--350--

23d Congress.]

No. 519.

[1st Session.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, SHOWING THE CONDITION OF THE  NAVY IN 1833.

COMMUNICATED TO CONGRESS, WITH THE MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT, DECEMBER 3, 1833.

Navy Department, November 30, 1833.

To the President of the United States:

Sir: In submitting to your consideration a review of the operations of the naval branch of the public service during the past year, I would first invite attention to its administration in this place.

The separate organization of the Navy Department, in the manner originally established by Congress, and the change since made by the addition of a Navy Board, have, with the several clerks now allowed, furnished a sufficient number of persons for the suitable discharge of all ordinary duties immediately connected with this office. So far as my knowledge extends, those duties have generally been performed with promptitude and accuracy; but some changes in the present laws respecting them would probably prove beneficial. Though the number of clerks, and the aggregate amount of salary paid to them, are deemed sufficient, yet more substantial justice could be enforced if that amount was so appropriated as to permit the Department to divide it in conformity to the usefulness of their respective services. It has happened that some of them receiving large salaries perform no greater or more difficult duties than those receiving less pay, and no power exists here to equalize their compensation, except by an occasional transfer of duties, not always convenient, appropriate, or useful.

--351--

A different arrangement of the Navy Board has, for a few years, been a subject of consideration by Congress. The board itself, and the head of this Department, once united in recommending such a change as to apportion its ordinary business among the several members, with a view to greater convenience, dispatch, and responsibility. This could be accomplished without any material increase of expense, and it seems, on many accounts, very desirable. The reasons for the change have been so fully detailed in former reports as not to need at this time further explanation.

There might be some useful operations connected with the administration of the naval branch of the service in the office of the Fourth Auditor, whose duties, though nominally belonging to the Treasury Department, are intimately allied with, and very essential in most of the operations of the navy. The great amount of property which is in charge of this Department, and which is yearly increasing, seems to require that a regular account of it should be opened in that office, and kept in such manner as to ensure safety and responsibility. In another particular, improvement could be made. The old balances on his books, due from defaulters who were once in the naval service, are large, and though few such balances have occurred lately, yet the collection of all of them would doubtless be promoted if it were devolved upon him as the person who, from his official station, is best acquainted with the situation of the claims, and the means of payment possessed by the debtors, and who could act with the most promptitude in securing the public.

Auxiliary to the central administration of the naval service, the inspection of our ordnance was a few years since assigned to an officer of rank, residing in this neighborhood, and authorized to receive the usual extra allowances while engaged in actual duty. His employment during the past season has been much extended, having embraced the inspection of all our ordnance and ordnance stores in depot at all the naval stations. The result it is hoped may prove highly beneficial in our future operations. Under a similar arrangement, the custody and correction, as well as occasionally the purchase of charts, chronometers, compasses, and nautical instruments generally, were devolved on two intelligent officers stationed at this place. The system has worked favorably; and the small increase of expense attending it has been amply repaid in the better preservation and quality of those articles, and in the probable increase of safety to our vessels afloat, and to the lives of their gallant officers and crews. A specific estimate for the purchase and maintenance of a lithographic press is submitted as a means of saving, under charge of these officers, still more to the public in the procurement of charts, circulars, and blank forms, of such kinds as are employed, not only in this office, but at the several yards and on board vessels in commission. (A.) Its various conveniences and usefulness in other respects, and especially in the drawings and plans connected with the survey of our coast, now in progress, are more particularly detailed in the reports annexed. (B, 1 and 2.) To prevent any nominal or real increase of appropriations in consequence of the purchase of this press, it will be seen in the general estimates that a corresponding, or, indeed, a larger reduction has been made in what is asked for the general contingent appropriations for this office and for the service, and out of which appropriations most of the above articles are now provided.

It was formerly recommended to organize at this place a naval medical bureau, and a bill is now on the files of Congress, reported for that purpose. As that bill was not finally disposed of, I did not deem it proper to adopt any different system for attaining in a different manner most of the benefits expected to be accomplished by that measure. But if nothing be done during the ensuing session of Congress, regulating this subject, it is intended, under our present laws, that one of the older surgeons, in connection with other services, either at the barracks or navy yard in this city, shall be detailed and employed in performing many of the duties contemplated for a surgeon general.

The whole expense, the past year, for all persons situated here, and belonging to the administration of this Department, as well as the expenses for the care and repair of our furniture, buildings, and the grounds appurtenant, were about $48,000. This amount, I trust, will be thought to bear a favorable comparison with the same class of expenses at former periods, or in other similar establishments, when the large increase and extent of duties at this place are duly considered.

Passing from the central administration of this Department to that of the persons connected with its operations elsewhere, I would next submit to your consideration a few remarks on the situation of such of those persons as fill official stations, but are not technically denominated naval officers. They are a large and useful class, belonging to what may be considered our civil list, and consist of agents, storekeepers, builders, schoolmasters, secretaries to commanders, clerks of yards, engineers, live oak superintendents, and some others attached to stations and hospitals.

In an establishment growing like the navy in a few years from so small a beginning to its comparatively great size at the close of the late war and at the present moment, it was perhaps unavoidable that many measures and appointments, considered as incidental to other important objects expressly authorized, should be left to the discretion of the Department. In this way most of the above persons have been employed and paid, usually by virtue of estimates and general appropriations, without any specific provision in any act of Congress regulating the manner of their appointment or the amount of their compensation. Indeed, a system similar in some respects has been extended to others; as the only limit which now exists to the number of every class of naval officers, is the same discretion, restrained solely by estimates and appropriations, and by the confirmation required from the Senate in the case of commissioned officers. These practices have not, in my opinion, been the safest; though the custom of this Department to submit to Congress, through the Executive and otherwise, full communications of its doings in relation to most of these subjects, enables the government to exercise any control deemed necessary over any supposed abuse. My own desire has been, whenever convenient and practicable, to impose still further limits on that discretion. With this view, on a former occasion, the estimates for the contingent appropriations were made by me more specific, and settled rules of allowances and compensation in most cases were established or collected, and then digested and published. The revision of our whole naval regulations by the board heretofore appointed for that purpose, will, when finished and adopted, probably introduce greater system and certainty in relation to some of these matters. But it still deserves consideration, whether additional legal provision might not judiciously be made concerning the appointment and wages of some of the classes before named. All the persons on the civil list now under consideration are believed to have conducted, during the past year, with fidelity to their duties. The only essential changes in relation to them have been the following: There has been a discontinuance of two naval constructors, whose services were no longer needed; and new and more economical arrangements have been made as to the duties of some of our agents and storekeepers abroad. The few live oak agents, appointed for certain districts, who remained in office last December, have been dispensed with; and no salary is

--352--

now paying on that account, except to one person, in temporary employ for a few months, in the examination of one unfinished district. In some cases in which we have had warranted officers, competent to perform the labors assigned to persons belonging to civil life, and hired at some of the yards, it has been deemed sound economy to order the former upon such duty, and to discontinue the services of the latter. It has not yet been found necessary to select a permanent engineer, as the superintendents of the dry docks and of the erection of the hospitals have been able, for the present, to perform such duties as would have been required of him. But the additional schoolmasters, authorized at the last session, have been employed, and. it is hoped with increased benefit to the class of younger officers. A general order has recently been issued with a view to improve the education of these officers, by requiring all midshipmen, whether passed or not, after suitable relaxation under leave of absence, to attend on one of the naval schools for further instruction in the studies, and proficiency in the duties, belonging to their profession. It is intended to employ them there not only in appropriate reading, nautical observations and recitations, but in forming a more practical acquaintance with "the several materials used in the construction and equipment of vessels, and with the manner of preserving them, and of applying them in building and repairs. A due portion of their leisure will also be devoted to the performance of such services, connected with our most important naval stations where the schools are established, as will be useful to the public, and at the same time advance them in a more thorough knowledge of the active duties which may soon devolve on them in higher and more responsible situations. Excepting these variations, the civil establishments at the yards, and abroad, have not been materially altered during the year. It will be seen that the whole expenses of the persons connected with them have been considerably reduced, and are now annually about $130,000. This does not include the wages of ordinary laborers, as these are more properly charged, according to their employment, under other heads, which will hereafter be considered—such, for example, as repairs of vessels, improvements at yards, or building of hospitals. The only material change proposed in the civil list for the ensuing year, is a small addition to the very low compensation of some of the clerks at a few of the yards.

The remaining persons belonging to the naval establishment are the various officers and seamen of the navy. The general conduct of these, the past year, has been highly commendable. The very small number of courts-martial, it is believed, has arisen from an improving spirit of harmony in the service, and from a mild but firm and uniform system of discipline. Seldom has the health enjoyed on every station been better; and the superior condition of the medical corps, as well as of the hospitals, exercises on this subject a very salutary influence.

The number of officers in the different classes has generally been kept within the estimates. It is proposed to continue the number much as it now exists. There are now quite as many captains and surgeons as can be usefully employed; the former having been increased about one-third, and the latter one-fourth, during the last ten years. There are somewhat more lieutenants and midshipmen than might be deemed indispensable, the former within that time having been increased about one-half, and the latter one-fourth; though, in making this comparison, it is proper to state that, previous to 1824, all these classes had occasionally been more numerous than they were at that period. But, in relation to the two last classes, no reduction from the estimates of last year is contemplated. It is considered that, on a peace establishment, they ought to possess ample and valuable materials for any sudden or large increase of the higher classes, which any national emergency may at any time require; while nothing is found to prove more injurious to older officers than to be placed in a condition where no further incentives to improvement by anticipated promotion exist, and where the classes they already fill contain so large a number as to permit many years to elapse without the possibility of putting them all on active duty, unless at the expense, inconvenience, and injury of more frequent changes of the superior officers, in stations and squadrons, than the public interests appear to justify.

The whole number of naval officers at this time, including those under warrants as well as commissions, are about 1,000; and our whole annual expenses of every kind, for their maintenance, is about $850,000, or, on an average, about $850 for each officer. These expenses have not been increased during the last ten years, except what has been caused by the addition before mentioned to the numbers of some classes of officers, and the augmentation in pay in 1827 to passed midshipmen, in 1828 to surgeons and their assistants, and in 1830 to lieutenants. In the meantime, of late years, more useless officers have been placed on half pay, and some large allowances reduced. But no further essential reductions in these particulars can, in my opinion, be effected, without injury either to individual officers or to the naval service. Whatever has been accomplished by myself on this subject, and on the requirement of a more equal portion of laborious duty from all officers of similar rank and date, who were not invalids, has often caused to me much pain; but it has been prompted by a strong sense of the equal justice due to the officers themselves, and of the manifest propriety in this Department of seeing that all those under its administration perform services for the public, when practicable, in some degree proportionate to the compensation they receive.

It is hoped that I may not be deemed importunate in once more urging on your attention a topic far more grateful to my feelings. I have long entertained a decided opinion that the compensation to some classes of officers ought to be increased. It is certain that more equal justice would be awarded to all, that services at sea could more easily be obtained, that greater cheerfulness and alacrity in the performance of duty would be evinced, and a higher grade of qualifications in some subordinate stations could be commanded, if the whole subject of pay was revised, and the compensation graduated in a fairer proportion among different ranks in the navy, and to similar ranks in the army; and if there was provision made for a larger and marked discrimination between duty afloat, and leave of absence or waiting orders on shore. Such a discrimination formed a prominent feature in the act of Congress passed April 21, 1806, and which regulated pay as now established. But the discrimination, amounting to one-half of the whole pay, was virtually abolished by a rule of this Department in 1819. During the continuance of the small compensation to some classes of officers, and after so long a practice under that rule, with the yearly sanction of Congress, by means of the estimates and corresponding appropriations in conformity to the rule, I have not felt at liberty to alter it. Further details on this subject, at this time, are not deemed necessary, as they have fully and recently been laid before you in a special report from this Department, on a resolution of the Senate, passed at the last session of Congress.

The whole number of seamen in the navy, including all the different grades, does not vary much from 5,000; and the annual expenses of their pay, rations, and enlistment are not far from $1,130,000, or, on an average, about $226 for each seaman. These expenses are small, and indicate great popularity

--353--

in the service, when we advert not only to one facility in obtaining good seamen, but to the high rate of wages, the past year, in merchant vessels, and to the great cost of this class of persons in the navies of some countries, where labor is generally much lower than in the United States. These expenses have not been increased the last ten years, except by an augmentation of about one-third in the whole number of seamen, arising chiefly from an increase of our force in commission. The complement of men to each vessel might advantageously, in some respects, be lessened, and the whole expenses, on account of them, be thus reduced, were it not considered of vital importance, in so small a navy, to have all our ships afloat as perfect as possible, in every particular conducive to their efficiency and to the reputation of the government. It is expected that a laudable" pride will then be felt and encouraged by all connected with the service, on a comparison of the condition of our own ships with those of other nations; and that the moral force of our navy, as a model for a larger one when wanted, as likely to vindicate its country's rights and honor in war, and protect its commerce in peace, will always be much greater with a small number of vessels afloat, built of the best materials and in the best manner, supplied with the most approved equipments, commanded by well educated and well disciplined officers, and navigated by full crews of hardy and contented seamen, with the whole ready on any emergency for immediate and efficient action, than with double the number of vessels half manned, and in other respects defectively provided. Every improvement in our materials, whether timber, cordage, or cannon, in our yards, docks, or harbors, in our hospitals or asylums, will add strength to this moral force, and better prepare us for any future conflict in which the violence or injustice of other nations may involve us.

