--731--

24th Congress.]

No. 585.

[1st Session.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, SHOWING THE CONDITION OF THE NAVY IN THE YEAR 1835.

COMMUNICATED TO CONGRESS, WITH THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE, DECEMBER 8, 1835.

Navy Department, December 5, 1835.

To the President of the United States:

Sir:

In presenting to your consideration the condition of our navy for the past year, it affords me great satisfaction to state that all the available means for its improvement have been successfully applied, and that its operations in protecting our commerce, although inadequate to the exigencies of that great and growing interest, have been highly honorable to the officers serving upon our naval stations at home and abroad.

Since my report of the 29th November, 1834, the ship of the line North Carolina has been thoroughly repaired in her hull, has been lately taken out of dock, and may be fitted for sea in eighty days.

The repairs of the ship of the line Independence, now in dock at Boston, have been commenced, and are progressing with great dispatch. The frigates Constitution and Constellation have been equipped and sent to sea. The frigate United States has been prepared, and is ready for the reception of a crew. The hull of the frigate Columbia, at Washington, has been so nearly completed, under the law for the gradual improvement of the navy, that she may be launched in the course of this month. The sloops-of-war Peacock and Vandalia have been equipped and sent to sea. The sloop-of-war Warren is taking in her crew, and will sail in a few days. The sloops-of-war Concord and Boston have been prepared and are ready for the reception of their crews; and the Lexington will be equally prepared in a few weeks.

The repairs of the sloops-of-war Falmouth and Natchez, and of the schooner Grampus, have been recently commenced, and it is believed that in a few weeks they may be ready for the reception of their crews.

The building of a store-ship, authorized by a law of the 30th of June, 1834, has been commenced at Philadelphia, and a steam vessel has been commenced at New York, but will not be ready for service until some time in the summer of 1836.

The ships of the line Alabama, Vermont, Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York, and the frigates Santee, Cumberland, Sabine, Savannah, Raritan, and St. Lawrence, are on the stocks, well protected from the weather, and as nearly completed as it is proper they should be, until it is determined to launch them.

For a more detailed statement of the condition of those vessels, as well as that of the ships of the line Franklin, Washington, Columbus, and Ohio, and their means of repair, I beg leave to refer to a report of the Commissioners of the Navy Board, herewith submitted, marked K; and for the amount of timber, iron, and other materials procured for the gradual improvement of the navy, I refer to their report, marked I.

The ship of the line Delaware, the frigate Potomac, the sloop John Adams, and the schooner Shark have been employed in the Mediterranean during the last year. The frigate Constitution sailed for that station on the 19th of August last from New York. The frigate United States returned from the Mediterranean on the 10th of December last. The Delaware is ordered to the United States, and is daily expected.

On the West India station the sloops-of-war Vandalia, St. Louis, and Falmouth, and the schooners Grampus and Experiment, have been employed. The Vandalia, after undergoing considerable repairs, sailed from Norfolk on the 14th of January last, to resume her station in the West Indies. The Falmouth returned from that station on the 1st of August last, and is now at Norfolk; the schooner Experiment also returned from that station in April last, and has been employed on the survey of the coast. The Grampus returned to Norfolk on the 23d of September last, is undergoing repairs, and will soon resume her station in the West India squadron. The frigate Constellation sailed for the West Indies on the 8th of October last from Norfolk.

The sloops-of-war Natchez, Erie, and Ontario, and the schooner Enterprise, composed the squadron on the Brazil station. The Natchez has lately returned to the United States, having arrived at New York on the 3d of October. The schooner Enterprise has been detached from that station, and ordered on a cruise to the East Indies; she sailed in company with the sloop Peacock from Rio on the 12th of July last, the Peacock having sailed from New York for that station on the 23d of April; in June last, the Ontario was ordered to the coast of Africa, with instructions to visit the Island of St. Thomas, Bassa Cove, Cape Palm as, and Mesurado.

The vessels which have been employed in the Pacific are, the frigate Brandywine, sloops Fairfield and Vincennes, and the schooners Dolphin and Boxer. The Vincennes has been ordered home by the way of the East Indies, and the Fairfield has lately arrived at Norfolk.

The events of the last year furnish much additional evidence that our naval force in commission is not adequate to the protection of our rapidly increasing commerce. The frequent insurrections and revolutions in the governments of South America and of Mexico endanger our merchant vessels upon the Atlantic as well as Pacific ocean, and in the Gulf of Mexico, and even upon our own coast.

Influenced by a knowledge of these circumstances, and in accordance with your suggestions, I have asked and obtained from the Board of Navy Commissioners an estimate of the increased annual expense of adding two frigates, three sloops-of-war, and four steam vessels to our force now in commission, to be employed upon foreign stations as well as upon our own coast.

By their report it appears that such an addition to our vessels in commission would require annually an appropriation of four hundred and seventy-eight thousand dollars: but as not more than one steam vessel can be finished in the next year, the appropriation wanted for 1836 for this purpose need not exceed four hundred and thirty-four thousand dollars. The sum is small compared with the benefits that may be fairly calculated to result from its expenditure in affording protection to our commence, independently of the advantage to the efficiency and discipline of our navy, by calling into active service a large number of officers now unemployed.

--732--

A large portion of the entire expenditure for the additional force proposed must be incurred, even if it should not be called into service.

The vessels necessary for such increase of force (except the steam vessels) will, if not so employed, remain at our wharves, affording no benefit to the country, and suffering more from decay than they would do if at sea; and a large portion of the officers necessary for their command, although earnestly asking for service, will remain on shore, receiving pay, but performing no duty; adding nothing to their professional skill, but losing their habits of discipline, which can only be preserved by constant exercise.

Should the proposed increase of force be sanctioned by Congress, we shall have in commission, in the year 1836, one ship of the line, six frigates, fourteen sloops-of-war, five schooners, and one steam vessel, with an addition of three steam vessels in succeeding years, as soon as the same can be prepared, the estimated expense of which appears by the report of the Commissioners, marked D, 1.

Appropriations for the gradual improvement of our navy yards are next in importance to the like appropriations for the gradual improvement of our navy. The necessity of more ample means for protecting our shipping, as well as the immense amount of public property in the different yards, must be apparent to every one who is acquainted with the subject; and the expediency of increasing the facilities for constructing and repairing our ships is not less apparent. Moderate appropriations, in addition to those that are usual, for three or four years, would accomplish those important objects. In accordance with this view of the subject, I submit a letter of the Board of Navy Commissioners, marked No. 2, together with an estimate, marked E 1, of the probable cost of the proposed improvements, which amounts to three millions five hundred thousand dollars, including that of the dry dock at New York, amounting to nine hundred thousand dollars.

A national foundry for the purpose of casting cannon, shot, and shells, as well for the army as the navy, was a subject of discussion before the two Houses of Congress at their late session, but was postponed in consequence of the shortness of the session and the pressure of more urgent business. No doubt can be entertained of the importance of such an establishment, when we consider the great improvements made in the fabrication of small arms at the different armories of the United States.

In our future wars, especially on the ocean, we must rely much upon the excellence of our cannon. The bursting of a single cannon may cause, as it often has done, the loss of a battle. The disasters from this cause, that occurred during the revolutionary as well as the late war, admonish us to guard against like disasters in future, which, it is believed, may be avoided by the means proposed.

It is only by a long series of experiments, and those attended with great expense, that we can hope to discover the best material for making cannon which our country affords, and the art of fabricating them with the most perfect accuracy and efficiency. Believing that such discoveries and improvements are attainable, and that they would be highly important in the army, and still more so in the navy, I must be permitted to express a hope that the subject will be revived at the approaching session of Congress, and that a plan of a national foundry will be adopted.

The importance of rearing a body of seamen, by enlisting into the service of our navy boys over the age of thirteen and under the age of eighteen, until they should arrive at the age of twenty-one years, has already attracted the attention of Congress. At the last session a bill for this purpose was introduced into the Senate. Every year the importance of this measure becomes more apparent. Able seamen are much wanted, while there are boys enough in our cities, leading lives of idleness and vice, for want of employment, who, if thus enlisted, under judicious regulations, would, in a few years, afford us a sufficient corps of able seamen to man our navy, and, in the meantime, render services to their country worth their pay.

The compensation to be given, by the late pay bill, to professors of mathematics, is such as to command the services of those who are every way competent to perform the duties of this station. A regulation is adopted to appoint none to this station who shall not receive a certificate of competency, after submitting to a rigid examination by scientific gentlemen who shall be appointed for that purpose. This will be of great advantage to the young officers of the navy; and if a large portion of them should be called into active service, by employing an additional naval force for the protection of our commerce, they will be enabled to perfect themselves in seamanship, the most important part of their education, and which can be acquired only at sea; but to make them accomplished officers something more is required than can probably be derived from those sources. A knowledge of military tactics, of engineering, and drawing, is deemed indispensable in the education of an officer of the army, and which ought to be deemed equally so in the education of a naval officer. So much of chemistry, mineralogy, geology, and natural history, as is taught at the Military academy, although not absolutely essential to the military or naval officer, yet is decidedly more important to the latter than to the former.

If provision should be made for the admission of a class of one hundred midshipmen at a time at the academy at West Point, to pursue such studies as should be prescribed by the Navy Department, and to be succeeded at the end of one or two years by another class, all, in their turn, might receive the advantage of this course of studies, highly necessary to their education as accomplished officers of the navy, and at a small expense; as the midshipmen, while at the academy, would receive no more pay than if attending the schools at the navy yards, or if waiting orders.

A national observatory, although not immediately necessary to the defence of our country, is remotely so; and considered with reference to the bearing it would have upon our navy, our commerce, and scientific pursuits, it assumes an importance worthy the consideration of Congress.

It is hardly to be doubted that we shall, at some future period, make such an establishment, and I will venture to express an opinion that no time can be more propitious for such an undertaking than the present. It would not be attended with any great expense. It is necessary now to employ an officer of science to keep our maps and charts, to regulate our chronometers, and to preserve all mathematical and philosophical instruments required for the naval service, and buildings are necessary for these purposes.

These duties would properly devolve upon the superintendent of an observatory, and the buildings necessary to such an establishment would be amply sufficient for the preservation of our maps, charts, and instruments.

Under the act concerning naval pensions and the navy pension fund, eighteen invalid pensions have been granted since my last report, making the number on the roll three hundred and five, and the annual amount required to pay them 824,944; and forty-one widows' pensions have been granted, making the number on the roll one hundred and fifty, and the annual amount necessary to pay them $32,594.

The annual charge, therefore, according to the present roll, will amount to $57,538.

--733--

It is not probable that all on the list will claim; but as the death of a pensioner is not officially known except when the account is settled by his or her representative, the number is made out from the rolls in this Department. Some have not claimed for two, three, four, and five years, but, as they are not known to bo dead, their names are still continued on the rolls. The receipts and expenditures on account of the fund, to the 30th September last, will be seen in the statement marked M, and the amount and description of stocks belonging to the fund in the statement marked M, 1.

Under the act of the 19th June, 1834, respecting pensions chargeable to the privateer pension fund, since my last report, six widows have received five years' pension each, amounting to $2,400; more than five years having elapsed since the date to which they were last paid. Two invalid pensions have also been granted, making the number on the roll thirty-six, and the annual amount required to pay them $3,184.

The account of stock, and of receipts and expenditures, will be seen in statement N.

The condition of the navy hospital fund, including receipts and expenditures, will appear in statement O. The annual receipts are much greater than the disbursements; and, as they will probably continue to be greater for several years, I respectfully repeat the suggestion in my last report, that authority be given to vest the surplus in some well secured stock, for the benefit of the fund.

Under the act of 30th June, 1834, the widows of all officers, seamen, and marines, who have died in the naval service since the first day of January, 1824, or who may die in said service, by reason of disease contracted, or of casualties by drowning or otherwise, or of injuries received while in the line of duty, are entitled to pensions equal to half the amount of the pay to which their husbands respectively were entitled at the time of their deaths.

