--541--

23d Congress.]

No. 551.

[1st Session.

A PLAN FOR EQUALIZING THE PAY AND EMOLUMENTS OF THE OFFICERS OF THE ARMY AND NAVY, AND PROVIDING FOR AN INCREASE OF THE PAY OF THE LATTER.

COMMUNICATED TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, MAY 17, 1834.

Mr. Watmough, from the select committee appointed on the 27th of December last to inquire into the expediency of equalizing the pay of the officers of the army and navy of the United States, and to which the bill to equalize and regulate the pay of the officers of the army and navy of the United States had been recommitted, reported:

Your committee have been actuated by a sincere desire to place the navy on that footing of comfort and respectability, in point of pay, which the importance of the service, and the high duties and responsibilities it involves, demand at the hands of Congress. A majority of them, however, were impressed with the idea that the amount to be thus annually and necessarily drawn from the Treasury, beyond what is at present required, might be compensated by such reduction in the extra allowances and emoluments of the army as could be made without injustice to that branch of the public service. With this view, and after the most mature and anxious investigation, your committee reported the bill No. 334, to equalize the pay of the officers of the army and navy of the United States.

By a reference to the official document from the Department of "War, hereto annexed, it will at once be seen that this effort at economy without injustice, like the former made by the honorable Secretaries of the War and Navy Departments, has failed to effect its object, and that the bill reported, far from reducing, has actually increased the already ample pay of the army by an annual amount of upwards of seventy thousand dollars.

By a reference to the comparative statement annexed, marked B, made by the Navy Department, it will be found that the whole increase of navy pay proposed only amounts to the sum of $116,053.25 annually, a sum comparatively insignificant, when the value and importance of the service to the security and independence of the country, with all its vast relations, are taken into view.

All the circumstances of the case, therefore, considered, the committee unanimously concur in the opinion that the principle of equalization, as heretofore sought to be established between the two services, is inexpedient and impracticable, and that the equality desired should be effected by a reference solely to the pay of the navy, admitted on all hands to be entirely inadequate, rather than by deranging the organization or affecting the harmony or existing efficiency of the army of the United States. They have been brought to this conclusion by the whole course of the evidence developed in the prosecution of the object proposed.

A majority of them placed implicit reliance in the soundness of the principles assumed in the bill lately reported. Yet, when analyzed, these principles are found to fail, and results, altogether different from those contemplated, are produced.

It might, likewise, have been well supposed that, from their complete knowledge of the whole subject, and means of information within their power, the honorable Secretaries of the War and Navy Departments could most readily have produced a plan of equalization likely to prove entirely satisfactory. It is fairly to be presumed that each set himself to work with a determination to do what was best for the general interests, and, at the same time, guard, as far as could be, the interest each had in charge. And what was the result in their case? A plan that pleased no one—that, while it unsettled all previous legislation, established no just principle for the future. It is true they in part relieved the pressing necessities of the naval, but did they not, at the same time, inflict injustice on the land service? This, it is believed, will not be denied.

It is to be presumed that Congress passed the several acts increasing- the pay and emoluments of the army with due care and deliberation, and it must be admitted that the officers of the army were justly entitled to view the proceedings of the legislature in their favor as the settled policy of the country towards them; that policy upon which they might depend, and that to which, so long as they faithfully and honestly and patriotically performed the duties of their several stations, they might look as to the source of their own maintenance, and as to the assured means of comfort and subsistence to their families.

As to the expediency of the measure proposed, your committee cannot do better than refer the House, which they respectfully do, to the annexed communication, marked No. 6, made to the Secretary of War,

--542--

in relation to this very subject, by the present paymaster general of the army, known as one of the most experienced and distinguished officers of this or any country.

This communication embraces every topic involved in the consideration of army pay and emoluments, and is believed to be conclusive, in all respects, against the principle of annual compensation in lieu of pay and allowances, as at present established.

The justice, therefore, of any sudden change in relation to them may well be questioned. The injustice and inexpediency of such change being therefore established, the effect cannot be other than seriously detrimental. Indeed, such instability in legislation, of late much too prevalent, is certainly to be deprecated. An act of justice to-day too frequently gives place to an act of caprice on the morrow; local jealousies and local expediency too often usurp the place of general interest; and your statute book becomes encumbered with various conflicting laws, each requiring separate explanatory acts, and all tending to create and fix more firmly in the public mind the fatal passion of all others best calculated to diminish the degree of confidence in our free and happy institutions essential to their preservation, and which it is especially the duty of Congress to foster, and eventually to derange the healthful action of the government, if not entirely subvert it.

Your committee, therefore, on due deliberation, and for the reasons above stated, ask leave respectfully to submit the accompanying bill, regulating the pay of the navy of the United States, by way of amendment, and in substitution of the one already reported.

The bill now substituted varies not greatly in amount, although necessarily in many of its principles, from the one lately reported.

The amendment proposes an increased compensation to the senior officer of the navy. It is certainly true, as stated in the former report, that, by the law, all captains over fifteen years' standing rank with the highest grade acknowledged in the army, that of major general. So far, therefore, as this goes, there is a perfect equality among the captains over fifteen years' standing. It is not the less true, however, that by the terms of the act approved 25th February, 1799, it is expressly stated in the third section, "That, whenever any officer, as aforesaid, shall be employed in the command of a squadron, on separate service, the allowance of rations to such commanding officer shall be doubled during the continuance of such command, and no longer, except in the case of the commanding officer of the navy, whose allowance, while in service, shall always be at the rate of sixteen rations per day." The increased compensation, therefore, to the senior officer, is in lieu of the double rations originally allowed him by law, and is believed to be due him on every principle as well of justice as of law. Abrogate the principles contained in the act above quoted, and the pecuniary loss is the smallest injury inflicted. You degrade the point of honor by assailing the pride of rank; you wound the veteran by lowering him in the estimation of his peers; and you commit a flagrant act of injustice by repealing that which the law originally allowed, and which the rules and regulations have since constantly confirmed.

On the general principle laid down in the previous report of the committee, no distinction is drawn between the pay of any of the captains when in command of squadrons. Your committee think it due to the acknowledged merits and long-tried services of the commanders in the navy, and to the high responsibilities their duties involve, deemed but little inferior to those of post captains, to place their compensation, at present utterly inadequate, on a footing bearing something like a proportion to their merits, their services, and their responsibilities.

The principle of graduating the pay according to the length of service, assumed in the former bill, is carried out somewhat further in the present. It is believed to be just in itself, and is intended to operate as an additional inducement to the honorable and deserving to continue in a service in which promotion is necessarily slow, and, indeed, in many cases, protracted even beyond all hope.

Your committee ask leave again to repeat their deep convictions of the importance of securing to the service the requisite talents and qualifications for its medical department. The pay of the surgeons is believed to be too low. It must be borne in mind that they are put to great expense, not only of money, but of time, and often of health, in qualifying themselves for the duties of their stations; that these duties are frequently of a nature to require the exertion of the highest faculties of the mind, and of the most exalted order of courage, because quietly exercised amidst disease and death, and unsustained by the brilliancy of military exploit, or the not less powerful incentive of military promotion. The rates proposed by the amendment, it is believed, are founded in justice and sound policy: justice towards the veteran who has passed with honor through all the toils and dangers of the service with comparatively inadequate compensation, and sound policy towards the ardent and gifted youth, to whom the certain prospect of emolument, as well as honor, is now opened.

It has not been deemed expedient to change the present system of supplies in the service. The pursers, therefore, are not included in the bill. Your committee take this opportunity to state their convictions that the government does not possess a more estimable, honorable, or deserving set of officers. Your committee have searched in vain for a single case of delinquency. Their duties are infinitely arduous and responsible, combining all that is performed by the four several and important grades of paymaster, quartermaster, commissary, and sutler in the army of the United States. To suppose them fraudulent, is to suppose the fact of collusion between them and their superior officers; an idea altogether inadmissible. Indeed, it has never been pretended that they are either faithless in the performance of their duties, or dilatory in the settlement of their accounts; and if, in some instances, it may be charged to them that they are exorbitant in some of their demands, it must not be forgotten that the risks they incur far transcend anything likely to arise in the ordinary business transactions of life, while the indispensable luxuries they afford the seaman more than compensate him for the price exacted.

On the whole, the system, as it at present exists, is believed to be a good one. Our seamen are well supplied, and the government is not only free from all risks, but it is absolutely secured from loss by bonds given, in all cases, in a penalty of twenty-five thousand dollars.

In conclusion, your committee beg leave generally to remark, that the subject of regulating the pay of officers in the navy cannot be adequately treated without taking into consideration their peculiar liability to expenses that are, in some sense, of a public nature, and to which they are compelled to attend by their duty to the nation.

Whether they are attached to a naval station on shore, or are temporarily in a foreign port, the occasions of expense from these causes are constantly recurring. The public ships of other nations, with whom we are in amity and who desire to cultivate it, are frequently in their neighborhood.

Members of the same profession, in foreign services as well as in our own, and individuals, of our

--543--

own and foreign countries, moving in the concerns of trade and navigation through the world, are often brought in contact with them. In turn, the obligations of at least a decent hospitality fall upon most of them, and extend to every grade.

