--513--

REPORT

OF

THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY.

Navy Department, November 25, 1844.

Sir:

I have the honor to present to you the annual report of the condition and operations of this department of the public service.

The navy of the United States consists of 6 ships of the line, 1 razee, 14 frigates, 21 sloops of war, 16 brigs and schooners, 3 store-ships, and 8 steamers, afloat.

There are on the stocks, in an unfinished state, 4 ships of the line, 3 frigates, 1 store-ship, an iron steamer at Pittsburg, and one at the navy-yard at Washington, to be used as a water tank. Since the last annual report, after careful survey and inspection, it was found most conducive to the public interest to sell the frigate Hudson, and the store-ships Consort and Chipola, and orders have been recently given for the sale of the Pioneer. In each case, the navy agent conducting the sale was limited as to the price, and the sales are satisfactory. The Hudson was originally built by contract for a foreign government, was found to be unworthy of repair, and it was believed to be more advantageous to sell than to break her up.

The vessels in commission have been employed as follows:

In the home squadron, the frigate Potomac, the sloops Vincennes, Vandalia, and Falmouth, the brigs Somers and Lawrence, and the steamer Union, under the command of Commodore Connor. In the month of August the Vincennes returned north from the gulf of Mexico, was put in ordinary, and her crew discharged.

In the Mediterranean sea, the squadron was under command of Commodore Morris until he left that station in the Delaware 74 in February, when the command devolved on Commodore Joseph Smith. Our naval forces in that sea consist of the frigates Cumberland and Columbia, the sloops Plymouth and Fairfield, and the store ship Lexington. The new sloop St. Mary's is under orders, and will proceed, as soon as she is ready for sea, to relieve the Fairfield.

On the coast of Brazil, the squadron has consisted of the Columbus 74, frigates Raritan and Congress, sloops John Adams and Boston, brig Bainbridge, and schooner Enterprise.

The Columbus, John Adams, and Enterprise, have returned home, been put in ordinary, and their crews discharged. This squadron is under the command of Commodore Daniel Turner.

In the Pacific ocean there have been employed the frigates United States and Savannah, sloops Cyane, Levant; and Warren, schooner Shark, and store-ship Relief. The United States and Cyane have returned home, been put in ordinary, and their crews discharged. The new sloop Ports-

--514--

mouth has been fitted for sea, and is under orders to join this squadron. Commodore Thomas Ap C. Jones was relieved from the command by-Commodore Alexander J. Dallas, by whose lamented death, in the month of June last, the command devolved on Captain James Armstrong, the second in command. Commodore John D. Sloat has been ordered to the Pacific, to assume command on that station.

No change has been made in the vessels composing the East India squadron since the last annual report. The frigate Brandywine arrived at Macao, with the Hon. Caleb Cushing on board, in February last. The sloop St. Louis, and the brig Perry have since arrived at the same port. Both of these vessels were detained on their outward passage by the illness of Commander Cocke, of the St. Louis, and of Commander Dupont, of the Perry. To the mortification of both these officers, and to the regret of the department, each was compelled, by the state of his health, to relinquish his command and return to the United States. Captain McKeever and Commander John Stone Paine were sent out to supply their places. The squadron is commanded by Commodore Foxhall A. Parker. The frigate Constellation, bearing the pennant of Commodore Kearney, returned home in April last, after a cruise of nearly four years. She has been laid up, and her crew discharged.

The squadron on the coast of Africa, under command of Commodore M. C. Perry, consists of the frigate Macedonian, sloops Saratoga and Decatur, and brig Porpoise, mounting ninety-three guns. The sloops Preble and Yorktown, and brig Truxtun, have been sent out to relieve the Saratoga, Decatur, and Porpoise. The new sloop Jamestown has been launched, and is in active preparation to go to sea to relieve the Macedonian. Commodore Charles W. Skinner has been ordered to proceed in her to the station, and relieve Commodore Perry. Another sloop will be ordered to the station with all practicable despatch. The squadron, as thus constituted, will mount eighty-three guns. It is found that single-decked vessels are best suited to this service, and that in them the health of the officers and crews will be more secure than in those of a larger class and more difficult of ventilation. It affords me pleasure to state that the apprehensions which were entertained for the health of the squadron have not been realized. While at sea, it is found that their health is good, and the deleterious influence of the climate is only felt by those on. shore. The operations of the squadron have, it is believed, exercised a favorable influence in preventing the slave-trade. With the provision of our laws denouncing it as piracy, and the presence of our own naval forces, with authority to visit all vessels under the American flag, it is not probable that our citizens will engage in this disgraceful and perilous traffic, or our flag be used by others to any great extent.

If other christian nations would inflict the same punishment on the offenders, it is not improbable that the trade would cease.

The store-ship Erie is about to sail from New York with stores for this squadron. The unhealthiness of a residence on shore, the influence of the climate in deteriorating provisions when in store, and the difficulties of landing them, make it very desirable to have a large and well-found store-ship permanently attached to the station.

No alteration has been made in the cruising-grounds of the several squadrons since the last annual report.

The following vessels have been employed on special service: The frigate Constitution, Captain Percival, sailed from New York on the 29th

--515--

May last, on a cruise in the Indian ocean. The Hon. Henry A. Wise took passage in this ship, and was landed at Rio de Janeiro on the 6th August, when she proceeded on her cruise.

The steamer Princeton, Captain Stockton, has been employed in gun-practice and experiments. She is under orders to be prepared for a cruise to test her qualities, as well under her sails as her steam, and to determine the advantages of her mode of propulsion.

The steamer Poinsett, Lieut. Semmes, has been employed in making surveys between Apalachicola bay and the Balize. The work is finished, and she will be laid up for the winter.

The brig Truxtun, Lieut. Upshur, returned from Constantinople in January last, with the remains of Commodore David Porter, and in June sailed to join the squadron on the coast of Africa, under command of Commander Bruce.

The steamers "Col. Harney" and "Gen. Taylor" were transferred from the "War Department for the use of the navy. The former has been employed in the transportation of recruits and supplies for the navy, and is now under orders to sail without delay, under command of Lieut. Lynch, to prevent trespasses on the live oak and other timber on the public lands between Cape Sable and the Balize, with instructions to give aid to merchant vessels in distress during the coming winter. The "Gen. Taylor," Lieut. Farrand, has been employed for like purposes during the past season.

The schooner Phoenix and brig Oregon have been successively employed under the command of Lieut. Arthur Sinclair, as a packet between this country and the isthmus of Darien. The mails for the. squadron, and for such of our citizens as choose to adopt this mode of conveyance, are regularly forwarded by this route. The schooner Flirt, Lieut. Davis, will be employed in the same duty. It is believed that great advantage to the service and to the public will result from this mode of communication with the Pacific ocean.

The Pennsylvania, at Norfolk; the North Carolina, at New York; the Ohio, at Boston; the Experiment, at Philadelphia; the On-ka-hy-e, at Charleston; and the Ontario, at Baltimore, are employed as receiving vessels.

The force estimated for, and proposed to be employed, during the year commencing on the 1st day of July, 1845, consists of 10 frigates, 13 sloops of war, 7 brigs, 2 schooners, 4 armed steamers, 3 small steamers, 4 store-ships, and 2 small vessels.

It is not so large as that estimated for in the last annual report; but it is somewhat larger than that authorized by the appropriations for the current fiscal year. It is confidently believed that this force may be most advantageously employed in giving protection to American commerce, which is daily enlarging its operations in every region of the globe.

The cruising grounds of the several squadrons are so extended, and the interests of our fellow-citizens requiring their protection so large, that it is hardly possible, with the utmost zeal and activity on the part of the officers, to visit many points where the presence of a national ship is necessary to attain this great object. To this protection they are entitled. In affording it, a high public duty is discharged; the officers and men are kept familiar and practised in their duties; and it is not believed that the public, vessels sustain more damage than if kept in ordinary. By the act of the 17th June, 1844, it is provided that the whole num-

--516--

ber of petty officers, seamen, ordinary seamen, landsmen, and boys, in the naval service during the current fiscal year, shall not exceed, at any one time, seven thousand five hundred men. The department promptly gave orders to suspend the enlistment of men, and to discharge the crews of the vessels as they reached our own waters, until the required reduction was effected. The line-of-battle ships have been put out of commission, except as receiving vessels, and the complements of men allowed to the several classes carefully revised, and reduced to the lowest point consistent with the safety of the vessel and the honor of the flag. It is hardly possible, in view of the changes of crews on foreign stations, to maintain any specific number with exact precision. The department has endeavored to conform to the law, and it is believed that the measures adopted have been successful.

I deem it my duty to suggest that the reduction made by that proviso will, in my opinion, be injurious to the public interest. It precludes the employment of ships of the largest class; and if it should become the settled policy of the government, the officers who will be required to command them, in the event of war, will not have that degree of familiarity with the order and management of ships of the line which is essential to success. There are also considerations of great weight against adopting as a maximum the number of men intended to be actually employed. In sending reliefs to squadrons abroad, it will frequently happen that the relief vessel sails before the one to be relieved returns home; while one is on the way to her station and the other on her return, there is apparently a double crew in service, but not so for any valuable purpose. With such a restriction, no public exigency or unforeseen national necessity would authorize an addition to the number, until the law could be repealed. The coast survey, the ordinary and the receiving ships, all require men, and they form a part of those allowed to the navy.

I have, therefore, caused estimates to be prepared for nine thousand men for the next year; and it is believed that this number will not leave available, for the ships of war in their appropriate duty on foreign service, more than seven thousand five hundred men.

An increase of the number of pursers and surgeons is respectfully recommended. The number of the former is not sufficient to relieve the commanding officers from the necessity of performing the duties of purser. For this they are not compensated; the duties are not professional; and they are sometimes involved in apparent defalcations, for want of knowledge of accounts and of the required forms of vouchers. The duties of disbursing officer place the commander in such a relation to the crew, as to affect, injuriously the discipline of the ship. If provision shall be made for the increase of the number of disbursing officers of the navy, as is earnestly recommended, it may be effected with more economy, and with great advantage, by authorizing the appointment of assistant pursers at a small salary. Twelve such officers might be employed with great advantage in the small vessels in commission. They would acquire an accurate knowledge of their duties, and constitute a class from which promotions to the more important and responsible office of purser might be advantageously made. In the British naval service, the employment of clerks in charge, in the smaller vessels, doing the duty of purser, has been approved, after long experience.

The number of surgeons and assistants is found to be below the wants

--517--

of the service. The Oregon had to proceed to sea, recently, with a citizen surgeon; and the voluntary but reluctant resignation of several passed assistant surgeons of great merit shows that the duties required of those in service are greater than they ought to be subjected to.

The measures adopted to keep a regular property account, and to enforce accountability in the purchasing and disbursing of supplies and in the public stores, have been very successful.

The inventories exhibit a very large amount of public property under the control of this department; and the returns required, and the examinations to which they are subjected, will insure, in a great degree, against any abuse or waste in this respect.

There appeared to be a considerable quantity of articles of various kinds which were no longer fit for use. After a careful selection of those which could be made available with repair, the residue have been directed to be. sold, and the proceeds carried to the head of appropriation from which they were purchased. A detailed statement of these sales will be communicated as soon as they are closed.

Under the act of the 17th of June, 1844, and the joint resolution of 18th February, 1843, a hemp agent has been appointed for the State of Missouri. The agents for Kentucky and Missouri have been instructed to afford every facility and information on the subject, and arrangements have been adopted for purchases of hemp, with a view of carrying out the policy indicated by Congress—of buying no more foreign hemp, if domestic can be procured of suitable quality, and at as low a price. Some deliveries have been made, and the reports as to their quality are highly satisfactory. The same rule has been adopted in procuring supplies of sail-duck.

To enable the hemp-growers to have their products submitted to the necessary tests and inspection with greater convenience, it is proposed to establish a rope-walk at the Memphis depot, on the Mississippi river.

In execution of the act of the 15th June last, to establish a navy-yard at or adjacent to the city of Memphis, a board of officers was organized and ordered to repair to that city, accompanied by Mr. Sanger, the engineer of the Bureau of Yards and Docks. Captain Rousseau, Commander Adams, and Lieutenant Johnston, were ordered on this duty; they made the selection, and reported the results of their examinations, with a draught and diagram, and with the evidences of title as far as made. The selection is approved, and believed to be highly advantageous. But the difficulties, or rather delays, unavoidably encountered in obtaining a perfect title to the site, have suspended the organization of the establishment and the commencement of active operations. Estimates of additional appropriations for this work are presented.

It is proposed to finish the construction of the frigate St. Lawrence, of the sloops Albany and Germantown, and of the steamer at Pittsburg. The estimates from the Bureau of Construction contemplate the completion of these vessels and their equipment. The reasons on which this recommendation is founded are stated by the chief of that bureau in his special report. Under the general head of appropriation for "increase, repair, &c.," as now presented, coal and hemp, which have heretofore been a subject of specific appropriation, are included.

It is not proposed, during the coming year, to procure any additional supplies of live-oak timber beyond those already contracted for. A schedule of all outstanding contracts for supplies of materials for construction;

--518--

was prepared, by my direction, soon after, the adjournment of Congress; and they have been satisfactorily adjusted and closed, or limited so as to bring them to a speedy consummation. The estimates from this bureau provide for the repairs of the necessary vessels to keep up the contemplated force under any circumstances of- accident, disaster, or recall; and for the wear and tear of vessels in commission or in ordinary.

It is also submitted for the consideration of Congress, that an appropriation be made to rebuild the frigate Guerriere; for completing the iron war-steamer which Robert L. Stevens, esq., has contracted to build according to the provisions of the act of April 14,1842; and to build a brig to replace the Enterprise.

The estimates from the Bureau of Yards and Docks are made with a view of prosecuting with efficiency the dockyard at Memphis, with its appendages; the works at Pensacola; and to carry out the plan of improvements at the other dock-yards, which was adopted in the year 1828. Amongst the buildings estimated for at Pensacola, is a house or shelter for coals for steamers, which is deemed of very great consequence to the future operations of our naval forces. Whether appropriations shall be made now, or at a future time, to complete the plan of the Atlantic dockyards, is a question respectfully submitted for the consideration of Congress.