The act of the 3d of March last, "to regulate the pay of the navy of the United States," and which increased the pay of many officers, is silent as to pensions. A difficulty arises in ascertaining the proper amount of pension to be allowed to widows of naval officers whose pay has been increased by this act. The pay of a captain in command of a squadron was increased to four thousand dollars a year; when on other duty, to three thousand five hundred dollars; and when off duty, to two thousand five hundred dollars. A corresponding increase of pay is made to other" officers.

In the case of a captain dying when in command of a squadron on a foreign station, a question arises whether his widow should receive a pension to the amount of six hundred dollars a year, to which she would have been entitled if this act had not passed, or whether she shall receive half the amount of pay to which her husband was entitled at the time of his death, as a captain commanding a squadron, as captain on other duty, or as a captain off duty.

After much deliberation, it has been decided to allow a pension in such cases of $1,135.62 a year, being the half pay of a captain commanding a squadron, reduced by the amount of $1,728.75, equal to his allowance before this act. The salary of four thousand dollars a year to a captain in command of a squadron is in lieu of former pay and emoluments. Those emoluments, excepting one ration a day, amounted to $1,728.75, which sum, deducted from $4,000, leaves $2,271.25, the half of which, $1,135.62, is considered as the proper amount of the widow's annual pension.

Questions on pensions more complicated than this may arise under this act, especially in the case of the deaths of surgeons and assistant surgeons, whose grades of pay are more numerous than those of captains.

The necessity of an explanatory act, to obviate these difficulties, is respectfully suggested. By the act of Congress of the 10th July, 1832, it is required that any surplus money belonging to the navy pension fund shall be vested in the stock of the Bank of the United States. The amount so vested is $619,000, and this Department has no authority to make a different investment of money without the further action of Congress.

Previously to the passing of the act of the 30th of June, 1834, for the better organization of the United States marine corps, double rations had been allowed to the commandant of that corps, and to the officers of the same, commanding at the Navy yards at Portsmouth, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Norfolk, and Pensacola, and to the senior marine officers in the squadrons in the Mediterranean, the West Indies, the Brazilian coast, and the Pacific ocean, all receiving the sanction of Congress by their appropriations. By this act, the officers of the marine corps are to receive the same pay, emoluments, and allowances as are given to officers of similar grades in the infantry of the army.

The act of the 16th of March, 1802, fixing the military peace establishment of the United States, authorizes allowances, to the commanding officers of each separate post, of such additional number of rations as the President of the United States shall from to time direct.

These provisions of this last act were continued by an act of the 3d of March, 1815, fixing the military peace establishment.

The paymaster of the marine corps made payments for double rations to officers heretofore receiving the same, from the 1st of July to the 30th of September, 1834; but the accounting officers of the Treasury did not think proper to allow the same, inasmuch as the commands of these officers had never been designated as separate stations, agreeably to the rule prescribed for the army. This is a case of difficulty which, it is respectfully suggested, requires the interposition of Congress.

Being still of the opinion expressed in my last report, that the public interests would be promoted by having the marine barracks placed without the navy yards to which they are attached, as early as may be practicable, estimates are submitted for purchasing sites and erecting barracks at places where they are deemed most necessary.

In performance of my duty under the act of the 3d of March last, authorizing the construction of a dry dock for the naval service, in the harbor of New York, or its adjacent waters, I proceeded in May last to the city of New York, where I was met by an able engineer, Loammi Balwin, Esq., whom I had previously engaged to make the soundings and other examinations necessary to a proper selection of a suitable site. After a long and laborious examination, Mr. Baldwin made his report, which has been submitted to your consideration, by which it appears that the proposed dry dock may be advantageously constructed in the Navy yard at Brooklyn. A selection of this place for this purpose is recommended by the consideration that the land occupied as the Navy yard belongs to the United States, and that the public buildings upon it, which are of great value, cannot be abandoned without serious loss.

One difficulty presented itself, which created some delay in making this selection; a building for the purpose of distilling turpentine had been erected so near the navy yard as greatly to endanger the public property; other buildings for similar purposes, or for purposes equally dangerous, might be erected near

--734--

the yard, if not prevented by some act of legislation. I am happy to state that the common council of Brooklyn, when the case was laid before them, promptly passed an ordinance, which, it is believed, will effectually secure the property in the navy yard from the danger of this nuisance and all similar ones; and it cannot be doubted that the common council of Brooklyn will grant all reasonable protection and accommodation to this navy yard, and that the State of New York will protect and promote the interests of the same by any legislative acts that may be found to be necessary and proper.

I shall therefore proceed, under your direction, with as much dispatch as present and future appropriations will permit, to cause the dry docks thus authorized by law to be constructed in the Navy yard at Brooklyn.

Under the act of the 30th of June, 1834, "authorizing the Secretary of the Navy to make experiments for the safety of the steam engine," and appropriating $5,000 for that purpose, many proposed improvements have been submitted for the purpose of being tested by experiments. Some of these were so easily tested by those having steam engines in operation, that the aid of government was not needed. Others were attended with greater difficulty, and could not be tested without the expense of constructing boilers and other machinery for the purpose. These proposed improvements have not been such as, in my opinion, to warrant a large expenditure of money, and no experiments have been made upon them. Such experiments, however, would have been made, if they could have been so made without the expense of constructing engines.

The act seemed particularly to require that the steam engine devised by Benjamin Philips, of Philadelphia, should be examined and tested, and that Mr. Philips should be employed in making the experiments. Mr. Philips was, therefore, employed to construct a model engine, with boilers and other machinery which he deemed necessary for the purpose of testing his improvements, which he brought to this district, where he remained several weeks, making his experiments before many members of the two Houses of Congress, before the officers of the different departments, and others.

I attended very carefully to these experiments, but have not been able to preceive in them any improvement increasing the safety of the steam engine.

The money paid for Mr. Philips' machinery, preparation and experiments, amounts to $519.75; the residue of the appropriation remains unexpended.

The fourth report of Mr. Hassler, superintendent of the coast survey, upon the operations performed in that work between the months of May and December, 1835, together with his detailed estimate of the appropriations required for the same for the next year, are herewith submitted, marked T.

Much work appears to have been done on the secondary triangulations, on the topographical operations, and by the sounding parties. That more has not been done in the primary triangulations is explained in the report.

Of the appropriations heretofore made for this survey, there remained, on the first day of this month, an unexpected balance of $8,823.

The duties of the sounding parties are performed by the officers and seamen of the navy, and the chief part of the expense is charged to the navy appropriations. As, however, there are some expenses which cannot be charged to these appropriations, they must necessarily be charged to the appropriations for the coast survey. In September, 1834, the schooner Jersey, not wanted for any purposes of the navy, was purchased for the sounding party under the command of Lieutenant Gedney. The price of this vessel, (63,350) therefore, could not be charged to the naval appropriations; it was properly charged to the appropriations for the coast survey. For the same reason, the boats, equipments, and other expenses for the schooner, amounting to $1,888.60, were charged to the same appropriation, as was also the charge for the extra pay to the officers, amounting to $650 in all, for the year 1834, to $5,888.60.

During the present season the expenses of this schooner, chargeable to the coast survey, have amounted to $1,399, making the whole expense of this schooner, for the years 1834 and 1835, chargeable to the coast survey, amount to $7,287.60.

It is not probable that the expense of this schooner, chargeable to the coast survey appropriation, will, for the next year, exceed $1,500.

The schooner Experiment, employed by the sounding party under Lieutenant Blake, belongs to the navy. The coast survey appropriation has, therefore been charged only for equipments, which were not necessary for the purposes of the navy. These, with other expenses attending the operations of the sounding party on board this schooner, from the 1st of July last, when she was sent upon the survey, to the 30th of September last, amounted to $2,517.73.

As most of the equipments of these schooners will last for several years, with but little expense for repairs and supply of articles which may be lost by accident, it is believed that the expenses of both schooners and the sounding parties on board of them, for the next year, chargeable to the coast survey, will not exceed $4,000.

It will be seen that this differs widely from the statement of Mr. Hassler, which may be explained by the circumstance that he did not derive his information from the books of the Treasury Department.

By a statement hereunto annexed, marked P, it appears that of the appropriations heretofore made for the suppression of the slave trade, there remains in the Treasury a balance of $13,489.55.

In my last report I took the liberty of stating that some of the clerks in my Department did not receive salaries proportioned to their services, or adequate to the decent support of themselves and families; and I respectfully solicited that the salaries, particularly of the chief clerk of the Navy Board, the warrant clerk, and the clerk keeping the register of correspondence of this Department, whose duties are arduous, requiring both talent and experience, should be increased, so that the first might receive $1,700 per annum, and the others $1,490 each. I repeat the solicitation, from a thorough conviction that their faithful services fully merit this increase of compensation.

The superintendent of the southwest executive building receives but $250 per annum for his services, which, it is believed, is a compensation too small to command the services of one competent to perform the duties of the station. The sergeants acting as clerks to the commandant and staff officers of the marine corps are paid at the rate of less than $700 a year for all their services, which, it is respectfully suggested, is not an adequate compensation.

The necessary references to papers and documents connected with this report will be found in a schedule hereunto annexed.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

MAHLON DICKERSON.

--735--

Schedule of papers accompanying the report of the Secretary of the Navy to the President of the United States, of November, 1835.

No. 1. The letter of the Commissioners of the Navy to the Secretary, transmitting the general and special estimates of the navy for the year 1836.

No. 2. Letter of the Commissioners, submitting estimate marked E, 1.

A. Estimate for the office of the Secretary of the Navy.

B. Estimate for the office of the Commissioners of the Navy.

C. Estimate for the expenses of the southwest Executive building.

D. The general estimate for the navy. Detailed estimate D, 1, for vessels in commission.

D, 2, for receiving vessels.

D, 3, for recruiting stations.

D, 4, for officers and others attached to navy yards and shore stations, and the abstract or recapitulation.

D, 5, for officers waiting orders and on furlough.

D, 6, for provisions.

D, 7, for improvements and repairs of navy yards, and recapitulation.

E. Special estimate for magazines, hospitals, steam vessels, and coast survey.

E, 1. Estimate of the several works, and their probable cost, which it is proposed to construct at the several navy yards.

P. General estimate for the marine corps.

Detailed estimates for the marine corps, F, 1 to 4.

G. List of vessels, in commission, of each squadron, their commanders and stations.

H. List of vessels in ordinary.

I. List of vessels building.

K. Report of the proceedings under the law for the gradual increase of the navy.

L. Report of the proceedings under the law for the gradual improvement of the navy.

M. Statement of the condition of the navy pension fund.

M, 1. Amount and description of stocks belonging to the navy pension fund.

N. Statement of the condition of the privateer pension fund.

O. Statement of the condition of the navy hospital fund.

P. Statement of the proceedings under the law for the suppression of the slave trade.

Q. List of deaths.

R. List of resignations.

S. List of dismissions.

T. Mr. Hassler's fourth report on coast survey.

No. 1.

Navy Commissioners' Office, November 18, 1835.

Sir:

The Navy Commissioners have the honor to transmit, herewith, the estimates for the navy for the year 1836, together with the reports of the condition of the vessels building and in ordinary, and of the measures which have been taken under the laws for the gradual increase and gradual improvement of the navy.

Special estimates are also submitted for steam vessels, according to your directions, and for other objects, which do not fall within the usual annual appropriations for the navy, but which are deemed essential to the public interests.

The general estimate for the usual appropriations of the navy presents two columns, one showing the amounts estimated for the year 1836, and the other showing the amounts appropriated for the year 1835. This arrangement shows, at a single view, the differences between the amounts for each of the items of the appropriation, as well as in the total amounts.

It will be perceived that the total amount of the estimate for the year 1836 exceeds the amount appropriated for 1835, in the sum of $622,151.75.

