--589--

23d Congress.]

No. 564.

[2d Session.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, SHOWING THE CONDITION OF THE NAVY IN 1835.

COMMUNICATED TO CONGRESS, WITH THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE, DECEMBER 2, 1834.

Navy Department, November 29, 1834.

To the President of the United States:

Sir:

In laying before you, at this time, a succinct view of the condition of our navy, and its operations during the past year, it affords me great pleasure to state that its gradual increase and improvement are such as might have been anticipated from the ample means for that purpose which have been afforded by the liberal policy of Congress.

All the services required of our naval force have been promptly performed; our commerce has been protected in the remote as well as the neighboring seas; our national character has been sustained at home and abroad, while a large portion of naval officers, seamen, and marines have been kept in active service, under a strict discipline, calculated to fit them for all the duties which may be required of them, whether in defending our property on the ocean from pirates or open enemies, our shores from hostile aggression, or our flag from insult.

An inspection of our navy yards at Portsmouth, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, and Norfolk, made in August and September last, in company with the Commissioners of the Navy Board, has afforded me the most satisfactory evidence of our means, in a short time, of increasing our navy to any extent the exigencies of our country may require.

The officers in charge of those stations perform their duties with great ability and zeal; the building and repairing" of our ships are conducted with dispatch and economy; and the ample materials on hand for naval purposes are preserved with the greatest care, and by all the means which science and experience can suggest to prevent decay.

Our naval force consists of six ships of the line, and seven frigates now building, for the completion of which, additional appropriations to the amount of $1,527,640 will be required; of five ships of the line, two frigates, and six sloops-of-war in ordinary, requiring repairs which will cost $1,362,000, in addition to the materials on hand for that purpose; and of one ship of the line, four frigates, eight sloops-of-war, and six schooners in commission; in all, twelve ships of the line, thirteen frigates, fourteen sloops-of-war, and six schooners. Besides which, the frames of ships procured, or under contract, for the gradual increase of the navy, and other materials on hand or under contract for that purpose, will afford the means of bringing into the service, as soon as it can probably be required, an additional force of five ships of the line, eleven frigates, seven sloops-of-war, and two schooners, the building of which may be immediately commenced on launching our vessels now upon the stocks.

--590--

Our vessels in commission during the past year have been employed, as heretofore, in protecting our commerce in the Mediterranean, in the West Indies, on the coast of Brazil, and in the Pacific ocean.

The ship of the line Delaware, the frigates United States and Constellation, the sloop-of-war John Adams, and the schooner Shark, have been thus employed in the Mediterranean; and the frigate Potomac, after her return from the Pacific and Indian oceans, was repaired, and sailed on the 20th of last month to join the Mediterranean squadron, from which the frigate Constellation had been ordered to return. This frigate arrived at Norfolk on the 20th instant. The sloop-of-war John Adams returned to the United States in February from the Mediterranean, and sailed again for that station in August last, after receiving necessary repairs.

On the West India station, the sloops-of-war Vandalia, St. Louis, Falmouth, and the schooners Grampus and Experiment, have been employed. The St. Louis returned to Norfolk in July last, where she has been repaired, and from whence she sailed on the 14th instant to resume her station in the West Indies. The Vandalia returned in August last to Norfolk, where she is undergoing considerable repairs, which, it is believed, will be completed early next month, when she will return to the West India squadron.

The sloops-of-war Natchez, Ontario, Erie, Lexington, and Peacock, and the schooners Enterprise and Boxer, composed our squadron on the coast of Brazil. The Erie did not sail for this station until August last. The Lexington returned to the United States in April, and the Peacock in May last. The Enterprise returned in April, and sailed again for the Brazilian station in July last, in which month the Boxer returned to the United States, and, after being repaired, sailed for the Pacific. The Peacock is now undergoing considerable repairs, and is expected to be ready for sea early in February next.

For our station in the Pacific, the frigate Brandywine sailed on the 2d of June last, to co-operate with the sloops-of-war Fairfield and Vincennes, and the schooner Dolphin, and, with the Boxer, now on her way to that station, from which the Falmouth returned on the 1st of February, and, after having been repaired, sailed for the West India station in March last.

Our naval force, consisting of commission and warrant officers, petty officers, seamen, ordinary seamen, landsmen, and boys, amounts to 6,072; and our marine corps, under its new organization, will consist of commissioned officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, to the number of 1,283; making a total of 7,355.

The dry docks at Boston and Norfolk have fully answered the most sanguine expectations that were formed of their usefulness. They are now deemed indispensable to a speedy and economical repair of our larger vessels. But the two already finished are not sufficient for the purposes of our navy. An additional dry dock, at some intermediate point between Boston and Norfolk, would greatly promote the purposes for which our navy is established and maintained. As a site for such additional dry dock, the harbor of New York presents greater advantages than are to be found in any other situation; among which may be enumerated the great commerce of the place, the facilities which the city of New York affords for recruiting seamen and for procuring all materials, as well as for employing skillful mechanics and laborers necessary for repairing vessels.