There are reasons of great weight in favor of progressing with all these works with some degree of activity. Labor is at a moderate price, and employment eagerly sought after. It is desirable to retain in the public service experienced mechanics and laborers accustomed to the routine of duty and to the regulations of the public works. Thus, on an emergency, the public interest will not suffer by suddenly calling into employment men who are not thus prepared to be efficient. By temporary employment and sudden discharges in dockyards, great distress is often produced, which justice to the men employed, and a due regard to the public interest, forbid.

By the act of 17th June, the Secretary of the Navy was directed to expend an appropriation therein made in "continuance of the work already commenced at Brooklyn for the construction of a stone dry-dock, or in the construction of a dry-dock on some other plan, if he shall deem the same better suited for the purposes of the navy, as in his discretion he shall deem best for the public interest."

In a subsequent section of the same act, the Secretary of the Navy was directed to appoint a competent board of officers and engineers to " examine, and report to Congress, at its next session the relative properties and advantages of a dry dock, and of the different kinds of floating docks, with or without a basin and railways." A board of officers and engineers, consisting of Commodore Kearney and Capt. Wyman, of the navy, and Capt. A. Talcott, and W. P. S. Sanger, civil engineers, were ordered to perform this duty, and to examine the harbors of Pensacola, and of Portsmouth, N. H., for the purposes mentioned in the said section. Uncontrollable circumstances have delayed the board in the performance of their duties. But they have made considerable progress, and their report may be expected at as early a day as will be consistent with the" thorough examination necessary to correct conclusions.

In discharge of the duty devolved on me by the section first above recited, I repaired to New York and examined the site at Brooklyn, and the plans of docks submitted for my inspection.

--519--

One of these was Gilbert's balance dock, and the other the sectional dock of Messrs. Moody & Dakin. Both are floating docks. Messrs. Moody & Dakin have patented a plan of basin and railway, as an appendage to receive the vessel which has been elevated by their dock. I am not aware that this last improvement had been put into actual operation, otherwise than by a model. In view of the terms employed, and of the duties imposed, by the two sections above referred to, I construed the law to require the establishment of a dry dock at Brooklyn. With our own experience of the admirable adaptation of such structures to the purposes of the navy, confirmed by the practice of the principal maritime powers of Europe, I felt it to be clearly my duty to proceed with the stone dry dock, already commenced, on a plan similar to those which had proved so successful at Norfolk and Boston. Of the relative properties and advantages of floating docks, with or without basin and railways, and of the stone dry dock, for the purposes of the navy, I do not deem it proper to express an opinion, as the aid in forming a correct conclusion, to be expected from the board charged with that inquiry by the direction of Congress, was not at my command.

The work on the stone dry dock is progressing in a satisfactory manner, under the direction of William Gibbs McNeill, esq., as engineer of the dock.

The estimates from the Bureau of Yards and Docks also provide for improvements at the several naval hospitals. These improvements are believed to be important for the protection of the public property, and to insure the safe and judicious treatment of the sick. The navy hospital fund is not sufficient to bear so heavy an outlay at once, and it is respectfully submitted for the consideration of Congress, whether an appropriation shall be made for these objects, in aid of the fund.

I would also respectfully state that there are now confined in the several naval hospitals twelve insane persons belonging to the naval service.

These noble edifices, which have been constructed for the accommodation and comfort of the sick and disabled, have no suitable apartments for the treatment of the insane. Those suffering under this deplorable malady cannot receive that judicious treatment which has, in modern times, so frequently led to a recovery of reason; and the raving of the maniac often prove highly injurious to the sick inmates of the hospital. I therefore suggest that, if it shall be the pleasure of Congress to provide an asylum for the insane of the District of Columbia, provision may be made for the insane of the navy and army in the same establishment.

I invite attention to a report from the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography on the subject of the delays and difficulties encountered in procuring, under contract, as required by existing laws, ordnance and gunpowder. The operation of the proviso to the act of the 3d March, 1843, which requires that all supplies for the navy, when time will permit, shall be procured by contract with the lowest bidder after advertisement, has not promoted the public interest, nor secured to the public, in all cases, the advantage of a full and fair competition. To the head of the department, and the officers making purchases, it is a great safeguard against reproaches or imputations of improper preferences. But experience has demonstrated that the public interest is not promoted in procuring many of the most important and necessary supplies for the navy in this mode. Some of these are ordnance, gunpowder, and medicines. The law gives no dis-

--520--

cretion, but the lowest bidder is to have the contract, whatever may be his means, his experience, or skill. If he declines, (which he may do without penalty,) it is to be offered to the next; and so on, until, not unfrequently, injurious delays occur, and well-founded complaints are made, that, by combination among bidders, the prices paid are higher than the articles would have cost in open market.

I deem it to be my duty to ask that the provisions of this law, applying only to this department, may be revised and modified.

The building for a depot of charts is completed, and a substantial wall constructed around the square. The grading has been partially made and to complete it, and to construct a house for the superintendent, an estimate is submitted, and an appropriation recommended. The instruments purchased have been received and placed in the depot. They are well selected, and may be advantageously employed in the necessary observations with a view to calculate nautical almanacs. For these we are now indebted to foreign nations. This work may be done by our own naval officers, without injury to the service, and at a very small expense. It is confidently believed that, in the process of time, a most perfect set of charts may be supplied from the depot to the navy and to the commercial marine, entirely to be relied on for accuracy, at the mere cost of publication.

The operation of the system of supplying the navy with clothing, established by the act of 26th August, 1842, has been highly satisfactory. An appropriation of one hundred thousand dollars is required to meet existing and future liabilities which will call for payment before the returns from the pay of the men will enable the department to continue the supplies. It is believed that, after this appropriation, the addition, of 10 per cent, on the prime cost will cover all losses, and the receipts meet the disbursements, while the system possesses the great merit of furnishing to the seamen the best clothes at moderate prices.

The navy hospital fund on the 1st day of November, 1844, consisted of $230,434 14. The number of aged and disabled seamen who have sought a home at the asylum near Philadelphia has so increased, that it was found necessary to their comfort to provide for withdrawing the governor and surgeon from the rooms occupied by them in the building. Two houses, according to the original plan, have been erected, and are nearly completed, to be occupied by these officers. A small slip of ground adjoining the site of the asylum has been purchased at a reasonable price. These are believed to be very important additions to the establishment

If it shall be the pleasure of Congress to authorize the investment of the fund in securities of the United States, it would add considerably to its income. The money is now unproductive in the treasury, and I earnestly recommend that authority be given to make the investment.

The condition of the navy pension fund, and the claims on it, are stated in the report of the Commissioner of Pensions, herewith transmitted.

Great anxiety is felt by many of the surgeons and assistant surgeons, and of the pursers in the navy, to have allowed them an assimilated rank; the corresponding officers in the army enjoy it, without detriment to the service. I respectfully recommend the subject to consideration.

Pursuant to the act of the 17th of June last, the naval storekeepers at Rio de Janeiro, Hong Kong, Mahon, the Cape de Verdes, and the Sand-

--521--

wich islands, were discontinued; and, with as little delay as practicable, Officers of the navy were ordered to perform those duties. As these officers were required to give bond before they entered on the execution of their orders, some delay occurred in making the selection. The compensation allowed to each is $1,500 per annum, and to each is allowed a clerk at $600 per annum.

The experimental examinations of coals, of iron, and of copper, in which Professor Walter R. Johnson was engaged, and on which he reported at the last session of Congress, have been suspended, the appropriations being exhausted. If it shall be the pleasure of Congress to have them continued, an appropriation will be necessary.

In pursuance of the directions of the act of June 17th, orders were given for the discharge of all persons in the navy appointed as masters' mates, to do duty as midshipmen, since 4th day of August, 1842, and who were not at the time of their appointment seamen of the first class. These orders have been executed as to all persons thus situated who were in the United States, or who have returned from foreign stations.

The third section of the act repealed so much of previous acts of Congress as provided that officers temporarily performing the duties belonging to those of a higher grade should receive the compensation of such higher grade while actually so employed.

1 respectfully suggest that the operation of this repealing act on those officers who are thus employed on foreign stations will probably involve them in very serious embarrassments. Uninformed of its passage, they will regulate their expenditures by the rate of compensation which they supposed that the law accords to them, and in some of the squadrons may not be advised of their mistake until they have received the higher pay, and expended it to so large an amount as to leave them without any income from their pay for a long time. It is not desirable that the officers should be indebted to the government; and to many, the regular receipt of their pay is necessary to their support.

I would respectfully suggest that the operation of the law, as to them, should be postponed until information of its passage shall be received on board the vessel to which the officer so situated may be attached; and I would recommend that it should not embrace the case of passed midshipmen performing the duty of master. The expenses necessarily incurred by this class of officers in the performance of these duties, are beyond the pay of their own grade.

Their services as master are highly advantageous, and, with the present limited number of warranted masters, many of whom are unable to go to sea, from age or infirmity, indispensable.

The report of the commandant of the marine corps, on the necessity of an increase of the numbers in that branch of the service, is respectfully recommended to consideration.

I respectfully repeat the recommendation of the last annual report, that an additional number of permanent clerks be allowed to this department and the several bureaus. The force now allowed by law, except for a limited time, and for temporary purposes, is not sufficient to perform the duties which the present arrangement of the business in the department requires. The appropriation now made for temporary purposes, and the two clerks allowed for the current year, with an addition of two or three

--522--

bookkeepers in the bureaus, would procure a sufficient number of permanent clerks.

The division of the duties of this department, made by the act of reorganization of 31st August, 1842, has produced much system and order in the operations, and promises to be yet more beneficial in its results, under regulations suggested by experience. The duties of the chiefs of the bureaus are very laborious; and advantage would result from a division of the duties of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair, and the establishment of another bureau.

The estimates from the several bureaus, and from the commandant of the marine corps, of the sums which will be required for the proposed service of the ensuing year, are transmitted with this report.

Respectfully submitted:

J. Y. MASON.

To the President of the United States.

LIST OF PAPERS

ACCOMPANYING THE REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY.

List of deaths, resignations, and dismissions in the navy.

Estimates for the office of the Secretary of the Navy, bureaus, and southwest executive building.

General estimate for the naval service, including the marine corps.

Balances of appropriations on the 30th of November, 1844.

Reports and detailed estimates from the—

Bureau of Yards and Docks,

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography.

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, &c.

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing.

Bureau of Medicine arid Surgery. .

Letter from the Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, on the mode of procuring cannon and powder for the navy.

Schedule of proposals made to the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing.

Letter from the Chief of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, on the number of maniacs confined in the several naval hospitals.

Letter from naval surgeons on the subject of rank to the medical officers of the navy.

Report of the officers appointed to select a site for the navy-yard it Memphis, Tennessee, with a drawing.

Letters from Professor W. R. Johnson, on the subject of further experiments on iron, copper, and coal. (Not included in hypertext version.)

Letter from General A. Henderson, on the increase of the rank and file of the marine corps.

Estimates from the paymaster and quartermaster of the marine corps.

Report from the Commissioner of Pensions, with lists of invalid, widow and privateer pensioners, and estimates.

--523--

List of deaths in the navy, as ascertained at the department, since December 1, 1843.

Name and rank.

Date.

Place.

Captains.

E. P. Kennedy

March 28, 1844

Norfolk, Virginia.

Alexander J. Dallas

June 3, 1844

On board the frigate Savannah, Callao bay.

Beverly Kennon

Feb. 28, 1844

On board the United States ship Princeton, Potomac river.

Edward R. Shubrick

March 12, 1844

On board the frigate Columbia, at sea.

A. S. Ten Eyck

March 28, 1844

New Brunswick, N. J.

Commander.

Jona. D. Williamson

April 10, 1844

Island of Cuba.

Lieutenants.

John F. Mercer

Feb. 10, 1844

New York.

Francis E. Barry

Aug. 19, 1844

St. Louis, Missouri.

Francis E. Baker

May 16, 1844

Valparaiso.

James E. Brown

Sept. 3, 1844

Westmoreland court-house, Virginia.

Ferdinand Piper

Oct. 28, 1844

Drowned in Pensacola bay.

Surgeons.

A. A. Adee

Feb. 22, 1844

New York.

Lewis Wolfley

July 21, 1844

Port Praya, Cape de Verdes.

Assistant Surgeon.

Robert B. Banister

July 12, 1844

Petersburg, Virginia.

Pursers.

James H. Clark

Sept. 19, 1844

Brooklyn, New York.

Grenville C. Cooper

March 2, 1844

Washington city.

Arthur W. Upshur

Sept., 1844

At sea, on board the sloop Falmouth.

Chaplain.

George W. Swan

Sept. 22, 1844

At Philadelphia.

--524--

List of deaths in the navy—continued.

Name and rank.

Date.

Place.

Passed Midshipmen.

Henry Cadwalader

July, 1844

Philadelphia.

Hambleton F. Porter

Aug. 10, 1844

On board the sch'nr Flirt, Charleston, S. C.

Midshipmen.

George W. Harrison

June 6, 1844

On board the brig Perry, at Macao.

Jno. B. Prentiss

Dec. 31, 1843

Rio de Janeiro.

Professor of Mathematics.

William S. Fox

Oct. 28, 1844

Drowned in Pensacola bay.

Carpenter.

Loman Smith

May 31, 1844

Norfolk.

Sailmakers.

Samuel V. Hawkins

July 27, 1844

Portsmouth, N. H.

William Ward

May 24, 1844

Baltimore.

Josiah Faxon

June 30, 1844

Callao, on board the frigate United States.

List of resignations in the navy since December 1, 1843.

Name and rank.

Date of acceptance.

Lieutenant.

James J. Forbes

November 23, 1844.

Purser.

John C. Holland

November 29, 1844.

Passed Assistant Surgeons.

Victor L. Godon

September 20, 1844.

Alexander J. Wedderburn

June 14, 1844.

H. D. Taliaferro

November 15, 1844.

--525—

List of resignations in the navy—continued.

Name and rank.

Date of acceptance.

Assistant Surgeons.

J. W. B. Greenhow

September 10, 1844.

Alfred C. Holt

November 18, 1844.

Chaplain.

J. P. B. Wilmer

July 23, 1844.

Passed Midshipman.

A. Hubley Jenkins

March 12, 1844.

Midshipman.

Lewis Beard

July 23, 1844.

Boatswains.

John Hunter

March 9, 1844.

William C. Burns

March 10, 1844.

Sailmakers.

Samuel B. Banister

July 10, 1844.

George S. Dow

September 18, 1844.

Navy Agent.

William Mackay

October 10, 1844.