A comparison of the differences between the appropriations and estimates for each of the two first items cannot be accurately made, because the additional appropriation made March 3d, 1835, in consequence of the law establishing the pay of the navy, does not distinguish the amounts applicable to each of the items; but the difference between the sums of the two items for the two years shows an increase for 1836 of $184,141.75.

This increase arises, in part, from a proposed addition to the force to be employed in commission, consisting of two frigates, three sloops-of-war, and one steam vessel; in part, from a modification of the pay of the officers by the laws of last session, and partly from a small increase of pay to some persons at navy yards, as stated in connection with estimate D, 4.

Under the third item, of provisions, there is also an increase of $140,000. This arises, in part, from additional numbers of persons proposed to be employed, and partly because the amount in the Treasury is not supposed to justify a reduction from the total estimate under this head, proportional to that made for 1835.

Under the fourth head, of repairs of vessels in ordinary, &c. , the amount of the estimate is less than the sum appropriated for the year 1835, in the sum of $24,000.

The appropriation for 1835, and the estimate for 1836, under the fifth head, for medicine and hospital stores, are the same, notwithstanding the proposed increase of force, in consequence of the large sum still remaining in the Treasury.

Under the sixth head, for improvements and repairs of navy yards, there is an increase in the estimates for 1836, over the appropriations for 1835, of the sum of $287,010. This increase is large, but is deemed necessary to meet the immediate wants of the public service. Although much has been done in

--736--

the different yards since the adoption of approved plans, under the law of March 3d, 1827, much still remains to be done to provide adequate means for the preservation of the materials which a prudent foresight has directed to be collected for future use, or to prepare the necessary conveniences for building, repairing, and equipping ships with proper economy and dispatch. The board refrain from any further remarks upon the subject at this time, as they have recently presented you with their views upon it in great detail.

The increase of $35,000, under the seventh head, for ordnance and ordnance stores, is occasioned by the necessity of renewing the supplies of several articles embraced under that head of expenditures.

The estimates for enumerated contingent is the same as the appropriation for 1835. It is possible that the alterations made by the law of the last session for regulating the pay of the navy might authorize some small reduction under this head; but, as the force in commission, and number of persons to be employed, is proposed to be increased, and the appropriations under the former laws were uniformly found to be insufficient, it has been deemed best to make no alteration until the effects of the change shall be practically tested.

The ninth item, for other contingencies, is the same as asked and granted for 1835.

The board beg leave to again call your attention to the salary of their chief clerk, and to request, if it should comport with your views, that your recommendation may be given for granting the additional hundred dollars to his salary, as proposed in paper B, placing him on the same footing as the chief clerks of his grade in other offices.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, your obedient servant,

JNO. RODGERS.

Hon. Mahlon Dickerson, Secretary of the Navy.

No. 2.

Navy Commissioners' Office, November 12, 1835.

Sir:

The Board of Navy Commissioners beg leave respectfully to present for your consideration the propriety of asking from Congress appropriations for a series of years, for the purpose of carrying forward the works of a general and permanent character in the different navy yards, which have been designated on the plans, in addition to those of a more special character, which are usually embraced in the annual estimates.

Regular plans were first made and approved for most of the navy yards in 1828, in conformity to the act of March 3d, 1827; previous to that time the buildings in the respective yards were generally temporary in their character, limited in extent, and calculated for present wants, and special rather than for general purposes. Since that time, two dry docks have been built, and other important improvements and additions made in different yards; but there is much still to be done to properly preserve the materials which are authorized to be collected, and to provide the means of economically and rapidly increasing, equipping, or repairing our vessels-of-war. Among the most important of these objects, and which seem to require a special appropriation, to continue for a series of years, are, the dry dock within the waters of the harbor of New York, for which Congress has made a partial appropriation; the construction of permanent quay walls, to prevent injury to the channels by their decay or want of stability; the construction of secure and durable building slips and launching ways, ready for building vessels; for ship houses to cover and shelter ships during their construction, and whilst policy may require them to be kept in readiness for launching; for the construction of timber docks and sheds, to season and prepare the quantities of timber which a just regard to our future wants requires us to keep prepared; for building pile wharves, where the quay walls are not intended to approach so near the channel as to admit vessels to come to them for repairs and equipment; for the construction of hydraulic docks, or inclined planes, in some of the yards, upon which to examine and repair small vessels, and thus to leave the docks for the examination and repair of the large ships; for gradually constructing the proposed wet basins, and for reducing the surface of the yards to a proper graduation, by leveling and excavation; and for the purchase of sites, when necessary.

The construction of the other buildings, as storehouses and workshops, and the ordinary repairs to the different buildings, may perhaps be best provided for as heretofore, that is, by annual appropriations for the respective yards, upon estimates stating the particular objects of proposed expenditure, made with reference to the particular wants of each year.

There being at present no civil engineer employed in the navy, particular estimates of the expense of the different objects could not be procured, which could be entirely depended upon for their accuracy. It was deemed sufficient, however, for the general purposes in view, to take the cost of objects which have already been built as the probable cost of those which are to be constructed, making such allowances as the difference in dimensions, nature of soil, and of difficulties to be overcome, seemed to demand.

Prom this general estimate, it is believed that the sum of three millions five hundred thousand dollars will be required for the purposes herein named, and that this sum may be advantageously expended in the course of the next five years, if it should be deemed expedient by Congress to appropriate, annually, the sum of seven hundred thousand dollars for that period. (See the estimate enclosed herewith.)

In presenting this subject to your consideration, the board would respectfully recall your attention to the great disadvantages which the public service would experience from a want of the improvements proposed, should they be delayed till a change of circumstances shall require any great and sudden extension of our naval force in commission; and to the great increase of expense, as well as inconvenience, if these works were to be constructed when other objects of great and pressing importance might claim a large portion of the financial resources of the country.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

JNO. RODGERS.

Hon. Mahlon Dickerson, Secretary of the Navy.

--737--

A.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy for the year 1836.

Secretary of the Navy

 

$6,000 00

Six clerks, per act of 20th April, 1818

$8,200 00

 

One clerk, per act of 26th May, 1824

1,000 00

 

One clerk, per act of 2d March, 1827

1,000 00

 

 

 

10,200 00

One clerk of navy and privateer pension funds, and navy hospital fund, per act of 10th July, 1832

$1,600 00

 

Messenger and assistant messenger

1,050 00

 

Contingent expenses

3,000 00

 

 

 

5,650 00

Submitted:

 

 

For two clerks, $400 additional each, now at 1,000 each, per annum

$800 00

800 00

 

 

$22,650 00

Note.—The last item in this estimate was submitted in my report of November, 1834. It was not acted on. It is again respectfully submitted, with the hope that it will receive favorable notice. Justice to the two gentlemen who are intended to be benefited by it, requires me to say that their grade, as compared with the clerks of the other departments of the government, as well as their important services and strict attention to duty, entitle them to the increase of salary proposed.

B.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the Navy Commissioners' office for the year 1836.

For the salaries of the Commissioners of the Navy Board

 

$10,500 00

For the salary of the secretary

 

2,000 00

For the salaries of their clerks, draughtsmen, and messenger, per acts of 20th April, 1818, 20th May, 1824, and 2d March, 1827

$8,450 00

 

Additional to the chief clerk, making his salary equal to that allowed to all other chief clerks of his grade

100 00

 

 

 

8,550 00

For contingent expenses

 

1,800 00

 

 

$22,850 00

C.

Estimate of the sums required for the expenses of the southwest Executive building for the year 1836.

Superintendent

 $250

Two watchmen, at $500 each

1,000

Contingent expenses, including fuel, labor, oil, repairs of building, engine, and improvement of the grounds

 3,350

 

$4,600

D.

There will be required for the navy during the year 1836, in addition to the balances that may remain on hand on the first day of January, 1836:

 

Amount of estimate for 1836

Amount appropriated for 1836.

1. 

For the pay of commission, warrant, and petty officers, and of seamen

 $1,974,538 91

 

2.

For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishment at the several yards

68,340 00

$1,858,737 16

3.

For provisions

590,000 00

450,000 00

4.

For the repairs of vessels in ordinary, and the repairs and wear and tear of vessels in commission

950,000 00

974,000 00

--738--

 

 

Amount of estimate for 1836.

Amount appropriated for 1836

5.

 For medicines and surgical instruments, hospital stores, and other expenses on account of the sick

$40,000 00

$40,000 00

6.

For improvements and the necessary repairs of navy yards, viz:

 

 

 

Portsmouth, N. H.

$67,000

 

 

 

Boston

199,575

 

 

 

New York

84,300

 

 

 

Philadelphia

11,750

 

 

 

Washington

37,500

 

 

 

Norfolk

167,000

 

 

 

Pensacola

64,000

 

 

 

 

 

631,125 00

344,115 00

7.

For ordnance and ordnance stores

 

50,000 00

15,000 00

8.

For contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz: * For the freight and transportation of materials and stores of every description; for wharfage and dockage, storage and rent, traveling expenses of officers, and transportation of seamen; house rent for pursers when attached to yards and stations where no house is provided; for funeral expenses; for commissions, clerk hire, office rent, stationery, and fuel to navy agents; for premiums and incidental expenses of recruiting; for apprehending deserters; for compensation to judge advocates; for per diem allowance to persons attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, or other services as authorized by law; for printing and stationery of every description, and for working the lithographic press; and for books, maps, charts, mathematical and nautical instruments, chronometers, models and drawings; for the purchase and repair of fire engines and machinery, and for the repair of steam engines; for the purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, timber-wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage and towing ships-of-war; for furniture of vessels in commission, and fixtures in houses for officers as allowed by law, for taxes and assessments on public property; for assistance rendered to vessels in distress; for incidental labor at navy yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; for coal and other fuel, and for candles and oil; for repairs of magazines or powder houses; for preparing moulds for ships to be built, and for no other object or purpose whatever

 

295,000 00

295,000 00

9.

For contingent expenses for objects not hereinbefore enumerated

 

3,000 00

3,000 00

 

 

 

$4,602,003 91

$3,979,852 16

Note.—The excess of this estimate for 1836 over the appropriation for 1835, amounting to $622,157.75, arises from a proposed increase of force to be employed in commission, from a proposed increase of expenditure for improving the navy yards, and from the late modifications in the pay of the officers.

The letter from the Board of Navy Commissioners to the Secretary of the Navy, of the 18th November, 1835, and the detailed estimates, give further and more particular explanations of the causes of this difference.

JOHN RODGERS.

I. CHAUNCEY.

C. MORRIS.

D, 1.

Estimate of the amount of pay that will be necessary for the year 1836, for the following vessels in commission, viz: one ship of the line, five frigates of the first class, and one frigate of the second class, fourteen sloops-of-war of the first class, five schooners and one steam vessel, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

Five commanders of squadrons

$20,000 00

One ship of the line

152,455 25

Five frigates, 1st class, at $88,905.25

444,526 25

One frigate, 2d class

72,951 91

Fourteen sloops-of-war, 1st class, at $44,023.25

616,325 50

Five schooners; at $18,103.25

90,516 25

One steam vessel

26,091 25

 

$1,422,866 41

--739--

D, 2.

Estimate of the number and pay, of officers, &c. , required for five receiving vessels, for the year 1836, being part of the first item in the general estimate.

 

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Baltimore.

Norfolk.

Total number.

Aggregate Amount.

Commandants

1

1

1

 

1

4

$8,400 00

Lieutenants

3

3

2

2

3

13

 19,500 00

Masters

1

1

1

 

1

4

 4,000 00

Pursers

1

1

 

 

1

3

 1,987 50

Passed midshipmen

2

2

 

 

2

6

 4,500 00

Midshipmen

6

6

3

3

6

24

 8,400 00

Boatswains

1

1

 

 

1

3

 1,500 00

Boatswains' mates

1

1

1

1

1

5

 1,140 00

Gunners' mates

1

1

 

 

1

3

 684 00

Carpenters' mates

1

1

1

 

1

4

 912 00

Masters-at-arms

1

1

 

 

1

3

 648 00

Ships' stewards

1

1

1

1

13

5

 1,080 00

Officers' stewards

1

1

1

1

1

5

 1,080 00

Ships' cooks

1

1

1

1

1

5

 1,080 00

Officers' cooks

2

2

1

 

2

7

 1,512 00

Seamen

2

2

2

2

2

10

 1,440 00

Ordinary seamen

6

6

4

2

6

24

 2,880 00

Boys

10

10

3

2

10

35

 2,940 00

Number of persons

42

42

22

15

42

163

 $63,683 50

D, 3.