The experience acquired in making the two dry docks already finished cannot fail to be of great advantage in the construction of a third.

I would respectfully repeat a recommendation of my predecessor, that authority be given to construct two or three steam batteries, as the means of testing the application of steam to the purposes of national defence.

It can hardly be doubted that the power of steam is soon to produce as great a revolution in the defence of rivers, bays, coasts, and harbors, as it has already done in the commerce, intercourse, and business of all classes of men in Europe as well as in America. This subject has already attracted the attention of the maritime powers of Europe; and our honor as well as safety requires that no nation, whose fleets may come in conflict with ours, should be in advance of us in the science and application of this power, upon which the success of our future wars with them may depend.

Should the power of steam, as a means of defence, produce all the effects that may be justly anticipated, it will diminish, in some instances, the necessity of permanent fortifications on our coasts, by substituting those which may be moved from place to place as they may be wanted, and in our own waters become the formidable engines of attack as well as defence. The heavy and cumbrous steam vessels and batteries, with their necessary apparatus and supplies, which may be brought into action with the most powerful effect by a nation near its own shores and harbors, cannot be transported over distant seas and oceans for the purpose of attacking its enemies. Should, therefore, the application of steam become a part of the system of maritime war, it is a consolation to reflect that it will greatly diminish the frequency as well as horrors of such war, inasmuch as it will hold out much greater advantages to the defending than to the attacking party, and take from the aggressor in a great degree his hope of success, and, of course, his motive for action.

I can add nothing to what has been frequently urged in favor of a peace establishment for our navy; but must be permitted to state, what has often been before stated, that the compensation of the commanders of our ships on foreign stations is altogether inadequate to an honorable discharge of their duties. They are compelled to incur expenses beyond the amount of their pay and rations, or decline to receive and return civilities uniformly offered to them on such stations, and upon which our friendly relations with foreign nations may, in some degree, depend.

The course pursued by our officers, under such circumstances, has been such as national as well as professional pride has dictated; and, of course, they frequently return from their tours of service deeply in debt; one evil consequence of which is, that it adds to the inducements of our officers to prefer service on our home stations to service at sea; whereas the pecuniary consideration should always be in favor of the sea service.

Much inconvenience frequently arises from a want of power to make transfers of materials purchased for the navy under certain appropriations, to the purposes of other appropriations, under which they are more immediately wanted. A power to make such transfers, guarded by limitations similar to those imposed upon the power of making transfers of money from certain appropriations to others, would save much time and expense in the building and repairing of our ships.

Under the act of the 30th of June last, for the better organization of the United States marine corps, the appointments of officers authorized by the same have been made; and the additional number of privates required will be recruited with all convenient dispatch.

--591--

So much of the military regulations, for the discipline of the marine corps, as were in force at the passing of the act, and not inconsistent with the same; will continue in force until superseded by regulations which shall be prescribed in conformity with the provisions of the eighth section of that act.

It is believed that the discipline and harmony of the officers and men of the navy proper, and of the marine corps, will be promoted by placing the marine barracks without the bounds of the different navy yards with which they may be connected. This arrangement would create but little additional expense to the government. The marine barracks at Portsmouth, should it be thought proper to retain them as such, are at a sufficient distance, and might be easily separated from that part of the navy yard in which ships are built and repaired, and in which are placed the workshops and stores of that station.

The marine barracks at Boston are within the bounds of the navy yard, but so decayed and dilapidated as not to be worth repairing, and they occupy a space designated for another purpose in the yard. A situation for barracks, sufficiently near the yard, it is said, can be procured upon reasonable terms.

The marine barracks at the navy yard at New York were condemned in 1826 as unworthy of repair. The officers attached to this station have been allowed house rent in lieu of quarters. An appropriation of $30,000 has been made for the erection of marine barracks at that station, and $6,000 for the purchase of a site for the same; but, as yet, the site has not been purchased, nor selected.

At Philadelphia, the barracks are within the navy yard, but unfit for use as such. It will be necessary to construct new barracks at that station.

At Washington, the barracks are not within the bounds of the navy yard.

At Norfolk, the barracks are within the bounds of the navy yard, but inadequate to the accommodation of the force required there. Besides, they are much out of repair; and the commanding officer has been necessarily allowed house rent in lieu of quarters.

At Pensacola, no permanent marine barracks have been prepared. The officers have been allowed house rent, and the men have occupied temporary buildings. It is proper here to observe that the plans of the navy yards, prepared and approved under the act for the gradual improvement of the navy, make no provision for barracks within the navy yards, except at Portsmouth.