In connection with this part of the service, it is deemed proper to present some remarks concerning the condition of the marine corps. The subject of its allowances, in addition to pay, was not specially noticed by Congress the last year; though in that way it has of late been customary to regulate them. But under a belief that the omission probably arose from accident, I have not interfered to revise the difficulties which have so long existed under that head. It will, however, be considered my duty, the ensuing year, to investigate, and attempt to adjust them, if not otherwise provided for.

The commutation of the whiskey part of the ration while the marines are at sea, has been extended to this corps; and the army regulation entirely abolishing that part has been applied to their rations while on shore. The whole expenses of the corps, independent of the erection of barracks and officers' quarters, are yearly about $190,000. The expenditures for such erections, on an average for the last ten years, have been about $5,000 annually. The quarters, authorized at Philadelphia, have been completed; but the comfort and proper accommodation of the men require new barracks at New York. The estimates for this purpose, and for the support of this corps, are herewith submitted. (0, 1 and 2.)

The examination of the state of the pensioners upon the navy pension fund, as those enjoying its privileges, who have been, or are now, in the service, or were connected with those once in it, may also be deemed to come properly under the head of persons attached to the navy. Though the annual expenditures from that fund are about $33,000, yet the fund itself did not spring from the public treasury, except as derived from prizes captured by our public vessels. It was not till lately that its disbursements were classed with the navy expenditures; and now the only yearly expense this fund and its administration here impose on the Treasury, is the portion of time they occupy of the head of this Department, and of one clerk. Its annual income now exceeds the annual expenses about $20,000; and, during the past year, rules have been prepared, and the benefits of this surplus extended, as originally contemplated by the act of Congress creating the fund, so as to embrace those officers and seamen who, without being wounded, have, during long and faithful services, been visited by infirmities entitling them to relief. Five persons, coming under this description, have been added to the pension list, and are allowed suitable clothing, food, and medical attendance. The number of pensioners, under this and the other provisions, is 298.

The condition of the privateer pensioners, placed under the exclusive administration of this Department, has not essentially changed during the year. The fund for their relief, like that for navy pensioners, does not come from the public treasury, and its management is no charge upon that treasury, except in the particulars before mentioned. As the whole of this fund was derived from captures by privateers, it has been deemed inexpedient to exhaust it in the support of those disabled, and of pauper persons connected with those whose bravery and enterprise made the captures. It has, therefore, become gradually reduced to $44,667. The annual charge on it at this time is about $3,000, exceeding considerably the annual income, and thus, in due time, carrying into effect the original policy of the system. For further particulars about these two funds, reference can be had to the annexed statements. (D, 1 to 6.)

On a review of the entire personal branch of our naval establishment, it will be seen that its annual cost, not including the marine corps, is about $2,000,000, and of that sum about $1,964,000 is an annual charge on the public treasury. Considering the size and usefulness of the whole naval establishment, it is believed that this part of it, at the present time, bears a judicious and economical proportion to the whole, except in the particulars heretofore enumerated. Should improvements be made in those particulars, I am satisfied that the number and compensation of the persons employed, both on the civil list and in the navy, will be found to be such as to ensure the due care and preservation of the public property, to furnish officers and men sufficient for the present protection of our commerce and rights abroad, and to maintain among all classes a state of discipline and activity indispensable to efficiency in the discharge of ordinary duties, and to a supply of suitable candidates for promotion in the extraordinary exigencies of the future.

The deaths, dismissions, and resignations in the service, since my last report, may be seen in the tables annexed. (E, F, G.)

When we advert to the other subjects connected with the navy, and more especially to what may be considered as belonging to its materials, it is deemed proper to notice, first, the employment and condition of our public vessels. Those in commission have consisted of one ship of the line, four frigates, eleven sloops, and seven schooners. They have been distributed as usual on four foreign stations, keeping up a greater intercourse than formerly with the western coasts of Portugal and Africa, and with the adjacent islands, extending our cruises into various parts of the Indian ocean, and making the West India squadron act somewhat more as a home squadron, by requiring a portion of it to visit twice annually some of our Atlantic ports. By properly regulating these visits, much exposure in the two most dangerous months in a tropical climate is avoided, and great facilities are obtained to furnish necessary supplies, to relieve parts of their crews, and exchange officers, as well as to have nearer at hand, during those visits, vessels

--354--

in commission, which, if any emergency should occur, may be dispatched at once on any distant or important service. Efforts have been made to relieve seasonably all our vessels which have been more than two years abroad. The Fairfield and the Vincennes have been sent to the Pacific to succeed the Potomac and Falmouth; the Natchez and Ontario to the Brazilian station, in place of the Lexington and Warren; the Experiment to the West Indies, in place of the Shark; and the Shark and Delaware to the Mediterranean, in place of the Concord, Boston, John Adams, and Brandywine. In making these changes so early as to prevent the expiration abroad of the service of our seamen, much discontent has been avoided, though this system has necessarily subjected the Department to some additional expense, by having occasionally, for short periods, double sets of vessels afloat attached to the same station. But it has enabled us to perform our engagements faithfully with their crews, and to keep up a more regular and constant force on each station for protection. At the same time, caution has been taken to guard against an increase of our whole expenditure for the current year beyond the appropriations connected with this subject.

All these squadrons have been actively and efficiently employed, and it gives me great satisfaction to state that our commerce in all quarters of the globe was probably never known to be more free from menaces, danger, or actual violence.

The estimates for the ensuing year are for the same amount of force as was authorized the past year, consisting of about 530 guns, and distributed in such a proportion among vessels of every class belonging to our service, as to combine the greatest efficiency for naval purposes, during peace, with the soundest economy. Few will deem that force either too large or extravagant, when it is considered that our foreign commerce exposed on the ocean exceeds $100,000,000 in imports, and almost an equal amount of exports, with vessels exposed in their transportation of over half a million in tonnage, arid probably twenty millions in value, and when it is remembered how much the security, not only of those vessels and their cargoes, but of their numerous crews, and of other classes of our citizens resident in some countries abroad, depends upon our navy being actively and widely distributed. On this point it may be well to reflect further how safely that navy enables us not only to send to new and the most distant markets, and thus to give increased value to the surplus proceeds of our agriculture, manufactories, and fisheries, and to obtain in return whatever may conduce to comfort, improvement, or wealth; but what protection and enhanced worth it confers on most of our immense coasting trade, how much our national reputation abroad is everywhere known and appreciated by it, the respect it inspires, the security it yields, and the weight it affords in all our claims of justice, and negotiations with semi-barbarous nations, and how justly it may be apprehended that new perils will ere long await a portion of our trade, and the tranquility of a part of our maritime frontier, from the operations of a new course of legislation by some foreign powers concerning an unfortunate portion of their population, and against which perils, as well as against the ordinary aggressions and piracies in peace, and much of the depredations which may threaten us in war, the navy, from the insular situation of our country as to most of the world, must always be regarded as our great safeguard.

The facilities for the examination and repair of our vessels have been much increased the past year by the completion, in most respects, of the two dry docks, and the expenses in refitting the class of larger vessels will thereby become sensibly reduced.

The present policy of this Department is to launch no more vessels of the same size with those in ordinary, until the latter are worn out. But it is proposed to build from time to time, and protect on the stocks till wanted, such new vessels as Congress may authorize to be constructed, because in that condition their timber will improve rather than decay, and the expense of taking care of them will be trifling compared with that of vessels in ordinary. This course has been adopted the past year with the Macedonian, now building. It is recommended as sound policy, that authority should be given to procure the frame for another sloop, to be called the Levant, after the consort so gallantly captured with the Cyane; and the frame for another frigate, to be called the Paul Jones, in grateful memory of one of the earliest, bravest, and most distinguished commanders in our naval service during the revolution. The estimates for the purchase of these are submitted. (H.)

Frames could not be bought for vessels of these names under any" existing laws; and the timber, if procured and seasoned, whether soon set up or not, would become more valuable, being sheltered under either our present excellent sheds or ship houses, and live oak probably becoming scarcer and dearer as our southern frontier is cleared for cultivation.

The vessels in ordinary and on the stocks, as well as the frames for others in depot, have all been examined, and found to be in a good state of preservation, except a few of those in ordinary. Some of these are defective by their long continuance afloat before being covered, some by their great age, and some by the original imperfection of their timber. Those unworthy of being refitted are used at times for receiving ships, and the rest, as wanted, are placed in a proper state to go into commission for the relief of other vessels returning from long cruises, and needing extensive repairs. As vessels afloat grow older, their repairs must of necessity become more expensive. The cost of all repairs of all our vessels the past year has been about $580,000. During the last ten years, the repairs have been, on an average, about $500,000 annually.

A table showing the vessels in commission, with their commanders and stations, is submitted, I.

The names and condition of those in ordinary and on the stocks may be seen in the documents annexed. (K, 1 and 2.)

Proceeding from the vessels to the materials used in their construction and equipment, not much has occurred the past year deserving notice. Some additions of valuable and durable articles have been made to our various stores on hand at the time of my last annual report. All these stores, and especially the timber in the docks and under sheds, are in good condition, and means have been taken to ascertain and supply any deficiency in any article not perishable which may be wanted for the building and perfect equipment of every vessel on the stocks, and every frame in depot. As more timber may be needed, or thought proper to be purchased in advance, our means for the supply for live oak, it being the most important species, have been fully investigated and discussed in a special report to Congress from this Department during the last session. Referring to that for detailed information on this point, I would only add, that subsequent examinations in some of the then unfinished districts have fully confirmed the impressions entertained concerning the great quantity of live oak timber on portions of the public lands in those districts. In respect to the other kinds of timber needed in ship building, the government has made little public provision, and doubts exist whether it will be necessary to make any further public

--355--

provision for its growth or preservation while the prices continue so moderate, and the resources of the country in such timber are likely for many years to remain so very abundant.

The erection of the two magazines where none before existed, is proposed the next season, and an estimate for that purpose is submitted. (L.) Connected with this, a thorough inspection has been made, not only of our present ordnance stores, but, as previously mentioned, of all our arms on hand, with a view to the sale of such as are defective or unsuitable, and to the procurement of what may be found necessary to produce uniformity and the greatest power in our future armaments. The usual sum of $10,000 has been expended for the purchase of such ordnance and ordnance stores as the current wants of the service required. The buying and manufacture of iron tanks for all our vessels in commission are in rapid progress under the late appropriation for that purpose; and should Congress sanction the making of our own cordage, as heretofore asked, and as now again proposed in the general estimates, the equipment of our vessels would soon become, throughout, all which the friends of the service could desire for health, safety, efficiency and national reputation.

After much deliberation, the Department has become convinced that the building or purchase of two store ships for the Pacific station, to be used in the transportation and the preservation there of supplies of all kinds, would promote sound economy and increase the comforts of our seamen. An estimate for the procurement of one the ensuing year is submitted. (M.) We are obliged to pay freight for these supplies, heavy duties either on their being landed or reshipped, and large rent for storehouses. The duties are a burden from which we are almost entirely exonerated under similar circumstances in other quarters of the world. The proposed measure would relieve us from them as well as the other charges; and the store ships, by going out and returning separately and alternately, would afford great facilities to exchange or bring home invalid officers and seamen, without incurring the expense of their passages in merchant vessels from so distant a station.

The construction of two or three small steam batteries, for reasons heretofore recommended, is still deemed highly important to our future interests; and too long delay in making further experiments, and in acquiring further science on this subject, in our naval service, may, on the sudden occurrence of hostilities, place us in a position not a little mortifying to our pride and hazardous to our welfare.

The different navy yards are essential portions of our naval establishment, connected with its materials. The condition of most of them has been improved the past year, either by new buildings for officers' quarters, or new storehouses and timber sheds, or new wharves and other conveniences.

The two dry docks at the yards near Norfolk and Boston having been successfully completed in all essential particulars, the details on that subject will be found in the report annexed. (N, 1, 2, and 3.) This report shows the whole expenditure the last year, not only on that subject, but on all others under the head of general improvement. From the great advantages already realized in the ease and rapidity of repairs in vessels at the yards where these dry docks are situated, I am satisfied that others would be found very beneficial. Surveys were formerly had for two more, one at New York and one at Portsmouth; and a report in favor of those two was once made and approved in the House of Representatives. Much can be urged in favor of the former place on account of its central position, and great resources for repairs, stores, seamen, and workmen; and of the latter place on account of the low price of labor, small cost of constructing a dock, and the easy access to it by vessels of all classes at all seasons of the year. But whether one, or both, or neither, shall be selected at this time, is submitted to the proper authority, on a review of the whole subject. It must be obvious that the relative importance of different stations must undergo changes as the capacities of different quarters of the country become more fully developed; and that some places now employed as naval depots can be of very little use on the occurrence of war, while the positions of others, when that event may happen, will greatly increase their usefulness. Among the new places which, on such an occasion, if not earlier, the interests of the country may require the government to occupy for naval purposes, will undoubtedly be Newport harbor on the north, and one or more positions on the long range of coast to the south, between Norfolk and Pensacola. Whether the last selection should be made near Charleston or Savannah, at Key West or the Dry Tortugas, each of which possesses advantages for such purposes, can be better decided when the time and circumstances occur rendering immediate action necessary. The continuance of Pensacola as a naval station seems to me judicious. This opinion arises not only from its convenient position as to the whole Gulf of Mexico, but its proximity to the mouths of the Mississippi and Mobile rivers, whose great and growing commerce is so amply entitled to the best protection. In the depth and size of its bay, in the excellent defences at its mouth, in its healthy situation, in its easy access to all our vessels, except of the two highest classes, Pensacola has no prominent rival in that neighborhood. The correspondence and documents annexed (O, 1 and 2,) are submitted, to aid yourself and Congress to judge of the practicability and propriety of deepening the entrance to the bay, so as to admit vessels of the largest class. This, it is supposed, can be effected at a small expense, compared with the importance of such a measure to the full operations of our navy on that coast, and to the greater security and strength of our southern maritime defences.

