--594--

[1]

REPORT

of

THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY.

Navy Department,

November 30, 1838.

Sir:

In the performance of a duty annually devolving on this department, I submit the following report:

The squadron employed in the Mediterranean during the past year under Commodore Jesse D. Elliott, consisted of two frigates, a sloop of war, and a schooner. These vessels, with the exception, of the sloop of war, having returned home either for repairs or in consequence of the terms of service of their crews having expired, will be replaced by a ship of the line, a frigate of equal force, and a despatch brig or schooner. The whole will be under the orders of Commodore Isaac Hull.

Although some of the causes which originally dictated the policy of employing a portion of our navy in the Mediterranean have in a great measure ceased, still it is believed that as a school of discipline under experienced officers, as a means of exhibiting a portion of our naval force in contact and comparison with that of the principal maritime states of Europe, and for the purpose of affording countenance and protection to our commerce, a perseverance in this policy will equally contribute to the good of the service and the honor of the United States.

The squadron now in the Pacific, under Commodore Henry E. Ballard, comprises one ship of the line, two sloops of war, and two schooners.

These last requiring extensive repairs, have been ordered home the ensuing spring, or as soon after as the public interests will admit, and the ship of the line may also be expected to return about the same time, as the terms of service of most of her crew will then be about expiring.

The unsettled and precarious relations subsisting between the South American States bordering on the Pacific, in my opinion render it essential to the protection of our commerce that at least an equal force should be maintained in that quarter. Accordingly, measures will be taken to replace the vessels ordered home by others not less efficient for that service.

The force operating on the coast of Brazil, under Commodore John B. Nicolson, consists of one razee, one sloop of war, and one brig. No change is at present contemplated. The present force is deemed adequate to the protection of our commerce in that quarter, and it is believed that no reduction would be consistent with the attainment of that object.

At the date of the last report of the Secretary of the Navy, the squadron employed on the West Indian station and in the Gulf of Mexico, under Commodore Alexander. J. Dallas, consisted of one frigate, five sloops of war, and one small vessel. The frigate and one of the sloops having recently returned to Boston for repairs, it is contemplated to send another frigate and to increase the number of sloops of war on that station to seven.

--595--

The force will then be composed of one frigate, seven sloops of war, and one small-vessel.

As the blockade of the Mexican ports by the French squadron continues to be strictly enforced, and as indications of a revolutionary spirit have lately been exhibited at Tampico, it is believed that under existing circumstances, as well as in view of future contingencies, no reduction of the proposed force can be prudently made.

A frigate and sloop of war which, as stated in the last annual report of the Secretary of the Navy, were then preparing for a cruise in the Indian seas, under Commodore George C. Read, sailed from Norfolk on the 6th of May last. By the latest advices from Commodore Read, dated the 28th of July, he had reached Rio de Janeiro, from whence he was to depart the next day. Having reason to believe it would conduce to the protection and safety of our citizens and commerce in these remote regions, I have directed these vessels to visit the Sandwich and Society islands on their way home.

That the officers employed on these various services have performed their duties with equal activity, vigilance, and prudence, is sufficiently, evidenced by the fact, that notwithstanding the wars and revolutions which still agitate so great a portion of the South American States bordering on the Pacific, and the long protracted blockade of the ports of Mexico and of Buenos Ayres, the persons and property of citizens of the United States have in no case which has come to the knowledge of this department sustained outrage or wrong; while, on the other hand, nothing has occurred throughout the whole of our intercourse or interposition, to distrust the relations of peace between us and the parties in collision with each other.

The exploring expedition, on the resignation of Commodore Thomas ap Catesby Jones, in consequence of ill health, was placed under the command of Lieutenant Charles Wilkes; with some modification of force; and finally sailed from Norfolk on the 19th of August. It now consists of the sloops of war Vincennes and Peacock, the store ship Relief, the brig Porpoise, and the pilot boat schooners Sea Gull and Flying Fish. Letters from Lieutenant Wilkes announce the safe arrival of these vessels at Madeira, with the exception of the Relief, which vessel was ordered by him to proceed direct for Rio de Janeiro. It will appear from the estimates for 1839, that the annual expense of the expedition, under its present organization, will be very considerably less than that required for it as originally contemplated.

A number of scientific gentlemen, who had accepted appointments in the expedition, under an impression that their services would be required, and their emoluments continued during the period anticipated for the completion of its objects, were not included in this new arrangement. They have asked to be remunerated for their sacrifices and disappointments, and I now submit the propriety as well as justice of their claim.

The act of Congress, approved 22d December, 1837, authorized the President of the United States to employ the public vessels in cruising along the Atlantic coast during the winter season, for the purpose of affording relief to merchantmen in distress. Under this law, the sloop of war Erie, the brigs Pioneer and Consort, the schooner Active, and the steam ship Fulton were occasionally employed with beneficial results. Owing to the want of proper vessels at the disposal of this department, after supplying the necessities of foreign stations, the steam ship Fulton is the only one now available for this service.

--596--

To aid in making the general survey of the coast of the United States, Lieutenants Gedney and Blake, with other naval officers, were, on the application of the Secretary of the Treasury, placed under his directions, and such other assistance afforded as circumstances permitted.

The survey of the southern coast, from Tyhee Bar to Hunting island. May river, as directed by the act of Congress of March 3d, 1837, has been completed by Lieutenant Wilkes, a copy of whose report will be communicated to Congress early in the approaching session. The surveys of the harbors of Beaufort and Wilmington, North Carolina, provided for by the same act, will be commenced forthwith by Lieutenant Glynn, of the navy; and it is expected will be completed in time to be communicated to Congress previous to its adjournment.

The delay in carrying this act into execution has arisen from a want of proper vessels for that service, which will now be performed in a steam vessel, loaned by the War Department. The attention of Lieutenant Glynn will also be directed to an examination of the coast between the mouths of the Mississippi and Sabine rivers, as directed by the act of 7th July, 1838.

Under the provisions of the act of Congress of the 28th June last, and the supplementary act of the 9th of July following, authorizing the appointment of three competent persons to test the various inventions which might be presented to their notice for the improvement and safely of steam boilers, a board has been designated by the President, to make the requisite examinations and experiments, and it is presumed, will report the results at the opening of the ensuing session of Congress.

In conformity with the provisions of the act of 7th July, 1838, making, appropriations for light-houses, light-boats, beacon-lights, and buoys, the coasts of the Atlantic and of the Great Lakes were divided into eight districts, and an officer of the navy appointed to each, with orders to report to the Secretary of the Treasury, for the purpose of carrying out the views of Congress, under his directions.

The instructions of the President for establishing lines of despatch vessels, to run during the continuance of the blockade, of the Mexican ports, by a French squadron, between New York and Vera Cruz, and New Orleans and Tampico. at stated and regular periods, have been carried into effect. The United States brig Consort, Lieutenant William H. Gardner, sailed from New York the 1st of November, and the revenue cutter Woodbury, loaned by the Treasury Department, it is presumed is now on her way to Tampico, under the command of Lieutenant John S. Nicholas, of the navy. This arrangement, it is believed, will be highly beneficial to the commercial community, by affording not only the means of communication, but of transporting their funds to the United States. The state of the navy pension fund is as follows:

The number of invalid pensioners is

440

The annual sum required to pay them is

$33,496 23

The number of widow pensioners is

302

The annual sum required to pay them is

55,716 00

The number of minor children pensioners is

105

The annual sum required to pay them is

13,908 00

Whole number of pensioners is

847

And the whole annual amount required to pay them is

$103,120 23

--597--

The amount of stocks owned by the navy pension fund on the 3d of March, 1837, was

$1,115,329 53

Do. 1st of October, 1838

390,832 25

Difference

724,497 28

Which was sold, and the proceeds of the sale, with the interest and dividend of the capital, were applied to the payment of pensions and arrears of pensions. Of the balance of stock, $390,832 25, owned by the fund 1st of October, 1838, the nominal amount of $97,699 16 has been directed to be sold to meet payments on the 1st of January, 1839, so that the actual capital of the fund for the year 1839 will be only $293,363 09.

It will thus be seen, that under the operation of successive pension laws, each widening and extending the stream of public munificence, this fund is rapidly decreasing; insomuch that in the course of a very few years large appropriations will be required to redeem the faith of Congress pledged for its support.

Privateer pension fund.—The number of privateer pensioners is thirty-six. The annual amount required to pay them is $2,862. No payments were made to these pensioners during the past year, as the privateer pension fund had been exhausted. This fund, it will be perceived, failed in 1836, and, consequently, no payments have been made since that time. The subject was brought to the notice of the President in former reports from this department, and I have only to add that as, in conformity with the law establishing and appropriating this fund, the certificates of pensions were granted during life, it would appear that the nation stands pledged to furnish the means of fulfilling the obligation.

Navy hospital fund.—The balance in the Treasury to the credit of this fund, on the 1st of October, 1837, was

$94,202 36

Receipts to 1st of October, 1838

31,242 92

125,445 28

Expenditures to 1st of October, 1838

1,975 00

Balance

123,470 28

The construction of a dry dock at some point in the harbor of New York has been heretofore repeatedly recommended by this department, and is every year becoming more necessary to the purposes of the navy. Whatever diversity of opinion may exist as to the most eligible site,, all seem to unite in favor of the object. The two docks at Norfolk and Boston are entirely insufficient to meet the requirements of the service. Delays in repairing ships, at all times injurious, and in time of war dangerous to the interests and safety of the country, frequently occur in consequence of there being no vacant dock to receive them; and at this moment two line of battle ships are lying at New York in a decayed and rapidly decaying state, which can neither be repaired where they are, nor removed elsewhere for that purpose, without great risk and expense.

The subject of a naval academy has also been more than once presented for consideration. Such an institution is earnestly desired by the officers of the navy, and, it is believed, would greatly conduce to the benefit of the service generally. The propriety of affording young midshipmen the means and opportunities for the acquisition Of that knowledge and those

--598--

sciences which are either absolutely necessary or highly useful to their profession, would seem to have been recognised by Congress in the liberal provision for teachers and professors, of mathematics on board our ships of war, and at the principal navy yards. Those, however, who have had the best opportunities for observing the practical operation of this system, are of opinion that it docs not answer the purposes for which it was intended, and that other and more effectual means are required. A naval academy, which should combine the acquisition of those sciences and that knowledge without which professional duties cannot be performed to the public satisfaction, with that practical experience which is, if possible, still more indispensable, would, in my opinion, add little to the expense of the present defective system, and be followed by benefits which would far more than repay the cost of such an establishment.

The attention of the President and Congress is also solicited to that part of the estimates of the Board of Navy Commissioners which contemplates the building of five brigs or schooners, the frames of which have been collected under the law for the gradual improvement of the navy, and which are required for despatch vessels, surveys, and other purposes. It is presumed that no arguments are necessary to enforce the propriety of retaining a sufficient number of ships in commission to afford active sea service to the officers of the navy. Such service is manifestly essential to discipline, to experience, and to those habits of hardihood, without which no officer can adequately fulfill his duty. The same practical experience, necessary to eminence in any other profession, is most emphatically so in that of a seaman; the self-possession and skill required to meet the exposures and dangers incident to a sea life, both in peace and in war, can only be acquired on the seas; the same consequences which result from idleness and neglect in all other conditions of life, will assuredly follow in this; and charged, as the officer is, with protecting the property, as well as defending the rights and honor, of his country, his incapacity is not less dishonorable to himself than injurious to her. Unless, however, his country affords him opportunities of acquiring this professional experience by often calling him into active service, it would be unjust to complain of his inability to perform these high duties, and it is only when he declines these opportunities that he can be fairly charged with being ignorant of what he has never been permitted to learn.

Experience has also demonstrated, that it is only by frequency of active service at sea that the otherwise unavoidable consequences of a long peace can in any degree be arrested. All other expedients will be found either entirely useless, or only partially operative; and I abstain from suggesting any material alterations, in the system of the service, not only for that reason, but because my limited experience in this department has not given me sufficient confidence in my own opinions, or, perhaps, entitled them to the consideration of others.

There are other strong and imposing reasons for keeping up the present naval establishment of the United States in full vigor and activity.

The unremitting attention which, since the late war with England, and the secrets it disclosed, has been paid by the maritime powers of Europe to the improvement and perfection of their ships, of war and of naval discipline, calls for awakened vigilance on our part. The position of the United States, remote as it is from the scene of European rivalry, affords no immunity from its consequences. Commerce makes neighbors of all nations;

--599--

and the conflicts of interest or ambition between any two, can scarcely fail of involving many others. Against such imminent contingencies, an adequate naval force, keeping pace with the. commerce and resources of the country, well manned, and, above all, well disciplined, is our most effectual security. It is equally recommended by its comprehensive sphere of action, the facility with which it can be directed to distant and various points, and by its freedom from almost all those objections which a wise people so justly cherish towards great military establishments. In addition to these considerations, it comes recommended to the people of the United States as the best guardian of their flag, wherever it is carried by their enterprise, as well as by having so largely contributed to that fund of national reputation, which, being a common possession, constitutes one of the strongest bonds of our Union.

Respectfully submitted.

J. K. PAULDING.

To the President of the United States.

--600--

SCHEDULE OF PAPERS

Accompanying the report of the Secretary of the Navy to the President of the United States, of November 30th, 1838.

No. 1. Letter from the Navy Commissioners, transmitting estimates, for 1839.

A. Estimate for the office of the Secretary of the Navy.

B. Estimate for the office of the Commissioners of the Navy.

C. Estimate of expenses of southwest executive building.

D. The general estimate for the navy.

Detailed estimate D 1, for vessels in commission.

D 2, for receiving vessels.

D 3, for recruiting stations.

D 4, for yards and stations—pay of officers and others at.

D 5, pay of officers waiting orders and on furlough.

D 6, for provisions.

D 7, for improvements and repairs of navy yards.

E. Special—for hospitals.

Submitted—for building five brigs or schooners, for receiving vessels.

F. Estimate for the marine corps.

G. List of vessels in commission, their commanders and stations.

H. List of vessels in ordinary.

I. List of vessels on the stocks.

K. Report of proceedings under laws for gradual increase of the navy.

L. Report of proceedings under laws for gradual improvement of the navy.

AI. Statement of progress made in carrying into effect the act of 3d March,

1837, authorizing the construction of two sloops of war and six small vessels.

N 1 to N S. Navy pension fund—list of pensioners, &c.

Privateer pension fund—list of pensioners, &c.

O. List of deaths in the navy.

P. List of dismissions in the navy.

Q. List of resignations in the navy.

R. Balance in the Treasury, under law for suppression of the slave trade.

--601--

No. 1.

Navy Commissioners' Office,

November 29, 1838.