Under the first section of the act concerning naval pensions and the navy pension fund, passed the 30th of June last, fourteen, pensions to widows have been renewed, and thirty-seven original pensions have been granted, in pursuance of the provisions of that act. These constitute a heavy charge upon that fund, and require for their payment, annually, the sum of $16,062.

Under the second section of that act, the sum of $141,303.80 has been reimbursed to the fund for the cost of the stock of the Bank of Columbia, heretofore purchased by the commissioners of the fund, with interest thereon from the period at which said bank ceased to pay interest to the time of reimbursement. $141,300 of the amount has been vested in the stock of the Bank of the United States, as authorized by the act of Congress of the 10th of July, 1832. The state of this fund will appear by documents annexed, marked M, M 1 and M 2.

The number of invalid pensioners is now two hundred and eighty-seven. Should all of them claim, which is improbable, the amount required for their annual payment will be $23,321.

The number of widow pensioners, including those under the act of the 30th of June last, is one hundred and nine; and the amount required for their annual payment is $24,023—making the annual charge, according to the present pension roll, $47,254.

From the account of stocks, hereunto annexed, marked M, it will appear that the income of the fund arising from those stocks, and others to be purchased by excess of money on hand, will be about $70,000 per annum. It is believed, therefore, that the fund will be sufficient for all the ascertained claims upon it, under existing laws; and the surplus of next year, which may be estimated at from $15,000 to $20,000, will, it is presumed, be enough to meet the ordinary increase of pensions for several years.

Of the privateer pension fund, the act of Congress of the 19th of June last revived five years' pensions to widows of officers, seamen and marines, slain or lost on board of private armed vessels.

In twenty-eight cases brought to the notice of this Department under this act, more than five years had elapsed from the date when their former pensions expired. They being sustained by satisfactory proof, were settled in the office of the Fourth Auditor, and the accounts certified by the Second Comptroller of the Treasury. The amount to pay these accounts was $15,480. Under the act, twenty-six pensions were renewed; of which, one expired on the 10th day of October last and one on the 28th instant. One will expire on the 4th of March, four on the 1st of February, and nineteen on the 1st of January, in the year 1835. The payments on these, to the 1st of July last, amounted to $11,995.20; and the sum required, to complete five years' pension to each, will be $1,320.80.

In addition to the above, there are thirty-four invalid pensioners on the roll, and the sum necessary to pay them will be 83,016 per annum.

It will be seen in the annexed statement, marked N 1, that the amount in the Treasury on the 1st instant, to the credit of the fund, was

$1,261 46

Stock owned by the fund (N)

15,567 05

Total

$16,828 51

After paying the claims that have as yet been preferred under the act of the 19th of June last, and it is believed that but few additional claims under the act can now be brought forward, it is estimated that the fund will be sufficient to pay, for four or five years, all the invalid pensions now chargeable to it.

From the statement annexed, marked 0, it will appear that the amount to the credit of the navy hospital fund, on the 1st inst., was $35,559.04. The increase of the fund, arising from deductions in the settlement of accounts in the Fourth Auditor's office, will be nearly $16,000 per annum. The expenditures for several years will probably not exceed $13,000 per annum. This will leave balances not wanted for current expenses. The propriety of authorizing, by law, the investment of such balances in some well-secured, productive stock, is respectfully suggested.

By the statement hereunto annexed, marked P, it appears that, of the appropriations heretofore made for the suppression of the slave trade, there remains in the Treasury a balance of $14,213.91. It is not believed that any further appropriation for this purpose is necessary at this time.

It will be perceived, by the estimates, that nothing is asked on account of the contingent expenses of the Secretary's office of this Department. A proper degree of economy has rendered any appropriation

--592--

for those expenses for the ensuing year unnecessary. This circumstance affords me an apology for stating that some of the officers connected with this Department do not receive an adequate compensation for their services.

The chief clerk of the Commissioners of the Navy Board, and the warrant clerk, and the clerk keeping the register of correspondence of this Department, perform arduous duties, which require talent and experience. Their salaries, respectively, are less than are paid in other departments for services of no greater difficulty and responsibility than theirs, and are inadequate to the decent support of themselves and families.

An estimate for an increase of $100 to the salary of the first, so as to make it $1,700 per annum, and of $400 to the latter, so as to make it $1,400, is respectfully submitted.

The salaries of the chief clerks of the commandants of the navy yards at Boston, New York, Washington, and Norfolk, are evidently below what may be considered a fair compensation for their services. I therefore solicit a small increase of $150 to their salaries respectively, so as to make them $900 each, as stated in the estimates.

