of Peru, after the existence of the government de facto, will be regarded by the actual authorities as an act highly obnoxious and offensive in its nature; as tending to keep up or to aggravate the ferment of the public mind; to cause apprehensions of some ulterior movements on the part of General La Fuente or his friends, with the countenance and implied aid of the squadron under my orders; and that it will thence lead to remonstrances, demands, and discussions, which it is evidently my duty, and certainly my inclination, to prevent and to avoid. The continuance of the general, moreover, under the protection of the power subject to my control, even out of the territory of Peru, may, and will, evidently be construed into an abetting of his plans, or a furtherance (no matter how remotely) of his cause; and as I am certain of the great impropriety of affording, by my conduct, any ground for the imputation of having the least participation or instrumentality as an accessory, either before or after the fact, in any operations that may have commenced, or may hereafter ensue, I have determined to advise that he seek an asylum out of this country. I can, therefore, neither continue to afford him protection in the squadron under my orders, or suffer him to land at any point of Peru, contrary to the properly signified wish of the government.

I think you will allow that too much circumspection cannot be used on this occasion; and I hope you will favor me with the unreserved expression of your sentiments.

I need scarcely add that the probable movements of the squadron will hardly be compatible with General La Fuente's purposes; and that his presence on board would certainly be inconsistent with the duties it may be called to perform on various points of this coast.

I have the honor to be, sir, your very obedient servant,

CHS. C. B. THOMPSON, Commodore, &c., &c.

To Samuel Larned, Esq., Chargé d'Affaires of the United States, Lima.

C.

Legation of the United States, Lima, April 24, 1831.

Sir:

I have had the honor to receive your note of yesterday's date, on the subject of the asylum afforded to General La Fuente on board the St. Louis .

The necessity of seeing the acting President of Peru, on this subject, this morning, and other indispensable occupations, have prevented me from addressing you so fully, in reply to your note, as I could have wished; although this circumstance is rendered the less important by the complete accordance of your views with mine in this particular.

The asylum afforded to General La Fuente was, no doubt, understood to be temporary; a protection from the momentary effects of military insubordination and violence, and not as a convenient place of protracted residence, whence to prosecute, with safety, his cause with the existing government of this country. Aware of this, I had anticipated your note, by addressing General La Fuente, yesterday morning, on the subject of his future movements, insinuating the propriety of his coming to a resolution in the matter as speedily as possible, and informing him that the acting President had privately and unoffici-

--128--

ally requested me to use my interest to induce him to depart, within a couple days, from the port of Callao.

To this, General La Fuente has replied to me "that his official demands to the Congress have not been taken notice of," and that "the supreme chief of Peru, atrociously assailed by a military mutiny, cannot leave the country as a runaway nor as a criminal;" that his "desire to vindicate himself, and show to the world that he has not been a perverse magistrate, will prolong his stay on board;" that he "cannot forget he has children, whose only patrimony will be the honor of their father," &c.

All this is, no doubt, very well for General La Fuente, but is foreign to the purpose; and without the consent of this government, the protraction of his residence on board, as announced, cannot, I am of opinion, be permitted. It therefore only remains to devise the best and most speedy mode of effecting the desired object, consistent with humanity, and the decorum and propriety demanded by the circumstances of the case.

In my interview with Mr. Reyes, the acting President, I stated distinctly the terms on which the asylum was granted to General La Fuente, and the desire entertained for his early departure, and suggested to him a course calculated to produce this result, and conciliate the views and interests of all parties. He engaged to submit my suggestions to his advisers, and inform me of the result. The disposition of Mr. Reyes towards General La Fuente is the most friendly, and he again assured me of the satisfaction he felt at the general's having found safety on board of the St. Louis .

I will give you the earliest advice of the determination of this government in the premises, and, upon its receipt, you will be able to come to some resolution therein. In the meantime, I perceive no necessity for further measures in the matter, particularly as the government of Peru has, as yet, taken no steps in the business; at least, I have no official notice of any. It would give me great pleasure to confer with you, personally, on this subject, as it would very much facilitate the mutual communication of our ideas in relation thereto; but the necessity of frequently seeing the authorities here on the business precludes me from going down.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient and humble servant,

SAMUEL LARNED.