The exchange of lands at the yard near New York, authorized at the last session of Congress, has been carried into effect. The controverted claim of the heirs of Mr. Harris to a part of the navy yard near Boston has once been laid before Congress, and a new action having been instituted by them against the commander of that station, as will be seen by the letter annexed, such course will be pursued, in its defence, as Congress may be pleased to direct. (P.)

Some new pretensions have been set up to different parcels of land included in our possession and purchases at Norfolk, but their justice cannot be recognized on the facts known to the Department; and those making them have been informed that no steps can be taken for their adjustment, unless the parties previously obtain the sanction of Congress, or a judgment in their favor by the courts of law.

The expenditures on all the yards the last year, exclusive of the dry docks, but including houses, sheds, stores, wharves, enclosures, workshops, marine barracks, and incidental labor, have been about $360,000. The expenditures on the dry docks are chargeable to a distinct appropriation for gradual improvement, and were about $180,000. The other expenditures under the last head were about $150,000. (N, 1.) The estimates for the usual objects at the yards, the ensuing year, are about the average amount for the last two years. Besides those objects, they include an extra sum towards the erection of rope-walks, in conformity with the plan adopted by Congress in 1827, and yet the whole amount requested towards these and all other improvements, at all the yards, is only $354,000.

Immediately connected with the subject of our yards, is that of our naval hospitals and the naval

--356--

asylum. Under the appropriations lately made by Congress, new hospitals have been commenced near Pensacola, New York, and Boston, on retired and healthy sites, combining great convenience and beauty. The plans of these have been formed on a scale suited only to the present wants of the service, but capable of easy and appropriate enlargement hereafter, whenever our necessities may require it. An additional sum will be needed to finish them in the manner proposed, and to make further progress in the hospital before built at Norfolk. (Q.) Such expenditures have been made the past year, on the latter, from the general hospital fund, as could well be spared, and as the comfort of its inmates seemed most urgently to demand. It is much larger than our present necessities require, and therefore it is not proposed to finish the whole interior of it; but the exterior of this hospital is now chiefly completed, and it has become one of the most beautiful and useful public buildings belonging to the government. The Naval asylum at Philadelphia has been finished, and partly furnished. But it is much regretted that the Department has not been able to obtain a cession of jurisdiction over it, without reservations that render the cession wholly nugatory. Besides retaining the usual power in the State to execute criminal and civil process, the reservations subject it to, and it actually is burdened by the assessment of large taxes, which are paid from the hard earnings of our seamen; and an unlimited right is retained to cut up the property by new streets. Further efforts are now making by the Department to obtain relief from these onerous taxes and liabilities, so disadvantageous, if not fatal to the success of this public and charitable institution. Should these efforts fail, all the correspondence and documents in the case will be submitted, in order that such legislation may be had as the whole circumstances connected with the subject shall be thought to require.

The general condition of the hospital fund may be seen in the statement before referred to. (D, 6.)

The ordinary purchases of medicines and surgical instruments for use in hospitals and yards, and in vessels afloat, are included under a specific appropriation, and are about $35,000 yearly. The pay and subsistence of the surgeons and assistant surgeons attached to the hospitals are provided for under the general appropriation for navy officers. The other annual expenses of our hospital establishment, independent of buildings, furniture, and repairs, are about $1,000. These are defrayed wholly from assessments on the seamen and officers. From the same quarter come all other resources for the establishment, with the exception of such appropriations as Congress have made, from time to time, to aid in erecting and furnishing buildings. These last appropriations have been made but seldom, and have, within ten years, amounted to a sum which would be on the average about $22,150 annually; and for the same purposes, during that period, the fund has furnished, from its annual increase and former accumulations, about $45,000 annually. Should Congress grant what is now asked, more will probably not be wanted for many years. In immediate connection with the yards, hospitals, and other real estate, belonging to our naval establishment, is the live oak plantation. Being situated only seven miles from our most southern yard, it has the past year been placed under the same general superintendence. The purchase of the land, and the cutting and removal of the underwood and common timber from about 200 acres of the plantation, had been accomplished before the charge of this Department was placed in my hands. It seemed to me judicious, in that state of things, to attempt to preserve any benefits already attained, or fairly anticipated, by continuing to destroy, a few years longer, the annual growth of other wood injurious to the young live oak trees, to trim and train the thriftiest new ones appearing, and to employ merely the leisure of the hands so engaged, in extending this process to more of the land. From 200 acres of land, and 22,000 live oak trees, to which, in 1829, the above system had been applied, it has, since 1831, been so continually extended, that the nursery has become enlarged to 225 acres, and includes over 60,000 trees. The expense attending this has been about $1,200 a year; but, should any considerable portion of the trees ever reach maturity, and attain a size suitable for ship building, the government will be amply repaid. As the trees grow larger, the annual expense concerning the same number will rapidly diminish. Doubts exist whether some of them, from the poverty of the soil, and their apparently dwarfish character, will ever attain a valuable size. But it is now too early for forming a decisive opinion on the extent to which the operation of these causes may affect the whole plantation; and, under existing circumstances, sound policy appears to require that the experiment, having gone so far, should be allowed a further and full trial. The nearness of the plantation to the Pensacola yard, and to water transportation, enhances much the value of any timber it may produce. Lately, I have not only placed this land under the general superintendence of the commander of that yard, but required his particular and constant vigilance over the live oak reservations in all that region of country.

The whole agencies, heretofore connected with our live oak, have, as before suggested, been discontinued; all the districts, except small portions of two, having been explored as fully as is deemed useful till the surveys of the land into townships and sections shall be completed. As fast as they may be completed, arrangements have been made for additional reservations of public land on which live oak has been ascertained to abound; and the prospect of a sufficient supply of that kind of timber in future is flattering, if that on private lands, as these are wanted to be cleared for cultivation, be, from time to time, purchased at moderate prices and placed in depot for the frames of vessels, specially authorized or collected under the head of gradual improvement. On this whole subject I have so recently and at such length submitted to Congress the views of this Department, that further observations here are not deemed necessary. (See report on live oak to House of Representatives, December 14, 1832.)

Some miscellaneous matters connected with the navy deserve a brief notice. The usual attention has been bestowed on the suppression of the slave trade. The colony of Liberia has been visited by the schooner Porpoise while in pursuit of a piratical vessel, and which vessel, it is gratifying to add, is supposed to have been since captured by a British brig, and her criminal career terminated near the Island of St. Thomas, on the coast of Africa. One-half of the usual appropriation on the subject of the slave trade will probably be sufficient for the ensuing year, as may be seen by the state of the account herewith submitted. (R.)

The renewal of an appropriation for the relief of Alexander Claxton, made in May, 1830, has become necessary in consequence of its having been transferred to the surplus fund before all the persons entitled to it were able to procure the necessary vouchers. The proceedings of the board, appointed under a resolution of Congress to revise the naval regulations, will be soon submitted in a separate report.

The survey of our seacoast having been placed in charge of the Treasury Department, it is not in my power officially to state its progress; but officers have been detailed and all available facilities provided whenever the wishes of those superintending the subject have been communicated.

Some expenses, under the contingent appropriation for enumerated objects, have not been included under any of the amounts already mentioned; but they belong to courts-martial, to pilotage of vessels,

--357--

to transportation of materials, to the purchase of charts and books, and various other small items, forming an aggregate of about $80,000.

On a review of the whole affairs of this Department, it appears that its expenditures on all naval subjects the past year have been somewhat less than four millions of dollars. It will be seen how this result compares with former periods, by adverting to the fact that during the last twenty years these expenditures, except during five years of that time, have never fallen so low as three millions, and except during six years of that time have never exceeded four millions. The whole estimates made the past year for the general wants of what is technically considered the navy, were, only $3,176,766. Those for the year previous were $3,227,383. Those for the present year are $3,292,224. (S, 1 to 10.) But it is to be remembered that under the head of naval expenditures, besides what is paid from the amount voted on the annual naval estimates, it is customary to class what is paid from half a million, appropriated for a term of years to gradual improvement, almost $200,000 for the marine corps, the payments from the navy pension, hospital, and privateer pension funds, and several miscellaneous sums voted by Congress on motions, resolutions, and petitions, and part of which sums, though charged under this head, have little or no concern with our naval establishment. On the contrary, some of the expenses connected with the administration of the Department at this place are included in the general appropriation bills for the support of government, and are not usually classed under the head of naval expenditures.

It is a high gratification to be able to state that since 1827 nearly half a million a year has been disbursed for gradual improvement; that within ten years a larger number than formerly of seamen and officers, with increased pay to four classes of the latter, have been maintained; very great and valuable improvements, besides the dry docks, have been begun and accomplished at many of the yards; and our force in commission considerably augmented; and yet that all our ordinary naval expenditures are, and probably can be, kept within four millions of dollars annually.

The smaller appropriations originally made for the navy served to maintain the few officers and seamen then employed, and supplied us with several fine vessels, four of which are still in existence. The subsequent appropriations on a more extended scale, besides supporting the current expenses of our force in its infancy, furnished the purchase money for most of our present yards, and defrayed the expenses of our brilliant hostilities with France, and afterwards with Tripoli; till, a few years of comparative inactivity having ensued, the commencement and progress of the last war with England led to a great addition to the naval establishment, and to expenditures much larger than at present. The liberal appropriations that were continued for some years after that war, aided in laying a good foundation for the gradual increase of the navy, and helped to build not only many of the vessels now in commission and ordinary, but most of those upon the stocks. The appropriations for some years past have been similar in amount, and have enabled the Department to enlarge its policy and widen the sphere of its operations. Besides building some additional vessels and defraying all the current expenses of an increased force, both personal and material, it has been able to erect hospitals, to construct dry docks, to improve greatly the old yards, to add and maintain a new one on our southern frontier, and to collect in depot a large amount of valuable stores as a part of the due preparation in peace for the various contingencies of war. With a careful regard to system and economy, and with strict accountability in agents and officers, this policy can long be pursued and extended without making the ordinary annual demands for this branch of the service often exceed four millions; and if, without essential changes by Congress, increasing our present expenses, and without any unforeseen and extraordinary wants, our fiscal operations can usually be confined within that amount yearly, it is confidently hoped the naval establishment will not be considered wasteful or burdensome beyond its benefits to the country.

In disbursing between three and four millions the past year, it is not known that a single instance of any loss has occurred.

The balances on hand, unexpended, are about $1,400,000, but most of them will probably be wanted to close the different accounts, on all the different subjects, when finally adjusted. Connected with our financial concerns is one other circumstance of urgent importance. The period of time at which the annual appropriations for this branch of the service are usually made is a source of great inconvenience and injury. The estimates and appropriations are known generally not to extend beyond the current year; consequently it happens that, after the 1st of January, there is nothing on hand under some heads to meet the daily demands of the service, amounting, on an average, to $10,000 per day, unless a new appropriation has been made, or there happen to be some balances of a former year not called for. Under some heads such balances always exist; because some disbursements, by means of absence, distance, and other causes, are not completed within the year. But they seldom exist under other important heads, and ought not to, if the accounts are seasonably settled and the estimates were accurate, and the appropriations, as is usual, conform to the estimates. The power now vested in the President, to transfer a balance from one appropriation to another, is confined to certain classes of claims, small in amount; and hence, as to all others, no transfer can legally be made, and if no balance remain at the end of the year, and the new naval appropriation bills have not passed, payment is entirely stopped, or the whole operations of this Department dependent on them are suspended. Considering how large a part of these operations and of our expenditures necessarily takes place in distant quarters of the world, it will be seen that the embarrassment in this branch of the service must often be peculiar and aggravated. In the case of bills of exchange drawn abroad, chargeable to the appropriations already exhausted, the public faith, under the above circumstances, is sometimes in danger of being violated; our credit in foreign countries becomes injured; and the Treasury, as actually happened during the last winter, is exposed to large losses, if the holders choose to resort to protests and claims for the mercantile rate of damages.

Under the present system of passing so late the naval appropriation bills, it happens that, unless money voted under one head is, without authority, as was once the practice, applied under other heads, this unfortunate condition continues, every short session of Congress about two months, and every long session about four months. It can easily be remedied in two methods: one of them is to make, previous to the 1st of January, new appropriations for a quarter or half of the year towards all permanent objects. By limiting them to such a time and to such objects, and by taking the estimates of the former year as a guide, no inconvenience will interpose, and no error can occur which may not be readily corrected when the residue of the appropriation for the whole year is voted at a later period in the session. Another mode is to authorize the President to make necessary transfers from one head to another, in all cases where the new naval appropriation bills do not pass by the commencement of the year, and to require from him a report to Congress of the amount and causes of such transfers. If the authority be thus

--358--

restricted, it is difficult to discover any danger likely to result from its exercise; and it is believed that the surplus or balances on hand under some of the appropriations would usually prove sufficient to supply the wants under others. The detail and earnestness with which legislation on this subject is now urged must find their excuse in my strong convictions that no measure whatever, requiring, like this, no increased expenditures, could be more conducive to the reputation and efficient operations of our naval establishment. Thus, sir, under an examination of its central administration, of its personal, or civil, and navy list, of its materials, with the appurtenants thereto, and of its miscellaneous concerns, I have submitted a review of all its transactions and expenditures, during the past year, that possess any great degree of importance. This has been accompanied by suggestions for such improvements as observation and reflection have convinced me might be useful; and should they meet with the approbation of yourself and Congress, I look forward with confidence to a long continuance of prosperity in the affairs connected with this Department.