The superintendent of the southwest Executive building receives at present but $250, and the two watchmen for the same but $300 each per annum. It is respectfully recommended that an increase of $250 be made to the salary of the superintendent, and of $200 to the salaries of each of the watchmen.

In the report of my predecessor, of the 30th of November last, an estimate of the expense of purchasing and maintaining a lithographic press was submitted, as a means of procuring charts and blank forms for this Department, as well as for the several navy yards and vessels in commission, as also for the purpose of multiplying copies of drawings connected with the survey of the coast. As, in my opinion, the employment of such a press would be a saving of time and money, in the duties now performed by clerks and draftsmen in this Department, and the branches of service connected with it, I respectfully renew the application for the necessary appropriation for this press; and annex hereto copies of the letters of the Commissioners of the Navy Board, and of Lieutenant Charles Wilkes, jr., heretofore laid before Congress, in favor of this application.

The charge of the coast survey, now under the superintendence of Mr. Hassler, was, on the 11th day of March last, transferred from the Treasury to the Navy Department, to which it was thought more properly to belong. I have found this arrangement very onerous, as it imposed upon me new duties, which could not be performed without a careful examination of the accounts of what had heretofore been done on the survey, contained in a voluminous correspondence between the Treasury Department and the superintendent. This arrangement also caused a short interruption in the progress of the work, but which has, nevertheless, been prosecuted with diligence and zeal by those employed in it.

The report of Mr. Hassler, of the 17th of May last, and his supplementary report of the 11th of last month, with the maps, drafts, and sketches accompanying the same, herewith transmitted, show the progress already made in this work under the law of 1832, and its connection with the progress made in the same in the year 1817.

The situation of the base line on the south side of Long Island has been most fortunately selected. As any error in this line would be attended with corresponding errors in the whole work depending upon the same, the utmost care has been taken to have it measured with the greatest possible accuracy.

From what has been done in this survey, we may reasonably hope that this important work will advance with all the aid which science, skill, and industry can give it, and in a manner as honorable to the government, under whose auspices it was begun and has been continued, as it will be useful to the present and to future ages.

The information wanted for accurate and detailed estimates of the necessary appropriations for the continuance of the coast survey cannot easily be obtained until further experience shall enable the officers engaged in it to introduce more system in the detail of duties and expenditures in their work than they have heretofore been able to do.

The sum of thirty thousand dollars was appropriated for this purpose the past year, and it is believed that an equal sum will be wanted for the ensuing year, as stated in the estimates.

Under the act of the 30th of June last, "authorizing the Secretary of the Navy to make experiments for the safety of the steam engine," preparations have been made for testing certain proposed improvements in steam boilers; but no such experiments have been exhibited or communicated to this Department, that could properly form the subject of a report.

Since the last annual report from this Department, the legislature of Pennsylvania have, by their act of the 10th day of April last, ceded to the United States the jurisdiction over the territory now in their possession in the county of Philadelphia, and occupied for the purpose of a naval asylum for sick and disabled seamen, so long as the same shall be used by the Government of the United States for that purpose, with a reservation of the right to lay out a certain street, called Sutherland avenue, through the western part of said ceded territory; and with a proviso that all process, civil and criminal, of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania shall extend into, and be effected within, such territory.

The necessary references to papers and documents, connected with this report, will be found in a schedule hereunto annexed.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient, humble servant,

MAHLON DICKERSON.

Schedule of papers accompanying the report of the Secretary of the Navy, to the President of the United States, of November 29, 1834.

1. The letter of the Commissioners of the Navy to the Secretary, transmitting the general and special estimates of the navy, for the year 1835.

A. Estimate for the office of the Secretary of the Navy.

B. Estimate for the office of the Commissioners of the Navy.

G. Estimate for the expenses of the southwest Executive building. D. The general estimate for the navy.

--593--

Detailed estimate:

D, 1. For vessels in commission.

D, 2. For receiving vessels.

D, 3. For recruiting stations.

D, 4. For officers and others attached to navy yards and shore stations, and the abstract or recapitulation.

D, 5. For officers waiting orders and on furlough.

D, 6. For provisions.

D, 7. For improvements and repairs of navy yards, and recapitulation.

E. Special estimate for magazines, hospitals, tanks, lithographic press, and survey of the coast.

E, 1. Lithographic press.

F. Estimates for the marine corps. Detailed estimates, F 1 to 6.

G. List of vessels in commission, of each squadron; their commanders and stations.

H. List of vessels in ordinary.

I. List of vessels building.

K. Report of the proceedings under the law for the gradual increase of the navy. L. Report of the proceedings under the law for the gradual improvement of the navy. M. Statement of the condition of the navy pension fund.

Detailed statements, M 1 and 2.

N. Statement of the condition of the privateer pension fund.

Detailed statements, N 1 and 2.