Sir:

The Board of Navy Commissioners have the honor to transmit, herewith, estimates for the support of the navy for the year 1839.

These estimates have been prepared in triplicate, in conformity with your instructions, designating the nature and extent of the force to be employed, and directing the amounts for other ordinary objects to be limited to the preservation of the different buildings in navy yards, and other establishments upon the respective stations from injury; and to continue such new works only as might be deemed of urgent importance.

The estimates which are submitted for the purchase of two vessels for the accommodation of recruits, are accompanied by a short statement showing the reasons for presenting them again to the consideration of Congress.

The estimate for building five small vessels has been submitted in conformity with your directions, that the attention of Congress may be called to making the necessary provision for any additional number of this useful class of vessels, if they should deem it proper.

Under the head of objects for which the appropriation for certain contingent purposes are authorized, the board have omitted some which have been included in former appropriations; these are

"For cabin furniture of vessels in commission;"

"For repairs of magazines or powder houses," for which appropriations may be asked when they are required;

"For preparing moulds for vessels to be built," which will constitute a proper charge against the vessels themselves. They also limit the purchase of fuel and candles or oil, for shore use only. This latter change is proposed in consequence of the great consumption of fuel by the steam vessel, and from a belief that these articles would be more appropriately a charge upon the appropriation for repair and wear and tear of vessels in commission, like other stores for ordinary use.

The demands upon this head of appropriation for contingents have frequently been so great as to exhaust it during the recess of Congress, and these changes will operate to prevent a recurrence of this circumstance.

I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient servant,

I. CHAUNCEY.

Hon. J. K. Paulding,

Secretary of the Navy.

A.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy, for the year 1839.

Secretary of the Navy

$6,000

Six clerks, per act of April 20, 1818

$8,200

One clerk, per act of May 26, 1824

1,000

One clerk, per act of March 2, 1827

1,000

10,200

--602--

One clerk of the navy and privateer pension and navy hospital funds, per act of July 10, 1832

$1,600

Messenger and assistant messenger

1,050

Contingent expenses

3,000

21,850

Submitted.

For pay of extra clerks whose services were found indispensable
during the past year to enable the department to answer calls from Congress, and to transact its current business

$3,600

For pay of extra clerks, whose services will be required for the year 1839

$2,190

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the Navy Commissioners' office for the year 1839, as at present established by law.

For the salaries of the Commissioners of the Navy Board

10,500

For the salary of their secretary

2,000

For the salaries of their clerks, draughtsman, and messenger,
per acts of April 20, 1818, May 24, 1824, and March 2, 1827

8,450

For contingent expenses

2,500

23,450

Proposed.

Two additional clerks, at $1,400 per annum

$2,800

One additional clerk, at $1,000 per annum

1,000

For the particular reasons which induce the board to ask the above increase on the number of clerks for the office, they respectfully refer to their letters to you of the 15th and 16th of March last, the first in answer, to a call for information from the chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs of the House of Representatives, and the latter in consequence of a resolution of the Senate of the United States, copies of both of which, as the board have been informed, were transmitted to Congress.

An extra clerk has been employed and paid at the rate of $3 per day from the contingent fund of the office, so long as the state of that fund would justify that application. He has been employed since 1st September last, with the understanding that he could receive no compensation unless Congress should sanction it by a special appropriation, or by an increase of the contingent fund of the office.

To meet this expense to the close of the present year, and other incidental expenses, the estimate for the contingent expenses of the office has been increased to $2,500, being $700 more than was appropriated for 1838.

I. CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office, November 19, 1838.

--603—

C.

Estimate of the sums required for the expenses of the southwest Executive building for the year 1839.

Superintendent

$250

Two watchmen, at $750 each, watching day and night

1,500

Contingent expenses, including oil, fuel, labor,
repairs of building, engine, and improvement of grounds

3,350

5,100

Submitted.

For altering and painting the passages in the 1st and 2d stories,
and erecting a structure at the head of the main stair-way, making
the southwest Executive building similar in convenience and comfort
to the northwest Executive building

1,800

6,900

D.

There will be required for the general service for the navy during the year 1839, in addition to the balances which may remain on hand on the 1st day of January, 1839, the sum of four million seven hundred and seventy six thousand one hundred and twenty five dollars and sixty-four cents.

Estimated for 1839, including the exploring expedition.

Appropriated for 1838, including the exploring expedition.

1st. For the pay of commission, warrant, petty officers, and seamen

$2,352,625 64

$1,312,000 00

2d. For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishments at the several yards

44,000 00

69,770 00

3d. For provisions

600,000 00

600,000 00

4th. For the repairs of vessels in ordinary, and the repairs and wear and tear of vessels in commission

1,000,000 00

1,200,000 00

5th. For medicines and surgical instruments, hospital stores, and other expenses on account of the sick

75,000 00

75,000 00

6th. For the improvement and necessary repairs of navy yards, viz:

Portsmouth, N. H.

30,000 00

20,000 00

Charlestown

26,000 00

74,000 00

Brooklyn

7,500 00

61,000 00

Philadelphia

8,000 00

21,500 00

Washington

26,000 00

30,000 00

--604--

D—Continued.

Estimated for 1839

Approp'd for 1833.

Gosport

$64,000 00

$77,500 00

Pensacola

25,000 00

76,500 00

7th. For ordnance and ordnance stores

65,000 00

65,000 00

8th. For contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz:

For the freight and transportation of materials and stores of every description; for wharfage and dockage, storage and rent, travelling expenses of officers, and transportation of seamen; for house rent to pursers when duly authorized; for funeral expenses; for commissions, clerk hire, office rent, stationery and fuel to navy agents; for premiums and incidental expenses of recruiting; for apprehending deserters; for compensation to judge advocates; for per diem allowance to persons attending courts martial and courts of inquiry, or other services as authorized by law; for printing and stationery of every description, and for working the lithographic press; for books, maps, charts, mathematical and nautical instruments, chronometers, models, and drawings; for the purchase and repair of fire engines and machinery; for the repair of steam engines in navy yards; for the purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, timber, wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage, and towing ships of war; for taxes and assessments on public property; for assistance rendered to vessels in distress; for incidental labor at navy yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; for coal, and other fuel, and for candles and oil, for the use of navy yards and shore stations; and for no other object or purpose whatever

450,000 00

150,000 00

9th. For contingent expenses for objects not herein before enumerated

3,000 00

3,000 00

4,776,125 64

4,135,270 00

--605--

The estimates for the year 1839 are for smaller sums under some of the heads of appropriation than were granted for the year 1838, and exceed the appropriations for that year under one head only, viz:

"For the pay of the commission, warrant, and petty officers, and seamen."

The principal cause of this difference will be found in the reduction which was made at the last session of Congress, of the sum of $999,854 91, from the estimates in the appropriation act for the navy.

The estimates, which were based upon the force proposed to be employed, were for $2,311,854 91, and that for the present year is for $2,352,625 64, showing an increase of $40,770 73. This increase is owing to the substitution of two additional sloops of war of the firsthand three of the third class, for the ship of the line of three decks which was embraced in the estimates for 1838, and by an increase in the number of officers, which has occurred since the estimates for 1838 were proposed.

The total amount of this general estimate for 1839, is about $409,000 less than the one for 1838.

Although the amount of money in the Treasury under the head of pay of the officers and others belonging to the navy was undoubtedly sufficient to justify the postponement of the full appropriation, when the reduction was made, yet there is no doubt that the amount of pay accruing to the officers and others upon foreign service will be greater than the sum actually appropriated, and consequently that the actual appropriation for 1838 does not form a proper amount with which to compare the estimates for 1839.

Estimated for 1839.

Approp'd for 1836

Special objects

Hospitals.

For completing the hospital at New York

$20,000 00

For conveying Schuylkill water to the naval asylum, at Philadelphia, and for all necessary repairs

9,760 00

For current repairs to the hospital and its dependencies, near Norfolk

1,500 00

For completing the hospital buildings at Pensacola, and building a wharf for landing the sick

4,000 00

35,260 00

Submitted.

For building five brigs or schooners from frames collecting under the law for the gradual improvement of the navy

$225,000 00

--606--

D—-Continued.

Estimated for 1839.

Approp'd for 1838.

Receiving vessels.

For the purchase of two vessels to be used as receiving vessels, one to be placed near the navy yard, Philadelphia, and the other in the harbor of Baltimore

$25,000 00

Navy Commissioners' Office,

November 19. 1838.

I. CHAUNCEY,

C. MORRIS,

ALEX. S. WADSWORTH.

D 1

Estimate of the amount of pay that will be required for the year 1839, for the following vessels in commission, viz: One ship of the line, one razee, five frigates, seventeen sloops of mar, seven small vessels, and one steamer—being part of the first item in the general estimate for that year.

Six commanders of squadrons

$24,000 00

One ship of the line, two decks

148,671 25

One razee

112,845 25

Three frigates, first class

264,363 75

Two frigates, second class

146,287 82

Twelve sloops of war, first class

525,009 00

Two sloops of war, second class

71,907 82

Three sloops of war, third class

95,109 75

Seven small vessels, including store ship Relief

131,964 25

One steamer

34,847 25

Scientific corps

20,700 00

Total

1,575,706 14

Estimated for 1838

$1,717,714 91

Estimated for 1839

1,575,706 14

Less estimated for 1839 than was estimated for the year 1838

142,008 77

The difference in the amount of this item from the estimate for 1838, arises from the substitution in the present estimate of two sloops of war of the first class, and three sloops of the third class, for a ship of the line of three decks, embraced in the estimate for 1838, and by a change in the number of officers which has been made since the last estimates were prepared.

I. CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office, Nov, 19, 1838.

--607—

D 2.

Estimate of the number and pay of officers, &c. required for five receiving vessels for the year 1839, being part of the first item in the general estimate for that year.

Boston

New York

Philadelphia

Baltimore

Norfolk

Total

Amount.

Captains

1

1

1

3

$10,500 00

Commander

1

1

1

2,100 00

Lieutenants

2

2

2

2

2

10

15,000 00

Masters

1

1

1

1

4

4,000 00

Pursers

1

1

1

3

1,987 50

Passed Midshipmen

6

6

6

18

13,500 00

Midshipmen

12

12

3

3

12

42

14,700 00

Boatswains

1

1

1

3

2,250 00

Gunners

1

1

1

3

2,250 00

Carpenters

1

1

1

3

2,250 00

Sailmakers

1

1

I

1

3

2,250 00

Boatswain's mates

4

4

1

4

14

3,192 00

Gunner's mates

1

1

1

3

684 00

Carpenter's mates

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,140 00

Masters-at-arms

1

1

1

3

648 00

Ship's corporals

1

1

1

3

648 00

Ship's stewards

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,080 00

Officers' stewards

2

2

1

1

2

8

1,728 00

Ship's cooks

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,080 00

Officers' cooks

2

2

1

2

7

1,512 00

Seamen

100

100

2

2

100

304

43,776 00

Ordinary seamen

150

150

4

4

150

458

54,960 00

Boys

50

50

3

2

50

155

13,020 00

Estimate for 1839

341

341

22

18

3411

[1]063

194,255 50

Estimate for 1838

63,683 50

Excess for 1839, over the estimate for 1838

130,572 00

This excess is produced by estimating for the employment of three ships of the line as receiving vessels, at the principal stations, to be kept in a state of forwardness for active service in case any unexpected event should require their employment at sea.

I. CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office, Nov. 19, 1838.

--608—

D 3.

Estimate of the pay of the officers attached to five recruiting stations, for the year 1839, being part of the first item in the general estimate for that year.

Boston

New York

Philadelphia

Baltimore

Norfolk

Total

Amount.

Commanders

1

1

1

1

1

5

$10,500 00

Lieutenants

2

2

2

2

2

10

15,000 00

Surgeons

1

1

1

1

1

5

8,750 00

Midshipmen

2

2

2

2

2

10

3,500 00

Total

6

6

6

6

6

30

37,750 00

Amount estimated for 1838

37,750 00

I. CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office, Nov. 19, 1838.

D 4.

Estimate of the pay of officers and others at navy yards and stations, for the year 1839.

No.

PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

Pay.

Aggregate.

1

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Master

1,000

3

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,050

1

Surgeon

1,800

1

Boatswain

500

1

Gunner

500

1

Carpenter

500

1

Sailmaker

500

1

Purser, including all allowances

941 75

1

Steward

216

$14,107 75

--609--

D4—Continued.

No.

PORTSMOUTH—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Ordinary

1

Lieutenant

$1,500

1

Carpenter's mate

228

6

Seamen, at $144 each

864

12

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

1,440

$4,032 00

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

1,400

1

Master builder

1,250

1

Foreman and inspector of timber

700

1

Clerk to the yard

900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Clerk to the storekeeper

500

1

Clerk to the master builder

400

1

Porter

300

6,350 00

Total

24,489 75

 

No.

BOSTON.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

2

Masters, at $1,000 each

2,000

1

Surgeon

1,800

2

Assistant surgeons, at $950 each

1,900

1

Chaplain

1,200

2

Professors, at $1,200 each

2,400

4

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,400

1

Boatswain

500

1

Gunner

500

1

Carpenter

500

1

Sailmaker

500

1

Purser, including all allowances

1,141 75

1

Steward

216

1

Steward, assistant to purser

360

$23,017 75

--610--

D4—Continued.

No.

BOSTON—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Ordinary.

3

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

$4,500

1

Master

1,000

6

Midshipmen, at $350 each

2,100

1

Boatswain

500

1

Gunner

500

1

Carpenter

500

4

Carpenter's mates, 3 as caulkers, at $228 ea.

912

2

Boatswain's mates, at $228 each

456

14

Seamen, at $144 each

2,016

36

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

4,320

$16,804 00

Hospital.

1

Surgeon

1,750

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Steward

360

2

Nurses, at $120 each {When the number}

240

2

Washers, at $96 each {of sick shall re-}

192

1

Cook {quire them.}

144

3,636 00

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

1,700

1

Naval constructor

2,300

1

Measurer and inspector of timber

1,050

1

Clerk to the yard

900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Clerk (2d) to the commandant

750

1

Clerk to the storekeeper

750

1

Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper

450

1

Clerk to naval constructor

650

1

Keeper of magazine

480

1

Porter

300

10,230 00

Total

53,687 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeons of the yard are to be required to attend to the duties of the yard, receiving ship, and marines; one to be always on board the receiving ship.

--611--

D4—Continued.

NEW YORK.

Pay,

Aggregate

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

2

Masters, at $1,000 each

2,000

1

Surgeon

1,800

2

Assistant surgeons, at $950 each

1,900

1

Chaplain

1,200

2

Professors, at $1,200 each

2,400

4

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,400

1

Boatswain

500

1

Gunner

500

1

Carpenter

500

1

Sail maker

500

1

Purser, including all allowances

1,141 75

1

Steward

216

1

Steward, assistant to purser

360

$23,017 75

Ordinary.