Engineers.

Thomas McDonough, 3d assistant

November 14, 1844.

George M. Copeland, 3d assistant

November 30, 1844.

--526--

Last of dismissions from the navy since December 1, 1843.

Name and rank.

Date of dismission.

Lieutenant.

John W. West

November 21, 1844.

Purser.

William P. Zantzinger

January 17, 1844.

Chaplain.

John Robb

Appointment ceased with the session of Congress, to wit, June 17, 1844; he having been rejected by the Senate.

Passed Midshipmen.

James W. Ripley

November 18, 1844.

Charles T. Crocker

November 18, 1844.

Midshipmen.

James L. S. Beckwith

September 23, 1844.

Albert G. Cook

November 21, 1844.

Navy Agent.

Robert C. Wetmore

July 1, 1844.

Engineer in Chief.

G. L. Thompson

October 3, 1844.

--527--

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Salary of the Secretary of the Navy, per act of February 20, 1819

$6,000

Salaries of the clerks and messengers employed in the office of the Secretary of the Navy, per act of August 31, 1842

13,350

Additional salary to one clerk, per fourth section of the act of August 26, 1842

200

Total for salaries

19,550

Contingent expenses—

Blank books, binding, and stationery

$1,000

Printing

400

Labor

400

Newspapers and periodicals

200

Miscellaneous items

840

2,840

22,390

SUBMITTED:

For salaries of additional clerks—

Two at $1,200 each

$2,400

Two at $1,000 each

2,000

$4,400

For extra clerk-hire

3,000

7,400

Navy Department, November 25, 1844.

General estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy, and the several bureaus of the Navy Department, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Office.

Salaries.

Contingent.

Secretary of the Navy

$19,550

$2,840

Bureau of Yards and Docks

10,400

500

Ordnance and Hydrography

8,400

520

Construction, Equipment, and Repair

9,700

500

Previsions and Clothing

7,100

770

Medicine and Surgery

6,600

870

61,750

6,000

--528--

SUBMITTED:

For the office of the Secretary of the Navy

$7,400

For Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair

2,800

Ordnance and Hydrography

1,200

Provisions and Clothing

2,564

13,964

Estimate of the sums required for the expenses of the southwest executive building, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Superintendent

$250

Three watchmen

1,095

Labor

325

Fuel and light

1,350

Miscellaneous items

1,150

4,170

SUBMITTED:

An additional sum of $200 each for the three watchmen, in consideration of their being required to watch day and night, viz: from 3 o'clock p. m. until relieved by the messengers of the department about 8 o'clock a. mi When their salaries were formerly fixed at $500, they were required to watch only from sunset to sunrise,

--529--

General estimate of the sums required for the support of the navy for the fiscal year commencing on the 1st July, 1845, and ending on the 30th June, 1846.

Estimated for 1845-'46

Estimated for 1844-'45.

Appropriated for 1844-'45.

Pay of commission, warrant, and petty officers and seamen, including the engineer corps of the navy:

For vessels in commission

$2,152,728

For navy-yards and shore stations

553,152

For officers on leave, or waiting orders

265,250

$2,971,130 00

$3,722,426 00

$2,509,189,00

Pay of superintendents

75,270 00

88,320 00

66,820 00

Provisions, including transportation, cooperage, and other expenses

792,780 00

1,027,037 00

615,828 00

Clothing for the navy

100,000 00

Surgeons' necessaries and appliances for the sick and hurt of the naval service, including the marine corps

37,300 00

42,250 00

12,250 00

Increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission

1,800,000 00

1,900,000 00

1,000,000 00

Ordnance and ordnance stores, including all incidental expenses

466,457 50

620,885 00

370,885 00

Nautical, books, maps, charts, instruments, binding or repairing the same, and all expenses of the Hydrographical office

43,000 00

43,200 00

23,200 00

Improvement and repairs of navy yards

1,226,223 30

502,202 55

259,674 66

Improvement and repairs of hospital buildings and grounds

177,612 77

19,510 00

Repairs of magazines

825 00

1,350 00

1,350 00

Contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz:

Freight and transportation; printing and stationery; books, models, and drawings; purchase and repair of fire-engines, and for machinery; repair of steam engines in yards; purchase and maintenance of horses and oxen; carts, timber-wheels, and workmen's tools; postage of letters on public service; coal and other fuel, and oil and candles for navy-yards and shore stations; incidental labor not chargeable to any other appropriation; labor intending the delivery of public stores and supplies on foreign stations; wharfage, dockage, storage, and rent; travelling expenses of officers; funeral expenses; commissions, clerk-hire, store-rent, office-rent, stationery, and fuel, to navy agents and naval storekeepers; premiums and incidental expenses of recruiting; apprehending deserters; per diem allowance to persons attending courts martial and courts of inquiry, or other services authorized by law; compensation to judge advocates; pilotage and towing vessels; assistance rendered to vessels in distress

600,009 00

500,000 00

400,000 00

Contingent expenses fur objects not hereinbefore enumerated

5,000 00

5,000 00

5,000 00

8,295,598 66

8,472,210 55

5,264,196 66

--530--

General estimate—continued.

Estimated for 1845-46.

Estimated for 1844-'45.

Appropriated for 1844-'45.

SUBMITTED:

For building a frigate, to replace the Guerriere

$175,000 00

For building and equipping a brig, to replace the schooner Enterprise

75,000 00

For completing war steamer for harbor defence

340,000 00

For erecting a house for the superintendent of the depot of charts

8,000 00

For removing the under-ground work, arching and paving galleries of magnetic apartment

3,000 00

601,000 00

Notes.—In the foregoing estimates are included the following items:

For improvement of navy-yard at Memphis, rendered necessary by the act of June 15, 1844, (estimated for 1845-'46)

$487,000 00

For improvement of navy-yard at Pensacola, (estimated for 1845-46)

171,438 45

658,438 45

These two items make up more than one half the estimate for the improvement and repairs of all the navy-yards.

The item for clothing of the navy can scarcely be regarded as an appropriation, but rather as a loan; as it will ultimately be returned to the appropriation for "pay of the navy."

Last year the estimate for "contingent enumerated," was $500,000, and the appropriation only, $400,000; and a deficiency is apprehended before the end of the current fiscal year. The sum of $600,000 has therefore been estimated for the ensuing year, as the lowest which will suffice for the demands of the service under that head. For explanations respecting the other items, reference is respectfully made to the reports in detail from the several bureaus.

MARINE CORPS.

Estimated
for 1845-'46.

Estimated
for 1844-'45.

Appropriated
for 1844-'45.

Pay and subsistence

$200,771 16

$200,815 60

$200,815 60

Provisions for marines serving on shore

45,069 90

45,011 95

45,011 95

Clothing

43,662 50

43,635 00

43,635 00

Fuel

16,274 12

16,274 12

16,274 12

Military stores

2,300 00

2,800 00

2,800 00

Transportation

8,000 00:

8,000 00

8,000 00

Contingencies

17,980 00

17,980 00

17,980 00

Repairs of barracks

6,000 00

6,000 00

6,000 00

340,057 68

340,516 67

340,516 67

SUBMITTED:

For commencing new barracks—

At Charlestown, Massachusetts

50,000 00

50,000 00

At Brooklyn, New York

50,000 00

50,000 00

At Gosport, Virginia

50,000 00

50,000 00

At Pensacola

25,000 00

25,000 00

175,000 00

175,000 00

--531--

Statement of balances of naval appropriations and funds remaining in the treasury the 1st day of December, 1844.

Pay, and subsistence of the navy

$1,282,888 38

Pay of superintendents

40,879 98

Provisions

279,915 10

increase, repairs, armament, &c.

771,440 29

Contingent expenses enumerated

175,696 57

Contingent expenses not enumerated

3,784 72

Navy pension fund

3,702 14

Navy hospital fund

224,934 63

Clothing for the navy

40,137 75

Ordnance and ordnance stores for navy

124,967 98

Navy-yard, Portsmouth, N. H.

8,304 45

Navy-yard, Boston

8,871 66

Navy-yard, New York

147,236 51

Navy-yard, Philadelphia

5,335 17

Navy-yard, Washington

1,713 91

Navy-yard, Norfolk

18,179 44

Navy-yard, Pensacola

16,255 97

Navy-yard, Memphis

100,000 00

Magazine at Boston

1,263 99

Magazine at New York

875 00

Magazine at Washington

700 00

Magazine at Norfolk

675 22

Hospital at Boston

1,139 36

Hospital at New York

13,520 63

Hospital at Pensacola

398 32

Medicine and hospital stores, arrearages

9,132 18

Surgeons' necessaries and appliances

29,170 10

Suppression of the slave-trade

3,482 81

Books, maps, &c., of Hydrographical office

23,200 00

Fuel for steam-vessels

36,047 19

Medium war steamers

34,009 77

Stevens's war steamer

250,000 00

Purchase of American hemp

50,000 00

Hemp agencies

1,139 34

Iron steamer at Pittsburg

86,726 99

Privateer pension fund

5,020 07

Pensions to widows, act of 1834

21 87

Pensions to widows and orphans, act of 1837

24,155 86

Pensions, invalid

45,098 43

Pensions, Grampus and Sea Gull

9,232 26

Home squadron

1,173 24

Survey of Apalachicola

4,912 29

Survey of Memphis

2,755 88

Printing and publishing rules

1,000 00

Temporary wharf at Pensacola

10,371 00

Permanent wharf at Pensacola

60,000 00

Ship-house and slip at Pensacola

40,000 00

Store-house at Pensacola

20.000 00

Timber shed at Pensacola

20,000 00

--532--

Examination of yards at Pensacola and Portsmouth, N. H.

$4,215 00

Grading University square

6,500 00

Steamers on the lakes

200 00

Privateer General Armstrong

371 33

Statement of balances of appropriations for the marine corps remaining in the treasury on the 1st day of December, 1844,

Pay and subsistence

123,047 13

Clothing

12,056 52

Medicines

124 65

Military stores

1,208 90

Contingent expenses

6,501 52

Repairs of barracks

16,182 95

Fuel

23,412 08

Transportation

10,256 98

Provisions

79,612 32

Total balances for navy and marine corps

4,323,155 83

--533--

REPORT FROM THE BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS.

Bureau of Yards and Docks,

November 19, 1844.

Sir:

I have the honor to hand for your information, as directed by your letter of the 29th of October last, estimates for the improvement of the several navy-yards; for the repairs of all objects contained in them, on which they may be requisite; for the support of the civil and naval portions of the establishments of the same; and for the improvement and repairs of the hospitals and magazines. They are also accompanied by the estimates for the ordinary of the yards, the receiving vessels, and the recruiting stations.

The amount called for on the present occasion is $2,154,383 16, being $898,108 61 more than was called for in the last year. The reason of this increase will be apparent, when we consider the continuation of the dock at New York upon the original plan, the result of experience and economy; the large improvements contemplated at Pensacola, and the commencement of a new yard on the Mississippi river, from which much advantage is expected to be derived; and the various additions to the older yards, required by increased demands for accommodation, and the increasing wants of the navy afloat.

To place the subject before you in a perspicuous manner, it will be proper to state somewhat in detail what has been done at each of the yards, and what it is proposed to provide for in the ensuing year.

In the first place, at the Portsmouth navy-yard the sum of $32,783 16 has been expended on various objects since 1st October, 1843, up to the same period of the present year, including the erection of quay-walls in. the front of the yard; the removal of materials, for building a permanent wharf in the place of one which was found to have given way by reason of the inequality of the bottom on which the superstructure was laid; for graduating the yard, and filling it in; and for repairs of the various edifices. The sum of $44,220 60 was asked for the present year, and for the succeeding year it is proposed to ask for the sum of $66,395 92; a large portion of which may be usefully employed in the prosecution of a plan by which, when finished, it will become of much greater utility than it is at present. With this sum, if appropriated, a number of conveniences essential to the despatch and economy of work, the increase of working room, the erection of a permanent water-front, with additional wharves, and a residence far the officer second in command, may be made. In order to bring the surface of the yard to a proper level, it will be found necessary to cut down so near the house occupied by that officer, as to render it difficult of access, as well as unstable. It is, at best, but an indifferent one, being of wood, and very old. It will also be found proper to remove a portion of a timber-shed, and re-erect it in a more convenient place. By this work there will be much room gained, and much labor saved, as it would require a strong force to haul timber and other heavy articles to the height on which the shed now stands.

At Boston the sum of $40,143 70 has been expended within the year ending the 1st of October last. The, objects accomplished by this have been—a wall on the northwest side of the yard, one on the east of the mast-house, a house for machinery and smithery, a wall on the west side of ship-house G, (a wharf which was very much needed for the accommo-

--534--

dation of vessels equipping and in ordinary,) and a number of requisite conveniences, and for the repairs of various buildings. There will be required, to carry on the improvements according to the plan, and to correspond with the importance of the establishment, a sum of $133,819 24. With this, it is in contemplation to build one wing of the house No. 15, for the storage of provisions and various other articles, for which there is not now sufficient accommodation; also, a cordage store, and a loft for fitting rigging; a wharf on piles at the angle No. 59; to complete the wharf between H and I; to build one in addition, and to fill up a portion of the yard—the last of which will add much to its convenience. It is also desirable to have a permanent coal-house for the reception of the coal to be kept on hand for the use of steamers afloat; stables for the better preservation of the teams and their food; and a fund for repairs, which annual decay makes necessary. It seems to be desirable that the above-named improvements should be carried on with as much celerity as a due regard to economy and the proper seasons will warrant; as at the yards in which there are docks, much more work will be expected to be done, and consequently there will Be a much greater accumulation of materials and demand for their preservation.