0. Statement of the condition of the navy hospital fund.

P. Statement of the proceedings under the law for the suppression of the slave trade.

Q. and Q 1. Statement of proceedings under law for surveying the coast.

R. List of deaths.

S. List of resignations.

T. List of dismissions.

No. 1.

Navy Commissioners' Office, November 14, 1834.

Sir:

The Board of Navy Commissioners have the honor to transmit, herewith, the estimates (in triplicate) for the expenses upon the following objects, under the direction of the Navy Department, viz: An estimate of the expense of the Navy Commissioners' office, marked B.

The general estimate for the navy, marked D, with detailed estimates for some of the items of the general estimate, marked from D 1 to D 7, inclusively.

A special estimate is also submitted, for the completion of objects which have been heretofore authorized by special appropriation, marked E.

The estimate for the expenses of the marine corps, as exhibited by the colonel commandant of that corps, marked F, with a statement of the probable distribution of the corps, marked F 1, and detailed estimates for some of the items, marked from F 2 to F 6, inclusively.

They also submit reports upon the number, rate, distribution and condition of the vessels in ordinary, marked H; a similar report of the vessels building, marked I; of the proceedings under the laws for the gradual increase of the navy, marked K, and of those under the laws for the gradual improvement of the navy, marked L.

As the amount of the general estimate is greater than the appropriations for the present year, the board respectfully state some of the causes which have produced the increase. The increase in the first item is occasioned by a small increase in the number to be employed, and by a small additional compensation proposed for others.

The increase in the fourth item, which is the largest, has become necessary, principally from the greater deterioration of the vessels which it will be necessary to repair, to furnish the required reliefs for vessels which must return to the United States to discharge their crews.

The board no not propose to depart from a course which has been for some time pursued by them, which has been to limit their estimates under this head to the probable wants for the current year; as they believe it to be good policy in time of peace, and when no sudden increase in force is contemplated, not to repair vessels which might afterwards remain long unemployed.

A small increase is proposed in the seventh item, to meet the current expenses for ammunition, and to gradually replace old, imperfect small arms, by others of approved quality, and of uniform patterns.

The special estimate, E, comprises the amounts which are considered necessary for giving due security and convenient access to the magazines, and for making arrangements to secure the comforts of the sick, and to give proper protection to the public property.

The advantages anticipated from the possession and use of a lithographic press were fully stated in the last annual estimates.

In the estimate for the expenses of the Navy Commissioners' office, marked B, they have proposed an increase of $100 to the salary of their chief clerk, to place him on an equality with other clerks in similar situations; and they feel assured that the nature and extent of his duties, and the manner in which he performs them, justly entitle him to this consideration.

The increased amount required for the support of the marine corps is a necessary consequence of the increase of the corps which was made at the last session of Congress.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN RODGERS.

Hon. Mahlon Dickerson, Secretary of the Navy.

--594--

A.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy, for the year 1835.

Secretary of the Navy

$6,000

Six clerks, per act of 20th April, 1818

$8,200

 

One clerk, per act of 26th May, 1824

1,000

 

One clerk, per act of 2d March, 1827

1,000

 

 

 10,200

One clerk of navy and privateer pension funds and navy hospital fund, per act of 10th July, 1832.

1,600

Messenger and assistant messenger

1,050

Contingent expenses. The balance remaining unexpended of appropriations for former years, under this head, will be sufficient for the year 1835.

 

 

$18,850

Submitted:

 

For two clerks, $400 additional each, now in receipt of $1,000 each per annum

800

 

$19,650

B.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the Navy Commissioner's office, for the year 1835.

For the salaries of the Commissioners of the Navy Board

$10,500

For the salary of their secretary

2,000

For the salaries of their clerks, draughtsman, and messenger, per acts of 20th April, 1818, 20th of May, 1824, and 2d of March, 1827

$8,450

 

Additional to the chief clerk, making his salary equal to that allowed to all other chief clerks of his grade

100

 

 

8,550

For contingent expenses

1,800

 

622,850

C.

Estimate of the sums required for the expenses of the southwest Executive building, for the year 1835.

Superintendent

$250

Two watchmen, at $300 each

600

Contingent expenses. The balance remaining unexpended of appropriations of former years, under this head, will be sufficient for the year 1835.

$850

Submitted:

 

Additional for superintendent

$250

 

Additional for two watchmen, at $200 each

400

 

 

650

 

$1,500

D.

There will be required for the navy during the year 1835, in addition to the unexpended balances that may remain on hand on the 1st day of January, 1835, the sum of three million six hundred and eighty-nine thousand eight hundred and fifty-one dollars and sixty-seven cents.

1st.

For pay and subsistence of the officers of the navy, and pay of seamen

$1,505,126 67

2d.