3

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

4,500

1

Master

1,000

6

Midshipmen, at $350 each

2,100

1

Boatswain

500

1

Gunner

500

1

Carpenter

500

4

Carpenter's mates, 3 as caulkers, at $228 ea.

912

2

Boatswain's mates, at $228 each

456

14

Seamen, at $144 each

2,016

36

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

4,320

16,804 00

Hospital.

1

Surgeon

1,750

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Steward

360

2

Nurses, at $120 each*

240

2

Washers, at $96 each*

192

1

Cook*

144

*When the number of sick shall require them.

3,636 00

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

1,700

1

Naval constructor

2,300

1

Measurer and inspector of timber

1,050

--612--

D4—Continued.

No.

NEW YORK—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Clerk to the yard

$900

Clerk to the commandant

900

Clerk (2d) to the commandant

750

Clerk to storekeeper

750

Clerk (2d) to storekeeper

450

Clerk to naval constructor

650

Keeper of the magazine

480

Porter

300

$10,230 00

Total

53,687 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are to be required to attend to the duties of the yard, receiving ship, and marines; one always to be on board the receiving ship.

No.

PHILADELPHIA.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Master

1,000

1

Surgeon

1,800

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Chaplain

1,200

1

Boatswain

500

1

Gunner

500

1

Carpenter

500

1

Purser, including all allowances

1,141 75

1

Steward

216

Ordinary.

$14,907 75

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Boatswain's mate

228

4

Seamen, at $144 each

576

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

1,440

3,744 00

Naval asylum and hospital.

1

Captain

3,500

1

Master

1,000

1

Secretary

900

--613--

D4—Continued.

No.

PHILADELPHIA—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

1

Surgeon

$1,750

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Steward

360

2

Nurses, at $ 120 ea.

240

2

Washers, at $96 ea.

192

1

Cook

144

{All above to attend the hospital if required.}

$9,036 00

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

1,250

1

Naval constructor

2,300

1

Inspector and measurer of timber

900

1

Clerk to the yard

900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Clerk to the storekeeper

500

1

Clerk to the naval constructor

400

1

Porter

300

7,450 00

Total

35,137 75

 

No.

WASHINGTON.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

1

Lieutenant

1,500

2

Masters, one in charge of ordnance, at $1,000 each

2,000

1

Surgeon

1,800

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Chaplain

1,200

1

Boatswain

500

1

Gunner, a laboratory officer

500

1

Carpenter

500

1

Purser, including all allowances

1,141 75

1

Steward

216

1

Steward, assistant to purser

360

1

Steward to hospital

216

$16,483 75

Ordinary.

1

Boatswain's mate

228

1

Carpenter's mate

228

6

Seamen, at $144 each

864

14

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

1,680

3,000 00

--614--

D4—Continued.

No.

WASHINGTON—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Civil

1

Storekeeper

$1,700

1

Master builder

1,250

1

Inspector and measurer of timber

900

1

Clerk to the yard

900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Clerk (2d) to the commandant

750

1

Clerk to storekeeper

750

1

Clerk to master builder

450

1

Master camboose maker and plumber

1,250

1

Chain cable and anchor maker

1,250

1

Keeper of magazine

480

1

Porter

300

$10,880 00

Total

30,363 75

 


 

No.

NORFOLK.

Pay.

Aggregate

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

2

Masters, at $1,000 each

2,000

1

Surgeon

1,800

2

Assistant surgeons, at $950 each

1,900

1

Chaplain

1,200

2

Professors, at $1,200 each

2,400

4

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,400

1

Boatswain

500

1

Gunner

500

1

Carpenter

500

1

Sailmaker

500

1

Purser, including all allowances

1,141 75

1

Steward

216

1

Steward, assistant to purser

360

$23,017 75

Ordinary.

3

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

4,500

1

Master

1,000

6

Midshipmen, at $350 each

2,100

1

Boatswain

500

--615--

D4—Continued.

No.

NORFOLK—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

1

Gunner

$500

1

Carpenter

500

4

Carpenter's mates, 3 as caulkers, at $228 ea.

912

2

Boatswain's mates, at $228 each

456

14

Seamen, at $144 each

2,016

36

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

4,320

$16,804 00

Hospital.

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Surgeon

1,750

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Steward

360

2

Nurses, at $120 ea.*

240

2

Washers, at $90 ea.*

192

1

Cook*

144

*When the number of sick shall require them.}

5,136 00

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

1,700

1

Naval constructor

2,300

1

Inspector and measurer of timber

1,050

1

Clerk to the yard

900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Clerk (2d) to the commandant

750

1

Clerk to storekeeper

750

1

Clerk (2d) to storekeeper

450

1

Clerk to the naval constructor

650

1

Keeper of the magazine.

480

1

Porter

300

[1]0,230

Total

55,187 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeons of the yard are to be required to attend to the duties of the yard, to those of the receiving ship, and to to the marines; one to be always on board the receiving ship.

--616--D4—Continued.

No.

PENSACOLA.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

1

Master

1,000

1

Surgeon

1,800

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Chaplain

1,200

3

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,050

1

Boatswain

500

1

Gunner

500

1

Carpenter

500

1

Sailmaker

500

1

Purser, including all allowances

1,141 75

1

Steward

216

$17,957 75

Ordinary.

1

Carpenter

500

1

Carpenter's mate

228

1

Boatswain's mate

228

10

Seamen, at $144 each

1,440

10

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

1,200

3,596 00

Hospital.

1

Surgeon

1,750

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Steward

360

2

Nurses, $120 each*

240

2

Washers, $96 each*

192

1

Cook*

144

*When the number of sick shall require them.}

3,636 00

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

1,700

1

Clerk to yard

900

1

Clerk to commandant

900

1

Clerk (2d) to commandant

750

1

Clerk to storekeeper

750

1

Clerk (2d) to storekeeper

450

1

Porter

300

5,750 00

Total

30,939 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard to attend to the duties of the yard, the ordinary, and marines, and receiving ship, if one should be allowed.

--617--

D4—Continued.

No.

STATIONS.

Pay.

Aggregate.

BALTIMORE.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Surgeon

1,500

1

Purser, including all allowances

862 50

CHARLESTON.

$7,362 50

1

Captain

3,500

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Surgeon

1,500

1

Purser and storekeeper, including all allowances

1, 189 75

7,689 75

SACKETT'S HARBOR.

1

Master

1,000

1,000 00

FOR DUTY AT WASHINGTON, OR ON GENERAL DUTY

Ordnance.

1

Captain

3,500

1

Lieutenant

1,500

5,000 00

CHART AND INSTRUMENT DEPOT.

1

Lieutenant

1,500

3

Passed midshipmen

2,250

3,750 00

1

Chief naval constructor

3,000

1

Civil engineer

4,000

foreign stations.

7,000 00

1

Storekeeper at Mahon

1,200

1

Storekeeper at Rio de Janeiro

1,500

2,700 00

--618--

D4—Continued.

RECAPITULATION.

Naval, 1st item.

Ordinary. 1st item.

Hospital. 1st. item.

Civil. 2d item.

Aggregate.

Portsmouth, N. H.

$14,107 75

$4,032 00

$6,350 00

$24,489 75

Boston

23,017 75

16,804 00

$3,636 00

10,230 00

53,687 75

New York

23,017 75

16,804 00

3,636 00

10,230 00

53,687 75

Philadelphia

14,907 75

3,744 00

9,636 00

7,450 00

35,137 75

Washington

16,483 75

3,000 00

10,880 00

30,363 75

Norfolk

23,017 75

16,804 00

5,136 00

10,230 00

55, 187 75

Pensacola

17,957 75

3,596 00

3,030 00

5,750 00

30,939 75

Baltimore

7,362 50

7,362 50

Charleston

7,689 75

7,689 75

Sackett's Harbor

1,000 00

1,000 00

Ordnance

5,000 00

5,000 00

Chart, &c., depot.

3,750 00

3,750 00

Naval constructor

3,000 00

3,000 00

Civil engineer

4,000 00

4,000 00

Storekeepers

2,700 00

2,700 00

70,820 00

317,996 50

Deduct for probable
surplus in the 4th column
1st January, 1839

26,820 00

26,820 00

Estimated for

157,312 50

64,784 00

25,080 00

44,000 00

291,176 50

Appropriated for 1838

155,812 50

64,784 00

21,180 00

69,770 00

311,546 50

Increase

1,500 00

3,900 00

Diminished

25,770 00

20,370 00

Note.—The increase in the first column is occasioned by attaching two more passed midshipmen to the chart and instrument depot. That in the third column by the addition of one captain, one master, and one secretary to the asylum at Philadelphia, and estimating for one lieutenant less.

The diminution in the fourth column is occasioned by increasing the pay of the master builder at the Portsmouth yard $50, to make the pay the same as at navy yard Washington, by the appointment of a foreman and inspector of timber $700, which is rendered necessary by the increase of work contemplated at that yard, and by adding $150 to the pay of the inspector and measurer of timber at Boston and New York, respectively, all which the board considered reasonable and proper, and by deducting the sum of $26,820, as a balance that will probably be on hand, on the 1st January next.

--619—

D5.

Estimate of the pay required for the commission and warrant officer's, waiting orders and on a furlough for 1839, being part of the first item in the general estimate for that year.

Waiting orders.

Furlough.

Aggregate.

21

Captains

$52,500 00

27

Commanders

48,600 00

1

do.

$900

94

Lieutenants

112,800 00

3

do.

1,800

18

Surgeons

28,800 00

1

do.

600

7

Pursers

4,637 50

11

Assistant Surgeons

7,150 00

33

Passed midshipmen

19,800 00

3

do.

900

22

Midshipmen

6,600 00

1

do.

150

Waiting orders

280,887 50

Furlough

4,550

$285,437 50

Add or 41 midshipmen, who after examination,
may be entitled to be arranged as passed midshipmen,
in addition to their pay as midshipmen.

12,300 00

Estimated for 1839

297,737 50

" for 1838

250,930 00

Excess for 1839

46,807 50

This excess is occasioned by an increase in the number of commission officers, and a variation in the number of those which arc embraced in other items of this head of appropriation for the respective years, and which necessarily vary the number- waiting orders and on furlough.

I. CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office.

November 19, 1838.

D 6.

Estimate of the amount required for provisions for the year 1839, explanatory of the third item of the general estimate for that year.

6,679

persons in vessels in commission, exclusive of marines.

560

marines embarked in vessels in commission.

1,243

persons (enlisted) attached to receiving vessels and shore stations.

8,482

--620--

8,482 persons, at one ration each a day, will make 3,095,930 rations, which, at 20 cents each ration, is equal to

$619,186 00

Estimating the balance that may remain in the Treasury on the 1st January, 1839, as available, there may be deducted from this amount the sum of $19,186 which, it is presumed, may not be required

19,186 00

Which will leave

600,000 00

Being the amount asked for in the general estimate.

The experience of several years has induced the board to believe that the cost of the ration, including contingent expenses and losses from decay, will not exceed twenty cents each, and they have, therefore, framed the estimates at that rate, instead of twenty-five cents each, as heretofore.

I. CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office,

November 19, 1838.

D 7.

Estimate of the proposed improvements and repairs to be made in navy yards during the year 1839, explanatory of the sixth item in the general estimate.

At Portsmouth, N. H.

Towards completing stone wharves

$20,000

For building launching slips

7,500

For repairs of all kinds

2,500

30,000

At Charlestown, Mass.

For steam saw-mill and machinery

$8,500

For additional machinery and boilers to rope-walk

12,000

For repairs of all kinds

5,500

26,000

At Brooklyn, N. Y.

For filling in yard

$2,000

For repairs of all kinds

5,500

7,500

At Philadelphia.

For extension of wharves

$5,000

For repairs of all kinds

3,000

8,000

--621--

At Washington.

For a chain-cable shop

$9,000

For extending and improving the anchor and smiths' shops, and for machinery for the same

15,000

For repairs of all kinds

2,000

26,000

At Norfolk, Va.

For quay walls

$50,000

For a house for boiling oil

1,600

For a store-room for keeping tar, pitch, oil, &c.

3,900

For repairs of all kinds

8,500

64,000

At Pensacola.

For a guard-house at navy yard gate

$10,000

For a cistern to timber shed

6,500

To complete stable for oxen

4.500

For repairs of all kinds and levelling

4,000

25,000

Recapitulation.

Portsmouth, N. H.

$30,000

Charlestown, Mass.

26,000

Brooklyn, N. Y.

7,500

Philadelphia

8,000

Washington

26,000

Norfolk, Va.

64,000

Pensacola

25,000

186,500

Note.—The amounts embraced in this estimate have been decided upon by the board, after careful examination of the recommendations of the respective commandants of the navy yards, and the objects selected are those that are deemed indispensable for the public interests.

I CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office,

November 19, 1838.

--622—

E.

HOSPITALS.

For completing the hospital at New York

$20,000 00

For conveying Schuylkill water to the naval asylum, at Philadelphia, and for all necessary repairs

9,760 00

For current repairs to the hospital and its dependencies near Norfolk

1,500 00

For completing the hospital buildings at Pensacola, and building a wharf for landing the sick

4,000 00

35,260 00

Note.—The sums asked for the hospitals have been limited by the amounts believed to be necessary for their proper preservation and advantageous use.

SUBMITTED.

For building five brigs, or Schooners, from frames collected under the law for the gradual improvement of the navy

$225,000 00

Note.—The sum proposed for building five small vessels has been submitted, by your direction, to furnish the means of communication with our squadrons, which has become more necessary than usual by the disturbed state of some of the countries near which they are employed.

RECEIVING VESSELS.

For the purchase of two vessels, to be used as receiving vessels, one to be placed near the navy yard, Philadelphia, and the other in the harbor of Baltimore

$25,000 00

Note.—The situation of the former receiving vessels at Baltimore and Philadelphia has rendered temporary arrangements indispensable, until more suitable vessels shall be authorized.

I. CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office,

November 19, 1838.

F.

Head Quarters of the Marine Corps,

Washington, October 26, 1838. Sir:

The Navy Department has directed that the estimates for the marine corps be sent to the Board of Navy Commissioners. In accordance with that order, they are herewith enclosed.

I would suggest the expediency of requesting Congress to inappropriate the sum of $150,000, at present appropriated for the purchase of sites, and

--623--

the erection of barracks at Charlestown, Massachusetts, Norfolk, Virginia, and Pensacola. I remain, with great respect, your obedient servant,

ARCHIBALD HENDERSON,

Colonel Commandant,

Com. Isaac Chauncey,

President Board of Navy Commissioners.

General estimate of the expenses of the marine corps for the year 1839.