The yard at New York comes next in order, and in importance also; as, with the advantage which will accrue to it from the erection of a permanent dock of stone, that establishment, which has heretofore been of inferior consequence on that account, will be put on a par, in a great measure, in point of advantage and accommodation, with those at Boston and Norfolk. For this the sum of $81,118 was required last year; and of. the sum granted, $13,883 52 have been usefully and advantageously expended in the repairs of buildings and a ship-house; in dredging out the channel; in a wall for the security of the yard on the west side; in procuring materials for a wharf on the bank off the navy-yard; in a guard-house, and on various other and smaller objects. It is intended to call for a sum, in addition to the balance on hand, of $146,500 for its further and more rapid improvement, exclusive of a sum which will hereafter be asked for, for the continuation of the dock. With this it is contemplated to erect a large smithery, sufficient for the exigencies of the yard generally; a new storehouse, much wanted; to continue the wharf on the bank opposite the yard, (called, for the sake of distinction, a cob-wharf;) to build a permanent coal-house for the fuel of steamers, as at Boston; to furnish a sum adequate to the contingency of repairs, and for one or two small objects which are also much wanted, as stables, a water-tank, &c., &c. It may be proper to say something in explanation of the use and propriety of the cob-wharf; and a few words will, it is believed, be sufficient to produce conviction on those points. By its erection, the channel on which we are annually dredging, to preserve a proper depth of water, will be rendered so free from the deposite of mud and silt, that the above-mentioned tedious and somewhat expensive operation may be dispensed with. We shall also obtain a large waterfront, more than double that of the yard, for the accommodation of vessels; and, in addition to this advantage, there will be secure places for the laying up in ordinary of three ships of the line, or a larger number of a smaller class, free from the risk of fire, and safe from the danger of ice. Within it also will be received all the mud as it is taken from the channel; and in a short time a large space (upwards of 23 acres) for buildings, the stowage of guns, shot, and anchors,

--535--

with their skids, and other appropriate fixtures, will be thus gained, without the expense of an additional purchase.

At Philadelphia, the sum of $34,615 16 was asked for in the last year; and of the sum allowed, $7,738 84 have been expended in the prosecution of the works begun in previous years, which consist of the extension of three wharves, rendered necessary by the shallowness of the water front, from the accumulation of the muddy collections by the downward current of the Delaware; of the erection, in part, of a quay-wall for the convenience of landing and embarking stores, as well as for the security and accommodation of the vessels resorting to it; and for the repairs of the various edifices. The sum of $48,394 will be required for the ensuing year, to be disposed of as follows: for the outer piers of the wharves Nos. 2 and 3; for the wharf No. 4; for the outer pier of the wharf of the same number; for filling in, bridging, and for the repairs of the various buildings. The extension of the wharves, rendered necessary by the already assigned cause, must be followed, in order to be efficient, by an outer pier or wharf head to each, to prevent further accumulations of mud. When these are completed, which it is believed will be effected by the sums now asked for, a confident hope is entertained that they will remain without further expense for a long time. No estimate has been made for officers' houses, because it is believed that the improvements proposed in the foregoing statement will absorb all that will be appropriated, and they are at this time considered of paramount importance. They have, it is believed, been twice or thrice estimated for, and as often stricken out. When we shall have to make estimates for the next year, it would be proper to include a portion of them, at least.

At Washington, $46,230 were called for in the last year; and of the sum granted, $5,604 96 only have been as yet expended; but the residue will scarcely suffice to answer all the demands to be made on it previous to the close of the year—and that, too, with the exercise of great care and economy. The objects to which this has been applied are—the filling in and repairs of wharves; the increase of conveniences and appliances of machinery to the hydraulic proving machine shop, and the anchor smithery and forges; with the requisite repairs, which are annually required in a greater or less degree. It is proposed to call for an amount of $55,094 for further improvements in this yard, by which its ability to provide all articles of iron and metal, particularly chain cables, anchors, water tanks, galleys, and castings, will be much increased. As such work has been, for a long time carried on and well executed here, it is desirable that there should be means provided for its extension, and on a much larger scale than hitherto, and that the improvements should be mainly directed to that object. Its situation at the head of tide-water, and its contiguity to the coal and iron districts, seem to point it out as peculiarly applicable to all the purposes of manufacturing for the use of the navy exclusively. With these remarks, I shall finish this brief statement by recapitulating the items to which the appropriation is to be applied. They are as follows: for filling up a portion of the timber dock, (gaining thereby room and health;) completing the laboratory buildings, for which a very small sum only was last year provided; for further improvements in the machine, camboose, and chain-cable shops, in the anchor forges, tilt-hammers and proving-machine, shops, and for the repairs of buildings.

--536--

At Norfolk, the sum of $124,680 was called for by the estimates of the last year. Of what was granted, and balances of appropriation for previous years, a sum of $20,437 40 only has been expended, in consequence of the small aggregate amount of those two funds. If the means had been at hand, much more might have judiciously and usefully been expended in that large establishment, capable of being made to afford such facilities, and in a climate where work is rarely suspended by the severity of cold. It is proposed to ask for this year the sum of $116,981 78, to be applied to the following objects: for the completion of a building and launching: slip, which was made to answer temporarily for the Jamestown sloop Of war; for the extension of the quay-walls in front, to the north side of the timber dock; for the completion of the timber dock; for finishing store-house No. 16; for the erection of another and a timber-shed jointly; for the completion of the bridge across the timber dock; for a permanent coal-house, as at Boston and New York; and for repairs generally. The first item it is very desirable to complete, as such an improvement is much wanted, and its permanent erection, whilst it insures security to the vessel which may occupy it, will be strictly consonant with sound economy ; for each building is designed, as it should be in each yard, to be of the most durable construction. The second item is also of great consequence, as it is the continuation of a work long since begun, and on which much progress has been made, but which has been retarded for the want of means. To carry it out to the timber dock will afford increased accommodation, and add greatly to the convenience of the yard, by insuring a quick removal of the deposite brought down by the ebb tide. The third is an item of similar import, as it is to form a part of the walls by its connexion with it. if this could be effected, we should have a vast basin for the immersion of timber, wherein it might be seasoned, and at the same time stowed away; thus producing two good results—the preparation of timber for construction, and a saving in timber sheds. Many more of these must be provided than were originally contemplated, if this work is not finished. The fourth item, No. 16, was begun two years ago, but has not been finished, as we have not had funds sufficient for the purpose. It is very desirable to have this building completed, and also to have No. 13, of a similar character, built; as, for the want of them, a very large quantity of that valuable timber, live oak, is now under temporary coverings but little better than sheds, exposed to fire and to storms, and yet these are the best that can now be afforded. The bridge (sixth item) across The timber dock is now in progress, and a small additional sum will enable us to complete that by the middle of the ensuing spring. The connexion between the two portions of the yard, now interrupted by water, will be then re-established, and additional security against fire be thus afforded to all sections, whilst the facility of communication will be the means of economy and despatch. The seventh item, a coal-house, is also requisite for the stowage of coal for navy steamers; for at this yard, as well as at Boston, New York, and' Pensacola, large deposites of that article are contemplated as a measure of prudence and expediency; The last item: is of import similar to that which is last enumerated at the other yards—viz: repairs; and of an importance proportionate to the number of objects by which it may be shared.

At Pensacola, the sum of $166,708 was granted at the last session of Congress for the commencement of works of importance, and for the pur-

--537--

pose of gradually enabling that establishment to afford repairs and supplies to the vessels standing in need of them, and to place it, as rapidly as circumstances will permit, in a situation to become the secure resource of the navy, in that quarter. Contracts have been entered into for the supply of materials of all the qualities necessary to prosecute the intended objects. A plan of the yard has been prepared and approved; and, as soon as materials can be procured in a sufficient quantity, the works will be commenced, and the yard have an organization corresponding with that of the others, by the employment of additional master mechanics, with the necessary workmen and laborers. The commission appointed by you will, in a short time, it is expected, be able to report Upon the best plan of a dock for that place; and the civil engineer of the navy will be at hand to lay down the works conformably to their plans, and to direct the mode of procedure under them. It has been deemed proper to propose for a sum sufficient to-complete the permanent wharf, the ship-house and slip, the store-house and the timber-shed, for which appropriations were made, in part, in June last; and to ask for a further sum for the erection of four houses, which are almost indispensable for the officers; as that yard, at a distance from town and city, affords none of those conveniences to be found in the vicinity of those to the north. A permanent coal-house for the sea-steamers' coal, and a provision for the necessary repairs, complete the estimates for this yard. The whole sum is $1,71,438 45.

For the navy-yard at Memphis, the sum of $487,090 is estimated as a commencement of improvements, to be expended in the embankments, graduation, excavation, and walling, to secure the river fronts, (of which there are several, the Wolf river running through the site, and rendering much of that kind of work expedient,) for six dwelling-houses, and for the foundation of a rope-walk. A plan of this yard has been made with great care, and accompanies this report. On it the boundaries are clearly laid down, and its face and general character shown; and an examination, even cursorily, will show that great labor, involving considerable expense, must be incurred to render it advantageous. Its natural situation, with the resources at hand, by means of its extensive intercourse with nearly all the producing States, will then enable it speedily to attain a degree of usefulness commensurate with the outlay, and gratifying to its projectors. In a short time it will be necessary to give an organization to this yard, by the appointment of officers, both naval and civil, and the preparation for the employment of mechanics, laborers, &c., &c. At Sackett's Harbor, in the State of New York, a very small appropriation will be required for the preservation of the embankment of a portion of Navy point, on which are stowed a number of guns and shot, and for leaking covers or sheds for their protection from the weather. For this, the sum of $600 will be ample. The ground, of which this point forms a part, has been rented by the department for many years; and on it are a ship-of-the-line in frame, and a ship-house to protect her. The first was commenced previous to the treaty of peace of 1814, when it was supposed we should have a further contest for the mastery of lake Ontario; and the latter was built after the peace, to preserve her. Another ship-of-the-line was also under construction at the same time; but, being left without a cover, soon began to rot, and was disposed of. The ship-house stands in need of some repairs; and it may become a question of

--538--

some consequence to determine if it be necessary to go to the expense of its repair; also to continue to rent the premises, to purchase them, or to relinquish them altogether. The introduction of steamers into active warfare, the celerity of their movements, and the preference awarded to them for their various advantages on the lakes, would seem to preclude the idea of having another fleet of sailing vessels, if ever an occasion for its use should occur.

Having laid before you a detail of the various wants of the several yards, 1 conclude by offering, as stated in the first part of this report, an item of $150,000 for the permanent stone dock at New York, which, with the balance of the appropriation of the last year, of $119,100, will be sufficient to meet the demands. It has been commenced under the direction of W. G. McNeill, esq.; and there are now a considerable number of persons employed on it. So rapid a progress as is desirable cannot, at this season of the year, be made; but, on the return of mild weather and longer days, it will be advanced with all the celerity which a proper regard for durability will insure.

Accompanying the estimates from this bureau, are submitted those for the several hospitals and the asylum, (marked Y. & D. No. 6,) which have been carefully examined by the Chief of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, and have been deemed very important by him.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks.

To Hon. John Y. Mason,

Secretary of the Navy.

Schedule of the papers which accompany the report of the Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks to the Secretary of the Navy.

Y. & D.—A.—General estimate.

Y. & D. No. 1.—Receiving vessels, in detail, being part of the first item in the general estimate.

Y. & D. No. 2.—Recruiting stations, in detail, being part of the first item in the general estimate.

Y. & D. No. 3.—Officers and others at yards and stations, in detail.

Y. & D. No. 4.—Improvements and repairs of navy-yards.

Y. & D. No. 5.—Statement showing the sums which make up the first and second items in the general estimate.

Y. & D. No. 6.—Improvements and repairs of hospitals and the asylum.

Y. & D. No. 7.—Repairs of magazines.

--539--

Y. & D.—A.

GENERAL ESTIMATE FOR YARDS AND DOCKS.

Estimated amounts that will be required for the naval service for the year ending June 30, 1846, so far as coming under the cognizance of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, in addition to the unexpended balances which may remain in the treasury July 1, 1845.

Estimated for the year ending June 30, 1846.

Estimated for the year ending June 30, 1815.

1st. For the pay of commission, warrant, and petty officers, (see paper marked Y. & D. No. 5,)

$527,452 00

$469,862 00

2d. For the pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishments at the several yards and stations, (see paper marked Y. & D. No. 5,)

72,270 00

88,320 00

3d. For improvements and the necessary repairs in navy-yards, (see paper marked Y. & D. No. 4,)

1,226,223 39

502,202 55

4th. For hospital buildings and their dependencies, (see paper marked Y. & D. No. 6,)

177,612 77

19,540 00

5th. For magazines, (see paper marked Y. & D. No. 7,)

825 00

1,350 00

6th. For contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz:

For the freight and transportation of materials and stores for yards and docks; for printing and stationery; for books, maps, models, and drawings; for the purchase and repair of fire-engines, and for machinery of every description; for the repair of steam-engines in yards; for the purchase and maintenance of horses and oxen; for carts, timber-wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for coals and other fuel; for candles and oil for the use of navy-yards and shore stations; for incidental labor at navy-yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; and for no other object or purpose whatever

150,000 00

175,000 00

2,154,383 16

1,256,274 55

Bureau of Yards and Docks, November, 1844.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

--540--

Y. & D. No. 1.

RECEIVING VESSELS.

Estimate of the number and pay of officers and others required, for seven receiving vessels, for the year ending June 30, 1846, if no alteration is made in the number of vessels, or in their respective complements.

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Baltimore.

Norfolk.

New Orleans.

Charleston.

Total.

Aggregate amount.

Captains

1

1

1

3

$10,500

Commanders-

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

7

14,700

Lieutenants

4

4

2

2

4

2

2

20

30,000

Masters

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

7

7,000

Pursers

1

1

1

3

7,500

Surgeons

1

1

1

3

7,200

Assistant surgeons

1

1

1

3

3,600

Chaplains

1

1

1

3

3,600

Passed midshipmen

3

3

3

9

6,750

Midshipmen

6

6

3

3

6

3

3

30

10,500

Clerks

1

1

1

3

1,500

Boatswains

1

1

1

3

2,400

Gunners

1

1

1

3

2,400

Carpenters

1

1

1

3

2,400

Sailmakers

1

1

1

3

2,400

Yeomen

1

1

1

3

1,440

Boatswain's males

2

2

1

1

2

1

1

10

2,280

Gunner's mates

1

1

1

3

684

Carpenter's mates

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

7

1,596

Quartermasters

3

3

3

9

1,944

Masters-at-arms

1

1

1

3

684

Ships' corporals

1

1

1

3

540

Ships' stewards

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

7

1,512

Officers' stewards

2

2

1

1

2

1

1

10

2,160

Surgeons' stewards

1

1

1

3

648

Ships' cooks

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

7

1,512

Officers' cooks-

2

2

1

1

2

1

1

10

1,800

Captains of hold

1

1

1

3

540

Seamen

15

15

2

2

15

4

2

55

7,920

Ordinary seamen

35

35

4

4

35

9

4

126

15,120

Landsmen & apprentices

50

50

50

4

154

12,936

Estimated in 1844

143

143

19

19

143

30

19

516

165,766

Estimated in 1843

143

143

19

143

30

19

497

Bureau of Yards and Docks,

November, 1844.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

--541--

Y. & D. No. 2.

RECRUITING STATIONS.