With great respect, yours, &c., LEVI WOODBURY.

Schedule of documents accompanying the report of the Secretary of the Navy, made to the President of the United States, 30th November, 1833.

A. Estimate for a lithographic press. (Submitted.)

B. 1 and 2. Reports in relation to a lithographic press, and its uses.

C. 1 and 2. Estimates for the marine corps.

D. 1 to 6. Statements in relation to the hospital and pension funds.

E. List of deaths in the navy since 1st December, 1832.

F. List of dismissions.

G. List of resignations.

H. Estimate for procuring frames of live oak for a frigate and sloop-of-war. (Submitted.)

I. List of vessels in commission, their commanders and stations.

K. 1 and 2. Statements showing the names, distribution, and condition of the vessels of the navy in ordinary and on the stocks at the several navy yards.

L. Estimate for building powder magazines at Boston and New York. (Submitted.)

M. Estimate for procuring a store ship for the transportation of supplies. (Submitted.)

N, 1, 2, and 3. Abstract of expenditures on the dry docks at Boston and Norfolk for the year ending October 31st, 1833, and from the commencement of the works, and report on gradual improvement.

O, 1 and 2. In relation to the practicability of deepening the bar at Pensacola.

P. Respecting a claim by the heirs of the late John Harris to a part of the navy yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts.

Q. Estimate for completing and furnishing hospitals. (Submitted.) R. Slave trade.

S, 1 to 10. General estimates for the naval service, and for the office of Secretary of the Navy, Navy Commissioners, and superintendent of the southwest Executive buildings.

A.

Estimate submitted for lithographic press.

For the purchase and use for one year of a lithographic press     $1,000 00

B, No. 1.

Reports on lithographic press.

Navy Commissioners' Office, September 12, 1833.

Sir:

The Commissioners have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of yesterday, enclosing a communication from Lieutenant Wilkes upon the subject of a lithographic press for the use of the Navy Department, and requiring an opinion upon the propriety of purchasing one.

The Commissioners are fully of opinion that the possession and employment of such a press would be both useful and economical; as, besides the various uses enumerated by Lieutenant Wilkes, it may, in their opinion, be applied to the printing of all the various forms required by the disbursing officers of the navy yards, which would at once combine uniformity, which is highly desirable, with a great saving of expense.

The communication of Lieutenant Wilkes is herewith returned.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, your obedient servant,

JOHN RODGERS.

Hon. Levi Woodbury, Secretary of the Navy.

B, No. 2.

Washington City, August 23, 1833.

Sir:

In reply to your letter of the 27th July, I have the honor to report that I have made very many inquiries relative to a lithographic press, the result of which is that they can be had for from thirty-live

--359--

to one hundred and fifty dollars, according to the size, goodness, and strength of material of which they are constituted; this is exclusive of rollers, ink, and stones. The rollers and ink will cost about $30, and the stones are to be had at ten cents the pound. Presuming your object to be usefulness and economy combined, I submit the following as my estimate of the cost of a suitable one for the printing of charts, viz:

Cost of press

$120 00

Rollers and ink

30 00

Five hundred pounds of stone, at ten cents

50 00

 

$200 00

For the maintenance of the press there will be required a printer, and a laborer to assist in working the press when the impressions are striking off; the pay of a printer is from $10 to $14 a week in New York, and no one who understands the art can be had under that price; the laborer's services would only be required occasionally, and it would be, therefore, preferable to hire him when wanted until the press was in full operation and constantly employed; therefore, I should estimate the maintenance of a press as follows, for a year:

Lithographic printer, at $50 per month

$600 00

Contingencies, including labor, paper, &c.

100 00

 

$700 00

So that the purchase and maintenance of the press for the first year would be nine hundred dollars.

I have made many inquiries relative to the cost of the charts that could be printed on a press, for the last ten years, and regret that I have not been able to obtain any information for you, having been informed by the accounting officers that all the accounts of the navy agents and pursers, both at home and abroad, that served in the navy for that time would have to be consulted, which would require, as they inform me, a period of six months. I am equally at a loss to inform you of the amount that has probably been expended in the service for those purposes.

In the place of this information, I can offer many reasons for the advantages to be derived from such an establishment, which will probably tend to satisfy you that the expenditure would not be thrown away. In the first place, all the charts now on hand might be made serviceable, by correcting the erroneous parts, viz: by annexing to them small lithographics of those parts corrected, which charts cannot now be supplied to our public vessels without endangering the public property in some degree, thus making what is now worthless valuable. In the second place, charts of harbors and coasts might be furnished our vessels on large and accurate scales, (and which are alone published by the English and French hydrographical officers,) that cannot now be bought. Thirdly. Errors that had been discovered by navigators, (which is of frequent occurrence,) could be immediately corrected, which the publishers of charts wholly neglect, or are slow in doing, not only on account of the expense in altering the plate, but the loss in not being able to sell the impression they have on hand. Fourthly. The ease and small expense at which it would enable the government to extend any hydrographical information to the mercantile marine, and to embody at once, in a useful shape, all hydrographical information that may be obtained; it is believed that many disasters to vessels would be prevented by having small sections of charts, showing the situations of dangers, to enable navigators fully to comprehend them, at once serving to dissipate any erroneous description, and making it clear to the most common understanding. The opportunity of obtaining hydrographical information well authenticated, and illustrated on charts, would facilitate the insurance of vessels, and equalize the risk between the insurer and insured: for the want of this information, and nowhere to obtain it sufficiently authenticated, many merchants are now denied this privilege, and others receive it at a large premium. As it is one of the great objects of our government to afford facilities to its commerce, and spread useful information, there are few ways in which more valuable information could be spread at so small expense, than by the establishment of a lithographic press connected with this office, which would not only receive the information, but be enabled to put it in immediate circulation; at the same time that it is a great economy in furnishing the navy with charts, and those that cannot be obtained elsewhere. Fifthly. As the coast survey progresses, it would enable the government to issue copies at little more than the price of the paper, which alone, contrasted with the amount now expending by Congress in the publication of the survey of Narraganset Bay, would have bought and maintained a lithographic press for three or four years. In connection with all this, it might be employed in printing off circulars for the Department. All this, I am of opinion, would occupy a press fully, and could not be obtained by even employing another printer at the press of the War Department, (which would be the same expense, except the first cost of the press,) as the time of printing could not be at our own disposal, which is a material consideration in the success of the operation, being very much influenced by the state of the temperature. These are some of the prominent objects that have appeared to me to be embraced in your letter, and which I have the honor respectfully to submit to your consideration.

I am, your most obedient servant,

CHARLES WILKES, Jr.,

Lt. U. S. Navy, in charge of Charts, Instruments, &c.

Hon Levi Woodbury, Secretary of the Navy.

--360--

C, No. 1.

Estimate of pay for the officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, and subsistence for the officers of the marine corps for the year 1834, and arrearages and increased pay under the act of 2d March, 1833.

PAY.

One lieutenant colonel commandant at $75 per month

$900 00

 

Five lieutenant colonels by brevet (commanding) at $60 per month

3,600 00

 

One paymaster at $60 per month

720 00

 

One quartermaster at $60 per month

720 00

 

Three captains at $40 per month

1,440 00

 

Twenty-three first lieutenants at $30 per month

8,280 00

 

Sixteen second lieutenants at $25 per month

4,800 00

 

One surgeon at $60 per month

720 00

 

One hospital steward at $18 per month

216 00

 

One sergeant major (under the act of 2d March, 1833) at $17 per month

204 00

 

One quartermaster sergeant (under the act of 2d March, 1833) at $17 per month

204 00

 

One drum major (under the act of 2d March, 1833) at $16 per month

192 00

 

One fife major (under the act of 2d March, 1833) at $16 per month

192 00

 

Thirty orderly sergeants and first sergeants of guards at sea at $16 per month

5,760 00

 

Forty-one other sergeants at $13 per month

6,396 00

 

Seventy-three corporals at $9 per month

7,884 00

 

Twenty-seven drummers and fifers (served faithfully two or more years) at $8 per month

2,592 00

 

Fifteen drummers and fifers at $7 per month

1,260 00

 

Three hundred and sixty-four privates (served faithfully two or more years) at $7 per month

30,576 00

 

Three hundred and eighty-six privates at $6 per month

27,792 00

 

Extra pay to the adjutant and inspector at $30

360 00

 

Pay for five clerks, viz: one for the lieutenant colonel commandant, one for the paymaster, one for the adjutant and inspector, and two for the quartermaster, at $20 per month each

1,200 00

 

Amount required for bounty, in conformity to the 3d section of the act of 2d March, 1833, to improve the condition of the non-commissioned officers, &c., of the army and marine corps, &c

1,540 00

 

Amount required for arrearages of pay, 1833, the estimate for that year being predicated on former laws, and not sufficient to meet the demands of the above-mentioned act of 2d March, 1833

10 940 00

 

 

 

$118,488 00

SUBSISTENCE.

One lieutenant colonel commandment, 12 rations per day, 4,380 rations, at 20 cents

$876 00

 

Five lieutenant colonels by brevet, (commanding) 10 rations per day, 18,250 rations, at 20 cents

3,650 00

 

One paymaster, 4 rations per day, 1,460 rations, at 20 cents

292 00

 

One quartermaster, 4 rations per day, 1,460 rations, at 20 cents

292 00

 

Three captains, (commanding) 6 rations per day, 6,570 rations, at 20 cents..

1,314 00

 

Twenty-three first lieutenants, 4 rations per day, 33,580 rations, at 20 cents..

6,716 00

 

Sixteen second lieutenants, 3 rations per day, 17,520 rations, at 20 cents

3,504 00

 

One adjutant and inspector, 4 rations per day, 1,460 rations, at 20 cents

292 00

 

One surgeon, 4 rations per day, 1,460 rations, at 25 cents

365 00

 

One hospital steward, 1 ration per day, 365 rations, at 25 cents

91 25

 

 

 

17,392 25

 

 

$135,880 25

C. R. BROOM, Paymaster, M. C.

Head-Quarters, Marine Corps, Paymaster's Office, September 25, 1833.

C, No. 2.

Estimate for expenditures in the quartermaster's department of the United States marine corps, for the year 1834.

SUBSISTENCE.

For 421 non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, and washerwomen, serving on shore, at one ration per day each, is 153,665 complete rations, at 12 cents per ration

$18,439 80

 

For amount required for extra rations, in conformity with the 3d section of the act of the 2d March, 1833, "to improve the condition of the noncommissioned officers, musicians, and privates of the army and marine corps, and to prevent desertion"

792 00

 

 

 

$19,231 80

--361--

CLOTHING.

 

 

For 938 non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, at $30 each, is

$28,140 00

 

For 100 watchcoats, at $6.25 each, is

625 00

 

For amount required for extra clothing, in conformity with the 3d section of the act of the 2d of March, 1833, "to improve the condition of the noncommissioned officers, musicians, and privates of the army and marine corps, and to prevent desertion"

550 00

 

 

 

$29,315 00

FUEL.

 

 

For the officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, and washerwomen, and for the public offices, hospital, and armory

9,098,00

 

barracks.

 

 

For repairs of barracks at the different stations, and for erecting a hospital at head-quarters. 8,000 00

 

 

transportation and recruiting.

 

 

For transportation of officers and men, and for expenses of recruiting

5,000 00

 

MEDICINES.

 

 

For medicines, hospital stores, and surgical instruments, for officers and men serving on shore

2,369 71

 

CONTINGENCIES.

 

 

For freight of stores, ferriage, toll, wharfage, and cartage; per diem allowance for attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, and for officers and men on extra duty; compensation to judge advocates; house rent and chamber money, where there are no public quarters assigned; incidental labor in the quartermaster's department; per diem allowance to a messenger for the public offices; expenses of burying deceased persons belonging to the marine corps; printing, stationery, forage, and postage on public letters; expenses in pursuit of deserters; candles and oil for the guards of the different stations; straw for the men; barrack furniture, bed sacks, spades, axes, shovels, picks, and carpenter tools

$14,000 00

 

For arrearages for contingencies for 1832

5,000 00

 

 

19,000 00

 

For amount of pay and allowances due the late Brevet Lieutenant Colonel William Anderson, under the act approved 14th July, 1832, concerning certain marine officers, being

 

 

a deficiency in the appropriation of last year, caused by an error in calculating the difference of pay and allowances between those of a captain and major from the 3d of March, 1825, to 2d March, 1827, instead of from the 3d of March, 1825, to 23d May, 1828, the date of his promotion to brevet lieutenant colonel

954 22

 

ERECTION OF BARRACKS.

 

 

For erection of new barracks for the marines stationed at Brooklyn, Long Island, New York 30,000 00

 

 

Total amount

$122,968 73

 

Respectfully submitted.

E. J. WEED, Q. M. C.

Head-Quarters. Marine Corps, Quartermaster's Office, Washington, September 21, 1833.

D.

A statement of the condition of the navy pension, privateer pension, and navy hospital funds, agreeably to an act of Congress, passed 10th July, 1832.

This statement includes a period of time from November, 1832, to October, 1833. The accounts of the navy pension fund are exhibited in the papers numbered from 1 to 4, inclusive.

D, No. 1. An exhibit from the Register of the Treasury of the receipts and disbursements on account of the fund from the period above stated.

D, No. 2. An exhibit from the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury in relation to this fund.

D, No. 3. An exhibit of all the stocks belonging to the fund, with the cost thereof, as nearly as can be ascertained, and the nominal value of the same; and also the annual amount of interest which accrues to the fund.