They cannot escape from the duty, whatever be the state of their personal means, without personal discredit, and without discredit to the service.

An officer of the United States navy, in the port or place where he is stationed, is considered as bound, by the very duty of his commission, to offer some civilities to those of the same profession who may be visiting in the place.

In a foreign port, he is an object of particular resort by his countrymen and others; he must do, at least in an humble way, something to show his consideration for them.

The reputation of the navy and of the country, independently of personal motives, imposes this tax upon him. It is not merely a matter of choice for him to pay it; it concerns the honor of the service. It is paid more or less by all who belong to it. Public opinion, and the established usages of the world, require it from them; and although the duty is generally performed with simplicity and all requisite economy, yet it cannot be performed at all without some expense; and in most instances, from the numbers whom naval and maritime concerns and curiosities bring before them, the expense is altogether beyond the compensation at present allowed them.

A scale of compensation, which does not take these expenses into consideration, but leaves to the officers no alternative but that of impoverishing themselves, or bringing discredit upon the country, is not one that will promote the reputation and efficiency of the navy; nor does it do justice to its past services and achievements.

Your committee, therefore, respectfully submit the present bill, founded on a principle of common justice and equal right, to the most popular branch of the public service. And as they feel confident it will so be viewed by the people at large, they humbly trust it will meet the approbation of the people's representatives.

In this hope, they connect with it a clause for the creation of a fund for the widows and orphans, and relatives of such officers as may die in the service. In reference to this, it is only necessary to say that it meets with the general approbation of the service.

AMENDMENT.

A BILL to regulate the pay of the navy of the United States.

Be it enacted, by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in general Congress assembled, That from and after the passage of this act, the annual pay of the officers of the navy of the United States shall be as follows:

The senior captain, when commanding a squadron, five thousand five hundred dollars; when on other duty, five thousand dollars; when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, three thousand five hundred dollars.

All other captains, when commanding squadrons, five thousand five hundred dollars; when acting as Navy Commissioners, four thousand five hundred dollars; when of five years' standing, and commanding vessels for sea service, or navy yards, or acting as captain of a fleet, four thousand dollars; when on other duty, three thousand five hundred dollars; when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, two thousand five hundred dollars; when under five years, and commanding vessels for sea service or navy yards, or acting as captain of a fleet, three thousand six hundred dollars; when on other duty, three thousand dollars; when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, two thousand five hundred dollars.

Commanders, or masters commandant, when attached to vessels for sea service, two thousand five hundred dollars; when attached to navy yards, or on other duty, two thousand one hundred dollars; when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, one thousand eight hundred dollars.

Lieutenants, Under ten years, when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, one thousand dollars; when on duty on board ship, for sea service, one thousand two hundred dollars; when on other duty, one thousand one hundred dollars; over ten years, when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, one thousand two hundred dollars; when on duty on board ship, for sea service, one thousand four hundred dollars; when on other duty, one thousand three hundred dollars; when commanding, and to flag lieutenants, one thousand seven hundred dollars.

Assistant surgeon, for the first five years after the date of his commission, five hundred and fifty dollars; over five years and under ten, seven hundred and fifty dollars; of ten years and upwards, eight hundred and fifty dollars, provided he has been examined and approved by a board of naval surgeons as competent to perform the duties of a surgeon, otherwise his pay shall continue at seven hundred and fifty dollars.

Surgeon, for the first five years after the date of his commission, one thousand dollars; for the second five years, one thousand two hundred dollars; for the third five years, one thousand four hundred dollars; for the fourth five years, one thousand six hundred dollars; after he shall have been commissioned as a surgeon twenty years, and upwards, one thousand eight hundred dollars; all medical officers of the navy under orders for duty, at navy yards, receiving vessels, rendezvous, or naval hospitals, shall have an increase of one-fourth of the foregoing amount of their respective annual pay from the date of their acceptance of such orders; all medical officers of the navy ordered to any of the ships or vessels of the United States, commissioned for sea service, shall have an increase of one-third of the foregoing amount of their respective annual pay, from the date of their acceptance of such orders; all surgeons of the navy, ordered as fleet surgeons, shall have an increase of one-half of their respective annual pay, from the date of their acceptance of such orders; and when appointed to perform the duties of surgeon general, his pay shall be increased three-fourths.

Chaplains, when attached to vessels for sea service, one thousand two hundred dollars; when attached to navy yards, eight hundred dollars; when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, six hundred and fifty dollars.

Professor of mathematics, when attached to vessels for sea service, or when at sea, or in a yard, one thousand two hundred dollars.

--544--

Secretaries to commanders of squadrons, when commanding-in-chief, one thousand dollars; to commanders of squadrons, when not commanding-in-chief, nine hundred dollars.

Sailingmasters, of a ship of the line, when attached to vessels for sea service, one thousand one hundred dollars; of all other sailingmasters, attached to vessels for sea service, or at navy yards, one thousand dollars; when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, seven hundred and fifty dollars.

Second masters, when attached to vessels for sea service, seven hundred and fifty dollars; when on other duty, five hundred dollars; when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, four hundred dollars.

Passed midshipmen, when attached to vessels for sea service, six hundred dollars; when on other duty, five hundred dollars; when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, four hundred dollars.

Warranted masters' mates, when attached to vessels for sea service, or at navy yards, four hundred and fifty dollars; when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, three hundred dollars.

Midshipmen, when attached to vessels for sea service, four hundred dollars; when at shore stations, and on other duty, three hundred and fifty dollars; when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, three hundred dollars.

Clerks, of a yard, nine hundred dollars; first clerk to a commandant, nine hundred dollars; second clerk to a commandant, seven hundred and fifty dollars; to commanders of squadrons, captains of fleets, and commanders of vessels, five hundred dollars.

Boatswains, gunners, sailmakers, and carpenters, of a ship of the line, seven hundred and fifty dollars; of a frigate, six hundred dollars; of a sloop, brig, or schooner, or while acting on shore, five hundred dollars; when on leave of absence, or waiting orders, three hundred and sixty dollars; officers temporarily performing duties belonging to those of a higher grade, shall receive the compensation allowed to such higher grade, while actually so employed; no officer shall be put on furlough but at his own request, and all officers so furloughed shall receive two-thirds only of the pay to which they would have been entitled if on leave of absence; one ration per day, only, shall be allowed to all officers when attached to vessels for sea service; the compensation hereinbefore specified shall be in full for pay and subsistence, and for all allowances whatever, including cabin allowance, to commanders of vessels; and for all allowances to officers attached to yards, or employed on any other shore duty, except for travel, under orders, for which sixteen cents per mile shall be allowed, detention, or employment on special service, chamber money or house rent on shore stations where quarters or public accommodations be not provided. And all acts or parts of acts inconsistent with the provisions of this act are hereby repealed.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the Secretary of the Treasury shall be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to deduct, from the pay hereafter to become due of the commission and warrant officers of the navy of the United States, three per centum of the amount thereof, and to pay the same to the Secretary of the Navy and the Navy Commissioners for the time being; who are hereby appointed a board of commissioners by the name and style of "commissioners of the navy widows and orphans' fund;" which, together with any other moneys to which the fund may become legally entitled, shall constitute a fund for the relief of the widows, children, and relatives of the said commission and warrant officers of the navy of the United States, to be invested by said board, and the proceeds of it divided and disbursed in such manner as may be hereafter prescribed by Congress.

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That from and after the passage of this act, it shall be the duty of every medical officer of the United States navy to provide himself with all such instruments as are necessary in his profession, and that the sum of dollars be, and the same is hereby, annually appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, to be applied, on an estimate to be furnished under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy, to the object specified in this act.

War Department, March 25, 1834.

Sir:

I have the honor to transmit you, herewith, reports from the quartermaster general and paymaster general, which contain the information asked for by your letter of the 5th instant. Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

LEW. CASS.

Hon. John G. Watmough, Chairman Select Committee, House of Representatives.

--545--

Comparative statement of pay and emoluments received through the pay department, by officers of the army, with the compensation proposed in the bill reported by a select committee of the House of Representatives, February 28, 1834.

No. of each grade.

Rank.

Present pay and emoluments per annum.

Proposed compensation per annum.

Remarks.

1

Major general

$4,867

$5,000

 

2

Aids-de-camp

1,106

300

 

2

Brigadier generals

6,258

8,000

 

2

Aide-de-camp

718

240

 

1

Adjutant general

2,348

3,000

 

2

Inspectors general

4,696

3,000

 

1

Quartermaster general

3,129

4,000

 

3

Quartermasters

5,238

6,000

If assimilated to rank of major commanding post.

1

Quartermaster, in addition to pay as captain over ten years

799

600

 

20

Assistant Quartermasters, in addition to pay

7,618

2,400

Six captains, fourteen lieutenants.

2

Military storekeepers, quartermaster's department

1,894

2,400

Over 10 years in service; present pay, &c., that of captain of infantry not on duty.