Estimate of the pay of officers attached to recruiting stations, for the year ending June 30, 1846, if no alteration is made in the number of stations.

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia.

Baltimore.

Norfolk.

New Orleans.

Charleston

Total

Aggregate amount.

Commandants

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

7

$14,700

Lieutenants

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

14

21,000

Surgeons

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

7

12,250

Midshipmen

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

14

4,900

Estimated in 1844

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

42

52,850

Estimated in 1843

6

6

6

6

6

6

36

45,300

Bureau of Yards and Docks,

November, 1844.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

Y. & D. No. 3.

Estimate of the pay of officers and others at navy-yards and stations for the year ending June 30, 1846.

No.

PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Master

1,000

3

Passed midshipmen, at $750 each

2,250

3

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,050

1

Surgeon

1,800

1

Boatswain

700

1

Gunner

700

1

Carpenter

700

--542--

No.

PORTSMOUTH, N. H.—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

1

Sailmaker

$700

1

Purser

2,000

1

Steward, (purser's)

360

1

Steward, (surgeon's)

216

$18,576

Ordinary.

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Carpenter's mate

228

6

Seamen, at $144 each

864

12

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

1,440

4,032

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

1,400

1

Naval constructor

2,300

1

Foreman and inspector of timber

700

1

Clerk to the yard

900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Clerk to the storekeeper

750

1

Clerk to the naval constructor

400

1

Porter

300

7,659

Total

30,258

 

 

No.

BOSTON.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Na.  val.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

2

Masters, at $1,000 each

2,000

1

Surgeon

1,800

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Chaplain

1,200

1

Professor

1,200

4

Passed midshipmen, at $750 each

3,000

3

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,050

1

Boatswain

800

1

Gunner

800

3

Carpenter

800

1

Sailmaker

800

--543--

No.

BOSTON—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

2

Pursers, at $2,500 each

$5,000

1

Clerk to purser

500

1

Steward, (purser's)

360

1

Steward, (surgeon's)

216

$29,076

Ordinary.

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

1

Master

1,000

3

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,050

1

Boatswain

700

1

Gunner

700

1

Carpenter

700

4

Carpenter's mates, (3 as calkers,) at $228 each

912

2

Boatswain's mates, at $228 each

456

14

Seamen, at $144 each

2,016

36

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

4,320

14,854

Hospital.

1

Surgeon

1,750

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Hospital steward

360

2

Nurses, at $120 each

240

2

Washers, at $96 each

192

1

Cook

144

3,636

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

1,700

1

Naval constructor

2,300

1

Measurer and inspector of timber

1,050

1

Clerk to the yard

900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Clerk (2d) to the commandant

750

1

Clerk to the storekeeper

1,050

1

Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper

600

1

Clerk (3d) to the storekeeper

500

1

Clerk to naval constructor

650

1

Keeper of the magazine

480

1

Porter

300

11,180

Total

58,746

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are to be required to attend to the marines also. One of the pursers of the yard is to be employed as inspector of provisions and clothing.

--544--

No.

NEW YORK.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

2

Masters, at $1,000 each

2,000

1

Surgeon

1,800

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Chaplain

1,200

1

Professor

1,200

4

Passed midshipmen, at $750 each

3,000,

3

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,050

1

Boatswain

800

1

Gunner

800

1

Carpenter

800

1

Sailmaker

800

2

Pursers, at $2,500 each

5,000

1

Clerk to purser

500

1

Steward, (purser's)

360

1

Steward, (surgeon's)

360

$29,220

Ordinary.

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

1

Master

1,000

3

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,050

1

Boatswain

700

1

Gunner

700

1

Carpenter

700

4

Carpenter's mates, (3 as calkers,) at $228 each

912

2

Boatswain's mates, at $228 each

456

14

Seamen, at $144 each

2,016

36

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

4,320

14,854

Hospital

1

Surgeon

1,750

2

Assistant surgeons, at $950 each

1,900

1

Apothecary

420

1

Hospital steward

360

1

Matron

250

5

Nurses, at $120 each

600

2

Cooks, at $144 each

288

2

Washers, at $168 each

336

1

Gardener

300

1

Gate keeper

460

2

Boatmen, at $108 each

216

[6,380]

--545--

No.

NEW YORK—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

$1,700

1

Naval constructor

2,300

1

Inspector and measurer of timber

1,050

1

Clerk to the yard

900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Clerk (2d) to the commandant

750

1

Clerk to the storekeeper

1,050

1

Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper

600

1

Clerk (3d) to the storekeeper

500

1

Clerk to naval constructor

650

1

Keeper of magazine

480

1

Porter

300

$11,180

Total

62,134

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also to be required to attend to the marines. One of the pursers of the yard is to be employed as inspector of provisions and clothing.

No.

PHILADELPHIA.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

1

Lieutenant, as inspector of provisions and clothing

1,500

1

Master

1,000

1

Surgeon

1,800

1

Assistant surgeon

950

3

Passed midshipmen, at $750 each

2,250

2

Midshipmen, at $350 each

700

1

Chaplain

1,200

1

Boatswain

700

1

Gunner

700

1

Carpenter

700

1

Purser

2,000

1

Steward, (purser's)

360

1

Steward, (surgeon's)

216

$22,676

--546--

No.

PHILADELPHIA—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Ordinary.

1

Lieutenant

$1,500

1

Boatswain's mate

228

4

Seamen, at $144 each

288

12

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

1,440

$3,744

Naval asylum and hospital.

1

Captain

3,500

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Secretary

900

1

Surgeon

1,750

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Hospital steward

360

2

Nurses, at $120 each

240

1

Washer

168

1

Cook

120

9,488

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

1,250

1

Naval constructor

2,300

1

Inspector and measurer of timber

900

1

Clerk to the yard

900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Clerk to the storekeeper

750

1

Clerk to naval constructor

400

1

Porter

300

7,700

Total

43,608

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also required to attend to the receiving vessel and the marines.

No.

WASHINGTON.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

2

Commanders, at $2,100 each

4,200

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

1

Master

1,000

1

Surgeon

1,800

--547--

No.

WASHINGTON—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

3

Passed midshipmen, at $750 each

$2,250

2

Midshipmen, at $350 each

700

1

Chaplain

1,200

1

Boatswain

700

1

Gunner

700

1

Carpenter

700

1

Purser

2,000

1

Steward, (purser's)

360

1

Steward to hospital

216

$22,326

Ordinary.

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Boatswain's mate

228

1

Carpenter's mate

228

6

Seamen, at $144 each

864

14

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

1,680

4,500

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

1,700

1

Naval constructor

2,300

1

Inspector and measurer of timber

900

1

Clerk to the yard

900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Clerk (2d) to the commandant

750

1

Clerk to the storekeeper

750

1

Keeper of the magazine

480

1

Porter

300

8,980

Total

35,806

Note.—The surgeon is also required to attend to the hospital when necessary. One of the commanders of the yard is to be employed as inspector of provisions and clothing.

No.

NORFOLK.

Pay.

Aggregate

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

2

Masters, at $1,000 each

2,000

--548--

No.

NORFOLK—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

1

Surgeon

$1,800

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Chaplain

1,200

1

Professor

1,200

4

Passed midshipmen, at $750 each

3,000

3

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,050

1

Boatswain

800

1

Gunner

800

1

Carpenter

800

1

Sailmaker

800

2

Pursers, at $2,500 each

5,000

1

Clerk to purser

500

1

Steward, (purser's)

360

1

Steward, (surgeon's)

360

$29,220

Ordinary.

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

1

Master

1,000

3

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,050

1

Boatswain

700

1

Gunner

700

1

Carpenter

700

4

Carpenter's mates, (3 as calkers,) at $228 each

912

2

Boatswain's mates, at $228 each

456

14

Seamen, at $144 each

2,016

36

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

4,320

14,854

Hospital.

1

Lieutenant

1,800

1

Surgeon

1,750

2

Assistant surgeons, at $950 each

1,900

1

Hospital steward

360

1

Matron

250

1

Porter or gate-keeper

216

5

Nurses, at $108 each

540

2

Cooks, at $120 each

240

2

Washers, at $96 each

192

4

Boatmen, at $108 each

432

1

Servant

120

2

Boys in dispensary, at $96 each

192

7,992

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

1,700

1

Naval constructor

2,300

1

Inspector and measurer of timber

1,050

--549--

No.

NORFOLK—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

1

Clerk to the yard

$900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Clerk (2d) to the commandant

750

1

Clerk to the storekeeper

1,050

1

Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper

600

1

Clerk (3d) to the storekeeper

500

1

Clerk to naval constructor

650

1

Keeper of the magazine

480

1

Porter

300

$11,180

Total

63,246

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are to be required to attend to the marines; also, one of the pursers of the yard is to be employed us inspector of provisions and clothing.

No.

PENSACOLA.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Commander

2,100

2

Lieutenants, at $1,500 each

3,000

1

Master

1,000

1

Surgeon

1,800

1

Chaplain

1,200

3

Passed midshipmen, at $750 each

2,250

3

Midshipmen, at $350 each

1,050

1

Boatswain

700

1

Gunner

700

1

Carpenter

700

1

Sailmaker

700

2

Pursers, at $2,500 each

5,000

1

Steward, (purser's)

360

1

Steward, (surgeon's)

216

$24,276

Ordinary.

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Carpenter

700

1

Carpenter's mate

228

1

Boatswain's mate

228

10

Seamen, at $144 each

1,440

60

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

7,200

11,296

--550--

No.

PENSACOLA—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Hospital.

1

Surgeon

$1,750

2

Assistant surgeons, at $950 each

1,900

1

Hospital steward

360

2

Nurses, at $120 each

240

2

Washers, at $96 each

192

1

Cook

144

$4,586

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

1,700

1

Naval constructor

2,300

1

Clerk of the yard

900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Clerk (2d) to the commandant

750

1

Clerk to the storekeeper

750

1

Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper

450

1

Porter

300

8,050

Total

48,208

Note.—The surgeon of the yard is also to attend to the marines near the yard, and to such persons in the yard as the commander may direct. One of the pursers of the yard is to be employed as inspector of provisions and clothing.

No.

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Naval.

1

Captain

$3,500

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Surgeon

1,800

1

Carpenter

700

1

Purser

2,000

1

Steward, (purser's)

360

1

Steward, (surgeon's)

216

$10,076

Ordinary.

1

Carpenter's mate

228

2

Ordinary seamen, at $120 each

240

468

--551--

No.

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE—Continued.

Pay.

Aggregate.

Civil.

1

Storekeeper

$1,250

1

Clerk of the yard

900

1

Clerk to the commandant

900

1

Porter

300

$3,350

Total

13,894

 

 

No.

STATIONS.

Pay.

Aggregate.

BALTIMORE.

1

Captain

$3,500

2

Lieutenants, (one as inspector of provisions and clothing)

3,000

1

Surgeon

1,500

1

Purser

1,500

1

Clerk

500

$10,000

CHARLESTON, S. C.

1

Captain

3,500

1

Lieutenant

1,500

1

Surgeon

1,500

1

Purser and storekeeper

1,500

8,000

FOR GENERAL DUTY.

1

Principal steam engineer

2,500

2,500

SACKETT'S HARBOR.

1

Lieutenant

1,500

PORT MAHON.

1

Surgeon

1,800

1

Assistant surgeon

950

1

Surgeon's steward

216

1

Nurse

120

1

Cook

120

--552--

RECAPITULATION.

Naval.

Ordinary.

Hospital

Civil.

Aggregate.

Portsmouth, N. H.

$18,576

$4,032

$7,650

$30,258

Boston

29,076

14,854

$3,636

11,180

58,746

New York

29,220

14,854

6,880

11,180

62,134

Philadelphia

22,676

3,744

9,488

7,700

43,603

Washington

22,326

4,500

8,980

35,806

Norfolk

29,220

14,854

7,992

11, 180

63,246

Pensacola

24,276

11,296

4,586

8,050

48,308

Memphis, Tenn.

10,076

468

3,350

13,894

Baltimore

9,500

500

10,080

Charleston, S. C.

8,000

8,000

General duty

1,500

2,500

2,500

Sackett's Harbor

1,500

Port Mahon

3,206

3,306

201,446

68,602

35,788

72,270

381,106

Bureau of Yards and Docks,

November, 1844.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

Y. & D. No. 4.

Estimate of the amounts that will be required for making the proposed improvements and repairs in the several navy-yards, for the year ending June 30, 1846.

Navy-yard at Portsmouth, N. H.

For quay-walls, from U to W

$9,959 25

For rebuilding wharf No. 1

28,429 76

For wall, and filling in west front of sheds 6 and 7

5,994 00

For removing old cob work in timber dock

1,168 25

For removing timber-shed 13, and steam-box house

5,746 16

For commander's quarters

8,621 50

For saw-pits, hoop-heating furnace, and wells

1,041 00

For repairs of all kinds

5,446 00

66,395 92

Navy-yard at Boston.

For east wing of store-house No. 15

$30,561 74

For cordage-store, rigging-loft, &c.

30,000 00

For pier-wharf at angle No. 59

17,675 50

For reservoir

2,500 00

--553--

For completing wharf between H and. I, and rebuilding wharf

$11,860 00

For pier-wharf between I and 39

15,432 00

For filling in yard

6,630 00

For brick stables

4,020 00

For coal-house

8,000 00

For repairs of all kinds

12,000 00

133,819 24

Navy-yard at New York.

For dredging docks and channels, and filling in

$4,000 00

For brick stables

2,250 00

For store house

23,500 00

For smithery, converting timber-shed F, and adding two wings

42,000 00

For completing cob-wharf and slips

50,000 00

For water-tank

1,000 00

For coal-house, (permanent)

6,250 00

For repairs of all kinds

17,500 00

146,500 00

Navy-yard at Philadelphia.

For outside pier of wharf No. 2

$8,467 50

For outside pier of wharf No. 3

10,250 00

For wharf No. 4

6,725 00

For outside pier of wharf No. 4

12,375 00

For moving ship-house G

2,035 00

For wharfing across timber dock, and filling up

2,706 00

For repairs of all kinds

5,835 50

48,394 00

Navy-yard at Washington.