D, No. 4. An exhibit of the number of pensioners now on the navy pension roll.

The annual income of the navy pension fund, it will be perceived, is estimated at about $52,443.23.

And the amount paid, and required to be paid, for the same time, it is believed, will not fall short of $33,000.

Since the last statement to Congress, a number of applications has been made for pensions, where the claims did not come within the provisions of any acts of Congress relating to the navy pension fund, or were not supported by the necessary evidence. The former consists principally of the widows of officers and seamen who were killed during the late war, or who died in the service while acting in the line of their duty; the latter class of which was provided for by act of Congress, passed in March, 1817, and was again provided for by the act of 28th June, 1832. But the widows of those officers and seamen who have died since the repeal of the act of March, 1817, which took place on the 22d January, 1824, are left by that repeal not entitled, under any existing law, to a pension.

The act of March, 1817, provides for the widows of those whose death was produced by casualty

--362--

while in the service; the act of 28th June, 1832, recognizes these claims, because the claimants were formerly on the pension roll; but the widows of those who have died since 1824, while in the service, are excluded from any benefit to be derived from the navy pension fund, under the existing law.

The state of the privateer pension fund, and the number of pensioners who are deriving the benefit of it, appear in D, No. 5, herewith submitted.

The income of the privateer pension fund is derived from Maryland five per cent. stocks, and stock of the Bank of the United States. It amounts at this time, per annum, to $2,330.35, and the sum annually required to pay pensioners on its roll is estimated at about $2,628.

The receipts and expenditures on account of the navy hospital fund are shown in D, No. 6, being an exhibit of the same from the Register of the Treasury.

D, No. 1.

Navy pension fund.

Balance to credit of account on the 18th November, 1832, as per statement at that time rendered

$20,642 63

Deduct for error in that statement, repayment of this sum made 17th November, 1831, and included among the repayments made subsequently thereto

420 00

True amount of balance on the 18th November, 1832

$20,222 63

Amount of repayments to credit of account from 19th November, 1832, to 30th September, 1833, inclusive

134,606 55

 

$154,829 18

Amount of payments made on account of said fund, from 19th November, 1832, to 30th September, 1833, inclusive

137,156 82

Balance to the credit of account, 1st October, 183

$17,672 36

T. L. SMITH, Register.

Treasury Department, Register's Office, November 11, 1833.

D, No. 2.

Statement showing the balance standing to the credit of the navy pension fund, on the 18th day of November, 1832; the amount of receipts and disbursements on account of said fund, from that date to the 30th September, 1833, inclusive; and the amount of advances to agents during the same period.

1. Balance in the Treasury to the credit of the fund, on the 18th November, 1832, per last report

$20,642 63

Deduct for error in register's balance

420 00

 

$20,222 63

2. Amount received in the Treasury since that time, from whom, and on what account, viz:

 

1832.

Nov. 29.

From the Secretary of the Navy, trustee for dividend on Washington Bank stock, due May 1, 1832

$420 00

 

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland five per cent., due 30th September, 1832

1, 181 25

1833.

Jan. 10.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland five per cent., due 31st December

1,237 50

Jan. 15.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for reimbursement of United States three per cent. stock

58,555 40

Feb. 1.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividend on United States Bank stock

5,876 50

Feb. 13.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividend on stock of United States

2,519 59

Feb. 19.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Pennsylvania five per cent

5,311 74

May 6.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Washington Corporation stock, due 1st April

2,230 23

May 28.

 From the Secretary of the Navy, for reimbursement of 4 1/2 per cent. United States stock

19,946 74

May 28.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividend on stock of the Bank of Washington

420 00

May. 28.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividend on stock of the Union Bank of Georgetown

300 00

May 28.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividend on stock of the United States

1,856 03

June 14.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on stock of the city of Cincinnati

2,500 00

--363--

June 20.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for proceeds of 180 shares of the Bank of the United States sold

$20,468 TO

July 19.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland five per cents

1,443 75

Aug. 12.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividend on United States Bank stock

8,431 50

April 1.

Joseph P. McCorkle, for amount of salary advanced him which has been repaid the fund by an appropriation made by Congress

423 87

April 8.

Richard Smith, for interest on Maryland five per cents

1,443 75

Aug. 8.

Benjamin Homans, for this sum refunded

40 00

 

 

$134,605 55

3.

Disbursements made from the fund, from the 17th November, 1832, to the 30th of September, 1833, inclusive, viz:

 

1832.

Nov. 23.

Paid Eliza Cassin, widow, for pension

$1,053 33

Dec. 14.

Paid Mary Proctor, widow, for pension

1,080 00

1833.

 

 

Jan. 12.

Paid Isabella McCormick, widow, for pension

626 66

Feb. 15.

Paid president Branch Bank United States at Washington, balance due him

3,543 52

Feb. 28.

Paid Secretary of the Treasury for 600 shares United States Bank stock

60,000 00

March 1.

Paid Eliza Stewart, widow, for pension

420 00

March 13.

Paid B. Trevett, for five years' pension, as sole heir of Samuel R. Trevett, surgeon, deceased

1,500 00

June 18.

Paid Secretary of the Treasury for 310 shares of United States Bank stock

31,000 00

Total amount of disbursements

$99,223 51

4.

Advances to agents to pay pensions, &c:

 

1832.

Dec. 12.

To the president of the Farmers' Bank, at New Castle, Delaware.

$36 00

Dec. 17.

To the president of the Trenton Banking Company, New Jersey..

36 00

Dec. 17.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania

54 00

Dec. 17.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Lexington, Kentucky

300 00

Dec. 17.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Savannah, Georgia

114 00

Dec. 17.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Norfolk, Va.

2,500 00

Dec. 17.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Portsmouth, New Hampshire

253 00

Dec. 17.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Hartford, Connecticut

800 00

Dec. 17.

 To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Portland, Maine

600 00

Dec. 17.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Providence, Rhode Island

220 00

Dec. 17.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Boston, Massachusetts

3,750 00

Dec. 17.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at New York,

8,500 00

Dec. 17.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Baltimore, Maryland

560 00

Dec. 17.

To the president of the Bank United States, Philadelphia

1,590 00

1833.

Jan. 10.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at New York

600 00

Feb. 19.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Pittsburg

400 00

Feb. 19.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Washington, District Columbia

1,200 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Boston, Massachusetts

2,000 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Providence, Rhode Island

200 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Portsmouth, New Hampshire

300 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Portland, Maine

600 00

June 14.

To the president of the Trenton Banking Company, New Jersey..

50 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Savannah, Georgia

150 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at St. Louis, Missouri

113 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at New Orleans

500 00

--364--

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Cincinnati, Ohio

$330 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Norfolk, Virginia

2,400 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Washington, District Columbia

2,000 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Baltimore, Maryland

1,200 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania

100 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at New York,

4,000 00

June 14.

To the president of the Bank United States, at Philadelphia

1,500 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Hartford, Connecticut

100 00

June 14.

To the president of the Branch Bank United States, at Boston, Massachusetts

600 00

June 14.

To the president of the Farmers' Bank, New Castle, Delaware

60 00

 

 

$37,716 00

1832

Nov. 30.

To Joseph P. McCorkle, in part for salary

$66 67

Dec. 12.

To E. Kane, N. A., Washington, for sundries

12 11

Dec. 31.

To Joseph P. McCorkle, in part for salary

45 11

1833.

 

 

Jan. 14.

To E. Kane, N. A., Washington, for sundries

4 53

Jan. 31.

To Joseph P. McCorkle, in part for salary

44 44

Feb. 28.

To Joseph P. McCorkle, in part for salary

44 45

 

 

217 31

Total amount of advances

$37,933 31

AMOS KENDALL.

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office, November 18, 1833.

D, No. 3.

Exhibit showing the amount of stocks belonging to the navy pension fund, with the cost and nominal value thereof, on the 30th September, 1833.

 

Cost.

Nominal value.

United States stocks

$156,856 91

$149,482 78

United States Bank stock

256,900 00

256,900 00

Pennsylvania 5 per cents

243,485 92

212,469 16

Maryland 5 per cents

152,884 43

140,220 72

City of Cincinnati 5 per cents

110,275 00

100,000 00

City or Washington 5 per cents

56,493 75

59,472 40

Bank of Washington

14,260 00

14,000 00

Union Bank of Georgetown

15,340 50

15,000 00

 

$996,501 51

$947,565 06

Columbia Bank stock

99,502 60

92,600 00

This last-named stock was purchased, part in 1809 and part in 1819. The bank became insolvent, and the stock, it is believed, is an entire loss to the fund.

The annual interest accruing to the fund is:

From United States stocks

$7,317 13

From all other stocks

45,126 10

Making the sum of

$52,443 23

The amount of stocks redeemed and paid to the fund by the United States to the 30th September, 1833, since last report, is, per statement of the Register of the Treasury

$78,502 14

D, No. 4.

Exhibit showing the number of pensioners on the navy pension roll, from each State respectively, other than those authorized to be placed upon it by the act of 28th June, 1832, and also the number from each State, respectively, who are now on the roll in accordance to that act, from the States of—

Maine

9

Massachusetts

56

Rhode Island

8

Connecticut

6

--365--

New York

79

New Jersey

1

Missouri

1

Pennsylvania

38

Maryland

23

District of Columbia

13

Virginia

25

Ohio

2

Kentucky

1

Delaware

2

South Carolina

2

Louisiana

2

Total

277

Number of pensioners on the navy pension roll under the act of 28th June, 1832.

Maine

1

Massachusetts

2

New York

4

Pennsylvania

3

Maryland

1

District of Columbia

1

Virginia

3

Georgia

1

 

16

Number of pensioners under the act of the 23d April, 1800, for long and faithful services, is, from—

New Jersey

1

Pennsylvania

2

Maryland

2

 

5

Making the whole number of pensioners on the roll

298

D, No. 5.

On the 16th November, 1832, the date of the last statement to Congress, there remained belonging to the privateer pension fund, invested as follows:

In the Maryland five per cents

$44,436 52

In the stock of the Bank of the United States

1,100 00

Making the sum of

$45,536 52

Since which time the sum of

1,869 47

in the Maryland five per cents, has been sold, in order to meet the payments due to pensioners on this roll, which left

$43,667 05

On the 16th September last the sum of

1,000 00

was invested in stock of the Bank of the United States, making the amount of stocks now belonging to the fund

$44,667 05

The income of the fund per annum is

$2,330 35

And the annual amount of claims upon it is estimated at

2,628 00

Which leaves a deficit of

$297 65

The number of pensioners on the privateer pension roll is—

Maine

3

Massachusetts

15

New York

9

Pennsylvania

1

Maryland

5

Whole number at this time on the roll

33

--366--

D, No. 6.

A statement exhibiting the balance in the Treasury to the credit of the navy hospital fund on the 31st October, 1832, and the amount of receipts and expenditures on account of said fund to 30th September, 1833, together with the balance in the Treasury to its credit on that day.

Balance on the 31st of October, 1832

$14,014 65

Receipts into the Treasury from the 1st of November, 1832, to the 30th September, 1833

19,940 58

 

$33,955 23

Amount of expenditures from 1st November, 1832, to 30th September, 1833

5,212 02

Balance to the credit of the fund, 30th September, 1833

$28,743 21

T. L. SMITH, Register.

Treasury Department, Register's Office, November 22, 1833.

E.

List of deaths in the navy of the United States, as ascertained at the Department, since the 1st December, 1832.

Name and rank.

Date.

Cause.

Place.

CAPTAIN.

 

 

 

William Bainbridge

July 27, 1833

Dropsy

Philadelphia.

master commandant.

 

 

 

John H. Bell

August 14, 1833

Fever

Westmoreland co., Va.

LIEUTENANTS.

 

 

 

William Pottinger

February 5, 1833

 

Hagerstown, Md.

John M. Sullivan

February 22, 1833

 

Brooklyn, N. Y.

Richard E. McMullin

January 28, 1833

Fall from poop

Sloop Warren, at Rio.

Joseph M. Nicholson

April 5, 1833

Protracted illness

Norfolk hospital.

John M. Rinker

May 31, 1833

Consumption

Philadelphia.

John A. Wish

October 25, 1833

Injury from the falling of small pair shears.

Navy yard, N. Y.

SURGEON.

 

 

 

Lewis Heermann

May 19, 1833

Cholera

New Orleans.

assistant surgeons.

 

 

 

Richard K. H. Sims

July 5, 1833

Consumption

Philadelphia.

William Milnor

April 16, 1833

Apoplexy

At sea.

Andrew E. Kennedy

June 13, 1833

Dysentery

Hospital at Batavia

PASSED MIDSHIPMEN.

 

 

 

William F. Irving

November 4, 1832

Consumption

New York.

John H. Mansby

July 13, 1833

Drowned

In the Delaware, off New Castle.

William F. Hove

August 14, 1833

Fever

King George county, Virginia.

MIDSHIPMEN.

 

 

 

William Pryor

April, 1833

Murdered

Nashville, Tennessee.

John Middleton

April 12, 1833

 

Norfolk.

SAILINGMASTER.

 

 

 

Joseph Williston

April 14, 1833

Effusion on the brain.

Navy yard, Boston.

GUNNER.

 

 

 

Joseph Andrews

October 19, 1832

 

Navy yard, Portsmouth, N. H.

SAILMAKER.

 

 

 

John Clementson

July 9, 1833

Brain fever

Norfolk.

MARINE OFFICER.

 

 

 

Brevet Captain J. C. Hall

May 17, 1833

Suicide

New York.