There will be required for the support of the marine corps during the year 1839, in addition to the balances that may remain on hand on the 1st of January, 1839, the sum of three hundred and sixty-nine thousand seven hundred and ten dollars and forty-three cents, viz:

PAYMASTER'S DEPARTMENT.

1st. For the pay of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, and subsistence of the officers of the marine corps

$174,301 00

QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT.

2d. For provisions for the non-commissioned, officers, musicians, privates, servants, and washerwomen serving on shore

$45,054 99

3d; For clothing

43,662 50

4th. For fuel

10,274 12

5th. For the purchase of a site, and to commence the erection of barracks at Brooklyn, New York

50,000 00

6th. For keeping barracks at the different stations in repair, and for rent of temporary barracks at New York

10,000 00

7th. For transportation of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, and for expenses of recruiting

6,000 00

8th. For medicines, hospital supplies, surgical instruments, and the pay of matron and hospital stewards -

4,139 29

9th. For contingencies, viz: freight, ferriage toll, wharfage and cartage, per diem allowance for attending courts martial and . courts of inquiry, compensation to judge advocates, house rent where there are no public quarters assigned, per diem allowance to enlisted men employed in constant labor, expenses of burying deceased persons belonging to the marine corps, printing, stationery, forage, postage on public letters, expenses in pursuit of deserters, candles and oil. straw, barrack furniture, bed sacks, spades, axes, shovels, picks, carpenters', tools, and for the purchase and keeping of a horse for the messenger

17,077 93

10th. For military stoics, pay of armorers, keeping arms in repair, accoutrements, ordnance stores, flags, drums, fifes, and musical instruments for a band.

2,300 00

195,408 83

369,710 43

Appropriated for 1838

311,474 93

Excess for 1839

58,235 50

Respectfully submitted,

AUG. A. NICHOLSON, Quartermaster. Head Quarters Marine Corps,

Quartermaster's Department, Oct. 15, 1838.

--624--

No. 1.—Pay Department.

Detailed estimate of pay and subsistence of officers, and pay of noncommissioned officers, musicians, and privates of the marine corps of the United States, for the year 1839.

Rank and Grade.

Number.

Pay.

Subsistence.

Aggregate

Pay per month.

Extra pay per mo.

No. of servants at $8 per month.

No. of servants at $7 per month.

Total.

No. rations p. day at 20 cts. p. ration.

No. extra or double rations per day at 20 cents.

Total.

Colonel commandant

1

75 00

2

$1,068 00

6

6

$876

$1,944 00

Lieutenant colonel

1

60 00

2

888 00

5

5

730

1,618 00

Majors

4

50 00

2

3,072 00

4

4

2,336

5,408 00

Adjutant and inspector

1

60 00

2

912 00

4

292

1,204 00

Paymaster

1

60 00

2

912 00

4

292

1,204 00

Quartermaster

1

60 00

2

912 00

4

4

584

1,496 00

Assistant quartermaster

1

50 00

1

696 00

4

4

584

1,280 00

Captains commanding posts and at sea

4

50 00

1

2,736 00

4

4

2,336

5,072 00

Captains on recruiting service

3

40 00

1

1,692 00

4

4

1,752

3,444 00

Captains

3

10 00

1

1,692 00

4

876

2,568 00

First lieutenants commanding guards or detachments at sea

3

40 00

1

1,692 00

4

4

1,752

3,444 00

First lieutenants

16

30 00

1

7,104 00

4

4,964

12,068 00

Second lieutenants

20

25 00

1

7,680 00

4

5,840

13,520 00

Hospital steward

1

18 00

216 00

1

73

289 00

Sergeant major

1

17 00

204 00

204 00

Quartermaster sergeant

1

17 00

20

444 00

444 00

Drum and fife majors

2

16 00

384 00

384 00

Orderly sergeants and sergeants of guards at sea

27

16 00

5,184 00

5,184 00

Orderly sergeants employed as clerks to colonel commandant, adjutant and inspector, and quartermaster

3

16 00

20

1,296 00

1,296 00

Sergeants

50

13 00

7,800 00

7,800 00

Corporals

80

9 00

8,640 00

8,640 00

Drummers and fifers

60

8 00

5,760 00

5,760 00

Privates

932

7 00

78,288 00

78,288 00

Clerk to paymaster

1

15 80

20

429 60

1

73

502 60

Amount required for payment of bounty for re-enlistment

125

1,750 00

1,750 00

Additional rations to officers for every five years' service

130

9,490

9,490 00

141,451 60

32,850

174,301 60

Appropriated for 1838

162,01900

Excess for 1839

12,28260

Respectfully submitted,

GEORGE W. WALKER, Paymaster Marines.

Head Quarters or the Marine Corps,

Paymaster's Office, October 15, 1838.

--625--

Head Quarters of the Marine Corps,

Paymaster's Office, November 13, 1838.

Sir:

The sum of $9,490, asked for in the estimates for the year 1839, is caused by the 15th section of the "Act to increase the present military establishment of the United States, and for other purposes" passed the 5th July, 1838, wherein it is provided, "that every commissioned officer of the line or staff, exclusive of general officers, shall be entitled to receive one additional ration per diem, for every five years he may have served, or shall serve in the army of the United States."

It has been decided by the accounting officers of the Treasury that the officers of the marine corps of similar grades are entitled to the benefit of the above mentioned provision, under the 5th section of the "Act for the better organization of the marine corps," passed the 30th June, 1834, which provides "that the officers of the marine corps shall be entitled to, and receive, the same pay, emoluments, and allowances, as are how, or may hereafter, be allowed to officers of similar grades in the infantry of the army."

I am, very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

GEORGE W. WALKER,

Paymaster Marines.

Col. Archibald Henderson,

Com. U. S. Marine Corps, Head Quarters.

--626--

No. 2.—Provisions.

For whom required.

Enlisted men.

Washerwomen.

Matron.

Servants.

Clerks.

Total.

Rations per day, at 19 cts. per ration.

Rations per day, at 20 cts. per ration.

Aggregate amount.

For provisions for non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, and washerwomen

517

34

1

552

1

$32,281 20

For provisions for clerks and officers' servants

68

5

73

5,329 00

Amount required for two months' rations for each soldier, as premium for re-enlisting, agreeably to the act of 2d March, 1833

125

125

1

1,444 79

45,054 99

Appropriated for 1838

49,840 00

Deficiency for 1839

4,785 01

No. 3.—Clothing.

For whom required.

Enlisted men.

Servants.

Clerks.

Total.

Aggregate amount.

For clothing of the non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, at $33 per annum

1,156

1,156

$38,148 00

For clothing for officers' servants, at $33 per annum

68

68

2,244 00

For clothing for paymaster's clerk, at $33 per annum

1

1

33 00

Amount required for the purchase of 300 watch coats, at $8 50 each

2,550 00

Amount required for two months' clothing for each soldier, as premium for re-enlisting agreeably to the act of 2d March, 1833

125

125

687 50

43,662 50

Appropriated for 1838

43,695 00

Deficiency for 1839

32 50

--627—

No. 4.—Fuel.

For what purpose required.

Number

Each.

Total.

Aggregate

amount.

Cords

Feet

Inches

Cords

Feet

Inches

Colonel commandant

1

36

4

36

4

Lieutenant colonel south of latitude 39

1

26

26

Majors south of latitude 39

1

26

26

Majors north of latitude 39

3

29

87

Captains north of latitude 43

1

24

4

8

24

4

8

Captains north of latitude 39

2

23

6

47

4

Captains south of latitude 39

3

21

2

63

6

Staff south of latitude 39

3

26

78

Staff north of latitude 39

1

29

29

Lieutenants north of latitude 43

2

19

1

4

38

2

8

Lieutenants north of latitude 39

12

18

4

222

Lieutenants south of latitude 39

14

16

4

231

Non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates,

servants, and washerwomen north of latitude 40

239

1

5

388

3

Non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates,

servants, and washerwomen south of latitude 40

370

1

4

555

Clerk to paymaster

1

2

2

8

2

2

S

Matron to hospital

1

1

4

1

4

Commanding officer's office, Portsmouth, N. H.

1

8

5

4

8

5

4

Guard room, Portsmouth, N. H.

1

25

25

Hospital, Portsmouth, N. H.

1

19

1

4

10

1

4

Mess room, Portsmouth, N. H.

1

4

1

4

1

1

4

Offices of the commanding officers and assistant quartermasters at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia

4

8

32

Guard rooms at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia

3

24

72

Hospitals at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia

3

18

4

55

1

Mess rooms at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia

3

4

12

Offices of the commandant and staff and commanding officers at head quarters, Norfolk, and Pensacola

7

7

49

Guard rooms at head quarters, navy yard, Washington, Norfolk, and Pensacola

4

21

34

Hospital at head quarters, two fires

1

33

33

Hospitals at Norfolk and Pensacola

2

16

4

33

Mess rooms for officers at head quarters, Norfolk, and Pensacola

3

3

4

10

4

Armory at Washington city

1

30

30

2324

7

Which, at $7 per cord, is

$16,274 12

Appropriated for 1838

15,804 00

Excess for 1839

470 12

--628--

The only items of the estimate for the Quartermaster's Department of the marine corps for the year 1839, that differ from the estimate for 1838, are fuel and subsistence.

Subsistence.

The number of troops on shore has been reduced in accordance with instructions from the Navy Department, which has reduced te sum estimated for in 1838, by

$4,785 15

Fuel

The quantity of fuel estimated for is less by 106 cords and 5 feet, caused by a reduction of the number of troops considered on shore, as stated in the item of subsistence; but an addition of fifty cents per cord, agreeably to the contracts effected, make an addition to the amount required for fuel for 1838, of

469 37

Total reduction

4,315 78

Respectfully submitted.

AUG. A. NICHOLSON,

Quartermaster.

Proposed for compensation for five clerks employed by the commandant and staff officers at head quarters, in lieu of the pay, rations, clothing, fuel, quarters, and extra compensation heretofore allowed them, as follows:

QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT.

Chief clerk in the disbursing and subsistence department

$1,200

Clerk in the clothing and ordnance department

1,000

PAYMASTER'S DEPARTMENT.

One chief clerk

1,200

COMMANDANT'S OFFICE.

One clerk

1,000

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT.

One chief clerk

1,000

Proposed allowance

5,400

Present allowance, as per following statement

2,961

Proposed increase

$2,439

--629--

Copy of table No. 10, Senate documents of 1835 and 1836, showing the pay and emoluments of the clerks of the commandant and staff of the United States marine corps, before the act of organization, which remain unchanged:

CLERKS.

Lineal pay per annum.

Rations per annum.

Clothing per annum.

Fuel per annum.

Extra pay
per

annum.

Quarters.

Total.

First clerk to quartermaster

$201 60

$73

$30

$6

$354

$664 60

Second clerk to quartermaster

189 60

73

30

6

351

652 60

Clerk to colonel commandant

189 60

73

30

6

240

538 60

Clerk to adjutant and inspector

189 60

73

30

6

240

538 60

Clerk to paymaster

105 60

73

30

14

240

$104

566 60

2,964 00

Re-appropriation of $150,000, being the sum now appropriated for the purchase of sites and erection of barracks at Charlestown, Massachusetts, Norfolk, Virginia, and Pensacola.

Respectfully submitted.

AUG. A. NICHOLSON,

Quartermaster.

Head Quarters Marine Corps,

Quartermaster's Department, October 22, 1838.

Sir:

Quadruplicate estimates for the support of the marine corps for the year 1839, are herewith submitted. The amount asked for the support of the Quartermaster's Department is different from the estimates of last year, the cause of which is explained by the following statement.

It will be perceived that an appropriation is proposed for the clerks of the commandant and staff of the corps, in lieu of the several allowances they at present receive. This subject was recommended to the attention of Congress by the late Secretary of the Navy, in his annual report of 1835, in accordance with which, a bill was reported by the Naval Committee of the Senate, but from some cause did not become a law. These clerks have been in the receipt of their present allowances for ten years past, during which time the corps has been augmented, and their duties and responsibilities much increased.

The compensations proposed appear nothing more than their services entitle them to; and at this time will only afford "them a respectable support

I am, sir, &c. &c. &c.

AUG. A. NICHOLSON, Quartermaster. Col. Archd. Henderson, &c. &c. &c.

--630--

Navy Commissioners' Office,

November 19, 1838.

Of the items embraced in the general estimates for the marine corps, the estimated amount for purchasing a site and erecting barracks at Brooklyn, New York, is the only one which appears to require any remark from the Board of Navy Commissioners.

Although the board have several times expressed the opinion that it is desirable to obtain sites and commence the erection of marine barracks near the stations which are most generally resorted to by our vessels of war, yet as it is understood to be the wish of the department that the estimates for the year 1830 should be limited to the objects of the most urgent importance, the board suggest that this item of the estimate can probably be omitted with less injury to the public interests than any of the others.

With respect to the proposed change in the mode of compensating the clerks, which is submitted for consideration, the board are of opinion that in determining the extent of the compensation to be granted, the pay of those allowed to commandants and others, at navy yards, would form the best guide. The pay of the first clerk to the commandant of a navy yard is established by law at nine hundred dollars, and that of the second clerk at seven hundred and fifty dollars.

I. CHAUNCEY.

--631--

G.-List of vessels in commission, of each squadron, their commanders, and stations.

Class.

Names.

Flag ships.

Commanders of vessels.

Commanders of squadrons.

Stations.

Ship of the line

Ohio

Flag ship

Capt. Joseph Smith

Commodore Isaac Hull -

Mediterranean.

Frigate

Constitution

Capt. W. C. Bolton

Mediterranean.

Sloop

Cyane

Commander John Percival

Mediterranean.

Ship of the line

North Carolina

Flag ship

Commodore H. E. Ballard

Commodore H. E. Ballard

Pacific.

Sloop

Lexington

Capt. Jno. H. Clack

Pacific.

Sloop

Falmouth

Commander Isaac McKeever

Pacific.

Schooner

Enterprise

Lt. Comdg. W. M. Glendy

Pacific.

Schooner

Boxer

Lt. Comdg. Wm. C. Nicholson

Pacific.

Razee

Independence

Flag ship

Commodore Jno. B. Nicolson

Commo. Jno. B. Nicholson

Coast of Brazil.

Sloop

Fairfield

Lt. Comdg. H. Y. Purviance

Coast of Brazil.

Brig

Dolphin

Lt. Comdg. Alexr. Slidell Mackenzie

Coast of Brazil.

Frigate

Macedonian

Flag ship

Commander not yet designated

Commo. A. J. Dallas

West Indies.

Sloop

Vandalia

Commander U. P. Levy

West Indies.

Sloop

Boston

Commander Edward B. Babbit

West Indies.