Estimate of the pay of the officers attached to five recruiting stations, for the year 1836, being part of the first item in the general estimate.

 

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Baltimore.

Norfolk.

Total number.

Aggregate Amount.

Commanders

1

1

1

1

1

5

 $10,500 00

Lieutenants

2

2

2

2

2

10

 15,000 00

Midshipmen

2

2

2

2

2

10

 3,500 00

Surgeons

1

1

1

1

1

5

 8,750 00

Number of persons

6

6

6

6

6

30

 $37,750 00

D, 4.

Estimate for the pay of officers and others, at the several navy yards and stations, for 1836.

PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

 

 

Naval.

 

 

One captain

$3,500 00

 

One commander

2,100 00

 

One lieutenant

1,500 00

 

One master

1,000 00

 

One surgeon

1,800 00

 

Three midshipmen, $350 each

1,050 00

 

One boatswain

500 00

 

One gunner

500 00

 

One carpenter

500 00

 

One sailmaker

500 00

 

One purser

941 75

 

One steward

216 00

 

 

 

 $14,107 75

Ordinary.

 

 

One lieutenant

$1,500 00

 

One carpenter's mate

228 00

 

Six seamen, $144 each

864 00

 

Twelve ordinary seamen, $120 each,

1,440 00

 

 

 

 4,032 00

--740--

 

Amount.

Aggregate.

Civil.

 

 

One storekeeper

$1,400 00

 

One master builder and inspector of timber

1,200 00

 

One clerk to the yard

900 00

 

One clerk to commandant

900 00

 

One clerk to storekeeper

500 00

 

One clerk to master builder

400 00

 

One porter

300 00

 

 

 

 $5,600 00

 

 

$23,739 75

BOSTON.

Naval.

 

 

One captain

$3,500 00

 

One commander

2,100 00

 

Two lieutenants, $1,500 each

3,000 00

 

Two masters, $1,000 each

2,000 00

 

One surgeon

1,800 00

 

Two assistant surgeons, $950 each

1,900 00

 

One chaplain

1,200 00

 

Two professors, $1,200 each

2,400 00

 

Four midshipmen, $350 each

1,400 00

 

One boatswain

500 00

 

One gunner

500 00

 

One carpenter

500 00

 

One sailmaker

500 00

 

One purser

1,141 75

 

One steward

216 00

 

One steward, assistant to purser

360 00

 

 

 

$23,017 75

Ordinary.

 

 

Three lieutenants, $1,500 each

$4,500 00

 

One master

1,000 00

 

Six midshipmen, $350 each

2,100 00

 

One boatswain

500 00

 

One gunner

500 00

 

One carpenter

500 00

 

One carpenter's mate

228 00

 

Three carpenters' mates, as caulkers, $228 each

684 00

 

Two boatswains' mates, $228 each

456 00

 

Fourteen seamen, $144 each

2,016 00

 

Thirty-six ordinary seamen, $120 each

4,320 00

 

 

 

 16,804 00

Hospital.

 

 

One surgeon

$1,750 00

 

One assistant surgeon

950 00

 

One steward

360 00

 

Two nurses, (when the number of sick shall require them,) $120 each

240 00

 

Two washers, (when the number of sick shall require them,) $96 each

192 00

 

One cook

144 00

 

 

 

3,636 00

Civil.

 

 

One storekeeper

$1,700 00

 

One master builder

2,300 00

 

One inspector and measurer of timber

900 00

 

One clerk to yard

900 00

 

One clerk to commandant

900 00

 

One second clerk to commandant

750 00

 

One clerk to storekeeper

750 00

 

One second clerk to storekeeper

450 00

 

One clerk to master builder

650 00

 

One keeper of the magazine

480 00

 

One porter

300 00

 

 

 

10,080 00

 

 

$53,537 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeons of the yard are to be required to attend to the duties of the yard, to those of the receiving ship, and to the marines; one to be always on board the receiving ship.

--741--

 

Amount

Aggregate.

NEW YORK.

Naval.

 

 

One captain

$3,500 00

 

One commander

2,100 00

 

Two lieutenants, $1,500 each

3,000 00

 

Two masters, $1,000 each

2,000 00

 

One surgeon

1,800 00

 

Two assistant surgeons, $950 each

1,900 00

 

One chaplain

1,200 00

 

Two professors, $1,200 each

2,400 00

 

Four midshipmen, $350 each

1,400 00

 

One boatswain

500 00

 

One gunner

500 00

 

One carpenter

500 00

 

One sailmaker

500 00

 

One purser

1,141 75

 

One steward, assistant to purser

360 00

 

One steward

216 00

 

 

 

 $23,017 75

Ordinary.

 

 

Three lieutenants, $1,500 each

$4,500 00

 

One master

1,000 00

 

Six midshipmen, $350 each

2,100 00

 

One boatswain

500 00

 

One gunner

500 00

 

One carpenter

500 00

 

Four carpenters' mates; three as caulkers, $228 each

912 00

 

Two boatswains' mates, $228 each

456 00

 

Fourteen seamen, $144 each

2,016 00

 

Thirty-six ordinary seamen, $120 each

4,320 00

 

 

 

 16,804 00

Hospital.

 

 

One surgeon

$1,750 00

 

One assistant surgeon

950 00

 

One steward

360 00

 

Two nurses (when the number of sick shall require them), $120 each

240 00

 

Two washers (when the number of sick shall require them), $96 each

192 00

 

One cook

144 00

 

 

 

 3,636 00

Civil.

 

 

One storekeeper

$1,700 00

 

One master builder

2,300 00

 

One inspector and measurer of timber

900 00

 

One clerk to yard

900 00

 

One clerk to commandant

900 00

 

One second clerk to commandant

750 00

 

One clerk to storekeeper

750 00

 

One second clerk to storekeeper

450 00

 

One clerk to master builder

650 00

 

One keeper of the magazine

480 00

 

One porter

300 00

 

 

 

10,080 00

 

 

$53,537 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeons of the yard are to be required to attend to the duties of the yard, the receiving ship, and to the marines; one to be always on board the receiving ship.

 

PHILADELPHIA.

Amount.

 

Aggregate.

Naval.

 

 

One captain

$3,500 00

 

One commander

2,100 00

 

One lieutenant

1,500 00

 

One master

1,000 00

 

One surgeon

1,800 00

 

One assistant surgeon

950 00

 

One chaplain

1,200 00

 

One boatswain

500 00

 

One gunner

500 00

 

One carpenter

500 00

 

One purser

1,141 75

 

One steward

216 00

 

 

 

 $14,907 75

--742--

 

Amount.

Aggregate.

Ordinary

 

 

One lieutenant

$1,500 00

 

One boatswain's mate

228 00

 

Pour seamen, $144 each

576 00

 

Twelve ordinary seamen, $120 each

1,440 00

 

 

 

 $3,744 00

Hospital.

 

 

One surgeon

$1,750 00

 

One assistant surgeon

950 00

 

One steward

360 00

 

Two nurses (when the number of sick shall require them), $120 each

240 00

 

Two washers (when the number of sick shall require them), $96 each

192 00

 

One cook

144 00

 

 

 

3,636 00

Civil.

 

 

One storekeeper

$1,250 00

 

One master builder

2,000 00

 

One inspector and measurer of timber

900 00

 

One clerk to yard

900 00

 

One clerk to commandant

900 00

 

One clerk to storekeeper

500 00

 

One clerk to master builder

400 00

 

One porter

300 00

 

 

 

 $7,150 00

 

 

$29,437 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are both to attend to the yard, receiving vessel, and marines.

 

Amount.

Aggregate.

WASHINGTON.

Naval.

 

 

One captain

$3,500 00

 

One commander

2,100 00

 

One lieutenant

1,500 00

 

Two masters; one in charge of ordnance, $1,000 each

2,000 00

 

One surgeon

1,800 00

 

One assistant surgeon

950 00

 

One chaplain

1,200 00

 

One boatswain

500 00

 

One gunner (as laboratory officer)

500 00

 

One carpenter

500 00

 

One purser

1,141 75

 

One steward

216 00

 

One steward, assistant to purser

360 00

 

One hospital steward

216 00

 

 

 

 $16,483 75

Ordinary.

 

 

One boatswain's mate

$228 00

 

One carpenter's mate

228 00

 

Sis seamen, $144 each

864 00

 

Fourteen ordinary seamen, $120 each

1,680 00

 

 

 

 3,000 00

Civil.

 

 

One storekeeper

$1,700 00

 

One assistant master builder

1,000 00

 

One inspector and measurer of timber

900 00

 

One clerk to yard

900 00

 

One clerk to commandant

900 00

 

One clerk (2d) to commandant

750 00

 

One clerk to storekeeper

750 00

 

One clerk to assistant master builder

420 00

 

One master camboose-maker and plumber

1,200 00

 

One master chain cable and anchor maker

1,000 00

 

One keeper of magazine

480 00

 

One porter

300 00

 

 

 

 $10,300 00

 

 

$29,783 75

--743--

 

Amount.

 Aggregate.

NORFOLK.

Naval.

 

 

One captain

$3,500 00

 

One commander

2,100 00

 

Two lieutenants, $1,500 each

3,000 00

 

Two masters, $1,000 each

2,000 00

 

One surgeon

1,800 00

 

Two assistant surgeons, $950 each

1,900 00

 

One chaplain

1,200 00

 

Two professors, $1,200 each

2,400 00

 

Four midshipmen, $350 each

1,400 00

 

One boatswain

500 00

 

One gunner

500 00

 

One carpenter

500 00

 

One sailmaker

500 00

 

One purser

1,141 75

 

One steward, assistant to purser

360 00

 

One steward

216 00

 

 

 

 $23,017 75

Ordinary.

 

 

Three lieutenants, $1,500 each

$4,500 00

 

One master

1,000 00

 

Six midshipmen, $350 each

2,100 00

 

One boatswain

500 00

 

One gunner

500 00

 

One carpenter

500 00

 

Four carpenter's mates; three as caulkers, $228 each

912 00

 

Two boatswain's mates $228 each

456 00

 

Fourteen seamen, $144

2,016 00

 

Thirty-six ordinary seamen, $120 each

4,320 00

 

 

 

16,804 00

Hospital.

 

 

One surgeon

$1,750 00

 

One assistant surgeon

950 00

 

One steward

360 00

 

Two nurses, (when the number of sick requires them,) $120 each

240 00

 

Two washers, (when the number of sick requires them,) $96 each

192 00

 

One cook

144 00

 

 

 

 3,636 00

Civil.

 

 

One storekeeper

$1,700 00

 

One master builder

2,300 00

 

One inspector and measurer of timber

1,050 00

 

One clerk to yard

900 00

 

One clerk to commandant

900 00

 

One clerk (2d) to commandant

750 00

 

One clerk to store-keeper

750 00

 

One clerk (2d) to store-keeper

450 00

 

One clerk to master builder

650 00

 

One keeper of magazine

480 00

 

One porter

300 00

 

 

 

10,230 00

 

 

$53,687 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeons of the yard are to be required to attend to the duties of the yard, to those of the receiving ship, and to the marines; one to be always on board the receiving* ship.

 

Amount.

Aggregate.

PENSACOLA.

Naval.