To Com. Chas. C. B. Thompson, commanding the U. S. Naval Forces in the Pacific Ocean, Callao Roads.

D.

U. S. Ship Guerriere , Callao Roads, April 25, 1831.

Sir:

I have received your communication of the 22d instant, informing me of the events, in the shape of a revolution, which occurred in Lima, on the 16th of this month, and of your having received, on the morning of the 18th, General La Fuente, late Vice-President of Peru, and who had been assailed in his house, on the evening of the former day, by a party of one hundred and fifty soldiers, who attempted his life on that occasion; and from whom, having escaped, he sought an asylum on board the St. Louis . I am, likewise, apprised of the very proper stipulations and conditions upon which General La Fuente received protection under our flag, namely, that asylum should be afforded him only against the fury of the mob, and that he should be delivered, if demanded by the regular government; further, that he should not have any communication with his partisans on shore, or receive any from them.

I highly appreciate the motives which influenced you to afford protection to the general under the circumstances recited, and commend your conduct as honorable, benevolent, and discreet, in all its parts.

There are other considerations, however, that now present themselves for the government of my conduct; and as that conduct may form hereafter the subject of the strictest scrutiny and animadversion, both of my own government and of the world, and may deeply involve, not only principles of humanity and justice, but doctrines, likewise, of international law and neutral rights and wrongs, I deem it proper to communicate my views to you for reasons that will appear in the sequel.

Having bestowed on this matter the serious reflection which the case certainly deserves, I am convinced that, however properly the protection of our flag was afforded to General La Fuente at the lime, and under the circumstances of his reception on board the St. Louis , his continuance on board that ship, or any other vessel of the United States within the jurisdiction of Peru, after the existence of the government de facto, will be regarded by the actual authorities as a measure highly obnoxious and offensive in its nature; as tending to keep up or to aggravate the ferment of the public mind; and to cause apprehensions of some ulterior movements on the part of General La Fuente or his friends, with the countenance and implied aid of the squadron under my orders; and that it will thence lead to remonstrances, demands, and discussions, which it is evidently my duty, and certainly my inclination, to prevent and avoid. The continuance of the general, moreover, under the protection of the power subject to my control, even out of the territory of Peru, may, and will, certainly be construed into an abetting of his plans, or a furtherance (no matter how remotely) of his cause; and as I am certain of the great impropriety of affording, by my conduct, any ground for the imputation of having the least participation or instrumentality as an accessory, either before or after the fact, in any operations that may have commenced, or may hereafter ensue, I have determined to advise, and you are directed to communicate this determination to General La Fuente, that he seek another asylum; for I deem it improper either to continue to afford him protection in the squadron under my orders, or to authorize his being landed at any point in Peru, contrary to the properly signified wishes of the government.

I need scarcely add, that the probable movements of the squadron will hardly be compatible with General La Fuente's purposes, and that his presence on board would certainly be inconsistent with the duties it may be called to perform on various points of this coast.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

CHARLES C. B. THOMPSON, Commodore, &c., &c.

To Captain John D. Sloat, commanding U. S. Ship St. Louis, Callao Roads.

* In order to avoid the least incongruity in the opinions expressed to Mr. Larned and those communicated to Captain Sloat for his guidance, a conformity, as nearly verbal as the case would admit, has been preserved in the correspondence with both of those persons.

--129--

No. 1.

[Private.]

Lima, August 17, 1831.

My Dear Sir:

I write you to-day on the subject of an application made to me, by the President of this country, for the use of one of your vessels to convey Mr. Zanarte, the Chilian mediator, to Islay. The President called on me last evening, as he stated, expressly for this purpose. I told him that I would write you on the subject; that I did not know whether it would be possible for you to send off, at such snort warning, either of them, except, perhaps, the Dolphin, as you were daily expecting the relief ships. He said that she would doubtless answer the purpose. But I am of opinion that if the St. Louis could be got ready, and it were possible to dispose of her for the voyage, she would unquestionably be the most proper and desirable vessel for the object. Mr. Reyes, the President, told me that he intended to address me a note on the subject, which, as well as the replies, he would order to be published, accompanied by some observations making just and honorable mention of the disposition manifested by you, on this and other occasions, to subserve the interests of Peru, as well as those of commerce and humanity; and that he preferred asking a favor of this kind of us to going either to the French or English, who had made frequent proffers of service to the government.