1

Commissary general of purchases

3,000

3,000

 

2

Military storekeepers, commissary's department

1,894

2,200

Under 10 years' service; present pay, &c., that of captain of infantry.

1

Paymaster general

2,500

2,500

 

14

Paymasters

21,420

28,000

If assimilated to rank of major commanding post.

1

Commissary general of subsistence

2,252 

3,000

 

1

Commissary, per act 2d March, 1829

1,746

2,000

If assimilated to rank of major commanding military post.

1

Assistant commissary

432

120

 

50

Assistant commissaries of subsistence, in addition to pay

8,350

6,000

Lieutenants.

1

Surgeon general

2,500

2,500

 

12

Surgeons, 4 over 15 years, 8 under 10 years

13,512

6,400

 

 

 

 

9,600

 

55

Assistant surgeons

54,615

49,500

 

1

Colonel, chief engineer

2,072

3,000

 

1

Lieutenant colonel of engineers

1,723

2,500

 

2

Majors

3,060

4,000

 

1

Adjutant, in addition to pay as lieutenant

239

239

Not provided for by the bill; the present amount assumed as the intended compensation.

1

Paymaster

776

1,173

If assimilated to rank of major commanding post.

6

Topographical engineers

10,476

12,000

If assimilated to rank of major commanding post.

4

Assistant topographical engineers, captains under 10 years

3,788

4,800

If assimilated to rank of captains commanding companies.

6

Captains of engineers, one over 10 years

5,682

7,400

If assimilated to rank of captains commanding companies.

6

First lieutenants of engineers

4,962

6,600

 

6

Second lieutenants of engineers

4,602

5,400

 

1

Professor of natural and experimental philosophy

1,723

2,500

If assimilated to rank of lieutenant colonel commanding post.

1

Assistant professor of natural and experimental philosophy, in addition to pay as lieutenant

180

180

Not provided for by the bill; the present amount assumed as the intended compensation.

1

Professor of mathematics

1,530

2,000

If assimilated to rank of major commanding military post.

1

Assistant professor of mathematics, in addition to pay as lieutenant

180

180

Not provided for by the bill, &c.

1

Professor of engineering

1,530

2,000

If assimilated to rank of major commanding post.

1

Assistant professor of engineering, in addition to pay as lieutenant

180

180

Not provided for by the bill, &c.

1

Chaplain and professor of ethics

1,530

2,000

If assimilated to rank of major commanding post.

1

Professor of chemistry, in addition to pay as assistant surgeon

120

120

Not provided for by the bill, &c.

2

Teachers of French

1,894

2,300

One over ten years' service; present pay, &c., that of captain of infantry.

1

Teacher of drawing

947

1,100

Under ten years' service; present pay, &c., that of captain of infantry.

1

Master of the sword

706

706

Not provided for by the bill, &c.

250

Cadets

84,500

75,000

 

28

Cadets, acting assistant professors, in addition to pay

960

960

Not provided for by the bill, &c.

1

Colonel of ordnance

2,072

3,000

 

1

Lieutenant colonel of ordnance

1,723

2,500

 

2

Majors of ordnance

3,060

4,000

 

10

Captains of ordnance

9,470

12,000

 

--546--

Comparative statement—Continued.

No. of each grade.

Rank.

Present pay and emoluments per annum.

Proposed compensation per annum.

Remarks.

6

Military storekeepers of ordnance

$5,682

$6,800

Two over ten years; present pay, &c., that of captain of infantry.

1

Colonel of dragoons

2,396

2,000

 

1

Major of dragoons

1,794

2,000

 

1

Adjutant of dragoons

1,130

1,130

Not provided for by the bill, &c.

10

Captains of dragoons, commanding companies.

14,890

12,000

 

10

First lieutenants of dragoons

10,830

11,000

 

10

Second lieutenants of dragoons

10,830

9,000

 

4

Colonels of artillery

8,288

12,000

 

4

Lieutenant colonels of artillery

6,892

10,000

 

4

Majors of artillery

6,120

8,000

 

4

Adjutants of artillery, in addition as lieutenants

956

956

Not provided for by the bill, &c.

36

Captains of artillery

38,412

47,000

Commanding companies; nineteen over ten years' service.

72

First lieutenants of artillery

59,544

79,200

 

72

Second lieutenants of artillery

55,224

64,800

 

7

Colonels of infantry

14,504

21,000

 

7

Lieutenant colonels of infantry

12,061

17,500

 

7

Majors of infantry

10,710

14,000

 

7

Adjutants of infantry, in addition as lieutenants

1,673

1,673

Not provided for by the bill, &c.

70

Captains of infantry

74,690

89,400

Commanding companies; twenty-seven over ten years.

70

First lieutenants of infantry

57,890

77,000

 

70

Second lieutenants of infantry

53,690

63,000

 

106

Brevet second lieutenants

81,302

74,200

Attached to the several corps of the army.

 

Amount estimated for brevet pay per annum

17,140

17,140

 

 

Amount estimated for double rations

31,732

 

 

 

 

$881,104

$951,897

Increased by compensation bill, $70,793.

The first column in the above table is a full estimate of the pay and all allowances that officers are now entitled to receive through the pay department. Whenever an officer receives more than the positive allowances of his lineal rank, it is on account of his brevet rank, or of having a command entitled to additional rations. The items under those heads, at the foot of the first column, show the whole amount of brevet allowances, and double rations of the army in the year 1832, (the accounts of which are complete,) and is the amount estimated for those items for the year 1834.

The second column contains an estimate of the full pay of all officers as proposed by the new bill, if I am correct as to the rates intended for "assimilated rank," and for cases not provided for in the bill; each doubtful case is noted in the column of remarks, and, if not as was intended by the committee, can easily be corrected.

Under the laws now in force, officers receive certain allowances, or not, according to the circumstances, viz: Pay, &c., for servants, only when employed; forage, only when the horses are kept in service; double rations, only when holding certain commands, and performing certain duties; brevet pay, &c., only when commanding according to the rank. By the proposed bill, different amounts are to be received, according to the duty or service performed. It is difficult to say which would cause the greatest deductions from the full compensation as stated above.

N. TOWSON, P. M. G.

Paymaster General's Office, March 18, 1834.

Statement "of the whole amount of compensation and allowance" received through the pay department "by the chiefs of the Engineer and Ordnance departments, and by the inspectors general of the army, for the year 1833."

Colonel and Brevet Brigadier General C. Gratiot, chief engineer

$2,072 00

 

Same. Brevet pay and emoluments, and double rations

1,926 88

 

 

$3,998 88

Colonel George Bomford, chief of the ordnance

$2,067 92

 

Same. Double rations

438 00

 

 

2,505 92

Colonel and Brevet Brigadier General J. E. Wood, inspector general

$2,378 60

 

Same. Double rations

343 20

 

 

2,721 80

Colonel George Croghan, inspector general

$2,381 61

 

Same. Double rations

343 20

 

 

2,724 81

N. TOWSON, P. M. G.

Paymaster General's Office, March 18, 1834,

--547--

Quartermaster General's Office, Washington City, March 22, 1834.

Sir:

In obedience to your order, I have examined the bill to regulate the pay of the officers of the army and navy; and, comparing the allowances which it authorizes with those now furnished or paid through this department, I find the following to be the result, viz:

Estimated saving.

In fuel for officers, including their servants

$35,000

In rents for officers

7,124

In per diem for service on courts-martial

4,500

In per diem to officers on topographical duty

3,867

In per diem to officers superintending working parties

1,190

In per diem to officers on bureau duty

6,387

In forage, in kind, issued to officers, about

2,000

Making a total of

$60,068

From which should be deducted the probable increase of the transportation of officers authorized by the bill

29,249

Making the actual probable reduction through this department

$30,819

In estimating the increase of the allowance for transportation, I have taken the actual expenditure of the year terminating with the 30th of September, 1833, as the standard. The amount expended during that year, without including anything for the dragoons, amounted to $59,184. The organic laws authorize 705 officers to the army, 456 of whom are allowed, when traveling on duty without troops, ten cents per mile, and 249 twelve cents per mile; the bill referred to allows sixteen cents per mile to all. Hence, it will be seen that 456 x 10 + 249 X 12 : $59,184 : : 705 X 16 : $88,433, making the difference stated above.

I have made no deduction for stationery or postage, because I take it for granted that officers of the army will be considered as much entitled to the stationery required in the discharge of their public duties, and to the postage paid on public letters, as members of Congress, or any other civil officers.

Paper marked A, exhibits the sums paid to the chief engineer, the chief of ordnance, and the inspectors general, through this department, in 1833, for fuel and quarters, and for transportation of baggage. A portion of the amount paid to the senior inspector general was for claims which accrued in 1832. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

TH. S. JESUP, Quartermaster General.

The Hon. Lewis Cass, Secretary of War, Washington.

A.

Payments for fuel and quarters, and for transportation of baggage, or traveling allowance, in the year 1833, to the chief engineer, the chief of the ordnance, and the inspectors general.