Sloop

Natchez

Commander Benjamin Page, jr.

West Indies.

Sloop

Ontario

Commander W. E. McKenney

West Indies.

Sloop

Erie

Commander Joseph Smoot

West Indies.

Sloop

Levant

Commander H. Paulding

West Indies.

Sloop

Warren

Commander not yet appointed

West Indies.

Schooner

Grampus

Lt. Comdg. Jno. S. Paine

West Indies.

Frigate

Columbia

Flag ship

Commodore G. C. Read

Commodore G. C. Read

East Indies.

Sloop

John Adams

Commander Thos. W. Wyman

East Indies.

Sloop

Vincennes

Flag ship

Lieut, Comdg. Chas. Wilkes

Lt. Comdg. Chas. Wilkes

Exploring expedition.

Sloop

Peacock

Lieut. Comdg. Wm. L. Hudson

Exploring expedition.

Store ship

Relief

Lieut. Comdg. A. K. Long

Exploring expedition.

Brig

Porpoise

Lieut. Comdg. Cadwr. Ringgold

Exploring expedition.

Steam ship

Fulton

Capt. Chas. W. Skinner

Atlantic coast.

Brig

Consort

Lieut Comdg. Wm. H. Gardner

Government packet running between
New York and Vera Cruz.

Schooner

Woodbury

Lieut. Comdg. Jno. S. Nicholas

Government packet running between

New Orleans and Tampico, &c.

--632--

H.

A statement showing the names, rates, distribution, and condition of the vessels in ordinary.

At Charlestown, Mass.

The Columbus, ship of the line—has been recently thoroughly repaired, and could be equipped for sea at short notice. This ship is at present used as a receiving ship, for the accommodation of recruits.

The Constellation, frigate—has recently returned from the West India station, and is supposed to require large repairs.

The Concord, sloop of war—has recently returned from the West India station, and will require considerable repairs.

At Brooklyn, N. Y.

The Washington, ship of the line—requires a general repair.

The Franklin, ship of the line—requires a general repair.

The Hudson, frigate—is considered unfit for sea service. This ship is used as a receiving ship for recruits.

The St. Louis, sloop of war, is now under repair.

At Philadelphia.

The Sea Gull, an old steam vessel—very much decayed, is used for a receiving vessel, but is inadequate to the proper accommodation of recruits, and unfit for any other naval use.

At Gosport, Va.

The Pennsylvania, ship of the line—has been recently equipped, and could be prepared for sea in a very short time.

The Delaware, ship of the line—has been thoroughly repaired, and could be soon prepared for sea.

The Macedonian, frigate—nearly ready for sea service.

The Potomac, frigate—requires examination and repair.

The Brandywine, frigate—is under repairs, which will be completed in about three months.

The Constitution, frigate—has received the slight repairs which she required, and could be soon prepared for sea.

The Guerriere, frigate—is generally decayed, and will require very extensive repairs or to be rebuilt.

The Java, frigate—is unfit for sea service, and is used as a receiving vessel for recruits.

The Warren, sloop of war—has just been repaired, and could be soon equipped for sea.

The Shark, schooner—has been repaired, and could be equipped for sea service at short notice.

--633--

RECAPITULATION.

Three ships of the line, nearly ready for sea service.

Two ships of the lime, requiring extensive repairs.

Two frigates which could soon be ready for sea service.

Three frigates requiring repairs, which will be soon commenced.

Three frigates considered unfit for sea service.

One sloop of war, nearly ready for sea service.

One sloop of war, under repair; and

One sloop of war, requiring repairs, which will be soon given.

One schooner nearly ready for sea service.

One old steam vessel, so much decayed as to be unfit for any naval use.

I. CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office,

November 19, 1838.

I.

A statement of the vessels on the stocks at the several navy yards.

At Portsmouth, N. H.

One ship of the line, and one frigate.

At Charlestown, Massachusetts.

Two ships of the line, and one frigate.

At Brooklyn, New York.

Two frigates.

At Philadelphia.

One frigate.

At Gosport, Va.

One ship of the line, and one frigate.

Recapitulation.

Four ships of the line, and six frigates.

Note.—All of these vessels were commenced under the authority given by the acts for the gradual increase of the navy of the 29th April, 1816, and 3d March, 1831.

I. CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office,

November 19, 1838.

--634--

K

A statement of the measures which have been adopted to carry into effect the acts for the gradual increase of the navy, which were approved on the 29th April, 1816, and 3d March, 1831.

The ships of the line Columbus, North Carolina, and Delaware, were completed, and have been in service for several years.

The hull of the Ohio ship of the line was completed and launched, under this appropriation, in 1820.

This ship has recently been repaired and equipped from the ordinary appropriations, and is now about to sail from New York.

The Pennsylvania ship of the line, was launched in 1837, and the remaining balance of the appropriation for the gradual increase of the navy, with a special appropriation, were expended in preparing her for removal to Norfolk. This ship has since had her equipments nearly completed, from the ordinary appropriations.

The frigates Brandywine, Potomac, and Columbia, have been launched, equipped, and employed at sea.

Four ships of the line and six frigates remain on the stocks. They are generally sound, but the keels, kelsons, or dead woods of some of them are decayed, and will require to be replaced before they can be launched.

These vessels are in general so far advanced that they might, probably, be made ready for sea as soon as the necessary crews could be collected for them.

The appropriation under which these vessels were commenced has been exhausted, and additional appropriations will be necessary, whenever it may be deemed expedient to complete any of them for service.

I. CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office,

November 19, 1838.

L.

Statement of the measures which have been adopted under the laws for the gradual improvement of the navy, which were approved 3d March, 1827, and 2d March, 1833.

Contracts have been entered into for live oak frames for fifteen ships of the line, eighteen frigates, sixteen sloops of war, nine steamers, and nine small vessels, brigs, or schooners.

Of these the deliveries have been completed for four ships of the line, seven frigates, and four sloops of war.

For the remaining frames, partial deliveries only have been made. By the terms of the contracts, the whole ought to be completed in 1841.

The following statement shows, in greater detail, the quantities of different materials that have been collected, their cost, the liabilities still existing, and the balance which will be available for other purposes when the whole amount of the appropriation shall be realized, This statement is made up to the 1st day of October, 1838.

Cost of dry dock at Charlestown, Mass.

$677,089 78

Cost of dry dock at Gosport, Va.

974,356 69

Cost of timber sheds and other buildings in navy yards

143,508 84

--635--

Cost of labor in receiving and stowing materials

$160,292 03

Purchase of land and preservation of live oak trees

69,885 80

Cost of 623,025 cubic feet live oak timber

793,173 14

Cost of 427,087 cubic feet white oak timber

146,239 95

Cost of 10,194 white oak knees

55,703 49

Cost of 252,330 cubic feet yellow pine plank stocks

78,128 17

Cost of 137,505 cubic feet yellow pine beams and carlings

47,086 42

Cost of 64,744 cubic feet yellow pine mast and spar timber

40,676 88

Cost of 533,622 lbs. (57,571 sheets) of sheathing copper,

496,507 34

Cost of 1,698,579 lbs. copper bolts, spikes, and nails

Cost of 4,111,149 lbs. of iron

161,107 85

Transferred to exploring expedition

150,000 00

Total expended

3,993,756 38

Amount of appropriation as modified at last session of Congress

4,500,000 00

Difference to be accounted for

506,243 62

Of this sum there was in the Treasury 1st of October

$491,951 48

Supposed to be in the hands of agents and pursers

14,292 14

506,243 62

The liabilities under existing contracts, on 1st of October, is estimated at

$1,403,784 89

The above amount of

$506,243 62

And the appropriation due in 1839 and 1840

1,500,000 00

Gives total available amount of

2,006,243 62

And leaves available, for other purchases, the sum of

$602,458 73

Note.—The number of frames for sloops of war, as stated in this report, is six less than was stated in the report of last year. This difference arises, from the correction of an error in the report of last year, which was occasioned by inadvertently including the frames which had been contracted for, under the appropriation for six small vessels, with those which had been contracted for under this appropriation.

I. CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office,

November 19, 1838.

--636--

M.

Statement of the progress made in carrying into effect the appropriation act of 3d March, 1837, which authorized the construction of two sloops of war and six small vessels.

The two sloops of war named the Cyane and Levant have been completed, and are both employed at sea.

The difficulty of collecting the live oak frames in Florida, and other causes, have delayed the construction of the six small sloops of war. It is hoped that three of them will be commenced immediately, and be completed early in the next year.

I. CHAUNCEY.

Navy Commissioners' Office,

November 19, 1838.

--637—

N 1.

Alphabetical list of invalid navy pensioners, complete to 30th September, 1833.

NAMES OF PENSIONERS.

Rank.

Commencement
of pension.

Monthly
pension.

Act of
Congress
under which
allowed.

Zephaniah Allen

Marine

Mar. 1, 1801

$3 00

April 23, 1800

Samuel Abbot

Seaman

Mar. 1, 1815

5 00

do.

Peter Anderson

Seaman

Mar. 28, 1814

3 00

do.

James Allcorn

Sailingmaster

Jan. 1, 1815

20 00

do.

Jacob Albrecht

Seaman

Aug. 1, 1814

6 00

do.

Samuel Angers

Captain

Jan. 1, 1814

50 00

do.

Robert Andrews

Quarter gunner

Aug. 1, 1823

4 50

do.

Alexander Adams

Seaman

Oct. 6, 1812

3 00

do.

George Alexander

Ordinary seaman

July 19, 1814

8 00

do.

John Agnew

Seaman

Aug. 1, 1825

5 00

do.

John Adams

Seaman

Feb. 17, 1836

6 00

do.

George Adams

Quarter gunner

Dec. 31, 1836

5 62 1/2

do.

Lemuel Bryant

Ordinary seaman

Aug. 1, 1814

8 00

do.

Robert Berry

Seaman

June 22, 1829

6 00

do.

Joseph Barrett

Quarter gunner

Ap'l 17, 1813

9 00

do.

John Ball

Boatswain

July 4, 1814

9 00

do.

Joseph Blake

Ordinary seaman

July 26, 1822

5 00

do.

John Bennett

Seaman

Dec. 14, 1814

6 00

do.

John Burnham

Master's mate

Dec. 10, 1813

9 00

do.

Thomas Bartlett

Seaman

Nov. 24, 1834

6 00

do.

Samuel Bosworth

Seaman

July 3, 1823

6 00

do.

Thomas Buchanan

Marine

June, 4, 1829

3 00

do.

Samuel Bryant

Seaman

Mar. 5, 1830

3 00

do.

Nathan Burr

Quarter gunner

Dec. 30, 1814

4 50

do.

John Brown

Seaman

July 1, 1829

6 00

do.

Peter Barnard

Ordinary seaman

Dec. 1, 1814

4 00

do.

Edmund Brett

Marine

June 12, 1815

3 00

do.

John Brannon

Seaman

June 28, 1815

5 00

do.

Isaac Bassett

Ordinary seaman

May 15, 1814

5 00

do.

John Beatty

Marine

June 1, 1830

4 00

do.

Luke Brown

Seaman

July 5, 1834

3 00

do.

William Baggs

Marine

Mar. 1, 1814

3 00

do.

John Baxter

Seaman

Feb. 23, 1819

6 00

do.

James Bell

Seaman

Aug. 23, 1823

6 00

do.

Godfrey Bowman

Seaman

Sep. 10, 1813

6 00

do.

William Barker

Marine

July 1, 1802

6 00

do.

John Brumley

Seaman

Sept. 1, 1826

6 00

do.

James Bantam

Ordinary seaman

July 5, 1833

4 00

do.

Jonathan Bulkley

Midshipman

June 17, 1834

9 00

do.

James Brown

Seaman

Sept. 12, 1821

8 00

do.

John Berry

Master-at-arms

Mar. 18, 1835

4 50

do.

John Butler

Seaman

Nov. 22, 1815

5 00

do.

John Bruce

Quarter gunner

Nov. 1. 1826

9 00

do.

John Bostrom

Quartermaster

May 30, 1834

3 00

do.

Peter Borge

Captain's steward

May 19, 1834

6 00

do.

Edward Barker

Marine

May 18, 1836

3 50

do.

Samuel Butler

Quarter gunner

Aug. 28, 1815

8 00

do.

Thomas Barry

Gunner

Aug. 10, 1809

5 00

do.

Thomas Barber

Ordinary seaman

July 6, 1836

5 00

do.

John Bevins

Quarter gunner

Feb. 24, 1837

7 50

do.

William Bayne

Quarter gunner

Oct. 22, 1833

3 50

do.

David C. Bunnel

Seaman

Ap'l 27, 1813

3 00

do.

Thomas Bowden

Quartermaster

Dec. 7, 1837

4 00

do.

James Barker

Quartermaster

Ap'l 20, 1836

8 00

do.

Alfred Baits

Ordinary seaman

Oct. 24, 1833

5 00

do.

James Barron

Captain

June 22, 1807

25 00

do.

Robert Butler

Quarter gunner

Ap'l 30, 1835

3 75

do.

John Brown, 4th

Seaman

Aug. 31, 1825

3 00

do.

--638—

N1—Continued.

NAMES OF PENSIONERS.

Rank.

Commencement
of pension.

Monthly
pension

Act of
Congress
under which
allowed,

George T. Bassett

Surgeon

Aug. 20, 1830

$25 00

April 23, 1800.

Edward Barry

Surgeon

July 4, 1837

4 50

do.

Leonard Chase

Ordinary seaman

Aug. 1, 1828

5 00

do.

John Clements

Seaman

Dec. 29, 1812

6 00

do.

Robert Cathcart

Seaman

Sept. 20, 1816

6 00

do.

George Cornell

Captain's mate

Sept. 10, 1813

9 00

do.

John C. Chaplin

Seaman

May 21, 1831

6 00

do.

Nathaniel Chapman

Quarter gunner

June 10, 1815

9 00

do.

James Cole

Seaman

May 1, 1823

5 00

do.

John Collins

Seaman

Feb. 9, 1813

6 00

do.

Francis Covenhoven

Ordinary seaman

June 22, 1807

3 75

do.

John Cole

Ordinary seaman

Feb. 6, 1832

5 00

do.

Robert Carson

Ordinary seaman

June 26, 1821

5 00

do.

Daniel H. Cole

Marine

Dec. 27, 1833

3 00

do.

George Coomes

Seaman

July 1, 1825

9 00

do.

Enos R. Childs

Midshipman

Ap'l 2, 1823

9 50

do.

William Cantrill

Marine

Ap'l 8, 1830

2 00

do.

Stephen Champlin

Lieutenant

Sept. 3, 1814

20 00

do.

Edward Carr

Seaman

May 13, 1835

6 00

do.

William Cook

Cabin cook

June 30, 1836

4 50

do.