Believe me to be yours, very truly,

SAM'L LARNED.

Commodore Thompson, Sc., Sc., Sc.

P. S.—I have, since writing the above, received the note mentioned, but have not time to copy it; it is as promised.

S. L.

No. 2.

Legation of the Unitied States, Lima, August 17, 1831.

Sir:

I last evening had the honor of a personal visit from the acting President of Peru, for the purpose of soliciting the use of one of our vessels-of-war to convey the Chilian minister to Islay.

You are aware that the government of Chili, yielding to the request of that of Bolivia, some time ago took upon itself the office of mediator between the latter country and Peru, and empowered its representative here to undertake, with the previous acquiescence of this government, an adjustment of the pending difficulties. Both governments have accepted the mediation; and the Chilian plenipotentiary is accordingly about to proceed to the place designated for the mutual conferences. At this moment, as the President informed me, the government of Peru has no public vessel, disposable and fit for service, in Callao; and would feel very grateful for the use of one of ours for the object mentioned, as it is extremely desirable that the mediator should bo on the spot at as early a moment as possible.

The President informed me there is every prospect that the mediation will be attended with the happiest results; and that peace will consequently be preserved between the two States. The wish to contribute to this desirable result, the conservation of peace, as well between ourselves and other nations, as between these respectively, (more especially those of this continent,) being one of the most cherished objects of our policy, stimulated me at once to accede to the President's request, so far as to engage to address you on the subject, and to recommend that you would place one of the vessels under your command at his disposal for the end indicated; and I feel every assurance that a similar disposition on your part will induce you readily to confirm and ratify my conditional engagements to the President in this particular.

It is highly important, as mentioned, that the vessel should be ready to depart forthwith; as, I understand, the Chilian mediator only waits an opportunity for embarking to proceed on his mission of peace. Under these circumstances, I beg to hear from you, in reply, as early as your convenience may permit. I have the honor to be, with the highest respect, your obedient and humble servant,

SAM'L LARNED.

To Commodore Chas. C. B. Thompson, commanding the U. S. Naval Forces in the Pacific Ocean.

No. 3.

United States Ship Guerriere , Callao Roads, August 19, 1831.

Sir:

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 17th instant, delivered late last evening, advising me that the President of the republic of Peru had requested, through you, that one of the vessels of the squadron under my orders might be placed at his disposal, to carry to Islay the mediatorial minister appointed by Chili to undertake the reconciliation of the existing difficulties between Bolivia and Peru.

Impressed with a due sense of the importance of the projected mediation, I regret that a previously and indispensably determined destination prevents me from offering either the Guerriere or the St. Louis for that object; I still further regret that the Dolphin , on account of the unavoidable engagement of her commander as a member of a court-martial, cannot be so disposed of until Tuesday morning; but, at that time, it will afford me great pleasure to fulfill the wishes, in this respect, of the government of Peru.

I have the honor to be, sir, your very obedient servant,

CHS. C. B. THOMPSON, Commodore, Sc., Sc.

To Samuel Larned, Esq., Chargé d'Affaires of the United States, Lima.

--130--

No. 4.

U. S. Ship Guerriere , Callao Roads, August 22, 1831.

Sir:

Having as yet received no answer to my letter addressed to you on the 19th inst., and delivered on the afternoon of the same day, informing you that, according to the request of the President of this republic, communicated through you, the Dolphin would be placed at the disposition of the government, on a certain day, for the purpose of conveying to Islay the mediator between Bolivia and Peru; and having, since addressing you, understood from good authority that, pending the interval between the application made to me and my answer, a similar request had been made to the senior officer of the British squadron in these roads, I am induced, by considerations respecting the observance of a proper courtesy, due at least on the part of Peru, as well as by others, affecting the appropriation of the vessels under my orders, to ask a reply from you as early as it may suit your convenience to make one.

I have the honor to be, sir, your very obedient servant,

CHS. C. B. THOMPSON, Commodore, &c., &c.

To Samuel Larned, Esq., Chargé d'Affaires United States, Lima.

No. 5.

Legation of the United States, Lima, August 23, 1831.