 

 

One captain

$3,500 00

 

One commander

2,100 00

 

Two lieutenants, $1,500 each

3,000 00

 

One master

1,000 00

 

One surgeon

1,800 00

 

One assistant surgeon

950 00

 

One chaplain

1,200 00

 

Three midshipmen, $350 each

1,050 00

 

One boatswain

500 00

 

One gunner

500 00

 

One carpenter

500 00

 

One sailmaker

500 00

 

One purser

1,141 75

 

One steward

216 00

 

 

 

$17,957 75

--744--

 

Amount.

Aggregate.

Ordinary.

 

 

One carpenter

$500 00

 

One carpenter's mate

228 00

 

One boatswain's mate

228 00

 

Ten seamen, $144 each

1,440 00

 

Ten ordinary seamen, $120 each

1,200 00

 

 

 

$3,596 00

Hospital.

 

 

One surgeon

$1,750 00

 

One assistant surgeon

950 00

 

One steward

360 00

 

Two nurses (when the number of the sick requires them,) $120 each

240 00

 

Two washers (when the number of the sick requires them,) $96 each

192 00

 

One cook

144 00

 

 

 

 3,636 00

Civil.

 

 

One storekeeper

$1,700 00

 

One clerk to the yard

900 00

 

One clerk to commandant

900 00

 

One clerk to storekeeper

500 00,

 

One porter

300 00

 

 

 

 4,300 00

 

 

$29,489 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard to attend to the duties of the yard, the ordinary, the marines, and the receiving ship, should one be allowed.

STATIONS.

Baltimore.

 

Amount.

Aggregate.

One captain

$3,500 00

 

One lieutenant

1,500 00

 

One. surgeon

1,500 00

 

One purser

862 50

 

 

 

 7,362 50

Charleston.

One captain

$3,500 00

 

One lieutenant

1,500 00

 

One surgeon

1,500 00

 

One purser and storekeeper

1,189 75

 

 

 

 7,689 75

Sackett's Harbor

One master

$1,000 00

 

 

 

 1,000 00

On duty at Washington, or on general duty.

Ordnance:

 

 

One captain

$3,500 00

 

One lieutenant

1,500 00

 

 

 

 5,000 00

Chart and instrument depot.

One lieutenant

$1,500 00

 

One passed midshipman

750 00

 

 

 

 2,250 00

One chief naval instructor

$3,000 00

 

One civil engineer

4,000 00

 

 

 

 7,000 00

Foreign stations.

One storekeeper at Mahon

$1,200 00

 

One storekeeper at Rio de Janeiro

1,500 00

 

 

 

 2,700 00

--745--

RECAPITULATION.

 

Naval.
1st item.

Ordinary.
1st item.

Hospital.
1st item.

Civil.
2d item.

Aggregate.

Portsmouth

$14,107 75

$4,032 00

 

 $5,600 00

$23,739 75

Boston

23,017 75

16,804 00

 $3,636 00

10,080 00

53,537 75

New York

23,017 75

16,804 00

 3,636 00

310,080 00

53,537 75

Philadelphia

14,907 75

3,744 00

3,636 00

 7,150 00

29,437 75

Washington

16,483 75

3,000 00

 

10,300 00

29,783 75

Norfolk

23,017 75

16,804 00

3,636 00

 10,230 00

53,687 75

Pensacola

17,957 75

3,596 00

3,636 00

4,300 00

29,489 75

Baltimore

7,362 50

 

 

 

7,362 50

Charleston

7,689 75

 

 

 

7,689 75

Sackett's Harbor

1,000 00

 

 

 

1,000 00

Ordnance

5,000 00

 

 

 

5,000 00

Instrument depot

2,250 00

 

 

 

2,250 00

Naval constructor

 

 

 

3,000 00

3,000 00

Civil engineer

 

 

 

4,000 00

4,000 00

Navy storekeepers

 

 

 

2,700 00

2,700 00

 

$155,812 50

$64,784 00

$18,180 00

$67,440 00

 $306,216 50

Under this item of the estimates, the following changes are proposed for 1836, in the number of persons and their compensation, as allowed for the year 1835, viz:

In the naval branch.—A steward, as an assistant to the purser at Washington, is proposed, at the usual pay of $30 per month, equal to $360. The number of mechanics employed at this yard renders this addition necessary, in the opinion of the board.

In the hospital branch.—An increase of pay, from $18 to $30 per month, is proposed for the stewards of the hospitals at Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Norfolk, and Pensacola, amounting, in the whole, to $720. This addition is proposed, from the belief that it will be necessary to command the services of persons possessing the requisite information to perform the increased duties, and sustain the increased responsibilities, which will hereafter be allotted to them in the permanent hospitals now about to be opened.

In the civil branch.—It is proposed to increase the compensation of the master builder and inspector of timber at Portsmouth, N. H., to the amount of $300. The compensation for the performance of both duties has, for some years past, only been equal to that allowed for the performance of the duties of inspector of timber at other yards. As the duties will be greater hereafter, in consequence of the quantities of timber delivering under contracts, it is deemed just to increase the compensation in a corresponding degree. The compensation to the principal clerks to the storekeepers at Boston, New York, and Norfolk, is proposed to be increased from $600 to $750. The second clerks, at the same yards, from $360 to $450. The storekeepers' clerks at Portsmouth, Philadelphia, and Pensacola, from $350 to $500; and at Washington, from $500 to $750. An increase is also proposed for the clerks to the master builders at Boston, New York, and Norfolk, from $500 to $650, and those at Portsmouth and Philadelphia, from $400 to $500 each. The person charged with the management and repair of steam engines and sawmills, formerly paid by an annual salary of $800, it is now proposed to place on daily pay, to be paid for his actual attendance only. This renders the whole increase under this head equal to $1,570, making the total increase equal to $2,650.

An increase of compensation to the different clerks has been solicited by them, upon the grounds that their present compensation was insufficient to meet their necessary expenses at their several places of residence, and that it was not proportioned to the compensation granted to other persons in the yards having no greater responsibilities, and performing duties requiring no greater qualifications. From the representations made by the commandants of the yards, and other officers, the board were satisfied that the first ground taken by the clerks was generally correct, and they coincided in opinion with them as respects the relative responsibilities and necessary qualifications.

The board, influenced by these considerations, have, therefore, proposed to place the principal clerks of the storekeepers, as heretofore, at the same compensation as the second clerks to commandants, which was established by the law of the last session, and to submit a proportionate increase to the other clerks, modified, in a slight degree, by the amount of labor to be performed, and the ordinary cost of subsistence, at the respective yards.

--746--

D, 5.

Exhibit of the commission and warrant officers that will be waiting orders, and on furlough, for the year 1836, by the estimates, being part of the first item in the general estimate.

WAITING ORDERS.

12 

captains

$207,200 00

commanders

89 

lieutenants

surgeons

47 

passed midshipmen

*86

midshipmen

ON FURLOUGH.

commanders

5,162 50

lieutenants

1

 purser

2

passed midshipmen

midshipmen

 

 

$212,362 50

D, 6.

Estimate of the amount required for provisions for the year 1836, explanatory of the third item in the general estimate.

6,269

 persons in vessels in commission, besides the marines embarked.

 

524

marines embarked in vessels in commission.

 

396

enlisted persons attached to receiving vessels and shore stations.

 

 

Making 7,189 persons in total, at one ration each per day, makes 2,623,985 rations, which, at twenty-five cents per ration, is equal to

 $655,996 25

 

From this sum there may be deducted (estimating the balance that may remain in the Treasury on the 1st January, 1836, which, it is presumed, will not be required) the sum of

 65,096 25

 

Which will leave

 $590,000 00

Being the amount asked for in the third item of the general estimate.

D, 7.

Estimates of the proposed improvements and repairs to be made in navy yards during the year 1836, explanatory of the sixth item in the general estimate.

NAVY YARD, PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE.

For building timber shed

 $18,000 00

Towards mast and boat house

 25,000 00

For a timber dock

 20,000 00

Repairs of all kinds

 4,000 00

 

$67,000 00

NAVY YARD, BOSTON.

For the ropewalk

 $63,000 00

For the tarring house

 9,000 00

For the steam engine and machinery for laying up

 30,000 00

For spinning machinery

 15,000 00

For a hemp house

 38,000 00

For storehouse No. 15

 35,275 00

For repairing and replacing masting shears

 3,575 00

For yard wall at northeast corner

 1,500 00

For completing the change of fronts to officers' quarters

 1,225 00

For the repairs of docks, wharves, and buildings in the yard

 3,000 00

 

$199,575 00

* Embracing seventy-five midshipmen, who, after examination, may be entitled to bo arranged as passed midshipmen, in addition to their pay as midshipmen, $300 each.

--747--

NAVY YARD, NEW YORK.

For securing and preserving the ordnance, or for repairing the gun block

$5,000 00

For building offices

9,000 00

For building a timber shed

21,000 00

Launching slip to ship house No. 1

9,500 00

To enlarge smithery

2,500 00

For well and reservoir for watering ships

2,500 00

For leveling the yard and filling in

5,700 00

For walls to enclose the yard on the lines, by the wharf and back of the stores, from the south end of the present wall to southwest corner of yard, from southwest corner to the magazine or southeast corner, from entrance gate to present wall

18,500 00

Slip for boat house

1,600 00

Repairs of ship house No. 2

5,000 00

For the repairs of other buildings, wharves, and docks

4,000 00

 

$84,300 00

NAVY YARD, PHILADELPHIA.

For raising brick wall on north side of ship house No 2

$800 00

For extending brick wall from the east end of ship house No. 2 to the end of the wharf, 80 feet

800 00

For plunking over slip at east end of ship house No 1

470 00

New floor for mould loft, and six fireproof windows

700 00

For paving timber shed No 4

850 00

For paving ground in front of officers' quarters

130 00

For painting offices, &c., &c.

350 00

For building an engine and hose house, 40 feet by 30

1,500 00

For building frame saw shed

1,650 00

For repairs

500 00

For tinning ship house No. 2

3,500 00

 

$11,750 00

NAVY YARD, WASHINGTON.

A timber shed

$16,000 00

Repairs to ship house W

1,500 00

Repairs to buildings, fences, and gutters

5,000 00

Foundation for building slip where the Columbia now stands

15,000 00

 

$37,500 00

NAVY YARD, NORFOLK.

For the eastern wall and entrance gates to the timber dock

$38,000 00

For the quay wall on east side of yard, including launching ways of the Macedonian

23,500 00

For a quay wall from timber dock round to meet the present east wharves

26,000 00

For a steam engine to pump out coffer dams

1,500 00

For smithery No. 9

21,000 00

For two houses, No, 39, and dependencies

27,000 00

For houses Nos. 2 and 3, and dependencies

7,000 00

For No. 28, mast house

6,500 00

For boat house No. 29

1,500 00

For repairs of ship house B

10,000 00

For repairs of all other buildings, docks, and wharves

5,000 00

 

$167,000 00

NAVY YARD, PENSACOLA.

For a bakery and mess room

$3,000 00

For a brick kitchen, and filling up cellars

1,500 00

For slating navy store

4,000 00

For a cistern

5,000 00

For three third class houses

27,000 00

For a building to accommodate assistant surgeon and sick in the yard

5,500 00

Wharf

15,000 00

Repairs

3,000 00

 

$64,000 00

 

RECAPITULATION.

Portsmouth, N. H.

$67,000 00

Boston

199,575 00

New York

84,300 00

Philadelphia

11,750 00

Washington

37,500 00

Norfolk

167,000 00

Pensacola

64,000 00

 

$631,125 00

--748--

E.

Special estimates for extraordinary purposes, or for objects not embraced in the usual annual estimates for the current service of the navy.

No 1.

FOR STEAM VESSELS.

For completing the steam vessels-of-war, now building at the Navy yard, Brooklyn, New York, in aid of the amount which may be available from the appropriation for the gradual increase of the navy

$150 000 00

For building, equipping and arming complete, three steam vessels-of-war

675,000 00

Total

$825,000 00

The Board of Navy Commissioners would respectfully remark that, from a want of experience in the construction and equipment of steam vessels-of-war in this country, it is possible that these estimates may not prove as accurate as might be wished; but, from the best information which they have been able to obtain, they believe, that the amounts asked will be sufficient for the objects proposed.