NAVY AGENT.

 

 

 

Isaac Phillips

September, 1833

Fever

Baltimore.

--367--

F.

List of dismissions from the navy of the United States since the 1st of December, 1832.

Name.

Date of dismission.

LIEUTENANT.

 

Robert B. Randolph

April 19, 1833.

PASSED MIDSHIPMAN.

 

Walter C. Cutts

May 17, 1833.

MIDSHIPMEN.

 

Philip M. Bos

June 21, 1833.

John E. Holt, jr

June 25, 1833.

John C. Davidson

June 25, 1833.

John W. Graham

July 9, 1833.

John C. Barker

July 9, 1833.

Jenjamin S. Sly

July 9, 1833.

Bohn B. Meigs

September 24, 1833.

G.

List of resignations in the navy of the United States since the 1st of December, 1832.

Name.

When accepted.

LIEUTENANTS.

 

George Izard

May 4, 1833.

John R. Cose

May 29, 1833.

Thomas R. Gerry

August 27, 1833.

J. Edward Calhoun

November 11, 1833.

CHAPLAINS.

 

H. H. Hays

April 18, 1833.

J. P. Fenner

September 23, 1833.

PASSED MIDSHIPMEN.

 

Charles A. Thompson

September 27, 1833.

Lorenzo T. Bennett

October 18, 1833.

ASSISTANT SURGEONS.

 

William G. Micks

October 18, 1833.

Richard Kennon

November 12, 1833.

MIDSHIPMEN.

 

William Russell

December 13, 1832.

Edward H. Perkins

January 2, 1833.

Benjamin D. Moore

January 2, 1833.

George Lansing

Feb'y 1, 1833, as of October 27, 1832.

Nathan B. Lane

February 27, 1833.

David B. Morgan

March 25, 1833.

Cranstoun Laurie

April 4, 1833.

David M. Stokes

April 15, 1833.

John L. Spencer

April 20, 1833.

E. L. Greenwood

May 13, 1833.

Francis E. Jaynor

May 27, 1833.

William C. Banister

June 6, 1833.

Henry Booraem

June 14, 1833.

Alexander M. Henderson

June 17, 1833.

Alexander K. Yancey

June 25, 1833.

Lewis P. Higbee

June 28, 1833.

George Butterfield

July 8, 1833.

Virgil McCracken

July 16, 1832, to take effect April 1, 1832.

Hugh H. Stockton

September 5, 1833.

Charles G. Bush

September 23, 1833.

Francis B. Wright

August 24, 1833.

A. C. Hinton

October 28, 1833.

William M. Wallace

November 1, 1833.

SAILINGMASTER.

 

John Barry

July 9, 1833.

BOATSWAIN.

 

John Ball

November 11, 1833.

GUNNER.

 

John Martin

December 18, 1832.

CARPENTERS.

 

James Jones

October 12, 1832, by Capt. Reed, commanding frigate Constellation.

Calvin Oaks

August 20, 1833.

Elliott Green

September 6, 1833.

--368--

Name.

When accepted.

MARINE OFFICERS.

 

Second Lieutenant A. C. McLean

May 8, 1833.

Second Lieutenant Francis S. Neville

July 15, 1833.

H.

Estimate submitted.

For procuring the live oak frames for a frigate and sloop-of-war, to be called Paul Jones and the Levant ... $50,000 00

I.

List of vessels in commission, their commanders and stations. -

Class.

Name.

Commanders.

Where employed.

Ship of the line.

Delaware

Captain H. E. Ballard

Mediterranean.

Frigate

United States

Captain John B. Nicholson

do

Frigate

Constellation

Captain George C. Read

do

Sloop

John Adams

Master Commandant P. P. Voorhees

do (ordered home.)

Schooner

Shark

Lieutenant Hiram Paulding

do

Sloop

Vandalia

Master Commandant Thomas T. Webb

West Indies.

do

St. Louis

Master Commandant Thomas M. Newell

do

Schooner

Grampus

Lieutenant Joseph Smoot

do

do

Porpoise

Lieutenant William Taylor

do

do

Experiment

Lieutenant Thomas Paine

do

Sloop

Lexington

Master Commandant Isaac McKeever

Coast of Brazil, (ordered home.)

do

Peacock

Master Commandant David Geisinger

do and India.

do

Natchez

Master Commandant John P. Zantzinger

do

do

Ontario

Master Commandant William D. Salter

do

Schooner

Enterprise

Lieutenant Samuel W. Downing

do

do

Boxer

Lieutenant William F. Shields

do and India.

Frigate

Potomac

Com. John Downes

In the Pacific, (ordered home.)

Sloop

Falmouth

Master Commandant F. H. Gregory

do (ordered home.)

do

Fairfield

Master Commandant E. A. F. Valette

do

do

Vincennes

Com. Alexander Wadsworth

do

Schooner

Dolphin

Lieutenant Ralph Voorhees

do

K, No. 1.

Statement showing the names, distribution, and condition of the vessels of the navy in ordinary, 1st November, 1833.

AT PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

Concord—sloop-of-war, requiring slight repairs.

AT CHARLESTOWN, MASS.

Columbus—ship of the line, requiring moderate repairs.

Independence—ship of the line, requiring a thorough repair.

Constitution—frigate, undergoing a thorough repair.

Erie—sloop-of-war, undergoing a thorough repair.

Boston—sloop-of-war, requiring considerable repairs.

AT BROOKLYN, N. Y.

Ohio—ship of the line, requiring extensive repairs.

Washington—ship of the line, requires thorough repairs.

Franklin—ship of the line, requires thorough repairs.

Hudson—frigate, requires rebuilding.

Brandywine—frigate, has just been coppered, and is nearly repaired for sea service

AT PHILADELPHIA.

Cyane—sloop-of-war, to be replaced.

Warren—sloop-of-war, just arrived, requires slight repairs.

Sea Gull—unfit for repairs.

AT GOSPORT, VA.

North Carolina—ship of the line, requires considerable repairs.

Java—frigate, to be replaced.

Guerriere—frigate, requires extensive repairs.

Congress—frigate, requires extensive repairs.

--369--

K, No. 2.

Statement of the vessels building at the several navy yards, under the law for the gradual increase of the navy.

AT PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

One ship of the line, one frigate.

AT CHARLESTOWN, MASS.

Two ships of the line, one frigate.

AT BROOKLYN, N. Y.

Two frigates.

AT PHILADELPHIA.

One ship of the line, one frigate

AT WASHINGTON.

One frigate,

AT GOSPORT.

One ship of the line, one frigate.

All of these vessels are under cover, and in a good state of preservation.

There is building, at the navy yard, Gosport, a frigate of the second class, to replace the Macedonian, condemned and broken up under a special act of Congress.

L.

Estimate submitted.

For building a powder magazine at Boston

$12,000 00

For building a powder magazine at New York

12,000 00

Total for magazines

$24,000 00

M.

Estimate submitted.

For procuring a store ship for the use of the service $40,000 00

N, No. 1.

Statement showing the progress made under the law for the gradual improvement of the navy.

Frames of live oak have been delivered at the different navy yards, as follows:

For two ships of the line, two frigates, and one sloop-of-war, at Charlestown, Mass.

For one frigate, at Brooklyn, New York.

For two frigates and one sloop-of-war, at Philadelphia.

For one frigate and one sloop-of-war, at Washington.

For two ships of the line, one frigate, and one sloop-of-war, at Gosport, Va.

Contracts for the frames of a frigate and sloop-of-war, at Portsmouth, have been made, but a small part only has been delivered; and upon the contract for the frame of a ship of the line, at Brooklyn, N. Y., none has been delivered.

Total quantity of live oak received, cubic feet 365,435

There is also on hand, at the different navy yards, belonging to this appropriation, of white

oak plank, board measure

206,887

White oak timber, cubic feet

198,652

Yellow pine timber, for plank, cubic feet

188,204

Yellow pine, mast and spar timber, cubic feet

44,560

White oak knees, in number

5,500

There have also been built, from this appropriation, at the different navy yards, for the preservation of timber, five substantial timber sheds.

Of the dry docks authorized under this appropriation, that which was constructed at Charlestown, Mass., was so far completed on the 24th June last as to receive the frigate Constitution for repairs. It is now completed. The total cost, including the engine and pump house, which will be available for other useful purposes, and all other incidental expenses, has been $677,089.78 1/3.

For the cost in detail the board beg leave to refer to paper N, No. 2, herewith enclosed. That which was constructed at the Navy yard, Gosport, was so far completed on the 17th of June last as to admit the ship of the line Delaware, and subsequently the North Carolina.

--370--

The only objects yet unfinished are the floating gate, necessarily delayed to admit the above mentioned ships, and to deepen the entrance a little from the channel to the gate. The expenditures to the 31st of October were $943,676.73, and the engineer estimates that it will require $7,000 to complete it. This, as at Charlestown, includes the engine and pump house and all other incidental expenses. It is expected it will be finally completed in the course of the present year. For the detailed expenditures on this dock the board refer to the enclosed paper, N, No. 3. From the test given by the occupation of both docks, the board feel confirmed in the opinion that they are constructed in the most substantial and durable manner, and will prove highly useful to the nation, and permanent testimonials of the ability and attention of Col. Baldwin, the superintending engineer.

The board propose to advertise for offers for other articles, under this appropriation, as required by your instructions, so soon as they can obtain some information which is deemed essential to enable them to determine upon the most advantageous expenditure.

About $150,000 have been expended for the purchase and reception of timber, and for the preservation and cultivation of live oak timber.

Navy Commissioners' Office.

N, No. 2.

Abstract of expenditures on the different branches of the dry dock in Boston, for the year ending October 3, 1833, and also from the commencement to the completion of the work.

No.

 

For the past year.

From the commencement.

Materials

Labor.

Total.

Materials.

Labor.

Total.

1

Office

$212 43

 

$212 43

$1,784 53

$266 19 3/4

$2,050 72 3/4

2

Tools

362 82

 

362 82

2,537 85

1,861 09 1/2

4,398 94 1/2

3

Iron and steel

36 91

$634 69

671 60

11,305 48

22,622 99

33,928 47

4

Driving machines

 

 

 

1,918

20 1,188 74

3,106 94

5

Scows, boats, &c.

 

 

 

1,355 59 1/2

687 09 1/4

2,042 68 3/4

6

Coffer dam

 

 

 

4,399 18

7,103 903

11,503 083

7

Pier wharves

135 82

2,129 74

2,265 56

7,286 01 3/4

6,871 83

14,157 84 3/4

8

Spruce and pine timber

 

 

 

1,967 31

 

1,967 31

9

Blacksmith shop

164 25

164 25

8,181 58

312 21 1/2

8,493 79 1/2

 

10

Miscellaneous

3,857 15

1,580 22

5,437 37

11,594 54 1/2

19,015 29 3/4

30,609 84 1/4

11

Dry quay wall

 

 

 

5,625 37

102 81

5,728 18

12

Filling coffer dam

 

 

 

2,573 28

537 34

3,110 62

13

Surveys and plans of navy yards

 

 

 

1,132 18

1,764 37

2,896 55

14

Foundation of dock

 

 

 

18,686 16

22,451 40

41,137 56

15

Draining

 

 

 

11,654 44

9,537 27

21,191 71

16

Excavation

 

 

 

2,259 86

29,795 59

32,055 45

17

Masonry of dock

1,464 72

835 80

2,300 52

116,953 52

123,502 66

240,456 18

18

Great steam engine

1,190 28

1,933 19

3,123 47

12,015 12

2,846 76

14,861 88

19

Superintendence

2,095 46

3,048 82

5,144 23

14,955 80

30,464 37

45,420 17

20

Banking up behind walls, &c

3,300 68

 

3,300 68

7,467 31

13,090 77

20,558 08

21

Turning gates

1,746 74

1,927 90

3,674 64

16,806 66

9,509 95

26,316 61

22

Great pumps

212 92

 

212 92

28,114 55

 

28,114 55

23

Removing coffer dam, &c.

2,979 49

4,794 48

7,773 97

4,642 50

9,623 59

14,266 09

24

Steam engine house, wells, &c

454 73

376 26

830 99

14,707 39

19,593 83

34,301 22

25

Floating gate

16,096 23

11,537 94

27,634 17

19,689 85

12,288 06

31,977 91

26

Wicket gates

313 16

 

313 16  

2,308 06

129 30

2,437 36

 

 

$34,623 79

$28,799 04

$63,422 83

$331,922 34 2/3

$345,167 43 1/2

$677,089 78 1/3

--371--

N, No. 3.

Abstract of expenditures on the different branches of the dry dock at Gosport, Virginia, for the year ending October 31, 1833, and also from the commencement of the work to the same day.

No.

 

For the past year.

From the commencement.

Materials.

Labor.

Total.

Materials.

Labor.

Total.

1

Office

$96 60

 

$96 60

$1,788 91

$959 87

$2,748 78

2

Tools

2,020 54

$6,888 19

8,909 73

16,286 22

17,849 49

34,135 71

3

Iron, nails, &c.

1,213 43

 

1,213 43

11,155 29

 

11,155 29

4

Driving machine

 

 

 

94 75

929 68

1,024 43

5

Lighters, boats, &c

207 43

299 10

506 53

3,500 01

2,760 29

6,260 30

6

Cofferdam

 

 

 

9,317 60

14,215 24

23,532 84

7

Pier wharves

 

 

 

6,596 03

4,376 47

10,972 50

8

Pine timber, plank, &c.