Sir:

I had the honor to receive last evening your note of yesterday's date, and, in reply, have to observe that, immediately on the receipt of your communication of the 19th inst., I informed the minister of foreign relations of this government of your accession to its request in relation to the Dolphin ; and I was not aware, until the receipt of your first-cited note, that any further reply from me was necessary, or expected by you, more particularly as I had nothing new to communicate on the subject, not having (even yet) received anything from the minister touching my last note to him.

With respect to the application stated to have been made by this government to the senior officer of the British squadron, your note gave me the first intimation of the existence of such a report. I am now, however, able to assure you, from satisfactory authority, that the government of Peru has made no such application, and has, from the moment of receiving my note of the 19th, consequent upon yours of the same date, proposed to avail itself of your offer; this I learn from Mr. Zanarte, to whom the minister passed a note to this effect yesterday morning.

That some doubt has existed on the part of the government whether the Dolphin would be placed at its disposition or not, is certain, and arose, very naturally, from the accidental delay that occurred in replying to its request, and the unsatisfactory nature of a private note, (see copy A, annexed) addressed by me to the minister, on the morning of the 19th, consequent upon yours of a like description and date (copy B) to me, in which I gave him your identical words, certainly of a tenor by no means positive, and which I deemed it proper to address him in order to account for the delay that had occurred, and prepare him for any result that might take place.

It seems that on Saturday morning, Mr. Solar, a friend of Mr. Zanarte, (I have it from the person himself) called on the President to inquire whether any vessel had been yet procured. Mr. Reyes, the President, replied by showing them my private note to the minister, of that morning, alluded to. This person had occasion afterwards to see Mr. Kendall, a British merchant resident here, to whom, in reply to some inquiries on the subject, he stated the uncertainty that existed in relation to this matter. Mr. Kendall, it appears, visited Callao that day, and saw Captain Waldegrave of the Seringaptam, just then arrived, and whom he acquainted with the state of the affair. Captain Waldegrave immediately observed that either of the British corvettes, then in the harbor, would be at the disposition of Mr. Zanarte for the object proposed. On the return of this gentleman to Lima, he gave this information to Mr. Solar, who hastened with it to Mr. Reyes. In the meantime, intelligence of my official communication to the minister, of the 19th, (sent in on the morning of the 20th,) had reached Mr. Reyes, who immediately replied to Mr. Solar that Captain Waldegrave's offer could not be accepted, inasmuch as the Dolphin had been obtained for the service.

You will, therefore, perceive that the government has had nothing to do in relation to the supposed request to Captain Waldegrave.

I give you this detailed information for your satisfaction; and

Have the honor to be, with great respect, your very obedient servant,

SAMUEL LARNED.

To Com. Chs. C. B. Thompson, commanding the U. S. Naval Forces in the Pacific.

P. S.—Mr. Zanarte informs me that he shall be ready to go on board on Saturday next.

Yours,

S. L.

A.

[Particular.]

Lima, 19 de Agosto de 1831.

Mi Estimado Amigo Y Senor:

Acabo de saber, del como doro, que mi nota, con siguiente a la del ministerio del 11. No llego a sus manos haste anoche, y aqui, por haberse cruzado en el camino con el ordinanza que la llevo; quien estubo detenido, por el Senor Alar con, hasta cerca de las tres y media de aquel dia. Me dice el Comodoro, que la fragata- Guerrera y la corbeta Sn Louis, se estan alistando con todo presteza, para emprender su viage a los Estados Unidos, y que el Comandante de la goleta Dolphin es actualmente, uno de los miembros de unconsejo deguerra, ocupado en juzgar a unos delincuentes; pero

--131--

cree que, que este podra concluir sus tareas mafiana, en cuyo caso, si el barco puede estar despachado (sobre todo lo que me contestant oficialmente, sin perdida de tiempo, pues, con este objeto, baja hoy al Callao) tendrd mucho gusto en ponerla a disposicion del Gobierno, para el fin indicado. De todo esto, le instruiza de oficio, en el momento que tenga contestacion terminante del Comodoro, en el entretanto, me subscribo,

Su atento servidor y amigo Q. S. M. B.,

SAMUEL LARNED.

Senor D. Matias Leon, &c., &c., &c.

B.