John Clough

Sailingmaster

June 4, 1829

15 00

do.

David Connor

Lieutenant

May 23, 1815

16 66 2/3

do.

Alexander Claxton

Midshipman

Oct. 18, 1812

7 12 1/2

do.

Horatio N. Crabb

1st lt. marine corps

Jan. 1, 1831

7 50

do.

John S. Chauncey

Midshipman

Sept. 30, 1817

4 75

do.

Thomas H. Clarke

Ordinary seaman

Feb. 18, 1823

2 50

do.

Edward Cordeven

Seaman

Feb. 28, 1836

3 00

do.

John Clark

Seaman

May 31, 1825

3 00

do.

John Clark

Boatswain's mate

Jan. 15, 1838

7 12 1/2

do.

Horace Carter

Landsman

Jan. 22, 1838

3 00

do.

John Davidson

Landsman

Mar. 1, 1801

20 00

do.

Stillman Dodge

Ordinary seaman

May 1, 1831

3 33 1/3

do.

John Dunn

Marine

July 1, 1818

3 00

do.

Jacob Dornes

Seaman

July 1, 1802

8 50

do.

John Daniels

Quartermaster

Sept. 7, 1816

9 00

do.

Richard Dunn

Seaman

Jan. 1, 1829

6 00

do.

Samuel Daykin

Marine

Oct. 22, 1834

3 00

do.

John Diragen

Seaman

Dec. 23, 1815

5 00

do.

Matthias Douglass

Seaman

Ap'l 23, 1814

10 00

do.

Owen Deddolph

Gunner

June 25, 1814

10 00

do.

William Dunn

Gunner

Oct. 8, 1835

10 00

do.

Daniel Denvers

Marine

Oct. 22, 1835

3 00

do.

Joseph Dalrymple

Seaman

Feb. 24, 1814

4 50

do.

Marmaduke Dove

Sailingmaster

Ap'l 20, 1833

5 00

do.

John Downes

Master command'nt

Nov. 28, 1813

10 00

do.

John A. Dickason

Carpenter

Aug. 19, 1835

3 33 1/2

do.

Ebenezer Day

Ordinary seaman

June 1, 1813

1 66 2/3

do.

James Darley.

Ordinary seaman

Mar. 1, 1838

5 00

do.

James Dixon

Seaman

Nov. 11, 1835

3 00

do.

Ebenezer Evans

Seaman

Mar 2, 1813

6 00

do.

Thomas Edwards

Quartermaster

Jan. 1, 1823

9 00

do.

Jesse Elem

Marine

Aug. 1, 1828

6 00

do.

Gardner Edwards

Ordinary seaman

June 4, 1814

5 00

do.

Jacob Eastman

Cooper

July 3, 1828

4 00

do.

Thomas English

Ordinary seaman

May 14, 1832

5 00

do.

William Evans

Marine

May 1, 1827

3 00

do.

Abner Enos

Master's mate

Jan. 4, 1830

6 00

do.

Francis H. Ellison

Sailing master

Dec. 27, 1830

15 00

do.

D. S. Edwards

Surgeon's mate

June 28, 1822

7 50

do.

Alvin Edson

1st lt. marine corps

Feb. 6, 1832

7 50

do.

George Edwards

Boy, (1st class)

May 21, 1837

4 00

do.

--639--

N1—Continued.

NAMES OF PENSIONERS.

Rank.

Commencement
of pension.

Monthly
pension

Act of
Congress
under which
allowed.

Edward Field

Surgeon's mate

July 1, 1801

$10 00

April 23, 1800.

Robert Forsaith

Marine

May 18, 1799

3 00

do.

John Fallahee

Landsman

Aug. 1, 1827

4 00

do.

N. T. Farrell

Marine

May 10, 1830

5 00

do.

William Farrell

Seaman

June 4, 1829

6 00

do.

Moses French

Seaman-

Ap'l 19, 1834

6 00

do.

Alfred Fisher

Seaman

May 15, 1835

5 00

do.

William Farrer

Quartermaster

Ap'l 21, 1834

6 00

do.

Michael Fitzpatrick

Master-at-arms

June 4, 1829

9 00

do.

Peter Foley

Marine

June 27, 1837

3 50

do.

William Flagg

Lieutenant

Oct. 31, 1800

18 75

do.

James Ferguson

Sailingmaster

Feb. 19, 1827

10 00

do.

Jack Flood

Seaman

July 7, 1837

6 00

do.

William Fitzgerald

Seaman

Dec. 31, 1836

6 00

do.

John Geyer

Seaman

Ap'l 6, 1815

6 00

April 2, 1816.

Samuel H. Green

Quartermaster

Jan. 1, 1819

9 00

April 23, 1800.

John Grant

Ordinary seaman

July 1, 1831

4 00

do.

Anthony Gerome

Seaman

Jan. 1, 1832

6 00

do.

William Gregory

Marine

May 28, 1830

2 00

do.

John Grant

Seaman

May 20, 1813

6 00

do.

William Gunnison

Ordinary seaman

Nov. 24, 1833

5 00

do.

Patrick Gilligan

Marine

June 4, 1829

3 00

do.

James Grant

Seaman

Ap'l 9, 1829

8 00

do.

Peter Green

Seaman

Aug. 3, 1827

5 00

do.

Chester Goodell

Ordinary seaman

Dec. 12, 1834

3 00

do.

Charles Gordon

Ordinary seaman

May 11, 1835

5 00

do.

William Gillen

Seaman

Jan. 1, 1832

6 00

do.

Jerry Gardner

Ordinary seaman

Jan. 14, 1818

5 00

do.

Anthony Gale

Lt. col. marine corps

Jan. 5, 1835

15 00

do.

James Good

Seaman

Jan. 1, 1829

12 00

do.

John M. Garr

Steward

Nov. 11, 1832

4 50

do.

James Glass

Serg't. marine corps

Oct. 24, 1836

6 50

do.

William M. Goodshall

Seaman

July 15, 1825

6 00

do.

Richard Gilbody

Ordinary seaman

Jan. 14, 1806

4 00

do.

Uriah Hanscomb

Ordinary seaman

Oct. 16, 1799

6 00

do.

James Hatch

Quarter gunner

July 1, 1814

12 00

do.

James D. Hammond

Seaman

Dec. 29, 1812

6 00

do.

John Hamilton

Seaman

May 1, 1827

6 00

do.

Elijah L. Harris

Marine

Sep. 25, 1833

3 00

do.

John Hoxse

Seaman

Aug. 15, 1800

8 50

do.

Garret Henricks

Seaman

Aug. 9, 1834

6 00

do.

John Hodgkins

Corporal's mate

July 1, 1814

7 00

do.

Boswell Hale

Ordinary seaman

Dec. 25, 1819

5 00

do.

William Harringbrook

Seaman

Feb. 18, 1814

6 00

do.

John Hogan

Seaman

Mar. 4, 1830

3 00

do.

John Hall

Quartermaster

Oct. 20, 1830

4 50

do.

Henry Hervey

Seaman

Mar. 8, 1834

4 00

do.

William Hamilton

Seaman

July 1, 1829

6 00

do.

Isaac Harding

Seaman

May 9, 1834

5 00

do.

Isaac T. Hardee

Sailingmaster

April 1, 1817

20 00

do.

Samuel Hambleton

Purser

Sep. 10, 1813

20 00

do.

Simon Hillman

Ordinary seaman

July 3, 1815

4 00

do.

John Harris

Quarter gunner

Aug. 1, 1827

4 50

do.

John Hussey

Ordinary seaman

Jan. 1, 1832

5 00

do.

Josias Hopkins

Seaman

Dec. 7, 1805

6 00

do.

John Hardy

Seaman

June 25, 1813

6 00

do.

Joshua Howell

Ordinary seaman

June 30, 1836

5 00

do.

William L. Hudson

Sailingmaster

July 6, 1817

15 00

do.

Elias Hughes

Ordinary seaman

Aug. 28, 1837

5 00

do.

Ephraim Hathaway

Landsman

Jan. 15, 1838

4 00

do.

Joshua Howell

Ordinary seaman

Feb. 17, 1837

5 00

do.

--640--

N1—Continued.

NAMES OF PENSIONERS.

Rank.

Commencement
of pension.

Monthly
Pension.

Act of
Congress under
which allowed.

Alexander Hamilton

Boatswain's mate

May 31, 1838

$7 12 1/2

April 23, 1800.

J. L. C. Hardy

Midshipman

July 31, 1821

4 50

do.

David Jenkins

Seaman

Aug. 1, 1828

6 00

do.

James Jackson

Seaman

Mar. 4, 1816

5 00

do.

John Johnson

Seaman

Mar. 28, 1814

6 00

do.

Thomas Jackson, 2d

Quartermaster

June 1, 1813

9 00

do.

Sylvester Jameson

Seaman

Aug. 1, 1828

6 00

do.

Edward Ingram

Boatswain

April 1, 1831

5 00

do.

Thos. ap C. Jones

Lieutenant

Dec. 14, 1814

20 00

do.

James Jeffers

Ordinary seaman

Dec. 7, 1805

4 00

do.

Obadiah Johnson

Ordinary seaman

April 1, 1819

5 00

do.

Lewis Jones

Seaman

Oct. 27, 1835

6 00

do.

Reuben James

Boatswain's mate

Jan. 27, 1836

9 50

do.

Richworth Jordan

Seaman

Mar. 15, 1836

6 00

do.

Henry Jackson

Captain of foretop

Sep. 20, 1836

3 75

do.

William Jones

Boy

Aug. 24, 1814

2 25

do.

Henry Irwin

Private m. corps

Feb. 20, 1837

1 75

do.

Gilbert Jones

Ordinary seaman

June 31, 1815

2 50

do.

Ichabod Jackson

Seaman

Jan. 25, 1837

4 50

do.

James Kelly

Marine

Aug. 24, 1814

4 50

do.

John Kenney

Quarter gunner

July 1, 1825

4 50

do.

George Kensinger

Master-at-arms

May 22, 1819

9 00

do.

Daniel Kleiss

Ordinary seaman

May 6, 1829

5 00

do.

Nicholas Kline

Serg't marine corps

Jan. 1, 1832

5 00

do.

William Kinnead

Marine

April 3, 1834

5 00

do.

William C. Keene

Master-at-arms

Sep. 10, 1813

9 00

do.

Thomas Kelly

Seaman

Apr. 25, 1815

4 00

do.

Joseph Kelly

Seaman

Oct. 31, 1835

4 50

do.

Henry Keeling

Gunner

Aug. 30, 1834

5 00

do.

John Keegan

Quartermaster

Mar. 27, 1830

6 00

do.

Thomas Kowse

Quartermaster

Oct. 11, 1813

9 00

do.

William Lewis

Marine

Dec. 12, 1813

4 00

do.

Richard Lee

Quartermaster

July 1, 1820

6 00

do.

John Lloyd

Marine

June 8, 1819

3 00

do.

Isaac Langley

Ordinary seaman

Dec. 1, 1814

5 00

do.

Timothy Lane

Cook

Mar. 25, 1816

8 00

do.

John Lewis

Boatswain's mate

Jan. 1, 1832

9 00

do.

James Lloyd

Marine

April 5, 1834

2 00

do.

James Laughen

Marine

Dec. 30, 1811

1 75

do.

John Lagrange

Seaman

Nov. 30, 1834

4 50

do.

John Lang

Seaman

July 20, 1827

6 00

do.

Peter Lewis

Ordinary seaman

July 30, 1837

5 00

do.

John Loscomb

Ordinary seaman

Jan. 15, 1838

2 50

do.

John Lovely

Seaman

Apr. 23, 1835

6 00

do.

John Leonard

Seaman

July 1, 1829

9 00

do.

John G. Lauman

Quarter gunner

June 20, 1836

7 50

do.

James Merrill

Ordinary seaman

Oct. 23, 1819

5 00

do.

Colton Murray

Boatswain's mate

Aug. 1, 1831

9 00

do.

Enoch M. Miley

Quarter gunner

Mar. 28, 1814

8 00

do.

Peter McMahon

Ordinary seaman

Nov. 2, 1807

6 00

do.

Andrew Mattison

Seaman

Sept. 10, 1813

5 00

do.

Patrick McLaughlin

Ordinary seaman

Nov. 1, 1815

5 00

do.

Charles Moore

Seaman

Aug. 5, 1822

6 00

do.

Giles Manchester

Ordinary seaman

May 1, 1827

5 00

do.

Joseph Marks

Seaman

May 1, 1827

6 00

do.

John Myers

Seaman

Nov. 1, 1828

6 00

do.

Samuel McIsaacs

Boy

July 30, 1814

5 00

do.

James Moses

Purser's steward

Apr. 23, 1816

9 00

do.

William Moran

Seaman

Dec. 5, 1815

6 00

do.

Enos Marks

Ordinary seaman

Feb. 16, 1815

5 00

do.

John H. McNeale

Seaman

June 1, 1832

3 00

do.

--641--

N1—Continued.

NAMES OF PENSIONERS.

Rank.

Commencement
of pension.

Monthly
pension

Act of
Congress
under which
allowed.

John Mitchell

Quartermaster

June 11, 1832

$8 00

April 23, 1800.

Matthew McMurray

Seaman

Sept. 1, 1827

6 00

do.

Thomas Miller

Seaman

Oct. 23, 1829

4 00

do.

Matthias McGill

Seaman

May 28, 1814

8 00

do.

John Moore

Seaman

Dec. 4, 1817

6 00

do.

Archibald Moffat

Ordinary seaman

June 1, 1832

5 00

do.

Hamlet Moore

Ordinary seaman

Oct. 6, 1821

5 00

do.

James Mount

Marine

Sept. 1, 1830

3 25

do.

John Meigs

Seaman

July 1, 1819

10 00

do.

Thomas Murdock

Seaman

June 30, 1836

6 00

do.

John Munroe

Seaman

July 22, 1835

3 00

do.

Richard Merchant

Marine

June 30, 1824

1 75

do.

John McMahon

Ordinary seaman

July 9, 1836

5 00

do.

Samuel Miller

Capt. marine corps

Aug. 24, 1814

10 00

do.

James McDonnell

Seaman

Dec. 31, 1836

3 00

do.

Charles Morris

Lieutenant

Aug. 19, 1812

12 50

do.

John T. McLaughlin

Passed Midshipman

Feb. 8, 1837

9 37 1/2

do

Jacob Marks

Private m. corps

June 30, 1810

9 43 3/4

do.

George Marshall

Gunner

Mar. 31, 1825

2 50

do.

James McDonnell

Corporal m. corps

Dec. 31, 1814

2 25

do.

Edward Martin

Seaman

Mar. 3, 1837

3 00

do.

Samuel Meade

Seaman

Oct. 19, 1837

3 00

do.