To General Charles Gratiot, chief engineer:

 

Quarters and fuel, from 1st January to 31st December

$537 75

Transportation of baggage, or traveling allowance

368 20

 

$905 95

To Colonel George Bomford, chief of ordnance:

 

Quarters and fuel, from 1st January to 31st December

$529 50

To Brevet Brigadier General J. E. Wood, inspector general:

 

Quarters and fuel, from 1st June, 1832, to 30th November, 1833

$852 50

Transportation of baggage, or traveling allowance, including his transportation when traveling in Europe in 1832, reimbursed since his return in 1833

1,658 00

 

$2,510 50

To Colonel George Croghan, inspector general:

 

Quarters and fuel, from 1st January to 31st December

$529 50

Transportation of baggage or traveling allowance

546 36

 

$1,075 86

No. 6.

Extract from a report made by the paymaster general to the Secretary of War, dated—

April, 3, 1826.

To judge of the expediency of changing the present mode of compensating officers of the army, it will be proper to examine the several items of allowance; to inquire the reasons why they were so made; and the probable effect that would be produced by substituting a fixed sum of money in lieu.

--548--

1. Pay and subsistence.

The allowances under this head may be considered similar to the salary of civil officers, and on a slight view it would seem that no inconvenience would result to the government, or officer, from substituting a fixed sum of money for the subsistence part, which is so definite and unvarying; but a little reflection will show that the reasons for including rations in the allowance are cogent.

It frequently happens that troops serve, both in peace and war, in unsettled or exhausted countries, where provisions cannot be procured, or where the prices would exceed the officer's means of purchase; it is therefore indispensable that the government provide food for the officer as well as for the private, and it is accordingly stipulated to be done. The price of the ration is fixed, in order that the compensation may be equal wherever drawn. The option to draw in kind, or to commute, is granted to the officer, that the compensation for his services may be as entirely within his control as the salaries of civil officers are within theirs. It is evident that it would be embarrassing to the service, as well as to officers, to deprive them of the privilege of drawing rations in kind, in many situations; they must, therefore, be furnished as at present, or sold to the officer by the subsistence department, which amounts to the same thing.

2. Servants.

This allowance is contingent, and cannot be granted unless the servants are actually employed. If it were intended solely as an emolument, as is frequently supposed, it would be of no importance to the government, and for the interest of the officer, that it should be granted without the condition of employment; but this is not the case; the good of the service, as well as the convenience of officers, requiring that the expense of employing servants should be incurred. It would not do for officers on a march, near an enemy, or in many other situations, to neglect their proper and important duties to look after their baggage, take care of their horses, or to cook their provisions. The compensation for servants is made under the heads of pay, subsistence, and clothing; the two last are included for the same reason that subsistence forms a part of the compensation for services, namely, that they may be obtained in all situations, and at a reasonable price; they may, therefore, be drawn in kind, or commuted, as officers shall elect. The effect of granting a fixed sum, in lieu of this allowance, would be to hold out an inducement to dispense with the employment of waiters, which, it has been shown, Would be injurious to the service. It is true, servants are frequently a convenience to officers, independent of their public duties; but this is incidental; the true reason for allowing them is that the interest of the government is promoted by employing waiters, instead of officers, to perform menial duties.

3. Forage.

Forage is only granted to officers whose particular duties require them to be mounted, which involves an expense that it is reasonable should be borne by the government. The number of horses for which forage can be claimed is determined by the rank of the officer. The allowance is contingent, and can only be charged when the horses are actually kept, consequently there can be no inducement to keep a greater or less number than the duties of office require. If not furnished by the government, it would be frequently impossible for officers to obtain it. Another reason why it should be, is the difference in the price of the article at different places. An officer, traveling through the Creek nation, was compelled to pay four dollars per bushel for corn, at a time when it could have been purchased in Ohio or Kentucky for twenty-five cents. It is therefore evident that the same amount allowed for forage at different places would be unequal in its value.

A. Additional or double rations. 

These are granted to commandants of military departments, posts, and arsenals, engineer officers superintending the construction of fortifications, and to particular heads of the staff at this place, on the ground that the duties and station of such officers unavoidably subject them to a greater intercourse with military men and persons on public business, and, consequently, to greater expense than officers who are not so situated. The reason for making this allowance under the head of rations, is to enable officers to draw a greater quantity of provisions from the subsistence department than they are authorized to do when not subject to the expense of entertaining official visitors. When the difficulty of procuring provisions does net exist, the rations are commuted at twenty cents each, which amounts to the same as allowing a specific sum. The option to commute is with the officer. The allowance is not considered an emolument, but the reimbursement of an expense imposed on the officer by his particular situation and duty. It is contingent, being governed by command and locality.

5. Fuel.

This article is always furnished in kind, except at this place. It is supplied by the Government, because it would frequently be difficult for officers to obtain it in any other way, and because the price varies very materially at different posts, which would produce inequality in the compensation of officers of the same rank. The allowance is not intended to be greater than is necessary for current consumption; therefore, if not drawn monthly, it reverts to the government. It is unnecessary to add, that this object would be defeated by substituting a fixed sum in lieu.

6. Quarters.

It would often be impossible, and always inconvenient, for officers to procure lodgings when serving either in fortifications, cantonments, or camps, and, if they could, it would be prejudicial to the service to separate them from their commands. Quarters and tents are therefore provided by the government for officers as well as privates. They are* always furnished by the Quartermaster's department in kind, except at this place, where it is mutually the interest of the government and officer to commute them. Many restrictions are imposed on this allowance. (See article on the Quartermaster's department, No. 69, "army regulations.")

--549--

There is no allowance, perhaps, which would be so unequal in its value, to officers differently located as a fixed sum in lieu of quarters, unless a charge is raised against those who occupy public buildings. For instance, it would make the entire difference of the sum allowed, between officers of the same rank stationed at Greenleaf's Point and in this city. A fixed sum in money, in lieu of the present allowance, would be much more expensive to the government, unless rent be charged for public quarters.

7. Stationery.

This is furnished by the government in kind, because it cannot, at frontier posts, and in time of war, be procured by officers in any other way. The allowance is very limited, and, so far from being an emolument, is, in most cases, not equal to the actual consumption on public business. The allowance of a fixed sum in lieu would, in all cases where a supply of the article was precarious, produce great embarrassment to officers, and to the service generally.

8. Transportation.

This is so entirely contingent as to make it impossible to fix a given sum as an equivalent. All that can be done is, to regulate the allowance according to the rank of the officer, and to fix the rate per mile, which is now the case. In many instances, the means of transportation must be furnished by government, from necessity; in others, it is its interest to do so. The option, therefore, of furnishing it in kind is reserved to the government. The allowance is very strictly guarded. (See article No. 69, "army regulations."

The foregoing embrace all regular allowances authorized by law or regulations, and from these it will be seen that pay and subsistence, proper, include everything given in lieu of salary, and in payment for services; all other allowances are contingent, and granted to cover expenditures which the duty of officers and the interest of the government require should be made. Those allowances frequently add to the officers' convenience; but this, as I have before observed, is incidental, and not the object for which they are made. Hence the conditions that officers must keep the servants and horses, command double ration posts, receive fuel as it is used, occupy the quarters, travel the distance stated in their transportation accounts, and draw the stationery in kind, to entitle them to the allowances under the several heads. In many cases they are not even a convenience; and then, if the good of the service does not require it, the expense is not incurred.

The government has a security in the high sense of honor of military men that those contingent allowances will not be abused; and if this were not so, the fact that an officer places himself at the mercy of his enemies, and that his commission would be the price of an improper certificate, is a sufficient guaranty.

Our laws and regulations, which relate to pay and allowances, were formed with a thorough knowledge of the usages in other services; and in whatever particulars they may differ, I am persuaded a sufficient reason will be found, either in local circumstances or in advantage to the service, to justify the change.

There is no service in which the pay proper includes all allowances. In time of war it would be impossible for the operations of an army to be carried on, even in Europe, where all supplies can be more readily provided than in this country, if the government did not furnish its officers with such as are indispensable. In this country, the impossibility of procuring them exists in time of peace as well as war; it follows, therefore, that certain allowances must be made in kind, in numerous cases at all times. The practice, both in the French and British service, is to grant the allowances as permanent emoluments, and to furnish the article in kind, whenever it is necessary for the good of the service. We have preferred to make allowances, not as emoluments but to cover official expenses, to prevent the service suffering from the cupidity of some, and to remunerate the faithful and patriotic discharge of duty in others. The option with the officers to receive in kind, has the advantage also of equalizing the compensation much better in this country, than a difference in moneyed allowances at different stations would; for the prices of the several articles granted in kind fluctuate as much with time as they do with place, and what would be a fair allowance in one year would be unfair in the next.

It is scarcely thought necessary further to urge the importance of equalizing the compensation at different posts. One of the privileges of seniority is the choice of command—a necessary privilege. No senior officer, therefore, would relinquish his claim to an economical command in favor of a junior, however beneficial it might be to the service. It is true, this might and would become the duty of superior authority to decide, and to order accordingly; but if the decision was against the senior, it would produce much dissatisfaction. It is, therefore, better to avoid the cause of contention, unless some positive advantage were to result from the change.