[Private.]

August 19, 1831.

My Dear Sir:

It was only last night that I received your communication of the 17th instant, with your private note of the same day. I now hasten to inform you that the Guerriere and the St. Louis are in active preparation to sail immediately for the United States, and that the commander of the Dolphin is, at this time, a member of a court-martial, which, however, may be finished to-morrow. If that should be the case, and the Dolphin can possibly be dispatched, I beg you to assure the President that it will give me pleasure to place that vessel at his disposition for the object recited in your letter. Of all this I will give you information very soon.

In great haste, yours truly, CHAS. C. B. THOMPSON.

To Saml. Larned, Esq., &c., &c.

No. 6.

Legation op the United States, Lima, August 23, 1831.

Sir:

After having written my official communication of the 17th instant, I received from the minister of foreign relations a note on the same subject, of which, as honorable mention is therein made of your services to this government on repeated occasions, I do myself the pleasure of transmitting to you a copy, which you will find annexed.

Flattering mention has also been made of you in the government paper of yesterday, of which I likewise do myself the honor to enclose you an exemplar.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient and humble servant,

SAM'L LARNED.

To Commodore Chas. C. B. Thompson,

Commanding the United States Naval Forces in the Pacific, Callao Roads.

C.

Ministerio de Eslado del Despacho de Belaciones Exteriores.

Republica Peruana, Casa del Supremo Gobierno, En Lima, a 17 de Agosto de 1831.

Senor:

Habiendo sido ratificado por el Gobierno de Bolivia la mediacion que solicito del de Chile; y estando accordadas ya las bases sobre quedebenentablarselas negociaciones; el Gobierno del infraescrito tiene el sentimiento de ver retarder sn apertura por carecer de un buque de guerra que conduzca a Islay al Seiior Ministro de la Potencia Mediadora. En este conflicto, ha ordenado al que suscribe, dirijirse al sus Encargado de Negocios de los Estados Unidos para que sirva interponer el influjo que le de su representacion, con el coniandante de las fuerzas navales estacionadas actualmente en el puerto del Callao, a fin de que traslade al puerto mencionado al Seiior Ministro; y anadir este importantisimo servicio a los muy sefialados que en diferentes ocasiones ha dispensado generosamente al Gobierno del Peru.

El infraescrito aprovecha con la mayor satisfaccion, la primera oportunidad que se le ofrece de saludar respectuosamente al los Encargado de Negocios de los Estados Unidos; y de protestarle la alta consideracion con que es.

Su muy atento obsecuente servidor,

MATIAS LEON.

Senor Encargado de Negocios, de los Estados Unidos de N. A.

Extract from the " El Conciliador."

Se anuncia como mui proximi la salida de la legacion de Chile, en cuyos buenos oficios confian todos los amigos de la paz. No habiendo en la actualidad buque alguno de la escuadra nacional en el Callao, la bandera de los Estados Unidos tendrd. la gloria do contribuir al resultado que todos deseamos. El ajente diplomatico de aquella republica cerca de neustrol Gobierno, y el comodoro de su estacion en estos mares, han facilitado un buque de los que la componen, para transportar al mediador; condescen-dencia en alto grado honorifica a los nobles sentimientos de los Senores Larned y Thompson, y propia de los empleados de aquella gran republica, tan interesada en que la causa de la libertad no se contamine en America con la sangre de los libres.

--132--

No. 7.

Legation of the United States, Lima, August 24, 1831.

Sir:

Subsequently to addressing you, yesterday, in reply to your communication of the 22d instant, I received a note from the minister of foreign relations, formally accepting the offer made by you of the Dolphin , for the purpose of conveying the Chilian mediator to Islay; and informing me that he would be ready to proceed on his voyage on Saturday next.

The minister, in conclusion, requests permission to embark on board of the Dolphin a few stores, for the use of Mr. Zanarte and his suite; and, as he expresses it, purely as a testimony of consideration for him—on which point I should be glad to hear from you previous to replying to the minister.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient and very humble servant,

SAM'L LARNED.

To Com. Charles C. B. Thompson, commanding the U. S. Naval Forces in the Pacific.

No. 8.

Lima, August 24, 1831.