No. 2.

HOSPITALS.

For the completion of the hospitals near New York and Boston, and for regulating the grounds, and building necessary enclosures, and repairing the Naval asylum and all other hospitals, and the buildings, wharves and. landings dependent upon and connected with them, and for preparing suitable burying grounds

$45,410 00

No. 3.

POWDER MAGAZINES.

For building a powder magazine near the Navy yard, Pensacola

$17,000 00

For completing the magazines near New York and Boston, and for the necessary landings, enclosures and other dependencies

19,200 00

 

$36,200 00

No. 4.

COAST SURVEY.

Towards the survey of the coast of the United States

$80,000 00

JNO. RODGERS.

I. CHAUNCEY.

C. MORRIS.

E, No. 1.

Estimate of the several works, and their probable cost, which it is proposed to construct at the several navy yards.

PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

Timber docks, and quay walls, ship houses and launching ways

$100,000 00

 

BOSTON.

A ship house and launching slip

$40,000 00

 

Walls and wet basin

250,000 00

 

Excavations and filling up

60,000 00

 

Wharves

50,000 00

 

Quay walls

30,000 00

 

Hydraulic dock or inclined plane

120,000 00

 

 

 

550,000 00

NEW YORK.

Quay walls, launching slips and timber docks

$550,000 00

 

Dry dock

900,000 00

 

 

 

1,450,000 00

PHILADELPHIA.

Quay walls and appendages

60,000 00

 

WASHINGTON.

Timber docks and wharves

65,000 00

 

--749--

NORFOLK.

Quay walls, landing slips and timber docks

$704,000 00

 

Three ship houses

125,000 00

 

Canal at south side of yard, &c.

46,000 00

 

Hydraulic dock or inclined plane

125,000 00

 

 

 

$1,000,000 00

PENSACOLA.

Wharves and appendages

$150,000 00

 

Hydraulic dock or inclined plane

125,000 00

 

 

 

275,000 00

 

 

$3,500,000 00

P.

General estimate of the expenses of the marine corps for the year 1836.

There will be required for the support of the marine corps during the year 1836, in addition to the balances which may remain on hand on the 1st of January, 1836, the sum of $488,856.19.

Paymaster's department.

1.

For the pay of the officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates, and subsistence of the officers of the marine corps

$163,077 25

 

Quartermaster's department.

2.

For the provisions for the non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates serving on shore, servants and washerwomen

$33,517 72

 

3.

For clothing

38,655 00

 

4.

For fuel

14,589 00

 

5.

For repair of barracks near Portsmouth, N. H., and for repairs at other stations

8,900 00

 

6.

For the purchase of sites and erection of barracks near Charlestown, New York, Norfolk, and Pensacola

200,000 00

 

7.

For transportation of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates, and expenses of recruiting

6,000 00

 

8.

For medicines, hospital stores, surgical instruments, and pay of matron. 4,139 29

 

 

9.

For military stores, pay of armorers, keeping arms in repair, drums, fifes, flags, accoutrements, and ordnance stores

2,000 00

 

10.

For contingencies, namely: Freight, ferriage, toll, wharfage, and cartage; per diem allowance for attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry; compensation to judge advocate; house rent where there are no public quarters assigned; incidental labor in the Quartermaster's department; expenses of burying deceased persons belonging to the marine corps; printing, stationery, forage, postage on public letters; expenses in pursuit of deserters; candles and oil for the different stations, straw for the men, barrack furniture, bed sacks, spades, axes, shovels, picks, and carpenter's tools

 17,977 93

 

 

 

325,778 94

 

Total amount

$488,856 19

Note.—The excess of this estimate over the appropriations for 1835 arises principally from the sum of $200,000, proposed for the purchase of sites and erection of barracks.

--750--

F, 1.

Detailed estimate of pay and subsistence of officers, and pay of non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates of the marine corps of the United States, for the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty- six.

 

Pay.

 

 

 

 

 

Subsistence.

 

 

 

 

Rank and Grade.

 Number.

 Pay per month.

 Extra pay per month.

 Servants at $8.

 Servants at $6.

 Total.

 Number of rations per day at 20 cents per rations.

 Extra rations per day while commanding, at 29 cents per rations.

 Number of rations per day at 25 cents per rations.

 Total.

 Aggregate amount.

Colonel commandant

1

$75 00

 

 

2

$1,044 00

6

6

 

 $878 40

$1,922 40

Lieutenant colonel

1

 60 00

 

 

2

 864 00

5

5

 

 732 00

1,596 00

Majors

4

 50 00

 

 

2

 2,976 00

4

4

2,342 40

5,318 40

 

Adjutant and inspector

1

 50 00

 

 

2

 744 00

4

 

 

 292 80

1,036 80

Quartermaster

1

60 00

 

2

 

 912 00

4

 

 

 292 80

1,204 80

Paymaster

1

50 00

 

 

2

 744 00

4

 

 

 292 80

1,036 80

Assistant quartermaster

1

40 00

$20

 

1

792 00

4

 

 

 292 8.0

1,084 80

Captains, commanding posts at sea

5

50 00

 

 

1

3,360 00

4

4

 

2,928 00

 6,288 00

Captains, commanding companies

4

50 00

 

 

1

2,688 00

4

 

 

1,171 20

3,859 20

First lieutenants, commanding companies and guards at sea

4

40 00

 

 

1

2,208 00

4

 

 

1,171 20

3,379 20

First lieutenants

16

30 00

 

 

1

6,912 00

4

 

 

4,684 80

11,596 80

Second lieutenants

20

25 00

 

 

1

7,440 00

4

 

 

5,856 00

13,296 00

Hospital steward

1

18 00

 

 

 

16 00

1

 

 

 73 25

289 25

Sergeant major

1

17 00

 

 

 

204 00

 

 

 

 

204 00

Quartermaster sergeant

1

17 00

20

 

 

444 00

 

 

 

 

444 00

Drum and fife majors

2

16 00

 

 

 

384 00

 

 

 

 

384 00

Orderly sergeants and sergeants of guards at sea

27

16 00

 

 

 

 5,184 00

 

 

 

 

 5,184 00

Orderly sergeants, employed as clerks to colonel commandant, adjutant and inspector, and quartermaster

3

16 00

20

 

 

 1,296 00

 

 

 

 

 1,296 00

Sergeants

50

13 00

 

 

 

7,800 00

 

 

 

 

7,800 00

Corporals

80

9 00

 

 

 

8,640 00

 

 

 

 

8,640 00

Drummers and fifers

60

8 00

 

 

 

5,760 00

 

 

 

 

5,760 00

Privates

932

7 00

 

 

 

78,288 00

 

 

 

 

78,288 00

Clerk to paymaster

1

8 80

20

 

 

345 60

1

 

 

73 20

418 80

Amount required for two months' pay as bounty for re-enlistment, under act of 2d March, 1833

125

 

 

 

 

 1,750 00

 

 

 

 

 1,750 00

Amount required for payment of musicians and privates' retained pay, under act of 2d March, 1833

 

 

 

 

 

 1,000 00

 

 

 

 

 1,000 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

$141,995 60

 

 

 

 $21,081 65

 $163,077 25

F, 2. provisions.

For whom required.

Enlisted men.

Washerwomen.

Matron.

Servants.

Clerks.

Total.

Rations per day, at 12 cents.

Rations per day, at 20 cents.

Aggregate amount.

For provisions for non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, and washerwomen, serving on shore

581

39

1

 

 

621

1

 

  $27,274 32

For provisions for clerks and officers' servants

 

 

 

68

4

72

 

1

5,343 40

Amount required for two months' rations for each soldier, as premium for re-enlisting, agreeably to the act of March 2, 1833.

125

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

900 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$33,517 72

--751--

F, 3.

CLOTHING.

For whom required.

Enlisted men.

Servants.

Total.

Aggregate  amount.

For clothing for the non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, at $30 a year each

1,156

 

1,156

$34,680 00

For clothing for officers' servants, at $30 a year each

 

69

69

2,070 00

Amount required for two months' clothing for each soldier, as premium for re-enlisting, agreeably to the act of 2d March, 1833, at $5 each

125

 

125

 625 00

Paymaster's clerk, clothing for him, at $30 a year

1

 

1

 30 00

Amount required for the purchase of 200 watch-coats, at $6.25 each

 

 

 

 1,250 00

 

 

 

 

$38,655 00

F, 4.

FUEL.

For what purpose required.

Number.

Fuel for each.

Total fuel.

Aggregate

amount.

Cords.

Feet.

Inches.

Cords.

Feet.

Inches.

Colonel commandant

1

36

4

 

36

4

 

 

Lieutenant colonel, south of latitude 39 degrees

1

26

 

 

26

 

 

 

Major, south of latitude 39 degrees

1

26

26

 

 

 

 

 

Majors, north of 39 degrees north latitude

3

29

 

 

87

 

 

 

Captain, north of latitude 43 degrees

1

24

4

8

24

4

8

 

Captains, north of latitude 39 degrees

2

23

6

 

47

4

 

 

Captains, south of latitude 39 degrees

3

21

2

 

63

6

 

 

Staff, south of latitude 39 degrees

3

26

 

 

78

 

 

 

Staff, north of latitude 39 degrees

1

29

 

 

29

 

 

 

First lieutenant, north of latitude 43 degrees

1

19

1

4

19

1

4

 

First lieutenants, north of latitude 39 degrees

6

18

4

 

111

 

 

 

First lieutenants, south of latitude 33 degrees

7

16

4

 

115

4

 

 

Second lieutenant, north of latitude 43 degrees

1

19

1

4

19

1

4

 

Second lieutenants, north of latitude 39 degrees

6

18

4

 

111

 

 

 

Second lieutenants, south of latitude 39 degrees

7

16

4

 

115

4

 

 

Non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, servants, and washerwomen, north of latitude 40 degrees

264

1

5

 

429

 

 

 

Non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, servants, and washerwomen, couth of latitude 40 degrees

414

1

4

 

621

 

 

 

Clerk to paymaster

1

2

2

8

2

2

8

 

Matron to hospital

1

1

4

 

1

4

 

 

Commanding officer's office at Portsmouth, N. H.

1

8

5

4

8

5

4

 

Guard room at Portsmouth, N. H.

1

25

 

 

25

 

 

 

Hospital at Portsmouth, N. H.

1

19

1

4

19

1

4

 

Mess room at Portsmouth, N. H.

1

4

1

4

4

1

4

 

Offices of the commanding officers and assistant quartermasters at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia

4

8

 

 

32

 

 

 

Guard rooms at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia

3

24

 

 

72

 

 

 

Hospitals at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia

3

18

4

 

55

4

 

 

Mess rooms for officers at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia

3

4

 

 

12

 

 

 

Offices of the commandant and staff, and commanding officers at head-quarters, Norfolk and Pensacola 7

7

 

 

 

49

 

 

 

Guard rooms at head-quarters, Navy yard, Norfolk, and Pensacola

4

21

 

 

84

 

 

 

Hospital at head-quarters, two fires

1

33

 

 

33

 

 

 

Hospitals at Norfolk and Pensacola

2

16

4

 

33

 

 

 

Mess rooms for officers at head-quarters, Norfolk, and Pensacola

3

3

4

 

10

4

 

 

Armory at Washington city

1

30

 

 

30

 

 

 

Total fuel

 

 

 

 

2,421

4

 

 

Total amount, at $6 per cord

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 $14,589 00

--752--

G.

List of vessels in commission, of each squadron, their commanders, and stations.

Class.

Names.

Flag ships.

Commanders of vessels.

Commanders of squadrons.

Station.

Ship of the line.