For tilt-hammer and engine in anchor-shop

$11,860 00

For chain-cable forges in hydrographical proving-machine shop

5,055 00

For new boilers in camboose shop, and blowing chain-cable fires in machine shop

3,753 00

For completing laboratory buildings

9,426 00

For filling up part of timber-dock

20,000 00

For repairs of all kinds

5,000 00

55,094 00

--554--

Navy-yard at Norfolk.

For completing building and launching slip No. 48

$9,500 00

For store house No. 13, to be used as a timber shed

31,34 678

For extending quay-walls, and completing wall of timber dock

50,000 00

For completing store-house No. 16

5,000 00

For completing bridge across timber dock

3,500 00

For coal-house, (permanent)

8,000 00

For repairs of all kinds

9,635 00

116,981 78

Navy-yard at Pensacola.

For two third class houses, Nos. 12 and 13

$19,615 33

For two warrant officers' houses, No. 1

17,91683

For completing the permanent wharf

59,273 79

For completing ship-house and slip

20,000 00

For completing store-house

20,000 00

For completing timber shed

20,000 00

For coal-house, (permanent)

8,500 00

For repairs of all kinds

6,132 50

171,438 45

Navy-yard at Memphis.

For the commencement of improvements at this yard; for: embankments, graduation, excavation, and walling, to secure the river fronts; for six dwelling-houses; and for foundation for the rope-walk

$487,000 00

Sackett's Harbor.

For repairs of all kinds

$600 00

RECAPITULATION.

Portsmouth, N. H.

$66,395 92

Boston

133,819 24

New York

146,500 00

Philadelphia

48,394 00

Washington

56,094 00

Norfolk

116,981 78

Pensacola

171,438 45

Memphis

487,000

Sackett's Harbor

600 00

1,226,223 39

Bureau of Yards and Docks,

November, 1844.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

--555--

Y. & D. No. 5.

Statement showing the several items going to make up the sums of $527,452 and $72,270; being the first and second items in the general estimate (marked Y. & D.—A) from the Bureau of Yards and Books.

Receiving vessels, (see Y. & D. No. 1)

$165,766

Recruiting stations, (see Y. & D. No. 2)

52,850

Navy-yards, (see Y. & D. No. 3, except the civil branch)

308,836

$527,452

See same No. 3, civil branch, for second item

72,270

Bureau of Yards and Docks,

November. 1844.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

Y. & D. No. 6.

Estimate of expenses necessary for completing the enclosures around the hospital grounds, and for putting in efficient condition the naval hospitals at the several stations, and the naval asylum, for the year ending June 30, 1846.

Hospital at Boston.

For enclosure of the grounds attached to the hospital

$4,000 00

For a cistern, &c., to supply the hospital with water

700 00

For dead-house to hospital

500 00

For quarters for surgeon

7,000 00

$12,200 00

Hospital at New York.

For enclosure and improvement of the grounds attached to the hospital

$28,000 00

For enclosure of the cemetery

9,920 00

For completing present hospital building, and furnishing south wing

6,540 00

For additional building for small-pox patients

7,000 00

For brick barn and stables

3,500 00

For quarters for surgeon

7,000 00

$61,960 00

--556--

Hospital at Norfolk.

For enclosure of the grounds attached to the hospital, thus—

For repairs of walls

$3,051 00

For completion of walls

1,898 95

$4,949 95

For grading the grounds

2,000 00

For repairs of hospital buildings

2,750 00

$9,699 95

Hospital at Pensacola.

For wall to enclose the grounds attached to the hospital

$43,061 66

For central building of hospital

19,212 50

For grading the grounds in front of the hospital buildings

7,233 33

For repairs of hospital and quarters

3,912 33

$73,419 82

Naval Asylum, Philadelphia.

For wall to enclose the grounds attached to the asylum

$11,733 00

For draining, filling up excavations of former brick yards, and grading the grounds

4,200 00

For two small porters' lodges

700 00

For cemetery and dead-house

1,200 00

For stable on the premises

2,500 00

$20,333 00

RECAPITULATION.

Hospital at Boston

$12,200 00

New York

61,960 00

Norfolk

9,699 95

Pensacola

73,419 82

Asylum at Philadelphia

20,333 00

$177,612 77

Bureau of Yards and Docks,

November, 1844.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

--557--

Y. & D. No. 7.

Estimate of the amounts required for the repairs, &c. at the several magazines for the year ending June 30, 1846.

Magazine at Boston

$150

New York

200

Washington

150

Norfolk

325

Total

$825

Bureau of Yards and Docks,

November, 1844.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the Bureau of Yards and Docks for the year ending June 30, 1846, wider the act of Congress approved August 31, 1842.

Commodore L. Warrington, chief of bureau

$3,500

William G. Ridgely, chief clerk

1,400

Stephen Gough, clerk

1,000

William P. Moran, clerk

800

William P. S. Sanger, engineer

2,000

George F. de 1a Roche, draughtsman

1,000

Charles Hunt, messenger

700

Contingent expenses

500

Total

$10,900

Bureau of Yards and Docks,

November, 1844.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

--558--

REPORT FROM THE BUREAU OF ORDNANCE AND HYDROGRAPHY.

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography,

November 15, 1844.

Sir:

In obedience to your order of the 29th ultimo, I have the honor to submit herewith estimates for the support of this bureau for the year commencing 1st July, 1845, and ending 30th June, 1846.

I have the honor, to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. M. CRANE.

Hon. J. Y. Mason,

Secretary of the Navy.

Schedule of papers containing estimates for the support of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, for the year commencing the 1st July, 1845, and ending the 30th June, 1846.

A. Estimate of the expenses of the bureau, for the year ending the 30th June, 1846.

B. Estimate of the pay of officers on ordnance duty, for the year ending the 30th June, 1846.

C. Estimate of the ordnance and ordnance stores for the general service of the navy, for the year ending the 30th June, 1846.

D. Statement of the cost or estimated value of the ordnance and ordnance stores on hand at the several navy-yards, on the 30th June, 1844, and the receipts and expenditures for the previous year.

E. Estimate of the amount required under the head of "hydrography," for the year ending the 30th June, 1846.

A.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, from 1st July, 1845, to 30th June, 1846.

For salary of the chief of bureau, per act of August 31, 1842

$3,500 00

For salary of one clerk, at $1,200 per annum, per act of August, 31, 1842

1,200 00

For salary of two clerks, at $1,000 per annum each, per act of August 31, 1842

2,000 00

For salary of draughtsman, at $1,000 per annum, per act of August 31, 1842

1,000 00

For salary of messenger, at $700 per annum, per act of August 31, 1842

700 00

--559--

For contingent expenses of said bureau, viz:

For blank books and stationery

$260 00

For miscellaneous items

140 00

For labor

120 00

$520 00

$8,920 00

W. M. CRANE.

SUBMITTED:

One clerk at $1,200.

Note.—The clerk submitted is absolutely necessary. The property accounts of this bureau amount to upwards of $2,000,000, and require the services of an experienced book-keeper.

B.

Estimate of pay of officers on ordnance duty, from 1st July, 1845, to 30th June, 1846.

1 Captain, at $3,500 per annum

$3,500 00

2 Commanders, at $2,100 per annum each

4,200 00

4 Lieutenants, at $1,500 per annum each

6,000 00

$13,700 00

W. M. CRANE.

C.

Estimate of ordnance, ordnance stores, and small arms, required for the general service of the navy, from 1st July, 1845, to 30th June, 1846.

120 guns, 32-pounders, of about 50 cwt. each, at $133 per ton

$39,900 00

130 guns, 32-pounders, of about 35 cwt. each, at $133 per ton

30,257 50

250 gun carriages, with implements complete, at $150 each

37,500 00

3,000 barrels of powder, at $14 each

42,000 00

1,500 carbines, (Jenks's patent,) at $15 each

22,500 00

1,600 pistols, at $5 each

8,000 00

1,500 swords, at $4 each

6,000 00

2,500 copper powder-flasks, at $1 each

2,500 00

Copper powder-tanks for 9 ships of the line

60,600 00

For cannon locks, flannel for cylinders, battle and magazine lanterns, and for all other articles of ordnance stores

187,200 00

--560--

For contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz:

For drawings and models; for postage paid by officers on ordnance duty; for travelling expenses of officers in inspecting ordnance and ordnance stores; for hire of agents, and rent of storehouses for ordnance and ordnance stores on the lakes; for transportation of ordnance and ordnance stores; for advertising in the public newspapers, and for no other purposes whatever

$30,000 00

466,457 50

W. M. CRANE.

Note.—The estimates for ordnance stores, for the present year, have been materially increased in consequence of the book of allowances, just issued, requiring this bureau to include in its estimates the "armorer's" and "tinner's" tools—such as forges, anvils, bellows, shackles, iron for ships' use, coal for forges, &c., &c.

D.

A statement of the cost or estimated value of stores on hand at the several navy-yards at the close of the fiscal year, June 30, 1844, of articles received and expended from July I, 1843, to June 30, 1844, and the. stores on hand at that period, (June 30, 1844) under the appropriation for increase, repairs, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission, coming under the cognizance of this

Navy-yards, &c.

Value on hand
July 1, 1843.

Receipts.

Expenditures.

Value on hand
June 30, 1844.

Portsmouth

$96,014 07

$10,264 87

$1,798 22

$104,480 72

Boston

271,234 80

57,935 98

46,035 14

283,135 64

New York

744,868 56

42,296 31

82,052 71

704,112 16

Philadelphia

114,700 20

29,687 30

66,622 71

77,764 96

Washington

88,938 86

22,910 81

33,015 92

78,833 75

Norfolk

396,175 07

127,764 34

70,137 82

453,801 95

Pensacola

14,092 60

1,648 82

1,271 24

14,370 18

On the lakes

7,460 50

437 25

7,023 25

1,733,484 66

291,508 43

301,3.70 84

1,723,622 25

W. M. CRANE.

--561--

E.

Estimate of the amount required for the naval service, under the head of "hydrography" for the year ending 30th June, 1846.

Estimated for the year ending 30th June, 1816.

Appropriated for the year ending 30th June, 1846.

For the purchase of nautical books, maps,

charts, and instruments

$25,000 00

For binding and repairing the same, including pay of workmen, cost of engraving, printing charts, &c.

10,000 00

For freight and transportation

1,000 00

For postage, models, drawings, grading and improvement of grounds, and other incidental labor

4,000 00

For fuel, lights, books, and stationery, working the lithographic press, including pay of workmen, cost of stones, ink, and chemicals

1,200 00

For one draughtsman or book-keeper

1,200 00

For one porter, at $25 per month

300 00

For one watchman, at $25 per month

300 00

For erecting house for superintendent

5,000 00

For removing the under-ground work, arching and paving 185 feet of galleries, 9 feet by 10, of magnetic apartment

3,000 00

51,000 00

$23,200 00

OFFICERS TO BE EMPLOYED.

Four lieutenants, at $1,500 each

6,000 00

Eight passed midshipmen, at $750 each

6,000 00

$12,000 00

$12,000 00

W. M. CRANE.

--562--

REPORT FROM THE BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, &c.

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair,

November 11, 1844.

Sir:

I have the honor to transmit, herewith, estimates for the amounts which will probably be required for objects under the direction of this bureau for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1846; and reports of the vessels which were in commission, upon the stocks or building, or in ordinary., on the 1st instant.

Since the last annual report from this bureau, the sloops-of-war Jamestown and St. Mary's, and the new steamer Michigan, have been launched. The Michigan has been fully completed, and has made an experimental trip. The sloops of war are being equipped, and will probably be ready for sea before the close of the present year.

The iron steamer at Pittsburg, and the small iron steamer at Washington, which are being built after plans, and under the immediate direction and superintendence of Lieutenant Wm. W. Hunter, are in progress.

The vessel commenced for a medium steamer at Norfolk is in course of completion as a sailing store-ship.

The necessary repairs, equipment, or refitting, have been given to the frigates Cumberland, Raritan, Potomac, and Constitution; the sloops-of-war Plymouth, Portsmouth, Marion, Yorktown, and Ontario; the brigs Perry, Somers, Truxtun, Bainbridge, Lawrence, and Oregon; the schooners Flirt, Wave, Phoenix, and On-ka-hy-e; and to the steamers Union and Colonel Harney.

The sudden but necessary suspension of labor upon the frigate St. Lawrence, and sloops-of-war Albany and Germantown, in the autumn of 1843, left the two former exposed to premature decay, and the latter to injury from other causes. The general estimate includes the amount supposed to be necessary to complete these vessels. The bureau has no official information of the progress made in the construction of the iron steamer by Mr. Robert L. Stevens, under his contract with the Secretary of the Navy, authorized by the act of Congress of 31st August, 1842. The additional amount which will probably be required under that contract, when it shall be completed, is embraced in the special estimate submitted for consideration.

The frigate Hudson, the store brig Consort, and the schooner Enterprise, after being regularly and carefully surveyed, have been sold at pubic auction.

Many outstanding uncompleted contracts have been closed and finally settled by your decisions, under the authority of the act of Congress of 17th June, 1844.

The existing liabilities under specific contracts for materials to be delivered hereafter, were about $235,000 on the 1st instant.

About $50,000 will be required, in addition to the sum appropriated, for the iron steamer at Pittsburg, which has been included in the general estimate.

The general estimate, under the head of "increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy," also includes the amount necessary for the purchase of hemp, and for fuel for steam-vessels, during the fiscal year.

As there are now four covered building slips unoccupied, the expediency of commencing a frigate to be called the Guerriere, and of building

--563--

and equipping a brig to replace the Enterprise, is respectfully submitted for consideration. The amounts necessary for these purposes are submitted in the special estimate, marked E.

Experience has demonstrated the inability of the clerks allowed by law to this bureau to properly perform the duties which have been assigned to it. To provide in some degree for this deficiency, a proposition is submitted in connexion with the estimate for the expenses of the bureau. An increase is proposed in the compensation for two clerks who are charged with the preparation of contracts, and with the examination of the storekeepers' returns; duties which are evidently more important than those of recording or copying clerks, but which at present receive no greater compensation.

With much respect, I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

C. MORRIS,

Chief of Bureau.

Hon. John Y. Mason,

Secretary of the Navy.

Schedule of papers connected with the reports and estimates for the naval service for the year ending the 30th June, 1846; prepared by the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair.