Wm. P. McArther

Midshipman

Jan. 15, 1838

4 75

do.

John Marston, jr.

Midshipman

Dec. 31, 1814

4 75

do.

William Mervine

Midshipman

Nov. 28, 1812

3 66 2/3

do.

William Middleton

Seaman

Jan. 1, 1837

8 00

do.

James Mount

Sergeant

June 7, 1837

3 25

do.

James Nickerson

Seaman

Jan. 15, 1815

6 00

do.

John Nugent

Seaman

Aug. 14, 1813

6 00

do.

John P. Noyer

Marine

July 1, 1826

5 00

do.

William Napier

Corporal m. corps

July 1, 1826

4 00

do.

Thomas Nash

Ordinary seaman

Jan. 24, 1834

5 00

do.

John Neilson

Quarter gunner

Jan. 1, 1832

9 00

do.

James Nagle

Seaman

June 30, 1834

5 00

do.

David Newbury

Ordinary seaman

Apr. 15, 1836

2 50

do.

Francis B. Nichols

Midshipman

June 1, 1818

4 75

do.

William Newton

Ordinary seaman

Sept 11, 1814

1 25

do.

Isaac Omans

Seaman

June 26, 1821

6 00

do.

Samuel Odiorne

Seaman

Dec. 24, 1825

6 00

do.

John Otterwell

Mate

Feb, 16, 1815

6 00

do.

Asael Owens

Seaman

Jan. 22, 1838

3 00

do.

Thomas S. Parsons

Seaman

Sept. 1, 1808

6 00

do.

William Perry

Seaman

Apr. 9, 1825

6 00

do.

John Peterson

Ordinary seaman

Sept. 10, 1813

5 00

do.

Usher Parsons

Surgeon

Feb. 7, 1816

12 50

do.

William Parker

Seaman

Apr. 27, 1813

6 00

do.

Stephen Phyfer

Ordinary seaman

Apr. 4, 1825

7 00

do.

John Piner

Ordinary seaman

Nov. 6. 1828

5 00

do.

Daniel Peck

Seaman

July 1, 1829

6 00

do.

John Price

Seaman

May 11, 1835

6 00

do.

Charles Pasture

Seaman

Mar. 4, 1815

5 00

do.

Neale Patterson

Seaman

July 1, 1820

8 00

do.

James Perry

Ship's corporal

Sept. 1, 1827

9 00

do.

Thomas Payne

Sailing master

Feb. 7, 1834

20 00

do.

Peter Pierson

Seaman

Mar. 30, 1836

6 00

do.

Payne Perry

Seaman

Apr. 6, 1815

6 00

April 2, 1816.

Joseph Peck

Seaman

Dec. 19, 1836

2 50

April 23, 1800

Charles T. Platt

Lieutenant

June 4, 1829

25 00

do.

Samuel Philips

Carpenter

Mar. 23, 1815

7 50

do.

N. A. Prentiss

Sailing master

Nov. 30, 1814

10 00

do

John Percival

Lieutenant

Dec. 22, 1825

12 50

do.

--642--

N1—Continued.

NAMES OF PENSIONERS.

Rank.

Commencement
of pension.

Monthly
pension

Act of
Congress

under which
allowed.

David Quille

Quartermaster

Feb. 20, 1815

$5 00

April 23, 1800.

Peter Quantin

Ordinary seaman

Dec. 17, 1813

5 00

do.

Nathan Rolfe

Seaman

Dec. 14, 1813

6 00

do.

James Rodgers

Sailingmaster

July 27, 1815

15 00

do.

Edward Ross

Boy

Jan. 1, 1827

3 00

do.

Edward Rowland

Ordinary seaman

Sept. 11, 1814

5 00

do.

Rosnante Rhodes

Seaman

Dec. 5, 1815

6 00

do.

John Rice

Seaman

July 19, 1830

6 00

do.

William Robinson

Marine

June 5, 1817

6 00

do.

John Rogers

Carpenter's yeoman

May 18, 1832

4 50

do.

John Romeo

Ordinary seaman

April 1, 1828

5 00

do.

John Randall

Marine

Sept. 2, 1805

3 00

do.

John Riley

Marine

July 1, 1834

3 00

do.

John Richards

Quarter gunner

Oct. 20, 1829

9 00

do.

Benjamin Richardson

Master's mate

Oct. 8, 1829

10 00

do.

Alonzo Rowley

Ordinary seaman

Mar. 15, 1836

5 00

do.

John Roberts

Seaman

June 1, 1813

3 00

do.

B. S. Randolph

Midshipman

Oct. 7, 1815

6 00

do.

John Revel

Ordinary seaman

Aug. 20, 1833

2 50

do.

John Rodgers

Captain

June 23, 1812

25 00

do.

James C. Reed

Ordinary seaman

Mar. 5, 1837

2 50

do.

James Roberts

Quarter gunner

Ap'l 14, 1832

1 87 1/2

do.

Samuel Rose

Seaman

May 24, 1836

4 50

do.

John Richmond

Marine

July 31, 1816

1 75

do.

Samuel Riddle

Seaman

June 30, 1836

3 00

do.

John Robinson

Master's mate

Jan. 31, 1814

1 25

do.

James Reid

Ordinary seaman

Jan. 14, 1838

5 00

do.

Thomas Riley

Gunner

June 23, 1837

7 50

do.

Daniel Riggs

Ordinary seaman

May 18, 183G

3 75

do.

Nathaniel Staples

Seaman

May 1, 1833

3 00

do.

Aaron Smith

Ordinary seaman

Aug. 1, 1828

2 50

do.

Patrick Scanton

Ordinary seaman-

Jan. 1, 1811

6 00

do.

Benjamin Stevens

Master's mate

June 27, 1814

10 00

do.

Otis Sage

Corporal m. corps

Nov. 16, 1835

4 50

do.

Stephen Simpson

Marine

Nov. 10, 1835

3 50

do.

William Smith

Ordinary seaman

June 1, 1827

5 00

do.

John Shriver

Seaman

Ap'l 10, 1811

5 00

do.

John Schrouder

Seaman

June 29, 1819

6 00

do.

Robert Scatterly

Seaman

Mar. 28, 1812

4 00

do.

Jonas A. Stone

Seaman

April 4, 1829

9 00

do.

William Sitcher

Musician m. corps

Jan. 1, 1834

3 50

do.

Eli Stewart

Master's mate

May 20, 1814

7 00

do.

Harmon Sutton

Seaman

July 1, 1829

3 00

do.

William Stockdale

Marine

July 26, 1816

6 00

do.

Thomas Smith

Boatswain

April 6, 1815

10 00

April 2, 1816.

Thomas J. Still

Marine

Jan. 1, 1832

3 00

April 23, 1800.

Richard S. Sutor

Midshipman

Dec. 10, 1814

9 50

do.

William Smart

Ordinary seaman

July 1, 1829

5 00

do.

Charles Sheetor

Boatswain's mate

Nov. 1, 1832

6 00

do.

Robert Speddin

Lieutenant

Dec. 5, 1823

25 00

do.

Jacob Schriver

Seaman

Mar. 15, 1836

6 00

do.

William Seymore

Seaman

Feb. 17, 1836

6 00

do.

Thomas H. Stevens

Midshipman

Nov. 28, 1812

7 12 1/2

do.

George Stanfield

Seaman

June 7, 1837

6 00

do.

Joseph Smith

Lieutenant

Sept. 11, 1814

18 75

do.

John Smith

Boatswain

Dec. 31, 1837

5 00

do.

James Shanklin

Ordinary seaman

June 1, 1813

2 50

do.

Leonard Stevens

Sergeant m. corps

Jan. 27, 1837

3 25

do.

Alfred Smith

Ordinary seaman

Sept. 27, 1837

2 50

do.

John Smith

Seaman

Aug. 31, 1834

3 00

do.

Alexander Smith

Seaman

July 26, 1836

3 00

do.

--643--

N-Continued.

NAMES OF PENSIONERS.

Rank.

Commencement
of pension.

Monthly
pension

Act of
Congress
under which
allowed.

James Smith

Ordinary seaman

Dec. 2, 1837

$2 50

April 23, 1800.

Thomas Stalling

Ordinary seaman

Nov. 7, 1826

2 50

do.

John Strain

Seaman

Feb. 28, 1837

4 50

do.

John Stevens

Quartermaster

May 21, 1831

4 50

do.

Jeremiah Sullivan

Seaman

June 30, 1837

6 00

do.

Horace B. Sawyer

Midshipman

June 3, 1813

4 75

do.

James Trumbull

Ordinary seaman

April 6, 1815

5 00

April 2, 1816

Owen Taylor

Seaman

Aug. 19, 1812

6 00

April 23, 1800.

Henry Townsend

Ordinary seaman

Dec. 18, 1814

5 00

do.

David Thomas

Marine

Jan. 1, 1806

3 00

do.

Phillips Tully

Seaman

Jan. 10, 1816

6 00

do.

Isaac Thomas

Marine

Oct. 30, 1826

6 00

do.

William Thompson

Ordinary seaman

May 20, 1826

7 50

do.

John Tarlton

Ordinary seaman

Mar. 8, 1833

4 00

do.

James Tull

Sergeant m. corps

June 29, 1816

5 00

do.

George Tunstall

Seaman

Ap'l. 14, 1836

3 00

do.

James Thompson

Seaman

June 30, 1836

6 00

do.

Thomas Tindley

Seaman

April 6, 1815

3 00

do.

Julius Terry

Ordinary seaman

Aug. 31, 1812

5 00

do.

B. R. Tinslar

Surgeon

Jan. 31, 1830

6 50

do.

Peter Tooley

Marine

Jan. 27, 1837

3 50

do.

Benjamin Underwood

Ordinary seaman

Ap'l 24, 1815

5 00

do.

George Uphain

Marine

July 12, 1816

3 00

do.

William Venable

Boatswain's mate

May 2, 1834

4 75

do.

Gabriel Vanhorn

Marine

Dec. 23, 1837

3 50

do.

Nicholas Verplast

Marine

June 24, 1835

6 00

Special act.

Caleb Higgins

Ordinary seaman

May 23, 1814

3 00

April 23, 1800.

Charles F. Waldo

Master's mate

Mar. 18, 1813

10 00

do.

Peter Woodbury

Quartermaster

Mar. 18, 1813

9 00

do.

Reuben Wright

Carpenter's mate

Aug. 30, 1814

8 00

do.

John Williams

Seaman

July 1, 1818

6 00

do.

John Waters

Ordinary seaman

April 24, 1821

5 00

do.

William S. Welsh

Seaman

May 1, 1827

6 00

do.

Solomon White

Seaman

Feb. 29, 1812

3 00

do.

John Wright, 1st

Quarter gunner

Sept. 6, 1835

6 00

do.

Charles Weeks

Seaman

Feb. 23, 1830

6 00

do.

James B. Wright

Quartermaster

May 1, 1831

9 00

do.

Henry Ward

Quarter gunner

May 27, 1833

9 00

do.

Robert M. Wilson

Master's mate

Jan. 1, 1816

10 00

do.

James Wines

Seaman

Mar. 28, 1834

6 00

do.

Thomas Ward

Captain of fore top

Jan. 14, 1835

7 50

do.

William Williams

Marine

July 9, 1828

3 50

do.

William A. Weaver

Midshipman

June 1, 1813

9 50

do.

Joseph Ward

Seaman

July 1, 1818

6 00

do.

James Wilson

Quartermaster

July 1, 1817

9 00

do.

James Williamson

Armorer

Sept. 1, 1831

3 00

do.

William Whitney

Seaman

Nov. 1, 1818

8 00

do.

John A. Webster

Sailingmaster

Sept. 13, 1814

20 00

June 30, 1834.

William Wicks

Ordinary seaman

Aug. 4, 1813

4 00

April 23, 1800.

Charles Wilson

Quartermaster

Oct. 1, 1826

9 00

do.

James Woodhouse

Seaman

Mar. 17, 1836

6 00

do.

William Ward

Seaman

Aug. 1, 1832

6 00

do.

Charles Wheeler

Seaman

Oct. 3, 1836

3 00

do.

John Wright, 2d

Quarter gunner

Nov. 7, 1836

5 00

do.

William Welsh

Ordinary seaman

Jan. 1, 1822

2 50

do.

Charles W. White

Ordinary seaman

Feb. 17, 1837

5 00

do.

Marvel Wilcox

Carpenter's mate

Jan. 1, 1821

9 50

do.

Elias Wiley

Ordinary seaman

Sept. 10, 1813

2 50

do.

R. D. Wainwright

Lieut. marine corps

Aug. 27, 1810

7 50

do.

Samuel E. Watson

Major marine corps

Feb. 4, 1837

18 75

do.

--644--

N1—Continued.

NAMES OF PENSIONERS.

Rank.

Commencement
of pension.

Monthly
pension

Act of
Congress

under which
allowed.

William Wright

Seaman

Aug. 31, 1932

$3,00

April 23, 1800.

Thomas Williamson

Surgeon

Dec. 31, 1835

15 00

do.

Robert Woods

Seaman

Dec. 31, 1836

6 00

do.

Job G. Williams

1st lieut. m. corps

June 30, 1828

7 50

do.

John Williams

1st capt. of foretop

Sept. 9, 1836

1 87 1/2

do.

Edward Watts

Seaman

Dec. 31, 1828

3 00

do.

Henry Walpole

Seaman

Oct. 2, 1820

3 00

do.

Jack Williams

Seaman

Mar, 22, 1828

6 00

do.

Francis Williams

Landsman

Jan. 15, 1838

1 00

do.

George Wiley

Seaman

Mar. 1, 1837

3 00

do.

Henry Williams

Ordinary seaman

Mar. 3, 1838

5 00

do.

James L. Walsh

Ordinary seaman

April 30, 1837

5 00

do.

Thomas Welsh

Quarter gunner

Feb. 26, 1820

12 00

do.

Samuel Williams

Quartermaster

Sept. 1, 1827

6 00

do.

William Wagner

Quarter gunner

Dec. 3, 1819

9 00

do.

Robert Woods

Seaman

Dec. 31, 1836

3 00

do.

John Young

Lieutenant

May 21, 1829

25 00

do.

The number of invalid pensioners is 440.

Annual amount to pay them $33,496 23.

--645—

N2.

Alphabetical list of widow pensioners, complete to September 30, 1838.

NAMES OF PENSIONERS.

Husband's rank.

Commencement
of pension.

Monthly
pension

Act of
Congress

under which
allowed.

Sally Annis

Seaman

Ap'l 20, 1815

$6 00

March 4, 1814

Adelaide H. Adams

Master commandant

Jan. 1, 1831

30 00

June 30, 1834

Louisa Auchmuty

Lieutenant

Oct. 8, 1835

25 00

do.