 

 

 

6,639 05

 

6,639 05

9

Blacksmiths shop

407 25

 

407 25

4,942 09

615 08

5,557 17

10

Miscellaneous

4,085 47

3,435 45

7,520 92

14,087 21

20,954 34

35,010 55

11

Cob wharves

3,005 69

 

3,005 69  

4,042 42

9,980 17

14,022 59

12

Stables

714 83

401 09

1,115 92

10,027 96

2,750 39

12,778 35

13

Surveys and plans of navy yards

 

 

 

1,057 69

2,302 57

3,360 26

14

Foundation of dock

 

 

 

22,736 57

41,360 89

64,097 46

15

Draining

1,397 02

3,075 49

4,472 51

13,341 97

20,461 49

33,803 46

16

Excavation

 

 

 

2,744 76

50,827 57

53,572 33

17

Masonry of dock

1,430 59

25,270 09

39,400 68

248,972 83

201,816 79

450,789 62

18

Carpenter's shop

 

 

 

87 67

947 78

1,035 45

19

Superintendence

2,000 00

3,967 08

5,967 08

13,462 62

17,794 26

31,256 88

20

Turning gates

611 86

3,573 92

4,185 78

14,546 10

8,042 33

22,588 43

21

Banking up

255 38

 

255 38

1,745 72

9,693 00

11,438 72

22

Wells and tunnel

 

243 07

243 07

3,367 59

10,394 43

13,762 02

23

Great engine house

1,192 14

1,467 31

2,659 45

17,796 12

16,105 85

33,901 97

24

Great steam engine and pumps

3,050 70

190 01

3,240 71

26,271 68

1,673 54

27,945 22

25

Floating gate

11,103 19

13,018 35

24,121 54

11,103 19

13,018 35

24,121 54

26

Removing coffer dam

 

8,134 81

8,134 81

 

8,134 81

8,134 81

 

 

$42,486 43

$72,969 65

$115,456 08

$465,712 05

$477,964 68

$943,676 73

O, No. 1.

Reports on the bar at Pensacola.

United States Navy Yard, Pensacola, August 22, 1833.

Sir:

It affords me great pleasure, in compliance with your order to examine and report upon the practicability of deepening the bar at the entrance of the harbor at Pensacola, and also to give, as far as practicable with the limited means at my command, the character of the bottom to be removed, to be able to speak in such terms of a point so important to the interest of the south and west of our country, as will, I hope, induce you to recommend its being put on trial. As a preliminary step to this report, I had an examination of the bar and the nature of the bottom. The bar itself does not exceed in extent over 1,000 yards; the bottom, as far as could be ascertained, was composed of a pure white sand, very compact and firm. My next object was to ascertain if, since the discovery of the harbor and first survey of the bar, any material change had taken place in the depth or courses necessary to pass over it in the greatest quantity of water; and, if so, at what periods and under what circumstances. This has necessarily led me into the examination of many works treating on the topography, &c., of the country, as also to call upon some of the most respectable and talented inhabitants of the city of Pensacola for any information in relation to this object, whether traditional or otherwise. It would appear from these researches, that, in the year 1709 (although there is no doubt but that a survey and examination was had previous, and that the harbor was then called the harbor Siquenza), a French officer, by name Mons. de Jancourt, addressed a report, on the very point in question, to the minister of the French marine. The report I have no means of coming at. The next notice I find is contained in "Postlethwait's Dictionary of Trade and Commerce," under the head Mississippi, and states as follows:

"As the harbor of Pensacola will appear to be a considerable acquisition to Britain, it may be of some use to give the following account of it, from F. Laval, royal professor of mathematics, and master of the Marine academy at Toulon, who was sent to Louisiana on purpose to make observations, 1719, and had the accounts of the officers who took Pensacola at that time, and surveyed the place. The road of Pensacola is the only good port there for large ships, and Ship Island for small ones, where vessels that draw from thirteen to fourteen feet water may ride in safety under the island in fifteen feet, and a good holding ground, as well as in the other ports, which are only open roads exposed to the south, and from west to east.

"Pensacola is in the north latitude 30 deg. 25 min., and is the only road in the Bay of Mexico in which ships can be safe from all winds. It is land-locked on every side, and will hold a great number of ships, which have a very good anchorage in it, in a good holding ground. You will find not less than twenty-one feet on the bar which is at the entrance into the road, provided you keep in the deepest part of the channel.

"Before a ship enters the harbor, she should bring the fort of Pensacola to bear between north and south 3/4 east, and keep that course till she is west, or west 1/4 south, from the fort on the island of St.

--372--

Rose; that is, till that fort bears east 1/4 north; then she must bear away a little to the land on the west side, keeping about midway between that and the island, to avoid a bank on this last, which runs out to some distance west-northwest from the point of the island.

"In 1719, Pensacola was taken by Mr. Champmerlin, in the Hercules man-of-war of 64 guns, but carried only 56, in company with the Mars, pierced for 60 guns, but had only 54, and the Witon, pierced for 54 guns, but carried only 50, with two frigates of 36 and 20 guns.

"The admiral was on board the Hercules, which drew 21 feet of water, and there were but 22 feet into the harbor, so that they despaired of carrying in this ship. But an old Canadian, named Grimean, a man of experience, who was perfectly acquainted with the coast, boasted of being able to do it, and succeeded, for which he was the next year honored with letters of noblesse."

In the foregoing account from Mons. Laval, the measurement is French; consequently, the minimum depth of the bar, in the ratio of seven ells of Paris to nine yards English, must be 22 feet 9 inches; and the 22 feet mentioned as being on the bar, equal to 23 10/12 feet, or nearly 24 feet English. Of the unchangeable nature of the bar there is a chain of proof, from the earliest data—those of Mons. de Jancourt to those of Mons. Laval; from the sailing directions of the latter to those of Goult, and from thence to the present day, or to the latest official surveys of our own government, by Col. Kearney, of the topographical corps of engineers. In all these surveys and examinations, very little, if any, variation will be found either in the courses or depth of water; and the period embraced is about a century and a quarter.

From the foregoing information and detail, and from my own observation during a period of some years, I am induced to believe that the bar at the entrance of Pensacola harbor is a permanent bank of sand, not subject to be influenced by the winds, the waves, or the currents of the ocean, nor is there any deposit from any of the waters emptying into the bay.

Having come to this "conclusion, I see no difficulty in deepening the bar to almost any extent that may be desirable, but to the depth of seven feet nothing can be more practicable.

The difficulties that have been overcome at Nantucket are much greater than any that offer themselves here. That the bar will remain at the depth excavated, I infer from the want, heretofore, of any action, either by winds or currents, on its depth or course. The more difficult part of the call made on me still remains to be complied with. The Department are aware that my duties have not led me to the study of the power of the steam engine, as now understood and applied, and, of course, will receive with great indulgence any remark that may be made by me.

Captain Chase, of the corps of engineers, (to whom is entrusted the general superintendence of all fortifications being erected on the shore of the Gulf of Mexico,) made a report in relation to the deepening of the bar at Pensacola, entitled "Memoir and Estimate on the Improvement of the Pensacola Bar;" he states (going into detail) that a sum not exceeding $106,690 would excavate 1,385 yards long, by 390 wide, adding to the present depth on the bar three feet, throughout its whole extent. But it is desirable that an additional three feet should be excavated: the sum of $106,690 must be increased $40,000, making the amount $146,690, and giving a depth of from 29 1/2 to 30 feet water. In the estimate as made by Captain Chase, the power of the steam dredging engine is calculated as being competent to the excavation of fifty cubic feet the hour. I fear that an engine, the cost of which should not exceed $10,000, would lack the power given it by Captain Chase. The bar is so firm and compact, that an attempt by me to examine at the distance of four feet below the surface failed, by the twisting off of the auger, although the shank was an inch and a half in diameter.

In the power of the engine, and the cost of the vessel, which Captain Chase put down at $6,000, I differ with him, but in all other points of his report I am of his opinion. I therefore take the liberty of enclosing it to you. The vessel would, in all probability, cost from $8,000 to $10,000.

I need scarcely add, that I should be most happy to give my attention to this object, in connection with my other duties here. Captain Chase and myself would cheerfully unite our exertions to accomplish an object of so much importance to the country, and one of us could always be present.

I am at present, and have been, making observations upon the effect of the caisson upon the bottom as it sinks. When placed in the position it now is, there was but fourteen feet water, the bottom hard sand, of nearly the same firmness as that composing the bar; since which, it has been sunk five feet in the same position, and has washed away the bottom five feet, leaving at present nineteen feet where originally there was but fourteen.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. J. DALLAS.

To the Hon. Levi Woodbury, Secretary of the Navy, Washington.

O, No. 2.

Memoir and estimate on the improvement of the bar of Pensacola.

[Transmitted to the House of Representatives by the Secretary of War, Feb. 5, 1830.]

The bar, at the entrance of the harbor of Pensacola, is the only impediment to its well-being as a naval depot. The impediment may by removed, and, in proportion to its importance, at a very small expense.

It is unnecessary, in this place, to dwell on the importance of Pensacola as a naval depot, in conjunction with the defence of the Gulf of Mexico maritime frontier; it is sufficient to know that it is the only harbor on the gulf, within the limits of the United States, at which a great naval arsenal can be established; and it is satisfactory to know that such an arsenal has not only been commenced, but that it is too intimately acquainted with the great western and southwestern interests, to fear the opposition which personal or sectional views may give rise to.

If the importance, then, of this harbor is felt and appreciated, any proposition for its improvement must be interesting. The following data have, therefore, been collected, and are now respectfully submitted to the Engineer Department, to be added to the Information which it may already possess on this subject.

--373--

By comparing the oldest charts with those of the present day, we do not find any alteration of the position of the bar. The excellent chart of the survey of the Gulf of Mexico, executed by the British in 1763, exhibits the same soundings as were found by Col. Kearney, in his critical survey of the harbor, 1822. The depth of water on any part of the bar does not appear to have increased or decreased since it first begun to be known to navigators; and we have, therefore, strong grounds for our belief that an increased depth of water, obtained by artificial means, would remain without aggression.

The largest ships-of-war in our service do not draw over twenty-four feet water; it is, therefore, proposed to obtain twenty-seven and a half feet water at low tide. This, however, may be increased ad libitum. The capacity of the improved dredging machine is sufficient to the task; and we have only to glance at similar improvements, which are being made at Nantucket, and which are recommended for Ocracock shoals, to show that perseverance, and a judicious application of the proper means, will secure the results desired.

The improvement of the bars and shoals at Nantucket and Ocracock have in view the removal of obstacles more difficult to surmount than are presented at the bar of Pensacola; yet, the operations at Nantucket are reported as very successful.

The military engineer, in charge of that improvement, states that the channel already excavated does not fill up, but, on the contrary, that it perceptibly increases in its dimensions.

The vicinity of the public works at St. Rosa's Island would afford many facilities, by reason of the wharves, storehouses, (the casement of the fort,) and other organized means necessary to the operations. The superintendence of the operations would be cheerfully undertaken by the commanding engineer, by which a saving of expense would be exhibited on this score. In short, the manifest advantages that would accrue to the operations would alone induce their prosecution simultaneously with the public defences, even if other inducements were wanting for their speedy commencement and completion.

The depth of water at the pinch of the bar is 21 1/2 feet at low tides. From the pinch, it gradually deepens seaward to 27 1/2 feet to a distance of six hundred yards, and towards the harbor it deepens to 32 feet in a distance of 875 yards.

The whole distance is 1,385 yards, as is indicated on the accompanying chart by the parallelogram A, B, C, D. It being proposed to obtain a depth of 27 1/2 feet; the greatest depth to be excavated is six feet, and the least depth 0; the average depth is, of course, three feet. It is proposed to excavate a channel 130 yards wide, in the first instance, which is sufficiently wide for our largest vessels to pass through, with a fair wind, in safety; a steam tow vessel would bring them into port, if the wind were adverse.

It would be well to increase the width to 260 yards, or even 390 yards, after the first section of 130 yards shall have been accomplished.

The 1st section of 130 yards X 1,385 yards, in length

=

180,050.

The 2d section of 260 yards X 1,385 yards long, 21 feet deep

=

360,100.

The 3d section of 390 yards X 1,385 + 1

=

546,150.

 

ESTIMATE.

Cost of a steam dredging engine

$10,000 00

Cost of a vessel of 100 tons

6,000 00

Cost of sis receiving lighters, at $500 dollars each

3,000 00

Cost of one steam tow vessel

5,000 00

Cost of contingencies of boats, &c

1,000 00

Cost of apparatus

$25,000 00

Pay of superintendent of steam engine

1,000 00

Pay of three men, at $15 per month

540 00

Pay of six men for lighters

1,080 00

Pay of one captain of tow vessel,

480 00

Pay of one assistant steam engineer

360 00

Pay of three men, at $15

540 00

Pay of four men for all work, at $15

720 00

Subsistence of seventeen persons, at $8, one year

1,622 00

Fuel, 580 cords for dredging machine, at $3

1,500 00

Fuel, 150 cords for tow vessel

450 00

 

$8,302 00

Repairs and contingencies

1,698 00

 

$10,000 00

This would be the annual cost of one engine

$35,000 00

From observations upon the weather for one year, it. is supposed that the machine could be worked one hundred and twenty days, between the 1st of April and 30th September, or two-thirds of the time; and sixty days from the 1st October to the 31st March, or one-third of the time, making one hundred and eighty days per annum.

The capacity of the machine is fixed at fifty cubic yards per hour. We fix the working hours per day at ten, which gives 1,800 hours per year, and 90,000 cubic yards.

90,000 cubic yards would cost the first year 035,000, or 38,880 cents per cubic yard.