A. Estimate of the expenses of the bureau.

B. Estimate of the pay required for officers, seamen, and engineer corps,

for vessels proposed to be kept in commission, excepting receiving vessels.

C. Estimate of the amount which will be required for objects under the direction of the bureau; for the "increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and for wear and tear of vessels in commission."

D. Estimate of the amount which will be required for objects connected with the bureau, under the head of" enumerated contingent."

E. Special estimate for commencing a frigate, building and equipping a brig, and completing the steamer to be built under the direction of Mr. R.' L. Stevens.

F. Statement of vessels in commission.

G. Statement of vessels on the stocks or building.

H. Statement of vessels in ordinary.

I. Statement of the cost or estimated value of materials received and expended during the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1844, and the value, remaining on hand at that date at the several navy-yards.

K. Statement of the labor performed at the different navy-yards, and its cost, during the year ending 30th June, 1844, upon objects connected with the construction, equipment, and repair of vessels.

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair,

November 11, 1844.

C. MORRIS,

Chief of the Bureau.

--564--

A.

Estimate of the amount required for the expenses of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair, for the year ending June 30, 1846, as organized by the act of Congress approved August 31,1842.

Estimate for
the year
ending
June 30,
1846.

Appropriation
for the
year ending
June 30, 1845.

For salary of the chief of the bureau

$3,000

$3,000

For salary of the assistant constructor and draughtsman

1,600

1,600

For salaries of four clerks

4,400

4,400

For salary of messenger

700

700

9,700

9,700

For contingent expenses.

For blank books and stationery

$200

For labor

120

For miscellaneous

180

$500

For salary of chief naval constructor

$3,000

For salary of engineer in chief

3,000

6,000

Note—The salary of chief naval constructor was estimated last year under " Yards and Docks that for the engineer in chief appears to have been omitted altogether.

It is respectfully submitted for consideration to allow to this bureau—

Two additional clerks, at $1,200 each

$2,400

One additional clerk

1,000

A draughtsman

1,000

4,400

And to omit the "assistant constructor and draughtsman," now allowed.

1,600

Making an increase of expense of

2,800

Note.—The chief clerk is fully occupied by the correspondence and attention to the money requisitions, and the returns from navy agents of their receipts and expenditures. One clerk has to attend to drawing and

--565--

recording contracts, and to prepare copies or extracts for the several commandants of yards and navy agents, at the places of delivery of articles,, and to note the correspondence in relation to them. An additional clerk is necessary for these duties. One clerk only can be allotted at present to the examination of all the storekeepers' accounts of receipts and expenditures from the several navy-yards and foreign stations, and to keep accounts of all shipments of stores between the navy yards and foreign stations.

Proper attention to these returns requires another clerk. The only remaining clerk now allowed by law, is fully employed in recording the letters written from this bureau. There is no clerk allowed by law who can be assigned to receive the accounts, and to record the cost of building, repairing, or equipping vessels, or to take charge of reports of surveys, of statements of the nature and extent of repairs given to vessels, or of other information, which ought to be always so arranged as to be immediately available for the use of the department whenever it is wanted. One clerk for these duties is indispensable, and two could be employed advantageously.

The three additional clerks, for which the estimate is submitted, is the. smallest number with which the duties of the bureau can be properly performed.

Bureau of Construction, &c.,

November 11, 1844.

C. MORRIS,

Chief of Bureau.

B.

Estimate of the pay of the commission, warrant, and petty officers and seamen, including the engineer corps of the navy, which will be required for the vessels proposed to be kept in commission, (receiving vessels excepted,) for the fiscal year ending Jane 30, 1846.

For six commanders of squadrons

$24,000

For six lieutenants with commanders of squadrons

9,000

For six secretaries to commanders of squadrons

6,000

For six clerks to commanders of squadrons

3,000

For ten frigates

925,293

For thirteen sloops-of-war

572,520

For seven brigs and two schooners

156,978

For four armed steamers

194,400

For three small steamers

48,582

For four store-ships

56,312

For two smaller vessels

23,844

For one thousand men to cover reliefs, and for coast survey

129,800

Total

2,149,728

The estimate for the year ending 30th June, 1845, was for $2,730,560.

Bureau of Construction, &c.,

November 11, 1844.

C. MORRIS,

Chief of Bureau.

--566--

C.

The amount which will be required under the appropriation for " increase repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and for wear and tear of vessels in commission" for objects under the direction of this bureau? including fuel for steamers, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Estimate for year ending June 30, 1846.

Appropriated for the year ending June 30,1845.

For "increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and for wear and tear of vessels in commission," for objects under the direction of this bureau, including fuel for steamers

$1,800,000

$1,000,00

Note.—The regular appropriation for the year ending June 30,1845, was for $1,000,000. Separate appropriations were, however, made of $150,000 for the purchase of American hemp, and $48,880 for coal and other fuel for steam-vessels. These objects are included in the present estimates. The estimate for the year ending June 30, 1845, was for $1,900,000.

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair,

November 11, 1844.

C. MORRIS,

Chief of Bureau.

D.

The amount required for objects under the appropriation of "enumerated contingent."

Estimated for the year ending the 30th June, 1846.

Estimated for the year ending the 30th June, 1845.

The amount which will be required for objects under the direction of this bureau, under the appropriation of "enumerated contingent," is -

$210,000

$193,400

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair,

November 11, 1844.

C. MORRIS,

Chief of Bureau.

--567--

E.

Special estimate submitted for consideration.

For commencing a frigate* to replace the Guerriere

$175,000

For building and equipping a brig to replace the Enterprise, recently sold

75,000

For completing the steamer to be built under the direction of Mr. Robert L. Stevens, in addition to the former appropriation of $250,000

340,000

Total

$600,000

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair,

November 11, 1844.

C. MORRIS,

Chief of Bureau.

F.

Statement of the vessels belonging to the navy which were in commission on the 1st November, 1844.

Three ships-of-the-line (as receiving ships.)

Ohio,

North Carolina.

Pennsylvania,

Nine frigates.

Constitution,

Cumberland,

Potomac,

Savannah,

Brandywine,

Raritan,

Columbia,

Macedonian.

Congress,

Sixteen sloops-of-war.

Saratoga,

St. Louis,

Boston,

Levant,

Warren,

Portsmouth,

Falmouth,

Plymouth,

Fairfield,

St. Mary's,

Vandalia,

Decatur,

Preble,

Yorktown,

Jamestown,

Ontario, (receiving vessel.)

* If this frigate should be commenced, there will be required, at some future time, to complete her, the further sum of $180,000.

--568--

Seven brigs.

Porpoise,

Somers,

Truxtun,

Bainbridge,

Perry,

Oregon, (packet service.)

Lawrence,

Three schooners.

Shark

Experiment, (receiving vessel,)

Wave

Three store-ships.

Relief,

Erie.

Lexington,

Seven steamers.

Union

Princeton,

Michigan,

Colonel Harney,

General Taylor,

Poinsett

Engineer

RECAPITULATION.

3 ships-of-the-line, for receiving vessels.

9 frigates.

16 sloops-of-war.

7 brigs.

3 schooners.

3 store-ships.

7 steamers.

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair,

November 11,1841

C. MORRIS,

Chief of Bureau.

G.

Statement of the vessels on the stocks at the several navy-yards, or building at other-places, November 1,1844.

Near Portsmouth, N. H.

The Alabama, a ship-of-the-line.

The Santee, a frigate.

--569--

At Charleston, Mass.

The Virginia, a ship-of-the-line.

The Vermont, a ship-of-the-line.

At Brooklyn, N. Y.

The Sabine, a frigate.

The Albany, a sloop-of-war.

At Philadelphia, Penn.

The Germantown, a sloop-of-war.

At Washington, D. C.

A small iron steamer, for a water-tank and tow-boat* (building.).

At Gosport, Va.

The New York, a ship-of-the-line.

The St. Lawrence, a frigate.

The , for a store-ship, (building.)

At Pittsburg, Penn.

An iron steamer, building under: contract.

RECAPITULATION.

4 ships-of-the-line.

2 sloops-of-war.

2 steamers.

3 frigates.

1 store-ship.

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair,

November 11, 1844.

C. MORRIS,

Chief of Bureau.

H.

Statement of the vessels belonging to the navy, which were in ordinary November 1, 1844.

Three ships-of-the-line.

Columbus, at the navy-yard, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Delaware, at the navy-yard, Norfolk, Va.

Franklin, at the navy-yard, Charlestown, Mass.

--570--

Three frigates.

Independence, (razee,) at the navy-yard, Charlestown, Mass.

United States, at the navy-yard, Charlestown, Mass.

Constellation, at the navy-yard, Norfolk, Va.

Five sloops-of-war.

John Adams, at the navy-yard, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Cyane, at the navy-yard, Norfolk, Va.

Vincennes, at the navy-yard, Norfolk, Va.—under repair.

Marion, at the navy-yard, Charlestown, Mass.

Dale, at the navy-yard, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Two brigs.

Dolphin, at the navy-yard, Norfolk, Va.—under repair.

Pioneer, (store-vessel,) at the navy-yard, Norfolk, Va.

Four schooners.

Flirt, at navy-yard, Norfolk, Va.

Phoenix, "

On-ka-hy-e, " "

Boxer, at navy-yard, Charlestown, Mass.

Two steamers.

Mississippi, at the navy-yard, Charlestown, Mass.

Fulton, at the navy-yard, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Store-brig.

Pioneer, at the navy-yard, Norfolk, Va.

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair,

November 11, 1844.

C. MORRIS,

Chief of Bureau.

--571--

I.

Statement of the cost or estimated value of stores on hand at the several navy-yards July 1, 1843; of articles received and expended from June 30, 1843, to June 30, 1844; and of those remaining on hand July 1, 1844, which are under the direction of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair.

Navy-yards.

On hand July 1, 1843.

Receipts.

Expenditures.

On hand July 1, 1844.

Portsmouth

$583,046 33

$53,381 02

$66,297 57

$570,129 78

Charlestown

1,691,136 33

448,389 53

380,487 66

1,759,038 20

Brooklyn

1,353,058 20

117,817 12

213,800 09

1,257,075 23

Philadelphia

504,050 43

75,984 32

115,682 20

464,352 55

Washington

638,758 38

176,614 42

217,510 61

597,862 19

Gosport

1,548,809 74

394,877 42

360,905 93

1,582,781 23

Pensacola

65,627 95

13,107 70

16,490 80

62,244 85

Total

6,384,487 36

1,280,171 53

1,371,174 86

6,293,484 03

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair.

November 11,1844.

C. MORRIS,

Chief of Bureau.

K.

Statement of the number of days' labor, and its cost, from July 1, 1843, to July 1, 1844, for the respective navy-yards, for building, repairing, or equipping vessels of the navy, or in receiving or securing stores and materials for those purposes.

Navy-yards.

No. of days' labor.

Cost of labor.

Average pay per diem.

Portsmouth

22,510 1/2

$31,406 43

$1 39 1/2

Charlestown

78,794

130,608 67

1 65 1/2

Brooklyn

54,393 1/4

86,262 86

1 58 1/2

Philadelphia

48,173 1/2

62,130 64

1 29

Washington

54,620 1/2

80,266 74

1 47

Norfolk

74,615 1/2

108,512 84

1 45 1/2

Pensacola

2,526

4,345 85

1 72

Total

335,633 1/4

503,534 03

1 50

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair,

November 11, 1844.

C. MORRIS,

Chief of Bureau.

--572--

ESTIMATES FROM THE BUREAU OF PROVISIONS AND CLOTHING.

Estimate of the provisions required for the navy for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1845, and ending June 30, 1846.

For general service.

10 frigates (steamer "Mississippi" to be one)—

Seamen

4,000

Officers

300

Marines

500

13 sloops-of-war—

4,800

Seamen

2,000

Officers

286

Marines

338

9 brigs and schooners—

2,624

Seamen -

700

Officers -

81

781

For special service.

4 steamers (Princeton, Union, Michigan, and the one building at Pittsburg)— 

Seamen

240

Officers

68

Marines

104

3 steamers (Poinsett, Col. Harney, and Gen. Taylor)—

402

Seamen

120

Officers

18

Marines

15

4 store-ships

153

Seamen

240

Officers

24

264

2 small vessels (brig "Oregon" and schooner "Flirt")—

Seamen

100

Officers

12

Receiving vessels and ordinary

112

Seamen

600

Marines

124

724

To be added for recruits, to cover reliefs and coast survey

1,000

45 vessels.

10,860

10,860 persons, each drawing one ration, make 3,963,900 rations, which, at 20 cents each, is $792,780.

Navy Department,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, November 2, 1844.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK.

--573--

Statement showing the amount appropriated for the support of the navy for the: fiscal year ending June 30. 1845, and the amount asked to be appropriated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1845.

Asked to be appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1846.

Provisions

$615,828

Provisions

$792,780

Clothing

130,000

Clothing

100,000

Navy Department,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, November 2, 1844.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK.

Estimate for clothing for the navy during the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1845, and ending June 30, 1846.

For clothing for the navy . . . $100,000 00

At the establishment of this bureau, it was estimated that the sum of $570,000, at least, would be required to commence and get into operation the system for clothing the seamen of the navy, made necessary by the act of Congress of August 26, 1842.

At the 3d session of the 27th Congress an appropriation for. this purpose, of $380,000, was made; and at the 1st session of the 28th Congress a further appropriation of $130,000 was made; making, in the aggregate, the sum of $510,000, or $60,000 less than the first estimate.

When the last appropriation was made, it was hoped that the returns for clothing taken in ships going to distant stations, and that sent to distant depots for their use, would be received in such time, and to such amount, as to make application for a further appropriation under this head unnecessary. This, however, has not been the case; and the liabilities of the bureau at this time so much exceed the sum on hand, that it will require at least the $60,000 (still wanting to make the appropriation for clothing equal to the original estimate) to free its operations from embarrassment.

It is to be observed, in connexion with this subject, that at the lime of the change in the manner of furnishing the navy with clothing, there was on hand a large quantity of that article purchased under the appropriations for "pay, &c.," the returns for which accrue, as they come in, to the treasury. This is one cause of embarrassment to the bureau, making the returns for clothing purchased under the two appropriations above named so slow and so uncertain, that the question (one of great doubt at first) whether the original estimate of $570,000 will be sufficient for the full and efficient operation of the system, must continue doubtful lor some time yet; and when it is considered that this appropriation does not involve an expenditure of money, but is a loan in the shape of an advance to the seaman, to be returned with an addition of 10 per cent., it is believed that there can be no objection, and it would greatly facilitate the operations of the bureau to make the appropriation now asked for.