Sir:

I have just had the honor to receive your letter of this day, apprising me that the minister of foreign relations of Peru had formally accepted the offer made of the Dolphin to convey the Chilian mediator to Islay; and of his intention to proceed on the passage on Saturday. This arrangement is perfectly agreeable both to me and to the commander of the Dolphin .

In reply to that part of your letter which relates to the embarkation of stores, I beg leave to say that not the least objection will be made to any preparation, for the convenience and comfort of the minister and his suite, which he may deem advisable.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

CHARLES C. B. THOMPSON, Commodore, &c., &c.

To Samuel Larned, Esq., Charge' d'Affaires of the United States, Lima.

No. 9.

U. S. Ship Guerriere , Callao Roads, August 27, 1831.

Sir:

You will please to proceed in the Dolphin to Islay, with the mediatorial minister appointed by the government of Chili to undertake the reconciliation of the differences existing between the republics of Bolivia and Peru; and return with convenient dispatch to these roads, where you will either meet the Guerriere , or receive instructions for your future government.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

CHARLES C. B. THOMPSON, Commodore, &c., &c.

To Lieutenant Commandant Andrew Fitzhugh, commanding U. S. Schooner Dolphin.

Washington, March 29, 1832.

Sir:

I have the honor to hand you an account for expenses incurred in entertaining distinguished foreign officers during my late cruise in the United States ship St. Louis , in the Pacific ocean, which the Hon. Secretary of the Navy does not feel himself authorized to pay out of any funds appropriated for the naval service; and he is of opinion that they should be reimbursed from the appropriation for contingencies for foreign intercourse.

The circumstances relating to the first charge are: Columbia and Peru being at war, Guayaquil (the principal port of Columbia on the shores of the Pacific) fell into the hands of Peru. General Bolivar marched from the interior with a large force to retake it; there being a large amount of American property deposited there, I was ordered by Commodore Thompson to that place for its protection, during the struggle, which object was completely effected. After General Bolivar had again got possession of the place, he expressed to the consul of the United States a desire, in behalf of himself and his officers, to visit the St. Louis . I accordingly appointed a time, and received them in appropriate style.

The second item is for entertaining, for nearly a month, Lieutenant General La Fuente, President of Peru, and Major General Miller, of the Peruvian army, who made their escape from assassination at the time of the revolution in Peru, in 1831, and took refuge on board the St. Louis , then at anchor in the Bay of Callao. At the time, it was thought affairs would be reconciled in a few days, and that the President would return to the administration of the government. Therefore, it was thought by the chargé d'affaires of the United States, and all respectable Americans at Lima, to be politic to cultivate his good will, as a very great amount of American property was there at that time; and, particularly, as his difficulties had arisen principally because he would not prohibit the introduction of American flour, a large quantity of which was then afloat in the harbor. I considered myself bound to entertain these distinguished chiefs in an appropriate style, both for the honor and interest of my country, as well as from the instructions I had received from my government; and, therefore, think it cannot reasonably be expected that an officer receiving the small pay that those of my grade do, can afford to incur such heavy expenses for objects in which they have no other interest than the general good of the nation.

The President of the United States and the Secretary of the Navy have both expressed to me their decided opinion that I should be reimbursed these expenses, in which I hope and trust you will concur.

I also enclose you two letters from the Secretary of the Navy, and a report to him from the Fourth Auditor; also, my account submitted to that Department. The object of handing you that account is,

--133--

that you may see the certificate appended, from Commodore Thompson, approving the disbursement, and, also, that from the Fourth Auditor, showing that I have not received any compensation from the Navy Department, although many others have for similar expenses.

I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient, humble servant,

JOHN D. SLOAT.

To the Hon. Edward Livingston, Secretary of State, Washington.

The United States, State Department,

To J. D. Sloat,

Dr.

1829.

July 10. To expenses of entertaining Gen. Bolivar, Gen. Flores, and other officers of theColombian army, on board the United States ship St. Louis , at Guayaquil

$100 00

1831.

To expenses incurred on board the United States ship St. Louis, in Callao Bay, in entertaining Lieutenant General La Fuente,
President of Peru, and Major General Miller, of the Peruvian army, and their friends, after the revolution in Peru, in 1831, they having taken refuge on board for nearly a month

960 00

$1,060 00