It may be urged that the arguments, founded on the necessity of furnishing allowances in kind, apply to a state of war, and are not forcible objections to a salary in time of peace. If this were admitted to the fullest extent, it is respectfully conceived that it would not be sufficient to justify the change. All changes must be vicious in a body whose operations are so multifarious and complicated as those of the army, unless they produce a positive advantage. The alterations in the supplying departments alone, on recurring to the war allowances, would be of the most embarrassing nature, and would take place at the most inconvenient and perplexing crisis. Another, and I think an important objection, is, that the economy of officers' arrangements would be broken, and must be studied anew on every change; and, in this respect, the officer in peace and the officer in war would be as unlike as the recruit is unlike the soldier. But if my view of the subject be correct, the necessity, in our service, of supplying the articles in kind, at particular posts, exists as well in time of peace as of war. The alteration, then, can only be adopted at particular stations. I am therefore of opinion that it would not be expedient to change the present pay and allowances of officers for a fixed compensation; and I most respectfully recommend that, if it should at any time be thought advisable to augment or diminish the compensation, it may be done by changing the amount of the allowances, and not by abolishing them, and granting money in lieu.

If Congress should view the subject differently, and decide on a "fixed compensation," justice to the officers requires that, in determining the amount to be allowed, they should consider the great and unavoidable expense to which the erratic life of an officer subjects him, and the extravagant price of living at many stations. It should also be considered that our service holds out none of those pecuniary

--550--

rewards which are so liberally bestowed by other governments. Tour officer has no life estate in his commission, which he can sell out at great profit, no nominal command for which he receives pay, as well as for the one he exercises; no emolument from the paying, clothing, &c., of his regiment or company; no booty or prize money; no share of the estimated value of all contraband articles seized by his regiment in aid of the revenue laws. He looks forward to no full or half pay to retire upon, when disease or age may have unfitted him for the duties of his profession. If he is not disbanded, and dies in service, (unless it be his fortune to die in battle, or of wounds received in battle,) he leaves a portionless and unpensioned family. Not so the officer in other services; the greater part of the rewards enumerated are granted by all the European governments, and the whole by that government whose troops yours have been twice called on to meet in battle.*

If it be true that "officers are the soul of the army," and that victory will accompany the army best paid, fed, clothed and lodged, everything else being equal, then it is as politic as it is just, to make a liberal provision for those on whom you most rely in the hour of danger.

Respectfully submitted.

N. TOWSON, P. M. G.

Navy Department, March 17, 1834.

Sir:

I have to inform you that your letter of the 5th instant was duly received, and the first inquiry contained in it referred to the Fourth Auditor, and the second to the Navy Board.

The papers enclosed (A and B) present an answer to the first inquiry, believed to be sufficiently accurate for the purpose for which it was requested.

An answer to the second could not be prepared accurately without opening a correspondence at Philadelphia; but so soon as the circumstances will permit, it will be furnished.

I am, very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

LEVI WOODBURY.

To the Hon. John G. Watmough,

Chairman Select Committee on Pay of Officers, Army and Navy, H. R.

Navy Department, March 18, 1834.

Sir:

Information has this day been received, which enables me to submit an estimate in answer to the second inquiry in your letter of the 5th inst.

To furnish the whole number of surgeons and assistant surgeons now in the service with new and suitable instruments, it is supposed would require the sum of eleven thousand dollars.

The annual expense of keeping these in repair, and of purchasing new ones for new surgeons and assistant surgeons, would be about three thousand dollars.

I am, very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant, LEVI WOODBURY.

To the Hon. John G. Watmough,

Chairman Select Committee on Pay of Army and Navy, H. R.

A.

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office, March 17, 1834.

Sir:

—Herewith you will receive "an estimate showing the difference between the present pay of the officers of the United States navy, and the pay as proposed by a bill reported by a select committee of the House of Representatives, 28th of February, 1834," which is believed to approximate to entire accuracy.

The bill, and letter of the honorable chairman of the committee, by you referred to me, are herewith returned.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, AMOS KENDALL.

Hon. Levi Woodbury, Secretary of the Navy.

* The movable property captured by the army, under the Duke of Wellington, was considered lawful booty, and the amount claimed of the government is thus estimated:

1.

Arms and warlike stores

£235,908

16s.

2 3/4 d.

2.

Provisions, forage, baggage, &c., collected on the field of battle

150,000

00

0

3.

Public property taken in France generally

139,868

3

7 3/4

4.

Public property of the city of Bordeaux

107,026

10

0

5.

Vessels-of-war captured at Bordeaux

81,095

00

0

6.

Merchant ships taken at Bordeaux

96,768

00

0

7.

American vessels captured there also

22,048

00

0

8.

Specie taken at different places

33,735

12

8

 

Total value of prize money claimed

£916,450

2

6 1/2

The officers' baggage of Sir John Moore's army, lost on its retreat to Corunna, was estimated at £40,700 3s. 9d. sterling, and paid for by the government. The same quantity, lost by officers of the United States army, would neither have been estimated nor paid for.

--551--

B.

An estimate showing the difference between the present pay of the officers of the United States navy, and the pay as proposed by a bill reported by a select committee of the Souse of Representatives, February 28, 1834.

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

4

captains, over 15 years commanding squadrons, at $5,000 each

$20,000 00

$365 00

$20,365 00

 

 

 

House rent

 

10

captains, over 15 years on other duty, at $4,000 each

40,000 00

400 00

40,400 00

3

captains* over 15 years on leave or waiting orders, at $3,000 each

9,000 00

 

9,000 00

 

 

 

One ration.

 

3

captains, over 5 years at sea, at $3,000 each

9,000 00

273 75

9,273 75

1

captain, over 5 years on other duty

2,500 00

 

2,500 00

8

captains, on leave and waiting orders, at $2,000 each

16,000 00

 

16,000 00

*8

captains, not over 5 years on leave or waiting orders, at $1,900 each

 15,200 00

 

15,200 00

37

 

$111,700 00 

$1,038 75

$112,738 75

 

 

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference.

4

captains, &c., at $3,020 each

$12,080 00

$8,285 00

5

captains, on shore stations, at $3,466.75 each

$17,333 75

 

 

1

captain, on shore station, at $4,066.75

4,066 75

 

 

1

captain, on shore station, at $3,036.75

3,036 75

 

 

3

captains, Navy Commissioners, at $3,500.00 each

10,500 00

 

10

captains, over 15 years on other duty

34,937 25

5,462 75

3

captains, over 15 years on leave or waiting orders, at $1,930 each

5,790 00

3,210 00

1

captain, commanding 74,

$2,230 00

 

 

2

captains, commanding frigates, at $2,170 each

4,340 00

 

 

 

 

6,570 00

3,703 75

1

captain, &c., on shore station

3,466 75

966 75

8

captains, &c., on leave or waiting orders, at $1,930 each

15,440 00

560 00

8

captains, &c., on leave or waiting orders, at $1,940 each

15,440 00

240 00

37

captains

$93,724 00

$19,014 75

 

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

9

masters commandant, at sea, $2,000 each

$18,000 00

$821 25

$18,82125

 

 

 

House rent.

 

15

masters commandant, on other duty, at $1,600 each

20,800 00

1,800 00

22,600 00

18

masters commandant, on leave or waiting orders, at $1,200 each

21,600 00

 

21,600 00

1

master commandant, on furlough

800 00

 

800 00

41

masters commandant

$61,200 00

$2,621 25

$63,821 25

 

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference.

 

9

masters commandant, commanding sloops-of-war, at

$1,356 25

$12,206 25

$6,615 00

4

masters commandant, at yards, at $2,010.75 each

8,043 00

 

 

2

masters commandant, at yards, at $1,710.75 each

3,421 50

 

 

1

master commandant, at yards, at $1,982

1,982 00

 

 

5

masters commandant, on recruiting stations, at $2,010.75 each

10,053 75

 

 

1

master commandant, on receiving ship, at $1,356.25

1,356 25

 

 

13

masters commandant, on other duty

24,856 50

2,256 50

18

masters commandant, on leave or waiting orders, at $1,176.25 each

21,172 50

427 50

1

master commandant, on furlough

360 00

440 00

41

masters commandant

 $58,595 25

$5,226 00

 

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

11

lieutenants, over 10 years at sea, at $1,400 each

$15,400 00

$1,003 75

$16,403 75

 

 

 

House rent.

 

20

lieutenants, over 10 years on other duty, at $1,200 each..

24,000 00

400 00

24,000 00

39

lieutenants, over 10 years on leave, or waiting orders, at $1,000 each

39,000 00

 

39,000 00

1

lieutenant on furlough

600 00

 

600 00

78

lieutenants, not over 10 years at sea, at $1,200 each

93,600 00

7,117 50

100,717 50

23

lieutenants, not over 10 years on other duty, at $1,100 each

25,300 00

 

25,300 00

71

lieutenants, not over 10 years on leave, &c., at $900 each.

63,900 00

 

63,900 00

7

lieutenants, not over 10 years on furlough, at $550 each..

3,850 00

 

3,850 00

250

lieutenants.