Betsey Armstrong

Carpenter

Sept. 1836

10 00

do.

Catharine Anderson

Marine

Feb. 19, 1813

3 50

March 3, 1837

Abigail Appleton

Seaman

Jan. 4, 1815

6 00

do.

Martha Ann Atwood

Purser

May 11, 1823

20 00

do.

Juliana Buchmore

Surgeon

Sept. 10, 1829

57 50

June 30, 1831

Maria Babbit

Surgeon

May 24, 1826

25 00

do.

Caroline M. Berry

Lieutenant

July 17, 1824

25 00

do.

Elizabeth H. Baldwin

Captain's clerk

Ap'l 12, 1816

12 50

March 3, 1817

Nabby Burchstead

Carpenter

Dec. 11, 1833

10 00

June 30, 1834

Mary Burns

Seaman

Mar. 4, 1835

6 00

do.

Susan Bainbridge

Captain

July 27, 1833

50 00

do.

Eliza K. Boughan

Lieutenant

Nov. 6, 1832

25 00

do.

Harriet Barney

Captain

Dec. 1, 1818

50 00

Jan. 20, 1818

Emily Beale

Purser

Ap'l 4, 1835

20 00

June 20, 1834

Mary J. Babbit

Nov. 29, 1830

16 66 2/3

July 2, 1836*

Letitia Blake

Marine

Aug. 14, 1836

3 50

June 30, 1834

Lydia Brown

Carpenter

Mar. 28, 1824

10 00

do.

Elizabeth Beeler

Corporal mar. corps

Sept. 8, 1830

4 50

March 3, 1837

Catharine M. Beers

Surgeon

June 8, 1831

25 00

do.

Polly Barry

Marine

Dec. 7, 1812

3 50

do.

Elizabeth Bishop

Seaman

Dec. 18, 1813

6 00

do.

Martha Burrill

Seaman

Dec. 14, 1822

6 00

do.

Elizabeth Bartlett

Seaman

Ap'l 25, 1813

6 00

do.

Elizabeth Barnes

Carpenter

Nov. 2, 1819

10 00

do.

Mahala Bury

Seaman

May 18, 1838

6 00

do.

Eliza Bradlee

Sergeant mar. corps

Ap'l 12, 1838

6 50

do.

Gratia Bay

Quartermaster

Jan. 6, 1834

18 00

do.

Sarah Bernard

Carpenter's mate

Sept. 10, 1829

9 50

do.

Abigail Bailey

Landsman

Dec. 31, 1834

4 00

do.

Mary Cheever

Ap'l 12, 1814

8 33 1/3

April 12, 1814*

Abigail Cowell

Lieutenant

Ap'l 18, 1814

25 00

March 3, 1817

Harriet Carter

Lieutenant

Sept, 6, 1823

25 00

do.

Ann M. Clunet

Sergeant mar. corps

Dec. 1, 1825

6 50

June 20, 1813

Eliza M. Cloud

Assistant surgeon

Aug. 1, 1831

15 00

June 30, 1834

Celia Cross

Lieutenant

Feb. 10, 1834

25 00

do.

Eliza Cassin

Purser

Aug. 19, 1821

20 00

March 3, 1817

Francis P. Cook

Lieutenant

Feb. 7, 1834

25 00

June 30, 1834

Leah Carter

Musician mar. corps

Sept. 23, 1834

4 00

do.

Maria J. Cuvilier

Musician mar. corps

Jan. 28, 1834

4 00

do.

Eliza M. Cocke

Lieutenant

Mar. 7, 1823

25 00

June 20, 1813

Fanny Cassion

Lieutenant

Nov. 30, 1826

25 00

June 30, 1831

Ann V. Cocke

Lieutenant

May 31, 1835

25 00

do.

Ann Clark

Ordinary seaman

Sept. 27, 1836

5 00

do.

Ann D. Campbell

Lieutenant

June 3, 1836

25 00

do.

Sarah Clementson

Sailmaker

July 9, 1833

10 00

March 3, 1837

Margaret Cowan

Gunner

Sept. 14, 1831

10 00

do.

Elizabeth Cash

Seaman

Jan. 12, 1837

6 00

do.

Ellen Coxe

Midshipman

June 30, 1822

9 50

do.

Susannah Critchet

Seaman

June 19, 1812

6 00

March 4, 1814

Eleanor Carreia

Gunner

Dec. 21, 1823

10 00

March 3. 18377

Elizabeth J. Caldwell

Lieutenant

Aug. 9, 1831

25 00

June 30, 1834

Margaret Carmick

Major marine corps

Nov. 6, 1816

25 00

March 3, 1837

Mary Cassin

Lieutenant

Oct. 15, 1837

25 00

do.

Elizabeth Cernon

Ordinary seaman

Nov. 28, 1823

5 00

do.

Hannah J. Caldwell

Lieutenant

June 30, 1834

25 00

do.

* Special.

--646--

N2—Continued.

NAMES OF PENSIONERS.

Husband's rank.

Commencement
of pension.

Monthly
pension

Act of
Congress

under which
allowed.

Ellen Cars

Lieutenant

May 3, 1837

$25 00

March 3, 1837

Ellen Dix

Surgeon

Ap'l 16, 1823

25 00

March 3, 1817

Eliza Doxey

Sailingmaster

May 20, 1823

20 00

June 30, 1834

Lamitie Dill

Boatswain

Dec. 19, 1831

10 00

do.

Laura P. Daggett

Gunner

Ap'l 9, 1830

10 00

do.

Catharine Davidson

Seaman

June 27, 1830

6 00

do.

Sarah Drew

Sailingmaster

Ap'l 19, 1823

20 00

March 3, 1837

Susan Decatur

Captain

Mar. 22, 1820

50 00

do.

Susan Davis

Junior gunner

Aug. 10, 1800

7 50

do.

Virginia Duncan

Passed midshipman

Aug. 3, 1836

12 50

do.

Ellen Dever

Landsman

Ap'l 23, 1823

4 00

do.

Elizabeth Ann Dent

Captain

July 31, 1823

50 00

do.

Prudence Denham

Ordinary seaman

June 27, 1837

5 00

do.

Peggy Dorney

Steward

Jan. 25, 1838

9 00

do.

Arabella Dubois

Seaman

Aug. 30, 1837

6 00

do.

Sarah Davis

Master's mate

Jan. 6, 1820

10 00

do.

Mary Davis

July 1, 1823

9 00

do.

Dorothy M. Evans

Boatswain

July 9, 1832

10 00

June 30, 1834

Jane Evans

Captain

June 2, 1821

50 00

June 30, 1834

Harriet Ann Elbert

Lieutenant

Dec. 20, 1812

25 00

March 4, 1814

Abigail Elridge

Seaman

June 2, 1834

6 00

March 3, 1837

Hannah Everett

Chaplain

Ap'l 12, 1837

20 00

do.

Phebe Eldridge

Gunner

Dec 31, 1806

10 00

do.

Ann R. Edwards

Lieutenant

Jan. 1, 1838

25 00

do.

Mary Ford

Captain's mate

Ap'l 20, 1815

9 00

March 4, 1811

Abigail Fernald

Seaman

Feb. 24, 1815

6 00

do.

Mary T. Forrest

Lieutenant

Oct. 1, 1825

25 00

June 30, 1834

Catharine Freemody

Ordinary seaman

Jan. 20, 1836

5 00

do.

Sarah Fletcher

Captain

Aug. 10, 1800

50 00

March 3, 1837

Elizabeth Ferguson

Seaman

July 24, 1811

6 00

do.

Mary Forrest

Sergeant m. corps

Mar. 11, 1832

8 50

June 30, 1834

Eliza M. Fortin

Steward

Jan. 28, 1833

9 00

March 3, 1837

Lucy Flagg

Gunner

Ap'l 20, 1816

10 00

do.

Mary Griffin

Surgeon

Nov. 1, 1814

25 00

March 3, 1817.

Margaret F. Green

Carpenter

Nov. 14, 1834

10 00

June 30, 1834

Eliza Grayson

Captain m. corps

June 30, 1823

20 00

March 3, 1817

Sophia Gardner

Master commandant

Sept. 1, 1815

30 00

do.

Elizabeth C. Gray

Boatswain

Feb. 15, 1836

10 00

June 30, 1834

Hannah L. Gamble

Major marine corps

Sept. 11, 1836

25 00

do.

Ann B. Grimes

Captain m. corps

July 25, 1834

20 00

do.

Ann Gardner

Gunner

Ap'l 28, 1835

10 00

do.

Olive Grover

Ordinary seaman

Feb. 2, 1830

5 00

do.

Dionysia Goodrum

Lieutenant

May 9, 1836

25 00

do.

Ann T. Green

Purser

Aug. 24, 1812

20 00

March 3, 1837

Elizabeth Goldthwait

Ordinary seaman

Aug. 25, 1813

5 00

do.

Laura Griswold

Ordinary seaman

Mar. 29, 1837

5 00

do.

Jane Goslin

Marine

Dec. 28, 1831

3 50

do.

Mary Gallon

Seaman

Ap'l 28, 1825

0 00

do.

Mary Glass

Carpenter's mate

Oct. 1, 1837

9 50

do.

Mary S. Gadsden

Master commandant

Aug. 28, 1812

30 00

do.

Mary E. Holbert

Corporal m. corps

June 30, 1834

4 00

June 30, 1834

Phebe Hamersley

Lieutenant

Oct. 1, 1823

25 00

March 3, 1817

Sarah Higgins

Seaman

Sept. 28, 1834

6 00

June 30, 1834

Diana Hardy

Ordinary seaman

Sept. 10, 1813

5 00

March 4, 1814

Susan Harraden

Master commandant

Jan. 20, 1818

30 00

Jan. 20, 1813

Ellen Nora Hanbury

Sergeant m. corps

Jan. 4, 1825

8 00

June 30, 1831

Theresa Hoffman

Musician m. corps

Sept. 19, 1837

4 00

do.

Eliza Henley

Captain

May 23, 1835

50 00

do.

Mary R. Hatch

Pilot

Feb. 5, 1814

20 00

Jan. 20, 1813

Phebe W. Hoffman

Captain

Dec. 10, 1834

50 00

June 30, 1834

Ann R. Hail

Sailmaker

Sept. 18, 1826

10 00

do.

Hannah Hazen

Seaman

Mar. 28, 1814

6 00

June 20, 1813

--647--

N2—Continued.

NAMES OF PENSIONERS.

Husband's rank.

Commencement
of pension.

Monthly
pension

Act of
Congress

under which
allowed.

Cornelia Hobbs

Lieutenant

April 3, 1836

$25 00

June 20, 1813

Mary Ann H. Holmes

Armorer

Sept. 8, 1833

9 00

March 3, 1837

Mary S. Hunter

Chaplain

Feb. 24, 1823

20 00

do.

Hannah Hammond

Marine

Nov. 10, 1817

3 50

do.

Mary Ann Harnett

Carpenter

Sept. 9. 1830

10 00

do.

Phebe Hollis

Marine

May 13, 1811

3 50

do.

Emma Horton

Midshipman

Aug. 7, 1815

9 50

do.

Hetty Henry

Seaman

May 25, 1834

6 00

do.

Mary A. Horsley

Surgeon

Sept. 8, 1834

27 50

do.

Mary Hanna

Gunner

Jan. 17, 1837

10 00

do.

Ann J. Holmes

Master-at-arms

Aug. 22, 1836

9 00

do.

Rebecca Higgins

Seaman

Sept. 30, 1837

6 00

do.

Sarah A. Huntt

Purser

April 4, 1837

20 00

do.

Mary Hackleton

Seaman

Dec. 5, 1812

6 00

do.

Abigail Jones

Cook

Ap'l 20, 1815

9 00

Jan. 20, 1813

Ellen Jenkins

Seaman

June 2, 1825

6 00

June 30, 1834

Mary Jones

Chaplain

Jan. 20, 1829

20 00

do.

Maria T. Johnson

Carpenter's mate

Jan. 30, 1814

9 50

Jan. 20, 1813

Mary Jameson

Midshipman

Nov. 11, 1823

9 50

March 3, 1817

Elizabeth Jones

Marine

Sept. 1, 1827

3 00

June 30, 1834

Catharine Jolly

Captain of fore-top

Dec. 20, 1836

7 00

do.

Hannah Ingraham

Seaman

Ap'l 10, 1837

6 00

March 3, 1837.

Abigail Jones

Seaman

Aug. 16, 1800

6 00

do.

Elizabeth Johnson

Landsman

Feb. 21, 1833

4 00

do.

Catharine Johnson

Gunner

Aug. 11, 1818

10 00

do.

Mary Ann Jackson

Ordinary seaman

May 2, 1838

5 00

do.

Theresa Jones

Marine

June 26, 1810

3 50

do.

Abigail Kitchen

Seaman

Aug. 10, 1800

6 00

June 30, 1834

Harriet J. Kissam

Surgeon

Oct. 6, 1828

25 00

do.

Elizabeth Kitts

Sailingmaster

Sept. 27, 1819

20 00

March 3, 1837

C. C. King

Sergeant m. corps

Aug. 3, 1837

6 50

do.

Lydia Low

Yeoman

Aug. 1, 1834

7 50

June 30, 1834

Julia M. Lawrence

Captain

June 1, 1813

50 00

Jan. 20, 1813

Elizabeth Lee

Lieutenant

June 30, 1832

25 00

June 30, 1834

Frances M. Lewis

Master commandant

Sept. 1, 1815

30 00

March 3, 1817

Elizabeth Lagoner

Seaman

Mar. 4, 1835

6 00

June 30, 1834

Sarah Ann Lent

Sail maker's mate

Sept. 11, 1824

9 50

do.

Deborah Lindsay

Sailingmaster

May 19, 1826

20 00

March 3, 1837

Betsey Low

Seaman

Sept. 1, 1815

6 00

do.

Susannah Lippincott

Ordinary seaman

Jan. 1, 1838

5 00

do.

Ann G. McCullough

Sailingmaster

Aug. 24, 1814

20 00

Jan. 20, 1813

Jane Moulton

Seaman

Apr. 20, 1815

6 00

March 4, 1814

Ann Martin

Quarter gunner

Apr. 20, 1815

9 00

Jan. 20, 1813

Phebe Montgomery

Surgeon

Jan. 3, 1828

25 00

June 30, 1834

Lydia Macabee

Seaman

Aug. 6, 1834

6 00

do.

Sarah Matthews

Quarter gunner

Nov. 30, 1814

9 00

Jan. 20, 1813,

Ann Midlen

Master's mate

Sept. 15, 1814

10 00

do.

Mary E. McPherson

Master commandant

Apr. 28, 1824

30 00

June 30, 1834

Eliza Maury

<