*Delaware

Flagship

Captain J. B. Nicolson

Commodore D. T. Patterson

Mediterranean.

Frigate

†Constitution.

Flagship

Commodore J. D. Elliott

Commodore J. D. Elliott

Mediterranean.

Frigate

Potomac

 

Captain J. J. Nicholson

 

Mediterranean.

Sloop

John Adams

 

Master Commandant S. H. Stringham

 

Mediterranean.

Schooner

Shark

 

Lieutenant Ebenezer Ridgeway

 

Mediterranean.

Frigate

Constellation.

Flagship

Commodore A. J. Dallas

 Commodore A. J. Dallas

West Indies.

Sloop

St. Louis

 

Master Commandant L. Rousseau

 

West Indies.

Sloop

Vandalia

 

Master Commandant Thos. T. Webb

 

West Indies.

Sloop

Warren

 

Master Commandant William V. Taylor

 

West Indies.

Schooner

Grampus

 

Lieutenant Robert Ritchie

 

West Indies.

Sloop

Erie

Flagship

Commodore James Renshaw

Commodore James Renshaw 

Coast of Brazil.

Sloop

Ontario

 

Master Commandant William D. Salter

Coast of Brazil.

 

Frigate

Brandywine

Flagship

Captain David Deacon

Commodore A. S. Wadsworth.

Pacific.

Sloop

Vincennes

 

Master Commandant John H. Aulick

 

Pacific.

Sloop

Fairfield

 

Master Commandant E. A. F. Valette

 

Pacific.

Schooner

Dolphin

 

Lieutenant Charles H. Bell

 

Pacific.

Schooner

Boxer

 

Lieutenant Hugh N. Page

 

Pacific.

Sloop

Peacock

Flagship

Commodore E. P. Kennedy

Commodore E. P. Kennedy

East Indies.

Schooner

Enterprise

 

Lieutenant A. S. Campbell

 

East Indies.

Statement showing the names, distribution, and condition of the vessels in ordinary.

AT PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

Concord—sloop-of-war, nearly ready for sea.

Lexington—sloop-of-war, repairs nearly completed.

AT CHARLESTOWN, MASS.

Columbus—ship of the line, requires large repairs.

Independence—ship of the line, under repair.

Boston—sloop-of-war, nearly ready for sea.

AT BROOKLYN, N. Y.

Washington—ship of the line, requires very large repairs.

Franklin—ship of the line, requires very large repairs.

Ohio—ship of the line, requires large repairs; few of her equipments have ever been provided.

United States—frigate, nearly ready for sea.

Hudson—frigate, considered unfit for sea service.

Natchez—sloop-of-war, recently arrived, supposed to require considerable repairs.

AT PHILADELPHIA.

Warren—sloop-of-war, nearly ready for sea.

Cyane—sloop-of-war, condemned, as unfit for service.

Sea Gull—an old steam vessel, decayed and unfit for sea service.

AT GOSPORT, VA.

North Carolina—ship of the line, under repair.

Guerriere—frigate, requires large repairs or to be rebuilt.

Java—frigate, unfit for sea service.

Falmouth—sloop-of-war, requires large repairs.

Grampus—schooner, requires large repairs.

I.

Statement of the vessels building at the different navy yards.

Those building under the laws for the gradual increase of the navy are distributed as follows:

AT PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

One ship of the line, one frigate.

AT CHARLESTOWN, MASS.

Two ships of the line, one frigate.

AT BROOKLYN, N. Y.

Two frigates, one steam vessel.

* On her return to the United States. † Arrived at Gibraltar Sept. 11, 1836.

--753--

AT PHILADELPHIA.

One ship of the line, one frigate.

AT WASHINGTON.

One frigate.

AT GOSPORT, VA.

One ship of the line, one frigate.

All these vessels are under cover, and generally in good order, with the exception of their keels, keelsons, and deadwoods, of which some have been found to be defective.

There is building at Norfolk a frigate, under the authority of the act of Congress of July 10, 1832, to replace the Macedonian; she has a roof over her, and is in a state of perfect preservation.

K.

Statement of the measures which have been taken to carry into effect the laws for the gradual increase of the navy, approved April 29, 1816, and March 3, 1821.

The ships of the line Columbus, North Carolina, and Delaware, have been built and in service for several years.

The ship of the line, Ohio, was launched in May, 1820, but has never been equipped, nor has her hull been completed; she now requires repairs.

The frigates Brandywine and Potomac have been completed, and employed for several years.

Five ships of the line and seven frigates remain upon the stocks, all under tight houses. They are generally sound and in good condition, with the exception of the keels, keelsons, and deadwoods, of which some have become defective, and will require to be replaced. The ships are all, however, so far advanced that it is believed they can be completed and equipped by the time that crews could be collected for them.

A steam vessel has been recently commenced, under this appropriation, at the Navy yard at Brooklyn, and such arrangements made as the present state of the appropriation will justify. The amount in the Treasury on the 1st of October, 1835, was but $156,261, and, as a part of this must necessarily be devoted to the completion of the frigate Columbia, which has been directed to be launched, some further provision will be necessary to complete the steam vessel. This may be made by a direct appropriation, or, if admissible, by the transfer of materials purchased for "gradual increase," but which are not now wanted for that appropriation, to " repairs," for which they are required, and by transferring their value from the appropriation for "repairs" to the appropriation for "gradual increase"

Besides the articles which might be thus transferred with advantage, there are others to a large amount in the different navy yards that can be advantageously preserved for this appropriation, to which they belong.

The distribution of the ships building is shown in statement I.

It may be proper to remark that additional appropriations will be necessary before these vessels can be completed, as was more fully stated in a recent communication from the board.

L.

Statement of the measures which have been adopted to carry into effect the laws for the gradual improvement of the navy, approved March 3, 1827, and March 2, 1833

The live oak frames for four ships of the line, for seven frigates, and for four sloops-of-war, complete, have been delivered; the greater part of the frames of a frigate and sloop-of-war have also been delivered at the Navy yard, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and part of the frame of a sloop-of-war at the Navy yard at Washington.

The complete frames are distributed as follows:

At the Navy yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts, for two ships of the line, for two frigates, and for one sloop-of-war.

At the Navy yard, Brooklyn, New York, for one frigate.

At the Navy yard, Philadelphia, for two frigates and one sloop-of-war.

At the Navy yard, Washington, for one frigate and one sloop-of-war.

At the Navy yard, Gosport, Virginia, for two ships of the line, one frigate, and one sloop-of-war.

Contracts have been entered into, and have been in part executed, for the white oak and yellow pine timber, and for the copper and iron necessary to complete the hulls of these vessels, and for "their masts and spars.

Dry docks at Charlestown, Massachusetts, and at Gosport, Virginia, have been built from this appropriation, and other expenses incurred, under the provisions of the law, for buildings to preserve the materials, for receiving and storing them, and for the purchase, selection, preservation and improvement of lands for the cultivation of live oak trees.

The cost of works and materials to the 1st of October, 1835, under this appropriation, have been as follows:

For the dry dock at Charlestown, Massachusetts

$677,089 78

For the dry dock at Gosport, Virginia

974,356.69

For timber sheds and other buildings

143,508 84

For receiving and storing materials

142,894 59

For purchase of land, cultivation and preservation of live oak trees

68,224 76

--754--

For 395,143 cubic feet live oak timber

 $499,297 35

For 286,653 cubic feet white oak timber

 94,653 08

For 327,531 superficial feet white Oak plank

 17,304 25

For 7,718 white oak knees

 42,803 87

For 251,056 cubic feet of yellow pine, for plank

 79,936 37

For 120,595 cubic feet yellow pine, for masts and spars

58,902 99

For 45,896 cubic feet yellow pine, for beams, &c.

 23,489 73

For 915,670 lbs. of iron

 34,384 02

For 826,449 lbs. of copper

 173,244 73

Total

$3,030,091 05

From which deduct reservations as security for completion of contracts not yet paid

27,335 25

Leaves a balance of

$3,002,755 80

Which, deducted from the whole amount appropriated to the present time, equal to

4,500,000 00

Leaves a balance of

$1,497,245 20

Of which there remained in the Treasury on the 1st Oct., 1835, the sum of

$1,454,316 46

The balance, supposed to be in the hands of navy agents, is

42,929 34

Making a total, as above, of

$1,497,245 20

Of this sum there will be required, to meet existing engagements under contracts, about

616,000 00

Leaving, for other purposes, about

$881,245 20

 

Advertisements have been issued inviting offers for furnishing the live oak frames for five ships of the line, six frigates, five sloops-of-war, five schooners, and three steamers, which, if contracted for, will probably require about $600,000 of the balance remaining, "after meeting existing engagements.

M.

Statements showing the balance standing to the credit of the navy pension fund on the first day of November, 1834; the amount of receipts' and disbursements on account of said fund, from that date to the first of October, 1835; and the amount of advances to agents during the same period.

1.

Balance in the Treasury to the credit of the fund on the 1st day of November, 1834, per Register's report.

 

$9,223 00

2.

Amount received into the Treasury since that time, from whom, and on what account, viz: 1834.

 

 

Nov. 28.

From United States district attorney, Baltimore, for part of balance recovered in a suit against Joseph D. Learned

 $49 60

 

Dec. 16.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for sale of United States Bank stock

21,600 00

 

Dec. 31.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for sale of United States Bank stock

 5,261 38

 

1835.

 

 

 

Jan. 19.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividends on United States Bank stock

 20,643 00

 

Jan. 29.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland stocks.

3,562 87

 

Feb. 5.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Pennsylvania stocks

5,311 73

 

March 13.

From Richard Smith, cashier, for balance due on settlement

25

 

April 1.

From H. Toland, navy agent, Philadelphia, refunded

200 00

 

April 13.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividend on Union Bank stock

300 00

 

April 14.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Cincinnati corporation stock

2,500 00

 

June 6.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for sale of United States Bank stock

22,493 62

 

July 10.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland stock 1,789 66

 

 

July 21.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividends on United States Bank stock

20,706 00

 

August 5.

From the Bank of Pennsylvania, for proceeds of property taken from the pirates, and sold in Smyrna by the American consul

145 00

 

August 22.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Pennsylvania stock

5,311 73

 

August 25.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland stock.

1,752 78

 

 

Total amount of receipts

 

$111,627 62

--755--

3.

Disbursements made from the fund, from the 1st day of November, 1834, to the 1st day of October, 1835, viz:

 

 

1834.

 

 

 

Dec. 1.

Paid the Secretary of the Treasury, for eighty-five shares of United States Bank stock

 $8,500 00

 

Dec. 1.

Paid Elizabeth Sevier, for five years' pension

 1,200 00

 

Dec. 1.

Paid Susannah Taggart, (widow of S. A. Eakin,) for pension due her prior to her second marriage

 256 67

 

1835.

 

 

 

Jan. 16.

Paid Ann Stevenson (widow), for pension due her from 27th August 1813, to the 1st of January, 1835

 5,122 64

 

Feb. 11.

Paid the Secretary of the Treasury, for 228 shares of stock of the Bank of the United States

 22,800 00

 

Feb. 25.

Paid Abigail C. Fernald, for five years' pension

 360 00

 

April 15.

Paid the Secretary of the Treasury, for 40 shares of stock of the Bank of the United States

 4,000 00

 

May 28.

Paid Hannah Hazen, for five years' pension

360 00

 

June 26.

Paid Caroline M. Arnold, for balance of pension due to 11th March, 1835

 79 82

 

July 13.

Paid the Secretary of the Treasury, for 110 shares of United States Bank stock

 11,000 00

 

Aug. 1.

Paid the Secretary of the Treasury for 170 shares of United States Bank stock

 17,000 00

 

Sept. 14.

Paid the Secretary of the Treasury, for 80 shares of United States Bank stock

 8,000 00

 

Aug. 7.

Paid President of the Branch Bank of the United States, Washington, for balance due him for payments to pensioners

 228 69

 

 

Total amount of disbursements

 

$78,907 82

4.