$265,650 00

$8,521 25

$274,171 25

--552--

 

Present pay.

 

 

Whole pay.

Difference.

7

lieutenants, &c., at sea, commanding, at $1,296.25 each

 

$9,073 75

 

 

4

lieutenants, &c., at sea, commanding, at $965 each

 

3,860 00

 

 

11

lieutenants, &c., at sea, commanding

 

 

$12,933 75

$3,470 00

6

lieutenants, at yards,

$1,292 25 X [ ]

$8,154 00

 

 

1,492.25 X 25

2

lieutenants, in ordinary, at $965 each

 

1,930 00

 

 

3

lieutenants commanding receiving ships, at $1,296.25 each

 

3,888 75

 

 

9

lieutenants on recruiting stations, at $965 each

 

8,685 00

 

 

20

lieutenants, over 10 years on other duty

 

 

22,657 75

1,742 25

39

lieutenants, &c., on leave or waiting orders, at $965 each

 

 

37,635 00

1,365 00

1

lieutenant, on furlough

 

 

300 00

300 00

78

lieutenants, &c., at sea, at $965 each

 

 

75,270 00

25,447 50

2

lieutenants at yards, at $1,492.25 each

 

$2,984 50

 

 

2

lieutenants at yards, at $1,292.25 each

 

2,584 50

 

 

19

lieutenants on recruiting stations, at $965 each

 

18,335 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

23,904 00

1,396 00

23

 

 

 

 

 

71

lieutenants on leave or waiting orders, at $965 each

 

 

 68,515 00

4,615 00

7

lieutenants on furlough, at $300 each

 

 

2,100 00

1,750 00

250

lieutenants

 

 

$243,315 50

$30,855 75

 

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

4

surgeons, over 15 years at sea, at $1,800 each

$7,200 00

$365 00

$7,565 00

 

 

 

House rent.

 

7

surgeons, on other duty, at $1,600 each

11,200 00

800 00

12,000 00

5

surgeons, on leave, say at $1,400 each

7,000 00

 

7,000 00

 

Note.—Surgeons over 15 years on leave or waiting orders, are not provided for in the bill.

 

 

 

 

 

 

House rent.

 

5

surgeons, under 10 years at yards, at $1,400 each

7,000 00

200 00

11,000 00

 

 

 

One ration.

 

9

surgeons, on other duty, at $1,200 each

10,800 00

200 00

11,000 00

6

lieutenants, on leave or waiting orders, at $1,000 each

6,000 00

 

6,000 00

 

 

 

One ration.

 

5

surgeons, under 5 years at sea, at $1,100 each

5,500 00

456 25

5,956 25

1

surgeon, on leave, say at $900

900 00

 

900 00

1

surgeon, on furlough, at $500

500 00

 

500 00

43

surgeons ...

$56,100 00

$2,277 50

$58,377 50

 

Note.—Surgeons under five years, on leave or waiting orders, are not provided for by the bill.

 

 

 

 

 

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference.

4

surgeons, &c., at sea, at $2,300 each

$9,200 00

$1,635 00

7

surgeons at yards and stations

10,925 75

1,074 25

5

surgeons on leave or waiting orders, at $1,085 each

5,425 00

1,575 00

5

surgeons, under ten years at sea, at $1,327.50 each

5,637 50

818 75

.9

surgeons, under ten years on shore stations

12,712 25

1,712 25

6

surgeons on leave or waiting orders, at $1,000 each

6,000 00

 

5

surgeons under five years at sea, at $1,085 each

5,425 00

531 25

1

surgeon on leave, at $782.50

782 50

117 50

1

surgeon on furlough, at $300

300 00

200 00

43

surgeons

$57,408 00

$969 50

 

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

24

assistant surgeons, at sea, at $1,000 each

$24,000 00

$2,190 00

$26,190 00

 

 

 

House rent.

 

10

assistant surgeons, on other duty, at $900 each

9,000 00

1,200 00

10,200 00

12

assistant surgeons, on leave, &c., at $700 each

8,400 00

 

8,400 00

46

assistant surgeons

$41,400 00 

$3,390 00

$44,790 00

 

 

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference.

3

assistant surgeons, over five years at sea, at $1,027.50 each

$3,082 50

 

21

assistant surgeons, over two years at sea, at $785 each

16,485 00

 

 

 

$19,567 50

$6,622 50

10

assistant surgeons at yards, &c.

9,671 25

528 75

12

assistant surgeons on leave, &c., at $662.50 each

7,950 00

450 00

46

assistant surgeons

$37,188 75

$7,601 25

--553--

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

7

chaplains, at $1,000 each

$7,000 00

$365 00

$7,365 00

1

chaplain, on furlough

500 00

 

500 00

8

chaplains

$7,500 00

$365 00

67,865 00

 

 

Present pay.

 

Whole pay.

Difference.

4

chaplains, at sea, $662.50 each .

$2,650 00

$5,925 25

$1,439 75

3

chaplains, at yards, at $1,091.75 each

3,275 25

1

chaplain, on furlough

 

240 00

260 00

8

chaplains

 

$6,165 25 $

1,699 75

 

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

20

pursers, at sea, at $700 each

$14,000 00

$1,825 00

$15,825 00

10

pursers, on shore stations, at $700 each

7,000 00

1,800 00

8,800 00

12

pursers, waiting, &c., at $700 each

8,400 00

 

8,400 00

1

purser, on furlough, at $350

350 00

 

350 00

43

pursers

$29,750 00

$3,625 00

$33,375 00

Note.—Pursers are not named in the bill, and their pay is here calculated by section 3d of the bill, according to that of sailingmasters.

 

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference.

20

pursers at sea, at $662.50 each

$13,250 00

2,575 00

10

pursers on shore stations

10,180 25

1,380 25

12

pursers waiting orders, at $662.50 each

7,950 00

450 00

1

purser on furlough, at $240.00

240 00

110 00

43

pursers

$31,620 25

$1,754 75

 

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

29

sailingmasters, at $700 each

$20,300 00

$600 00

$20,900 00

 

Note.—Sailingmasters on other duty, waiting orders, and on leave, are not provided for by the bill.

 

 

 

29

Sailingmasters

$20,300 00

$600 00

$20,900 00

 

 

Present pay.

 

Whole pay.

Difference.

2

sailingmasters at sea, at $662.50 each

$1,325 00

 

 

20

sailingmasters on shore stations

17,213 00

 

 

4

sailingmasters on leave, &c., at 6662.50 each

2,650 00

 

 

3

sailingmasters on furlough, at $240.00 each 7

20 00

 

 

29

sailingmasters

 

$21,908 00

$1,008 00

 

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

50

passed midshipmen, under five years at sea, at $500 each

$25,000 00

$4,562 50

$29,562 50

30

passed midshipmen, on other duty, at $450 each 13,500 00

13,500 00

 

 

49

passed midshipmen, on leave, &c., at $400 each 19,600 00

19,600 00

 

 

129

 

$58,100 00

$4,562 00

$62,662 50

4

passed midshipmen, on furlough, at $225 each

 900 00

 

900 00

133

passed midshipmen

$59,000 00

$4,562 50

$63,562 50

 

 

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference.

120

passed midshipmen, at $482.50 each

$62,242 50

$420 00

4

passed midshipmen on furlough, at $150.00 each

600 00

300 00

123

passed midshipmen

$62,842 50

$720 00

--554--

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence.

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

4

secretaries to commanders of squadrons, at $900 each

$3,600 00

$3,600 00

18

clerks to yards and commandants on shore stations, at $900 each

16,200 00

16,200 00

17

clerks to commanders at sea, at $500 each

8,500 00

8,500 00

39

secretaries and clerks

$28,300 00

$28,300 00

 

 

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference.

4

secretaries to commanders of squadrons, at $1,000 each

$4,000 00

$400 00

18

clerks to yards, and commandants on shore stations

12,950 00

3,250 00

17

clerks to commanders at sea, at $391.25 each

6,651 25

1,848 75

39

secretaries and clerks

$23,601 25

$4,698 75

 

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence.

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

216

midshipmen, at sea, at $400 each

$86,400 00

$19,710 00

$106,110 00

32

midshipmen, on other duty, at $350 each

11,200 00

 

11,200 00

66

midshipmen, on leave, &c., at $300 each

19,800 00

 

19,800 00

314

 

$117,400 00

$19,710 00

$137,110 00

2

midshipmen, on furlough, at $175 each

350 00

 

350 00

316

midshipmen, (one not accepted,)

$117,750 00

$19,710 00

$137,460 00

 

 

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference

314

midshipmen, at $319.25 each

$100,244 50

$36,865 50

2

midshipmen on furlough, at $114.00. each

228 00

122 00

316

midshipmen

$100,572 50

$36,987 50

 

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence.

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

8

boatswains, at sea, at $700 each

$5,600 00

$730 00

$6,330 00

9

boatswains, on other duty, at $500 each

4,500 00

 

4,500 00

17

boatswains, (one not accepted,)

$10,100 00

$730 00

$10,830 00

 

 

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference.