For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishment at the several yards

63,110 00

3d.

For provisions

450,000 00

4th.

For the repairs of vessels in ordinary, and the repairs and wear and tear of vessels in commission

974,000 00

5th.

For medicines and surgical instruments, hospital stores, and other expenses on account of the sick

40,000 00

--595--

6th.

For improvements and necessary repairs of navy yards, viz:

 

At Portsmouth, N. H.

$39,925 00

 

 

At Charlestown, Mass

99,500 00

 

 

At Brooklyn, N. Y.

46,120 00

 

 

At Philadelphia

3,520 00

 

 

At Washington

10,000 00

 

 

At Gosport, Va.

100,450 00

 

 

At Pensacola

44,600 00

 

 

For Sackett's Harbor

500 00

 

 

 

$344,615 00

7th.

For ordnance and ordnance stores

15,000,00

8th.

For defraying the expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz: For the freight and transportation of materials and stores of every description; for wharfage and dockage, storage and rent; traveling expenses of officers and transportation of seamen; house rent, chamber money, and fuel and candles to officers, other than those attached to navy yards and stations, and for officers in sick quarters, where there are no hospitals, and for funeral expenses; for commissions, clerk hire and office rent; stationery and fuel to navy agents: for premiums and incidental expenses of recruiting; for apprehending deserters; for compensation to judge advocates, for per diem allowance to persons attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, and for officers engaged in extra service beyond the limits of their stations; for printing and stationery of every description, and for books, maps, charts, and mathematical instruments, chronometers, models and drawings; for purchase and repair of fire and steam engines, and for machinery; for purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, timber, wheels and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage and towing of ships-of-war; for cabin furniture of vessels in commission, and for furniture of officers' houses in navy yards; for taxes on navy yards and public property; for assistance rendered to vessels in distress; for incidental labor at navy yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; for coal and other fuel for forges, foundries and steam engines; for candles, oil and fuel, for vessels in commission and ordinary; for repairs of magazines and powder houses; for preparing moulds for ships to be built; and for no other object or purpose whatever

295,000 00

9th.

For contingent expenses for objects not hereinbefore enumerated

3,000 00

 

 

$3,689,851 67

D, 1.

Estimate of the pay and subsistence of all persons in the navy, attached to vessels in commission, for the year 1835.

Rank and grade.

Ships of the line.

Frigates, 1st class.

Frigates, 2d class.

Sloops, 1st class.

Schooners.

Total number of each.

Total amount of each grade.

1

3

1

11

7

Captains

2

3

1

2

 

8

$18,360 00

Commanders

 

 

 

11

 

11

12,938 75

Lieutenants commanding

 

 

 

 

7

7

8,233 75

Lieutenants

8

18

5

44

14

89

   85,885 00

Masters

1

3

1

11

 

16

 10,600 00

Surgeons of the fleet

1

1

 

2

 

4

8,045 00

Surgeons

 

 

1

9

 

10

12,098 40

Pursers

1

3

1

11

7

23

15,237 00

Chaplains

1

3

1

 

 

 

3,312 50

Secretaries

1

3

 

 

 

4

4,000 00

Second masters

1

 

 

 

 

1

662 50

Assistant surgeons

3

6

2

11

7

29

23,722 00

Midshipmen

27

60

16

110

35

248

56,544 00

Boatswains

1

3

1

11

 

16

5,300 00

Gunners

1

3

1

11

 

16

5,300 00

Carpenters

1

3

1

11

 

16

5,300 00

Sailmakers

1

3

1

11

 

16

5,300 00

Schoolmasters

1

3

1

11

 

16

6,260 00

Clerks

2

6

1

11

 

20

 6,720 00

Yeomen

1

3

1

11

7

23

 4,140 00

Boatswains' mates

6

12

3

22

14

57

12,996 00

Gunners' mates

4

6

2

11

7

30

6,840 00

Carpenters' mates

3

6

2

11

7

29

6,612 00

Masters-at-arms

1

3

1

11

 

16

3,456 00

Ships' cooks

1

3

1

11

7

23

4,968 00

--596 --

D, 1.—Estimate—Continued.

Rank and grade.

Ships of the line.

Frigates, 1st class.

Frigates, 2d class.

Sloops, 1st class.

Schooners. Total number of each.

Total amount of each grade.