Advances to agents to pay pensions, viz:

 

 

1834.

 

 

 

Nov. 11.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Pittsburg, Penn.

 $36 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Washington, D. C.

 514 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at New Orleans, La.

 200 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Savannah, Ga.

 120 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Charleston, S. C.

 300 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Portsmouth, N. H.

 400 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Providence, R. I.

 500 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Norfolk, Va.

 4,300 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Bank of the United States, at Philadelphia, Penn.

 2,000 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Farmers' Bank of New Castle, Del.

 48 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Trenton Banking Company, N. J.

 36 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Hartford, Conn.

 700 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Baltimore, Md.

 2,200 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Cincinnati, Ohio

 90 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Portland, Me.

 450 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Pittsburg; Penn.

130 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at New York, N. Y.

 1,000 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Louisville, Ken.

 800 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Boston, Mass.

 3,000 00

 

Dec. 13.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at St. Louis, Mo.

 36 00

 

Dec. 31.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Washington, D. C.

 1,000 00

 

1835.

 

 

 

Jan. 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Savannah, Ga.

 120 00

 

Jan. 22.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Ports mouth, N. H.

 182 00

 

--756--

Jan. 24.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Mobile, Ala.

 $44 20

 

Feb. 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Portsmouth, N. H.

 100 00

 

Feb. 20.

To H. Toland, navy agent, Philadelphia, Penn

 200 00

 

March 10.

To Elias Kane, navy agent, Washington, D. C.

40 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Boston, Mass.

 3,300 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Norfolk, Va.

 800 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Farmers' Bank, at New Castle, Del

 48 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank, of the United States, at Portsmouth, N. H.

 700 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Portland, Me.

 600 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at New York, N. Y.

 5,000 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Louisville, Ky.

 300 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at New Orleans, La.

 50 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at St. Louis, Mo.

 36 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Mobile, Ala

 50 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Baltimore, Md.

 2,000 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Cincinnati, Ohio.

 90 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Providence, R. I.

 700 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Pittsburg, Penn.

 158 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Savannah, Ga.

 300 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Charleston, S. C.

 180 00

 

June 9.

To the president of the Trenton Banking Company, New Jersey

72 00

 

June 13.

To the president of the Farmers and Mechanics' Bank, at Hartford, Conn.

 200 00

 

June 29.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Norfolk, Va.

 600 00

 

July 1.

To the president of the Bank of the United States, at Philadelphia, Penn.

 1,182 00

 

July 9.

To the president of the Bank of the United States, at Philadelphia, Penn.

 200 00

 

July 21.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Baltimore, Md.

 950 00

 

Sept 1.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at New York, N. Y.

 240 00

 

Sept. 3.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at New York, N. Y.

 120 00

 

Sept. 9.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Louisville, Ky.

 120 00

 

Sept. 25.

To the president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Washington, D. C.

 40 00

 

 

Total amount of advances

 

 $40,582 20

J. C. PICKETT.

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office, November 12, 1835.

M, 1.

Amount and description of stocks belonging to the navy pension fund, 1st November, 1835.

United States Bank stock

 $619,100 00

Pennsylvania five per cents

212,469 16

Maryland five per cents

 140,220 72

Cincinnati five per cents

 100,000 00

Washington Lottery stock, five per cent

 59,472 40

Bank of Washington stock

 14,000 00

Stock of the Union Bank, Georgetown

 15,000 00

 

$1,160,262 28

--757--

N.

Statement showing the balance standing to the credit of the privateer pension fund on the 1st day of November, 1834, the amount of receipts and disbursements on account of said fund from that date to the 1st of October, 1835, and the amount of advances to agents during that period.

1.

Balance in the Treasury to the credit of the fund on the 1st November, 1834, per Register's report

 $1,261 46

 

2.

Amount received into the Treasury since that time, from whom, and on what account, viz: 1834.

 

 

Dec. 16.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for sale of Maryland five per cent. stocks

$3,097 24

 

1835.

 

 

 

Jan. 29.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland stock

319 31

 

March 31.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for sale of Maryland stock

528 68

 

March 13.

From R. Smith, cashier, for balance at settlement

11

 

April 9.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for sale of Maryland stock

523 69

 

May 21.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for sale of Maryland stock

1,057 35

 

June 6.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for sale of Maryland stock

2,326 17

 

July 10.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland stock

106 43

 

July 25.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland stock

57 50

 

Aug. 25.

From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland stock

104 58

 

 

 

 

$8,12[] 06

3.

Disbursements made from the fund from the 1st day of November, 1834, to the 1st October, 1835:

 

 

1834.

 

 

 

Jan. 22.

Paid Mary Conklin, for five years pension

$1,200 00

 

Jan. 22.

Paid Andrew Desendorf, for pension due him from the 4th July, 1829, to 1st of January, 1835

263 47

 

March 13.

Paid Sally Thomas, widow, for 5 years' pension

 360 00

 

March 13.

Paid Catharine C. McMurray, for 5 years' pension

 480 00

 

March 13.

Paid Sally Mulloy, for 5 years' pension

 360 00

 

May 7.

Paid Ann Bennett, for 5 years' pension

 360 00

 

May 21.

Paid Patience Elden, for 5 years pension

 480 00

 

May 30.

Paid Rachel Ridley, for 5 years pension

 360 00

 

Aug. 20.

Paid president Branch Bank United States, Washington, D. C, for balance due him on payments to pensioners to 1st January last.

72 00

 

 

 

 

$3,935 47

4.

Advances to agents to pay pensions, viz:

 

 

1833.

 

 

 

Dec. 13.

To president Branch Bank United States, Portsmouth, N. H.

$600 00

 

Dec. 13.

To president Branch Bank United States, Philadelphia

120 00

 

Dec. 13.

To president Branch Bank United States, Providence, R. I.

 18 00

 

Dec. 13.

To president Branch Bank United States, Baltimore

234 00

 

Dec. 13.

To president Branch Bank United States, Portland, Maine

504 00

 

Dec. 13.

To president Branch Bank United States, New York

450 00

 

Dec. 13.

To president Branch Bank-United States, Boston

900 00

 

March 14.

To president Branch Bank United States, Washington

72 00

 

June 9.

To president Branch Bank United States, Boston

1,000 00

 

June 9.

To president Branch Bank United States, Portland, Maine

300 00

 

June 9.

To president Branch Bank United States, New York

500 00

 

June 9.

To president Branch Bank United States, Providence, R. I.

36 00

 

June 9.

To president Bank of the United States, Philadelphia

50 00

 

July 3.

To president Bank of the United States, Philadelphia

218 00

 

 

 

 $5,002 00

 

 

Five per cent. Maryland stock owned by the fund

$8,367 05

 

J. C. PICKETT.

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office, November 12, 1835.

O.

Navy hospital fund.

Balance in the Treasury, November 1, 1834

 $35,559 04

Repayments from November 1, 1834, to October 1, 1835

 20,349 09

 

$55,908 13

Payments from November 1, 1834, to October 1, 1835

 3,029 34

Balance, October 1, 1835

$52,878 79

--758--

P.

Suppression of the slave trade, under act of March 3, 1819.

1834.

 

Dr.

Nov. 19.

To balance in the Treasury this day

$14,213 91

1835.

 

 

Nov. 11.

To balance in the Treasury this day

 $13,489 55

1834.

 

Cr.

Dec. 24.

By bill of exchange of John B. Pinny, agent

$149 91

Dec. 29.

By bill of exchange of John B. Pinny, agent

100 00

Dec. 29.

By bill of exchange of John B. Pinny, agent

174 45

1835.

 

 

March 9.

By bill of exchange of John B. Pinny, agent

150 00

Oct. 15.

By bill of exchange of John B. Pinny, agent

150 00

Nov. 11.

By amount to balance

13,489 55

 

 

$14,213 91

List of deaths in the navy of the United States, as ascertained at the Department, since 1st of December, 1834.

Name and rank.

Date.

Cause.

Place.

CAPTAINS.

 

 

 

B. V. Hoffman

Dec. 10, 1834

 

Jamaica, N. T.

John D. Henley

May 23, 1835

 

On board the Vandalia at the Havana.

Wolcott Chauncey

Oct. 14, 1835

 

Navy yard, Pensacola.

LIEUTENANTS.

 

 

 

Wm. Taylor

Jan. 13, 1835

 

Naval hospital, Norfolk.

John Evans

Feb. 5, 1835

 

Naval hospital, Philadelphia.

Samuel B. Cocke

May 31, 1835

Consumption

Portsmouth, Va.

David E. Stewart

Aug. 6, 1835

 

Girgenti, coast of Sicily.

H. J. Auchmuty

Oct. 8, 1835

 

Westchester county, N. Y.

SURGEONS.

 

 

 

Gerard Dayers

May 20, 1835

 

Roxbury, near Boston.

Hyde Ray

Sept. 7, 1835

 

Annapolis, Md.

ASSISTANT SURGEON.

 

 

 

Frederick Wessels

Nov. 15, 1835

 

At sea, on board the Falmouth.

PURSER.

 

 

 

George Beale

April 4, 1835

 

Washington.

PASSED MIDSHIPMAN.

 

 

 

Wm. C. Farrar

Feb. 24, 1835

Killed by a fall from a horse

Near St. Louis, Mo.

MIDSHIPMEN.

 

 

 

John A. Jarvis

1834

 

 

David Irwin

Oct. 8, 1834

 

Pensacola.

George Macomber

Nov. 12, 1834

 

At sea, on board the Falmouth.

John Bannister

June 3, 1835

 

Rio de Janeiro.

Thos. W. Magruder

July 4, 1835

 Killed by accidental discharge of a gun

Baltimore.

GUNNERS.

 

 

 

Stephen Jones

Feb. 8, 1834

 

Norfolk, Va.

Francis Gardner

May 1, 1835

 

Buenos Ayres.

CARPENTER.

 

 

 

Elliott Green

Nov. 14, 1834

 

At sea, on board the Falmouth.

MARINE OFFICER.

 

 

 

2d Lt. T. M. W. Young.

July 7, 1835.

Consumption

New York.

--759--

List of resignations in the navy of the United States since the 1st of December, 1834.

Name and rank.

When accepted.

ASSISTANT SURGEON.

Henry De Witt Paulding

December 1, 1834.

PASSED MIDSHIPMAN.

William H. Burges

December 11, 1834.

MIDSHIPMEN.

R. D. McDonald

December 26, 1834.

Henry G. Hart

December 29, 1834.

Albert Wadsworth

January 19, 1835; declined accepting his appointment.

J. T. S. Collins

January 31, 1835.

F. V. Delbirge

February 14, 1835.

Charles Burdett

February 25, 1835.

William H. Inskeep

March 20, 1835.

William O. Slade

June 3, 1835.

A. B. Eustis

June 8, 1835.

Robert P. Welsh

July 6, 1835.

William H. Pendleton

July 7, 1835.

H. C. Tilghman

July 24, 1835.

Oliver Perry Baldwin

August 8, 1835.

Baldwin M. Hunter

August 20, 1835.

Alexander C. Blount

October 19, 1835.

BOATSWAINS.

George Blanchard

May 4, 1835, as of March, 1835.

William Waters

June 5, 1835.

SAILMAKER.

Christian Nelson

August 7, 1835.

CARPENTER.

L. Kervan, (acting)

November 30, 1835.

MARINE OFFICER.

Second Lieutenant Edgar Irving

February 27, 1835.

S.

List of dismissions from the navy of the United States since the 1st of December, 1834.

Name and rank.

Date of dismission.

MIDSHIPMEN.

Thomas W. Gibson

April 30, 1835.

Lewis M. Wilkins

June 29, 1835.

Ninian E. Lake

July 11, 1835.

Robert R. Knox

July 11, 1835.

GUNNER.

Samuel G. City

May 2, 1835.

CARPENTER.

Elisha Ellis