The machine being on hand, the second year, its repairs would cost say

$5,000 00

Its management

10,000 00

90,000 cubic yards would cost the second year

$15,000 00

Or 17.44 cents per cubic yard.

 

--374--

It has been shown that 180,000 cubic yards must be excavated to secure a channel 27 1/2 feet deep and 130 yards wide; now, 180,000 cubic yards, by the above estimate, would cost as follows:

90,000 cubic yards, first year

$35,000 00

90,000 cubic yards, second year

15,000 00

180,000

$50,000 00

Which is at the rate of 27.777 cents per cubic yard.

 

We will suppose the work to be performed in one year by two machines:
One machine and appendages, its management, &c., will cost

$35,000 00

Two machines, as above, will cost

$70,000 00

But as one tow vessel would be sufficient to attend upon two machines,
we will deduct the cost of one tow vessel

$5,000 00

Expense of labor, fuel, &c., for the same

2,310 00

 

7,310 00

The cost, then, of 188,800 cubic yards will be

$62,690 00

Which is 34.82 cents per cubic yard.

 

The advantages resulting from the use of two machines would be:

First. The opening of a channel in one year, of sufficient dimensions to admit ships of the line.

Second. If it were advisable to increase the width of the channel to 250 yards, or double the width, the operations of the same could be performed the second year at a reduced expense; for, the two machines being on hand, the expenditures in excavating 180,000 cubic yards more would be as follows:

Pay of operatives and contingencies

$10,000 00

Repairs and contingencies

10,000 00

Cost of additional 180,000 cubic yards

$20,000 00

Or 11.11 cents per cubic yard.

 

The cost, then, of a channel-way 1,385 yards + 1 yard X 150 yards=180,000 yards:

The operation being performed in one year, would be

$66,690 00

The cost of a similar section in the second year would be

20,000 00

360,000 yards excavation, exhibiting a channel 1,385 yards long, 9 yards deep, and 260 yards wide, could be performed for the sum of

$86,690 00

To arrive at the cost of making the channel 590 yards wide, we have only to add to $86,690 the cost of excavating 180,000 cubic yards, on the terms stated for the second section.

20,000 00

 

$106,690 00

RECAPITULATION.

Cost of excavating a channel-way over the bar of Pensacola, exhibiting a depth of 27 1/2 feet water in low tides, of the several dimensions stated, as follows:

 

Yds.

 

Yds.

 

Deep.

 

Cubic yds.

 

Cost.

 

First year's operation

130

X

1385

+

1

=

180,000

=

$62,690

 

Second year's operation

130

X

1385

+

1

=

180,000

=

20,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$86,690

 

260

X

1385

+

1

=

360,000

 

 

 

Third year's operation

130

X

1385

+

1

=

180,000

=

 

20,000

 

390

X

1385

+

1

=

540,000

=

 

$106,690

All of which is respectfully submitted.

WM. H. CHASE, Capt. Engineers.

St. Rosa's Island, December 16, 1829.

P.

Navy Yard, Charlestown, September 14, 1833.

Sir: I have the honor to inform you that Richard D. Harris, Esq., in behalf of the heirs of the late John Harris, has this day served a writ upon me, for lands claimed by them in this navy yard.

I have enclosed the writ to the district attorney, at Boston, and shall be governed by his decision in the case.

I am, very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

J. D. ELLIOTT.

To the Hon. Levi Woodbury, Secretary of the Navy, Washington.

--375--

Q.

Estimate submitted.

For completing hospital at Chelsea,

$13,500 00

For furnishing the hospital for use of the sick

5,250 00

For completing hospital at Brooklyn, New York

18,000 00

For furnishing for use of the sick

5,250 00

For completing the north wing and rear building, &c., for hospital at Norfolk,

10,000 00

For enclosing hospital at Pensacola

2,500 00

For furnishing hospital for use of the sick

3,000 00

For building house for surgeon at the hospital near Pensacola

6,500 00

Total for hospitals

$64,000 00

R.

Suppression of the slave trade, under the act of the 3d March, 1819.

1832.

 

Dr.

November 19.

To balance in the Treasury this day

$6,913 91

1833.

 

 

February 20.

To amount appropriated by act of this date

5,000 00

 

 

$11,913 91

November 19.

To balance in the Treasury

$10,263 91

1833.

 

Cr.

March 1.

By bill of exchange of Joseph Mechlin, agent, for his salary

$750 00

August 5.

By bill of exchange of Joseph Mechlin, agent, for his salary

750 00

October 3.

By bill of exchange of Joseph Mechlin, agent, for his salary

150 00

November 19.

By balance in the Treasury

10,263 91

 

 

$11,913 91

S, No. 1.

There will be required for the navy during the year 1834, in addition to the unexpended balances that may remain on hand on the 1st day of January, 1834, the sum of three million two hundred and ninety-two thousand two hundred and twenty-four dollars and twenty-one cents.

1. For pay and subsistence of officers of the navy, and pay of seamen

$1,487,245 21

2. For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishments, at the several yards

61,180 00

3. For provisions

450,000 00

4. For the repairs of vessels in ordinary, and the repairs and wear and tear of vessels in commission

590,000 00

5. For medicines and surgical instruments, hospital stores, and other expenses on account of the sick

40,000 00

6. For improvements, and the necessary repairs of navy yards

354,800 00

7. For ordnance and ordnance stores

10,000 00

8. For defraying the expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz: for freight and transportation of materials and stores of every description; for wharfage and dockage, storage and rent; traveling expenses of officers, and transportation of seamen; house rent, chamber money, and fuel and candles to officers, other than those attached to navy yards and stations, and for officers in sick quarters where there is no hospital, and for funeral expenses; for commissions, clerk hire, and office rent; stationery and fuel to navy agents; for premiums and incidental expenses of recruiting; for apprehending deserters; for compensation to judge advocates; for per diem allowances to persons attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, and to officers engaged in extra service, beyond the limits of their stations; for printing and stationery of every description, and for books, maps, charts, and mathematical and nautical instruments, chronometers, models, and drawings; for purchase and repair of fire and steam engines, and for machinery; for purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, timber wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage, and towing ships-of-war; for cabin furniture of vessels in commission, and for furniture of officers' houses at navy yards; for taxes on navy yards and public property; for assistance rendered to vessels in distress; for incidental labor at navy yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; for coal and other fuel for forges, foundries, and steam engines; for candles, oil, and fuel for vessels in commission and in ordinary; for repairs of magazines and powder houses; for preparing moulds for ships to be built; and for no other object or purpose whatever

295,000 00

9. For contingent expenses for objects not hereinbefore enumerated

4,000 00

 

$3,292,224 21

--376--

S, No. 2.

Estimate of the pay and subsistence of all persons in the navy, attached to vessels in commission, for the year 1834, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

 

Ships-of-the-line

Frigates, 1st class.

Frigates, 2d class.

Sloops, 1st class.

Schooners.

Total number of each.

Total amount of each grade.

1

3

1

11

7

Captains

2

3

1

3

 

9

$20,290 00

Masters commandant

 

 

 

11

 

11

12,938 75

Lieutenants commanding

 

 

 

 

7

7

8,233 75

Lieutenants

10

18

5

44

21

98

94,570 00

Sailingmasters

1

3

1

8

 

13

8,612 50

Pursers

1

3

1

11

7

23

15,237 00

Surgeons of the fleet

1

1

 

2

 

4

8,045 00

Surgeons

 

2

1

9

 

12

14,518 08

Assistant surgeons

4

6

2

11

7

30

24,540 00

Chaplains

1

1

 

 

 

2

1,325 00

Midshipmen

34

72

20

132

28

286

65,208 00

Boatswains

1

3

1

10

 

15

4,968 75

Gunners

1

3

1

10

 

15

4,968 75

Carpenters

1

3

1

10

 

15

4,968 75

Sailmakers

1

3

1

11

 

16

5,300 00

Secretaries

1

3

 

 

 

4

4,000 00

Schoolmasters

1

3

1

11

 

16

2,260 00

Clerks

1

3

1

11

7

23

6,900 00

Boatswains' mates

6

9

3

22

14

54

12,312 00

Gunners' mates

3

6

2

11

 

22

5,016 00

Carpenters' mates

3

6

2

11

7

29

6,412 00

Sailmakers' mates

2

3

1

11

7

24

5,472 00

Quartermasters' mates

12

27

9

55

21

124

23,808 00

Quartergunners

20

36

10

66

28

160

28,800 00

Yeomen

3

9

3

33

7

55

9,900 00

First captains of forecastles and tops

8

24

8

88

 

128

23,040 00

Second captains of forecastles and tops

6

18

6

66

 

96

16,128 00

Captains' stewards

1

3

1

11

7

23

4,968 00

Captains' cooks

1

3

1

11

 

16

3,456 00

Coopers

1

3

1

11

 

16

3,456 00

Armorers

1

3

1

11

 

16

3,456 00

Armorers' mates

2

3

1

 

7

13

2,340 00

Masters-at-arms

1

3

1

11

 

16

3,456 00

Ships' corporals

4

6

2

 

 

12

2,016 00

Cooks

1

3

1

11

7

23

4,968 00

Masters of the band

1

3

1

 

 

5

1,080 00

Musicians, 1st class

6

12

3

 

 

21

3,024 00

Musicians, 2d class

5

9

2

 

 

16

1,920 00

Seamen

300

450

120

660

98

1,628

234,432 00

Ordinary seamen

240

360

100

330

49

1,079

129,480 00

Landsmen

100

150

30

220

21

521

50,016 00

Boys

46

81

21

132

35

325

22,680 00

One hundred and thirty-six passed midshipmen

 

 

 

 

 

 

53,210 00

Ninety-four midshipmen, who may become entitled to be arranged as passed midshipmen, after their examination

 

 

 

 

 

 

15,345 50

 

834

1,360

367

2,065

385

5,011

$981,076 33

S, No. 3.

Exhibit of the officers, &c., awaiting orders and on furlough, for the year 1834, being part of the first item, of the general estimate.

 

Captain.

Master commandant.

Lieutenants.

Passed midshipmen.

Midshipmen.

Pursers.

Surgeons.

Assistant surgeons.

Chaplains.

Masters.

Sailmakers.

Amount.

Awaiting orders

15

13

98

6

 

7

7

 

64

337

43

$194,963 38

On furlough

1

9

3

2

1

 

1

2

1

 

 

7,951 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$202,914 88

--377--

S, No. 4.

Estimate of the number, pay, &c., of officers, &c., required for five receiving vessels, for the year 1834, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

 

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia.

 Norfolk.

Baltimore.

Total.

 Amount.

Masters commandant

1

1

1

1

 

4

$4,705 00

Lieutenants

3

3

2

3

2

13

12,545 00

Pursers

1

1

 

1

 

3

1,987 50

Assistant surgeons

1

1

 

1

 

3

2,081 25

Midshipmen

3

3

2

3

2

13

2,964 00

Boatswains' mates

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,140 00

Carpenters' mates

1

1

1

1

 

4

912 00

Stewards

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,080 00

Cooks

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,080 00

Seamen

2

2

2

2

2

10

1,440 00

Ordinary seamen

6

6

4

6

2

24

8,880 00

Boys

10

10

2

10

2

34

2,448 00

 

31

31

17

31

13

123

$35,262 75

S, No. 5.

Estimate of the pay, &c., of the officers attached to recruiting stations, ordnance service, and depot for instruments, charts, &c., &c., for the year 1834, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

 

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Norfolk.

Baltimore.

Total.

Amount.

Masters commandant

1

1

1

1

1

5

$10,053 75

Lieutenants

2

2

2

2

2

10

9,650 00

Midshipmen

2

2

2

2

2

10

3,192 50

Surgeons

1

1

1

1

1

5

5,425 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$28,321 25

 

 

ORDNANCE SERVICE.

One captain

$1,930 00

One lieutenant

965 00

 

$2,955 00

DEPOT FOR INSTRUMENTS, ETC.

One lieutenant

$965 00

One passed midshipman

482 50

 

$1,447 50

--378--

S, No. 6.

Estimate of the pay, rations, and all other allowances of officers and [h s], at the navy yards and stations, for the year 1834.

PORTSMOUTH.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

$300

40

20

2

 

2,010 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Surgeon

1

60

 

 

4

20

20

1

1,412 25

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Midshipmen

3

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

957 75

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Gunner

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Carpenter

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Sailmaker

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$14,137 50

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$965 00

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Seamen

4

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

941 00

Ordinary seamen

10

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

2,112 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$4,337 75

Civil establishment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

*200

 

 

 

 

$1,400 00

Master builder and inspector of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

500 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

350 00

Clerk to master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$4,350 00

Whole amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$22,825 25

BOSTON.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

 

40

20

2

 

1,710 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Surgeon

1

60

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,412 25

Assistant surgeon

1

30

2

$145

16

14

 

1

950 75

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

200

12

9

 

1

1,091 75

Teacher of mathematics

1

40

2

90

12

9

 

1

981 75

Teacher of languages

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Midshipmen

4

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,277 00

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Notes.—House rent is estimated for officers, and is to be allowed only in cases where no house is furnished by the government.

Pay and rations of surgeons and their assistants are averaged, under the law of 20th May, 1828.

*Directed February, 1830, by Secretary of the Navy.

--379--

S, No. 6.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Gunner

1

$20

2

 

12

9

 

1

$651 75

Carpenter

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Sailmaker

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Steward, assistant to purser

1

30

1

 

 

 

 

 

451 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$20,291 50

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenants

3

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$2,895 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Midshipmen

6

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,915 50

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50