 

Quartermasters

10

21

6

44

21

102

$19,584 00

Quartergunners

18

30

8

44

21 1

21

21,780 00

Captains of forecastle

3

6

2

22

14

47

8,460 00

Captains of tops

9

8

6

44

 

77

13,860 00

Armorers

1

3

1

 

 

5

1,080 00

Coopers

1

3

1

 

 

5

1,080 00

Ships' stewards

1

3

1

11

7

23

4,968 00

Officers' stewards

3

9

2

22

7

43

9,288 00

Surgeons' stewards

1

3

1

11

 

16

3,456 00

Sailmakers' mates

2

3

1

 

 

6

1,368 00

Captains of hold

2

6

2

11

 

21

3,780 00

Officers' cooks

3

9

2

22

7

43

9,288 00

Ships' corporals

2

3

1

 

 

6

1,008 00

Coxswains

1

3

 

 

 

4

864 00

Masters of the band

1

3

1

 

 

5

1,080 00

Seamen

243

459

3120

605

154

1,581

227,664 00

Ordinary seamen

250

300

70

418

84

1,122

134,640 00

Musicians, 1st class

6

12

3

 

 

21

3,024 00

Musicians, 2d class

5

9

2

 

 

16

1,920 00

Landsmen

150

180

46

231

56

663

71,604 00

Boys

57

75

20

132

42

326

27,384 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

4,986

$900,011 40

One hundred and thirty-three passed midshipmen

 

 

 

 

 

 

$52,036 25

Seventy-five midshipmen, who may become entitled to be arranged as passed midshipmen, after their examination, in addition to pay as midshipmen

 

 

 

 

 

 

12,243 75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$964,291 40

D,2.

Estimate of the number, pay, &c., of officers, &c., required for five receiving vessels, for the year 1835, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

 

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Norfolk.

Baltimore.

Total.

Amount.

Masters commandant

1

1

1

 

1

4

$4,705 00

Lieutenants

3

3

2

2

3

13

12,545 00

Masters

1

1

1

 

1

4

2,650 00

Pursers

1

1

 

 

1

3

1,987 50

Passed midshipmen

2

2

 

 

2

6

2,347 50

Midshipmen

6

6

3

3

6

24

5,472 00.

Boatswains

1

1

 

 

1

3

993 75

Boatswains' mates

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,140 00

Gunners' mates

1

1

 

 

1

3

684 00

Carpenters' mates

1

1

1

 

1

4

912 00

Masters-at-arms

1

1

 

 

1

3

648 00

Ships' stewards

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,080 00

Officers' stewards

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,080 00

Ships' cooks

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,080 00

Officers' cooks

2

2

1

 

2

7

1,512 00

Seamen

2

2

2

2

2

10

1,440 00

Ordinary seamen

6

6

4

2

6

24

2,880 00

Boys

10

10

3

2

10

35

2,520 00

Number of persons

42

42

22

15

42

163

$45,676 75

--597—

D, 3.

Estimate of the pay, &c., of the officers attached to recruiting stations, for the year 1835, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

 

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Norfolk.

Baltimore.

Total.

Amount.

Master commanders

1

1

1

1

1

5

$10,053 75

Lieutenants

2

2

2

2

 

2

10 9,650 00

Midshipmen

2

2

2

2

 

2

10 3,192 50

Surgeons

1

1

1

1

1

5

5,425 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$28,321 25

D, 4.

Estimate of the pay, rations, and all other allowances of officers and [h s], at the navy yards and stations, for the year 1835.

PORTSMOUTH.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Yard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

$300

40

20

2

 

2,010 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Surgeon

1

60

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,412 25

Purser

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Midshipmen

3

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

957 75

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Gunner

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Carpenter

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Sailmaker

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$13,937 50

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$965 00

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Seamen

6

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,411 50

Ordinary seamen

12

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

2,535 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$5,230 75

Civil establishment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,400 00

Master builder and inspector of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

350 00

Clerk to master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$4,450 00

Whole amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$23,618 25

Notes.—House rent is estimated for officers, and is to be allowed only in cases where no house is furnished by the government.

Pay and rations of surgeons and their assistants are arranged, under the law of 20th May, 1828.

--598--

D, 4.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

BOSTON.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 15

Master commandant

1

60

5

 

 

40

20

2

1,710 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Surgeon

1

60

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,412 25

Assistant surgeons

2

30

2

$145

16

14

 

1

1,901 50

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

200

12

9

1

 

1,091 75

Teacher of mathematics

1

40

2

90

12

9

 

1

981 75

Teacher of languages

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Midshipmen

4

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,277 00

Boatswain

1

20

2

12 9

 

1

 

 

651 75

Gunner

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Carpenter

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Sailmaker

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Steward, assistant to purser

1

30

1

 

 

 

 

 

451 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$21,479 50

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenants

3

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$2,895 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Midshipmen

6

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,915 50

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Gunner

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Carpenter

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Carpenter's mates, as caulkers

3

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

957 75

Boatswain's mates

2

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

63S 50

Seamen

14

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

2,293 50

Ordinary seamen

36

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

7,605 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$18,554 50

Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

$1,612 25

Assistant surgeon

1

30

2

145

16

14

 

 

1 950 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses*

2

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Washers*

2

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

374 50

Cook

1

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

235 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,902 50

Civil establishment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,700 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,300 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Inspector and measurer of timber.