8

boatswains, at sea, at $422.50 each*

$3,380 00

$2,950 00

9

boatswains, on shore stations

5,628 00

1,128 00

17

boatswains

$9,008 00

$1,822 00

 

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence.

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

8

gunners, at sea, at $700 each

$5,600 00

$730 00

$6,330 00

8

gunners, on other duty, at $500 each

4,000 00

 

4,000 00

1

gunner, absent on leave, at $500

500 00

 

500 00

17

gunners

$10,100 00

$730 00

$10,830 00

Note.—Gunners on leave are not named in the bill.

 

 

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference.

8

Gunners, at sea, at $422.50 each

$3,380 00

$2,950 00

8

Gunners, on shore stations

5,205 50

1,205 50

1

Gunner, on leave,

422 50

77 50

17

Gunners

$9,008 00

$1,822 00

 

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence.

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

8

sailmakers, at sea, at $700 each

$5,600 00

$730 00

$6,330 00

4

sailmakers, on other duty, at $500 each

2,000 00

 

2,000 00

2

sailmakers, on leave, at $500 each

1,000 00

 

1,000 00

14

sailmakers

$8,600 00

$730 00

$9,330 00

Note.—Sailmakers on leave are not named in the bill.

--555--

 

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference.

2

sailmakers, at sea, at $422.50 each

$3,380 00

$2,950 00

4

sailmakers, on shore stations

2,787 00

787 00

2

sailmakers, on leave, at $422.50 each

845 00

155 00

14

sailmakers

$7,012 00

$2,318 00

 

 

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence.

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

 

 

 

One ration.

 

6

carpenters, at sea, at $700 each

$4,200 00

$547 50

$4,747 50

7

carpenters, on other duty, at $500 each

3,500 00

 

3,500 00

3

carpenters, waiting orders, at $500 each

1,500 00

 

1,500 00

16

carpenters

$9,200 00

$547 50

$9,747 50

Note.—Carpenters on leave are not named in the bill.

 

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference.

6

carpenters, at sea, at $422.50

$2,535 00

$2,212 50

7

carpenters, on shore stations

4,373 75

873 75

3

carpenters, on leave, at $422.50

1,267 50

232 50

16

carpenters

$8,176 25

$1,571 25

Recapitulation.

Proposed pay.

Pay and subsistence

Ration and rent.

Whole pay.

Thirty-seven captains

$111,700 00

$1,038 75

$112,738 75

Forty-one masters commandant

61,200 00

2,621 25

63,821 25

Two hundred and fifty lieutenants

265,650 00

8,521 25

274,171 25

Forty-three surgeons

56,100 00

2,277 50

58,377 50

Forty-six assistant surgeons

41,400 00

3,390 00

44,790 00

Eight chaplains

7,500 00

365 00

7,865 00

Forty-three pursers

29,750 00

3,625 00

33,375 00

Twenty-nine sailingmasters

20,300 00

600 00

20,900 00

One hundred and thirty-three passed midshipmen

59,000 00

4,562 50

63,562 50

Thirty-nine secretaries and clerks

28,300 00

 

28,300 00

Three hundred and sixteen midshipmen

117,750 00

19,710 00

137,460 00

Seventeen boatswains

10,100 00

730 00

10,830 00

Seventeen gunners

10,100 00

730 00

10,830 00

Fourteen sailmakers

8,600 00

730 00

9,330 00

Sixteen carpenters

9,200 00

547 50

9,747 50

 

$836,650 00

$49,488 75

$886,098 75

Recapitulation.

Present pay.

Whole pay.

Difference.

Thirty-seven captains

$93,724 00

$19,014 75

Forty-one masters commandant

58,595 25

5,226 00

Two hundred and fifty lieutenants

243,315 50

30,855 75

Forty-three surgeons

57,408 00

969 50

Forty-six assistant surgeons

37,188 75

7,601 25

Eight chaplains

6,165 25

1,699 75

Forty-three pursers

31,620 25

1,754 75

Twenty-nine sailingmasters

21,908 00

1,008 00

One hundred and thirty-three passed midshipmen

62,842 50

720 00

Thirty-nine secretaries and clerks

23,601 25

4,698 75

Three hundred and sixteen midshipmen

100,472 50

36,987 50

Seventeen boatswains

9,008 00

1,822 00

Seventeen gunners

9,008 00

1,822 00

Fourteen sailmakers

7,012 00

2,318 00

Sixteen carpenters

8,176 25

1,571 25

 

$770,045 50

$116,053 25

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office, March, 14, 1834.

Navy Department, June 7, 1834.

Sir:

Your letter of the 31st ultimo was duly received, and referred to the Fourth Auditor for a report on the difference in the amount of pay proposed by the two bills mentioned.

His reply having been received this day, is enclosed, (A and B,) and will, it is believed, communicate all the information desired on that point.

The documents which you requested me to forward to our vessels on foreign stations, it has given me much pleasure to send by the first conveyance.

Concerning the only other point named in your letter, requesting my views or suggestions in respect

--556--

to the present bill, I would observe, that all the facts and principles of a material character, which had occurred to me on the subject of pay, were presented in my communication to you of the 15th of January last.

If, on further reflection, any new ones are found which appear worthy of consideration, I shall be gratified in submitting them at an early day.

But, supposing the comparative amount of pay between the two bills might be wanted immediately, I hastened to forward it the moment it was received.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

LEVI WOODBURY.

The Hon. John G. Watmough, Chairman, &c.

A.

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office, June 6, 1834.

Sir:

In compliance with the request contained in your letter of the 2d instant, accompanied by the letter of the Hon. John G. Watmough, &c., I have the honor to transmit herewith "a statement showing the difference between the pay of the officers of the United States navy, as proposed by bill No. 334, reported by a select committee of the House of Representatives, 28th February, 1834, and the pay as proposed in the amendment to said bill, reported by said committee 17th May, 1834."

This statement may not be precisely accurate in all its detail; but, not doubting that it is sufficiently so to answer the purpose in view, (if not entirely so,) I have thought it inexpedient, at this late period in the session of Congress, to detain it for further examination. The papers are returned.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

AMOS KENDALL.

Hon. Levi Woodbury, Secretary of Navy.

B.

A statement showing the difference between the pay of the officers of the United States navy, as proposed by bill No. 334, reported by a select committee of the House of Representatives, 28th February, 1834, and the pay as proposed in the amendment to said bill, reported by said committee 17th May, 1834.

Pay per amendment to bill No. 334.

 

 

Pay and subsistence.

One ration and house rent.

Whole pay per amendment.

Whole pay per bill No. 334.‡

Increase.

1

Senior captain on other duty, (Navy Commissioner)

$5,000 00

 

$5,000 00 

 

 

4

Captains commanding squadrons, at $5,500 each

22,000 00

*$365 00

22,365 00 

 

 

2

Captains acting as Navy Commissioners, at $4,500 each

9,000 00

 

9,000 00 

 

 

3

Captains of 5 years' standing, and commanding vessels for sea service, at $4,000 each

12,000 00

*273 75

12,273 25 

 

 

8

Captains of five years' standing, and commanding navy yards, at $4,000 each

32,000 00

†400 00

32,400 00 

 

 

1

Captain of five years' standing, on other duty

3,500 00

 

3,500 00 

 

 

13

Captains of five years' standing, and on leave of absence or waiting orders, at $2,500 each

32,500 00

 

32,500 00 

 

 

5

Captains under 5 years' standing, and on leave, &c., at $2,500 each

2,500 00

 

12,500 00 

 

 

37

Captains

$128,500 00

 $1,038 75

$129,538 75

$112,738 75

$16,800 00

9

Masters commandant attached to vessels for sea service at $2,500 each

$22,500 00

*$821 25

$23,321 25 

 

 

13

Masters commandant attached to navy yards, or on other duty, at $2,100 each

27,300 00

†1,800 00

29,100 00

 

 

18

Masters commandant on leave of absence or waiting orders, at $1,800 each

32,400 00

 

32,400 00 

 

 

1

Master commandant on furlough, at 2/3 of $1,800

1,200 00

 

1,200 00 

 

 

41

Masters commandant

$83,400 00

$2,621 25

$86,021 25

$63,821 25

$22,200 00

71

Lieutenants under 10 years, on leave of absence or waiting orders, at $1,000 each

$71,000 00

 

$71,000 00

 

 

7

Lieutenants under 10 years, on furlough, at $ of $1,000-$666.67 each

4,666 67

 

4,666 67

 

 

78

Lieutenants under 10 years, on duty on board ship for sea service, at $1,200 each

93,600 00

*$7,117 50

100,717 50

 

 

23

Lieutenants under 10 years, on other duty, at $1,100 each

25,300 00

 

25,300 00

 

 

39

Lieutenants over 10 years, on leave of absence or waiting orders, at $1,200 each

46,800 00

 

46,800 00

 

 

1

Lieutenant over 10 years, on furlough, at $ of $1,200 = $800

800 00

 

800 00

 

 

4

Lieutenants over 10 years, on duty on board ship for sea service, at $1,400 each

5,600 00

*365 00

5,965 00

 

 

7

Lieutenants over 10 years, commanding, at $1,700 each

11,900 00

*638 75

12,538 75

 

 

20

Lieutenants over 10 years, on other duty, at $1,300 each

26,000 00

†400 00

26,400 00

 

 

250

Lieutenants

$285,666 67

$8,521 25

$294,187 92

$274,171 25

$20,016 67

* One ration.