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

360 00

Clerk to master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

500 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$9,060 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$52,996 50

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeons of the yard are all to be required to attend to the duties of the yard, to those of the receiving ship, and to the marines: one to be always on board the receiving ship.

* When the number of sick shall require them.

--599--

D, 4.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

NEW YORK.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

$300

40

20

2

 

2,010 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,492 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,612 75

Assistant surgeons

2

30

2

145

16

14

 

1

1,901 50

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

200

12

9

 

1

1,091 75

Teacher of mathematics

1

40

2

90

12

9

 

1

981 75

Teacher of languages

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Midshipmen

4

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,277 00

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Gunner

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Carpenter

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Sailmaker

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Steward, assistant to purser

1

30

1

 

 

 

 

 

451 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$22,739 50

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenants

3

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$2,895 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Midshipmen

6

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,950 50

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Gunner

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Carpenter

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Carpenter's mates, as caulkers

3

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

957 75

Boatswain's mates

2

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

638 50

Able seamen

14

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

3,293 50

Ordinary seamen

36

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

7,605 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$19,589 50

Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

$1,612 25

Assistant surgeon

1

30

2

145

16

14

 

1

950 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses*

2

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Washers*

2

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

374 50

Cook

1

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

235 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,902 50

Civil establishment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,700 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,300 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Inspector and measurer of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

360 00

Clerk to builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

560 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$9,060 00

Whole amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$55,291 50

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeons of the yard are all to be required to attend to the duties of the yard, to those of the receiving ship, and to the marines: one to be always on board the receiving ship.

*When the number of sick shall require them.

--600 --

D, 4.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

PHILADELPHIA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Yard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

$600

65

30

3

 

$4,066 15

Master commandant

1

60

5

300

40

20

2

 

2,010 15

Lieutenant

1

50

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,492 75

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Surgeon

1

70

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,732 25

Assistant surgeon

1

40

4

145

16

14

1

 

1,253 25

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

200

12

9

1

 

1,091 75

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

1

 

741 75

Gunner

1

20

2

90

12

9

1

 

741 75

Carpenter

1

20

2

90

12

9

1

 

741 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

$16,463 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$965 00

Boatswain's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Able seamen

4

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

941 00

Ordinary seamen

12

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

2,535 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$4,760 25

Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

60

4

20

20

1

 

 

$1,412 25

Assistant surgeon

1

35

3

16

14

 

 

 

1 957 00

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses*

2

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Washers*

2

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

374 50

Cook

1

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

211 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,684 75

Civil establishment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,250 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,000 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Inspector and measurer of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

750 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

350 00

Clerk to master builder

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$6,450 00

Whole amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$31,358 50

WASHINGTON.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

75

6

 

40

20

2

 

1,982 00

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Master in charge of ordnance

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Chaplain

1

40

2

$200

12

9

1

 

1,091 75

Surgeon

1

70

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,532 25

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

9

1

 

1,141 75

Assistant surgeon

1

30

2

145

16

14

1

 

950 15

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

1

 

141 15

Gunner, as laboratory officer

1

20

2

90

12

9

1

 

141 15

Carpenter

1

20

2

90

 

12

9

1

141 15

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

301 25

Hospital steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$15,901 50

Note.—The surgeon and assistants are all to attend to the yard, receiving vessels and marines.

When the number of sick shall require them.

--601--

D, 4.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boatswain's mate

1

$19

1

 

 

 

 

 

$319 25

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Seamen

6

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,411 50

Ordinary seamen

14

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

2,957 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$5,001 50

Civil department.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,100 00

Assistant master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,000 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Inspector and measurer of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

750 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

500 00

Clerk to assistant master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

420 00

Master plumber and camboose maker

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,200 00

Master chain cable and anchor maker

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,000 00

Engineer

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

800 00

Keeper of the magazine

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

480 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$10,100 00

Whole amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$31,609 00

NORFOLK.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 15

Master commandant

1

60

5

$300

40

20

2

 

2,010 15

Lieutenant

1

50

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,492 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 15

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 15

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,612 25

Assistant surgeons

2

40

4

145

16

14

 

1

2,506 50

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 15

Chaplain

1

40

2

200

12

9

 

1

1,091 15

Teacher of mathematics

1

40

2

90

12

9

 

1

981 15

Teacher of languages

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Midshipmen

4

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,211 00

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 15

Gunner

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 15

Carpent3r

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Sailmaker

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Steward, assistant to purser

1

30

1

 

 

 

 

 

451 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$23,344 50

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenants

3

50

4