† House rent.

‡ For amounts in this column see statement marked B, in report to H. R., No. 467.

--557--

B.—Statement—Continued.

Pay per amendment to bill No. 334.

 

 

Pay and  subsistence.

One ration and house rent.

Whole pay per  amendment.

Whole pay per bill No. 334.

Increase.

5

Assistant surgeons for first five years, &c., at $550 each

$2,750 00

†$240 00

$2,990 00

 

 

2

Assistant surgeons for first five years, under orders for duty, &c., at $550 + 1/4 = $687.50 each

1,375 00

 

1,375 00

 

 

20

Assistant surgeons for first five years, at sea, at $5,500 + 1/3 =$733.33 each

14,666 67

†1,825 00

16,491 67

 

 

5

Assistant surgeons over 5 and under 10 years, at $1,200 each

6,000 00

 

6,000 00

 

 

9

Assistant surgeons over 5 and under 10 years, at $1,200 + 1/4 = $1,500 each

13,500 00

† 960 00

14,460 00

 

 

4

Assistant surgeons over 5 and under 10 years, at $1,200 + 1/3 = $1,600 each

6,400 00

*305 00

6,765 00

 

 

1

Assistant surgeon of 10 years and upwards, at $850

850 00

 

850 00

 

 

46

Assistant surgeons

$45,541 67

$3,390 00

$48,931 67

$44,790 00

$4,141 67

4

Surgeons for first five years, on leave of absence, at $1,000 each

$4,000 00

 

$4,000 00

 

 

1

Surgeon for first five years, on furlough, at $ of $1,000

666 67

 

666 67

 

 

5

Surgeons for first five years, under orders for duty, &c., at $1,000 + 1/4 = $1,250 each

6,250 00

†$800 00

7,050 00

 

 

7

Surgeons for first live years, at sea, at $1,000 + 1/3 = $1,333.33 each

9,333 34

*638 75

9,972 09

 

 

3

Surgeons for second five years, on leave of absence, at $1,200 each

3,600 00

 

3,600 00

 

 

4

Surgeons for second five years, under orders for duty, &c., at $1,200 + 1/4 = $1,500 each

6,000 00

†200 00

6,200 00

 

 

3

Surgeons for second five years, at sea, at $1,200 + 1/3 = $1,600 each

4,800 00

*273 75

5,073 75

 

 

3

Surgeons for third five years, under orders for duty, &c., $1,400 each

4,200 00

 

4,200 00

 

 

2

Surgeons for fourth five years, on leave of absence, at $1,600 each

3,200 00

 

3,200 00

 

 

1

Surgeon for fourth five years, under orders for duty, &c., at $1,800 + 1/4 = $2,250 each

2,000 00

 

2,000 00

 

 

3

Surgeons for 20 years and upwards, on leave, or waiting orders, at $1,800 each

5,400 00

 

5,400 00

 

 

3

Surgeons for 20 years and upwards, under orders on duty, &c., at $1,800 + 1/4 = $2,250 each

6,750 00

 

6,750 00

 

 

2

Fleet surgeons, at sea, at $1,600 + 2/3 = $2,400 each

4,800 00

* 182 50

4,982 50

 

 

2

Fleet surgeons, at sea, at $1,800 + 2/3 = $2,700 each

5,400 00

*182 50

5,582 50

 

 

43

Surgeons

$66,400 01

$2,277 50

$68,677 51

$58,377 50

$10,300 01

4

Chaplains attached to vessels for sea service, at $1,200 each

$4,800 00

*$365 00

$5,165 00

 

 

3

Chaplains attached to navy yards, at $800 each

2,400 00

 

2,400 00

 

 

1

Chaplain, on furlough, at 2/3 of $00 = $533.34

533 34

 

553 34

 

 

8

Chaplains

$7,733 34

$365 00

8,098 34

$7,865 00

$233 34

4

Secretaries to commanders of squadrons, at $1,000 each

$4,000 00

 

$4,000 00

$3,600 00

$400 00

1

Sailingmaster attached to a ship of the line, at $1,100

$1,100 00

*$91 25

$1,191 25

 

 

1

Sailingmaster, attached to a vessel on sea service, at $1,000

1,000 00

*91 25

1,091 25

 

 

11

Sailingmasters, attached to navy yards, at $1,000 each

11,000 00

†600 00

11,600 00

 

 

13

Sailingmasters, on leave of absence, &c., at $750 each

9,750 00

 

9,750 00

 

 

3

Sailingmasters, on furlough, at $ of $1,000 = $666.67 each

2,000 00

 

2,000 00

 

 

29

Sailingmasters

$24,850 00

$782 50

$25,632 50

$20,900 00

$4,732 50

22

Passed midshipmen, attached to vessels for sea service, at $600 each

$13,200 00

*$2,007 50

$15,207 50

 

 

58

Passed midshipmen, on other duty and on shore stations, at $500 each

29,000 00

 

29,000 00

 

 

49

Passed midshipmen, on leave of absence or waiting orders, at $400 each

19,600 00

 

19,600 00

 

 

4

Passed midshipmen, on furlough, at 2/3 of $500 = $333.33 each

1,333 34

 

1,333 34

 

 

133

Passed midshipmen

$63,133 34

$2,007 50

$65,140 84

$63,562 50

$1,578 34

207

Midshipmen, when attached to vessels for sea service, at $400 each

$82,800 00

*$18,888 75

$101,688 75

 

 

41

Midshipmen, on other duty and on shore stations, at $350 each

14,350 00

 

14,350 00

 

 

66

Midshipmen, on leave of absence or waiting orders, at $300 each

19,800 00

 

19,800 00

 

 

2

Midshipmen, on furlough, at 2/3 of $350 = $233.34

466 67

 

466 67

 

 

316

 

$127,416 67

$18,888 75

$146,305 42

$1,37,460 00

$8,845 42

 * One ration.

 † House rent.

 ‡ For amounts in this column, see statement marked B, in reports to H. R., No. 467.

--558--

B.—Statement—Continued.

Pay per amendment to bill No. 334.

 

 

Pay and subsistence.

One ration and house rent.

Whole pay per amendment.

Whole pay  per bill No. 334.

Increase.

18

Clerks to yards, at $900 each

$16,200 00

 

$16,200 00

 

 

17

Clerks to commanders at sea, at $500

8,500 00

 

8,500 00

 

 

35

Clerks to yards and to commanders at sea

$24,700 00

 

$24,700 00

$24,700 00

 

 

Boatswains, gunners, carpenters, and sailmakers:

 

 

 

 

 

3

Of a ship of the line

$2,250 00

*$273 75

$2,523 75

 

 

11

Of a frigate, at $600 each

6,600 00

*1,003 75

7,603 75

 

 

43

Of a sloops brig, or schooner, or while acting on shore, at $500 each

21,500 00

*1,460 00

22,960 00

 

 

8

On leave, or waiting orders, at $360 each

2,880 00

 

2,880 00

 

 

65

Boatswains, gunners, carpenters, and sailmakers

$33,230 60

$2,737 50

$35,967 00

$40,737 50

$4,770 00

* One ration.

† House rent.

‡ For amounts in this column, see statement marked B, in report to H. R., No. 467.

Recapitulation.

Pay per amendment to bill No. 334.

 

 

Pay and subsistence.

One ration and house rent.

Whole pay per amendment.

Whole pay  per bill No. 334.

Increase.

37

Captains

$128,500 00

$1,038 75

$129,538 75

$112,738 75

$16,800 00

41

Masters commandant

83,400 00

2,621 25

86,021 25

63,821 25

22,200 00

250

Lieutenants

285,666 67

8,521 25

294,187 92

274,17 125

20,016 67

46

Assistant surgeons

45,541 67

3,390 00

48,931 67

44,790 00

4,141 67

43

Surgeons

66,400 01

2,277 50

68 677 51

58,377 50

10,300 01

8

Chaplains

7,733 34

365 00

8,098 34

7,865 00

233 34

4

Secretaries to commanders of squadrons

4,000 00

 

4,000 00

3,600 00

400 00

29

Sailingmasters

24,850 00

782 50

25,632 50

20,900 00

4,732 50

133

Passed midshipmen

63,133 34

2,007 50

65,140 84

63,562 50

1,578 34

316

Midshipmen

127,416 67

18,888 75

146,305 42

137,460 00

8,845 42

35

Clerks to yards and commanders at sea

24,700 00

 

24,700 00

24,700 00

 

65

Boatswains, gunners, carpenters, and sailmakers

33,230 00

2,737 50

35,967 50

40,737 50

4,770 00

 

Whole increase per amendment to bill No. 334

$894,571 70

$42,630 00

$937,201 70

$852,723 75

$84,477 95

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office, June 6, 1834.