Navy Department,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, November 2, 1844.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK.

--574--

Estimate of the expense of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing for the pear commencing July 1, 1845, and ending June 30, 1846, agreeably to the 4th section of the act of August 31, 1842, entitled "An act to reorganize the Navy Department of the United States."

For compensation to the chief of the bureau

$3,000

For compensation to the chief clerk

1400

For compensation to one clerk

1,200

For compensation to one clerk

800

For compensation to a messenger

700

Contingent.

For blank books, stationery, and binding

450

For miscellaneous items

200

For one laborer

120

Submitted.

For one book-keeper

1,200

For one assistant book-keeper

1,000

For extra clerk-hire, rendered necessary by the business of the office, from January 1 to June 30, 1844

364

In submitting the above estimate for an increase of the clerical force of this bureau, I beg leave respectfully to refer to the suggestions and considerations urged at the first session of the present Congress.

Navy Department,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, November 2, 1844.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK.

Statement showing the amount appropriated for the support of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1845, and the amount asked to be appropriated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1845.

Asked to be appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1846.

For compensation to the chief of the bureau, clerks, and messenger

$7,100

For compensation to the chief of the bureau, clerks, and messenger

$7,100

Contingent

650

Contingent

770

Submitted.

Submitted.

For two accountants

For two accountants

2,200

For compensation to an extra clerk employed from April 7, 1843, to January 1, 1844, at $2 per day

538

For extra clerk hire rendered necessary by the business of the office, from January 1 to June 30, 1844

364

Navy Department,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, November 2, 1844.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK.

--575--

REPORT FROM THE BUREAU OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY.

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery,

November 13, 1844.

Sir: In obedience to your instructions of the 29th of October, I have the honor to submit the following statement of the fiscal condition of the surgical department of the navy.

The amount of the appropriation for surgeons' necessaries
and appliances, remaining on the 30th of June, 1844, in
the treasury of the United States

$30,591 49

Amount appropriated by the act of Congress of June 17, 1844

12,250 00

Aggregate

42,841 49

Of this sum, there has been expended for surgeons' necessaries and appliances, including what remains in the hands
of navy agents to meet approved bills, on the 1st of November, 1844

11,845 25

Balance on hand

$30,996 24

With economy, it is believed that the balance on hand will be found sufficient to meet whatever demands may be made on it during the present fiscal year.

The estimated expenses for the support of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery for the year commencing July 1st, 1845, are $7,470., (See table A.)

The estimated expenses for surgeons' necessaries and appliances for the naval service, including the marine corps, for the fiscal year commencing as above, $37,300. (See table B.)

The appropriation thus required is to defray the expense of the surgical department of vessels afloat, of navy yards, and marine corps. The naval asylum, and the several hospitals, derive theft support entirely from the hospital fund.

This fund, on the 1st of November, 1844, amounted to two hundred and thirty thousand five hundred and thirty-four dollars and fourteen cents. ($230,534 14.)

If the hospital fund is properly managed, and the sum already accumulated placed at interest, it will prove to be sufficient, when added to the yearly income, to support not only the pensioners at the naval asylum, but all the great hospitals at the several important naval stations. The hospital establishments, however, are still incomplete. For the protection of the hospital grounds, and the security of the inmates, substantial wails should be erected, and such other improvements made as we essential to the comforts and efficiency of these institutions.

To defray the expenses of such improvements out of the hospital fund, would entirely exhaust it, and thus cripple its resources. I would, therefore, respectfully submit to your consideration the propriety of asking from Congress an appropriation for these objects.

I beg leave to respectfully state that the present force of assistant surgeons, which has been limited in number by Congress, is entirely inadequate to supply the wants of the service. The number of assistant sur-

--576--

geons required to properly officer the force now recommended will be ninety-two. The number of passed assistant and assistant surgeons in the naval service is sixty-seven. The number necessary to fill vacancies, and. to complete the organization according to the estimates, is twenty-five. (See table C.)

In consequence of the limited number of assistant surgeons in the service, many of our vessels afloat are, from necessity, deprived of their usual complement of this class of officers. These deprivations are particularly and justly complained of by commanders cruising in sickly climates. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THO. HARRIS.

Hon. J. Y. Mason,

Secretary of the Navy.

A.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, for the year commencing July 1st, 1845, under act of Congress approved 31st August, 1842.

Surgeon Thomas Harris, chief of the bureau

$2,500

Passed assistant surgeon Chas. F. Guillou, assistant to chief

1,400

Moses Poor, clerk

1,200

William Plater, clerk

800

Marsh B. Clark, messenger

700

$6,600

Contingent expenses.

Labor

120

Blank books and stationery

500

Miscellaneous items

250

870

Total required

7,470

THO. HARRIS.

B.

Estimated expenses for the naval service during the year commencing on July 1, 1845, so far as coming under the cognizance of this bureau.

FOR GENERAL SERVICE.

10 frigates, each at

$1,100,

in all

$11,000

13 sloops-of-war, each at

800,

"

10,400

7 brigs, each at

600,

"

4,200

2 schooners, each at

600,

"

1,200

$26,800

--577—

FOR SPECIAL SERVICE.

4 steamers, one at

$800,

in all

$800

and three at (each)

500,

"

1,500

3 steamers, (smaller) each at

300,

"

900

4 store-ships, each at

300,

"

1,200

2 small vessels, each at

250,

"

500

4 receiving-vessels, each at

500,

"

2,000

7 navy-yards, thus—that at Philadelphia including the receiving-vessel

500,

"

500

six others, each at

350,

"

2,100

1 navy-yard at Memphis, including outfit

500,

"

500

2 vessels (coast survey,) each at

250,

"

500

10,500

37,300

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery,

November 1, 1844.

THO. HARRIS.

C.

Statement showing the number of assistant surgeons required for duty during the year commencing July 1, 1845, estimated upon the force to be employed.

FOR BUREAU OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY.

One assistant surgeon, to be assistant to chief of the bureau

1

FOR GENERAL SERVICE.

10 frigates, each to have two assistant surgeons, making in all

20

13 sloops-of-war, each to have one assistant surgeon, in all

13

7 brigs, each to have one assistant surgeon, in all

7

2 schooners, each to have one assistant surgeon, in all

2

FOR SPECIAL SERVICE.

4 steamers, whereof one to have, an assistant surgeon with a surgeon, the others to have surgeons only

1

3 steamers, (smaller) each to have one assistant surgeon -

3

4 store-ships, each to have one assistant surgeon, in all

4

2 small vessels, each to have one assistant surgeon, in all

2

4 navy-yards, each to have (besides surgeon) one assistant surgeon, viz:

at Norfolk

1

at New York

1

at Boston

1

at Philadelphia (including the receiving-vessel)

1

--578--

3 receiving-vessels, each to have (besides surgeon) one assistant surgeon, viz:

at Norfolk

1

at New York

1

at Boston

1

6 hospitals, (besides a surgeon each) to have assistant surgeons, thus:

near New York

2

near Norfolk

2

near Boston

1

near Philadelphia, (asylum)

1

near Pensacola

2

near Port Mahon

1

Coast survey, two vessels, each to have one assistant surgeon

Total number of assistant surgeons required for duty

71

Incurably ill, now on the register—two insanity, and one paralysis

3

For study, preparatory to examination for promotion

6

For relaxation on leave after long cruising, 1/12 of whole number

6

For temporary illness and other transient casualties, of the whole number

6

Total required

92

Total number of assistant and passed assistant surgeons authorized by law of August 4th, 1842

67

Number necessary to fill vacancies and complete the organization according to estimates, for the year to commence July 1st, 1845

25

THO. HARRIS.

--579--

Letter from the Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, on the mode of procuring cannon and powder for the navy.

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography,

November 21, 1844.

Sir:

I have the honor to inform you that the proviso in the act making appropriations for the naval service for the year ending 30th June, 1844, which requires that all materials for the navy be furnished by contract, operates greatly to the prejudice of this bureau, and to the public interest; and does not sufficiently guard the interests of the United States, or provide for the security of our ships and seamen.

Efforts to procure good cannon and powder under this proviso, which forces the acceptance of the lowest bidder, be he a jobber in contracts or a bona fide manufacturer of the article bid for, have resulted in frequent and inconvenient disappointments.

The contract for cannon dated December, 1842, failed on the part of the contractor, by the bursting and rejection of the guns delivered for proof: another contract, for the same guns, dated 13th August, 1843, failed in consequence of the inability of the contractor to comply with his engagements.

On the 20th August last, the same guns were awarded to the lowest bidder, who thereupon, refused to comply with his own bid; and, after a delay of nearly two years, have been let now (for the fourth time) to a responsible person, who, it is believed, will complete a delivery of the guns in June, 1845, which were to have been delivered by the 1st of December, 1843.

The lowest bidder for the supply of powder did not appear when the contract was declared, (12th November, 1843;) nor the next; and again the third; and, when let to the fourth, (who was the first responsible contractor who came forward,) nearly the whole contract failed from the bad quality of the powder delivered; and at a late period, under absolute necessity, the bureau had to go into the market and procure the supply.

It is my conviction that so important a matter as the supply of cannon and powder for the naval service should not be suffered to depend so much upon the ability of a contractor to meet the forfeit of non-compliance, as upon the known ability of the bidder to furnish a good article; to secure which advantage to the country, I would respectfully recommend, with great earnestness, that, so far as ordnance and ammunition for the navy are affected by the proviso above referred to, it be so modified as to exempt them from its action.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

W. M. CRANE.

Hon. J. Y. Mason, Secretary of the Navy.

--580--

A.

Schedule of proposals for supplying such quantities of small stores as may be required for the United States naval service at the navy-yard and station, Norfolk, Virginia, during the year ending June 30, 1845.

Articles.

E. J. Higgins & Bro.

Bonsai & Bro.

H. B. Reardon.*

Brushes, scrubbing

per dozen

$1 20

$0 90

$2 25

Brushes, shaving

do

75

10

25

Brushes, shoe

do

1 70

50

1 37

Brushes, clothes

do

1 00

1 00

1 00

Buttons, navy vest

per 100

1 48

1 00

1 00

Buttons, dead-eye

do

15

10

16

Buttons, navy, coat

do

75

2 00

3 00

Blacking

per dozen

96

30

50

Beeswax

per lb.

34

30

30

Combs, coarse, dressing

per dozen

58

1 00

1 00

Combs, fine, ivory

do

1 06

1 00

1 12

Cotton, spools

do

12

10

30

Handkerchiefs, cotton

do

50

1 50

1 00

Handkerchiefs, silk

do

5 50

4 00

3 00

Knives, jack

do

2 74

2 25

2 50

Kettles, mess

each.

73

60

75

Pans, mess

per dozen

7 50

7 20

1 50

Canisters, tin

do

8 00

1 20

each 75

Pots, tin

do

1 13

1 30

1 12

Looking-glasses

do

1 38

25

1 00

Mustard

do

1 14

90

1 08

Needles

per M.

1 00

60

1 00

Pepper, black

per dozen

1 15

1 00

1 00

Pepper, red

do

1 00

25

1 12

Razors

do

2 50

1 20

3 50

Razor straps

do

2 00

1 00

2 00

Riband, hat

per piece

42

87

50

Soap, Winchester's brown

per lb.

4

5

5 1/2

Soap, white

do

4 1/2

6

5 1/2

Soap, salt-water

do

7 1/2

8

5 1/2

Soap, shaving

per cake

1

2

4

Scissors

per dozen

2 75

1 00

2 00

Spoons

do

30

30

32

Silk, sewing

per lb.

75

1 00

1 00

Thread, white and brown

do

56

90

60

Thread, black

do

55

50

60

Tape, white

per dozen

13

10

15

Thimbles

do

10

8

12

Thread, blue

per lb.

45

50

60

52 54

37 01

39 58 1/2

* Accepted.

--581--

A—Continued.

Schedule of proposals for supplying' such quantities of small stores as may be required for the United States naval service, at the navy-yard, Boston, Massachusetts, for one year, ending March 29, 1845.

Articles.

Charles S. Homer.

Homer & Leighton.

Samuel Nicolson.

William Lang.*

H. G. K. Calef.

E. S. Rhodes.

Brushes, scrubbing

each

$0 17

$0 12

$0 19

$0 50

$0 50

$0 13

Brushes, shaving

do

9

8

6

8

10

8

Brushes, shoe

do

17

17

19

15

15

15

Brushes, clothes

do

28

24

19

21

20

21

Buttons, navy, vest

gross

2 50

2 74

4 50

2 50

4 00

2 50

Buttons, navy, coat

do

3 90

3 50

9 00

3 50

5 00

3 75

Buttons, dead-eye

do

20

20

24

21

25

18

Blacking

per doz. boxes

60

55

88

50

1 25

50

Beeswax, in 1/2 lb. cakes

per lb.

40

39

40

39

50

35

Combs, coarse dressing

per dozen

62

63

1 12

60

1 50

60

Combs, fine, ivory

do

95

98

1 00

90

2 25

80

Cotton

per doz. spools

37 1/2

45

40

37

50

37 1/2

Handkerchiefs, cotton

each

8

8

12

8

12

7

Handkerchiefs, silk

do

65

62

1 10

60

50

50

Knives, jack

per dozen

2 28

1 96

2 30

2 00

2 50

2 20

Looking-glasses

each

10 1/2

12 1/2

20

8

10

10

Mustard

per dozen

60

65

74

60

1 25

60

Needles, sewing

per M.

1 00

1 25

1 30

1 00

1 75

1 00

Pepper

per dozen

60

62

62

60

1 25

60

Razors

each

33

28

29

27

25

28

Razor straps

do

10 1/2

10 1/2

not pro.

8

40

10 1/2

Riband, black, hat

per piece

63

GO

70

50

75

60

Soap, white

per lb.

6

5 3/4

5

9

5 1/2

Soap, brown, (Winchester's)

do

7

6 1/2

6 1/2

6

8

6 1/2

Soap, shaving

per cake

2

3

4

1 1/2

4

2

Scissors

each

21

16

19

16

25

19

Spoons, iron

do

3

3

4

2

10

3

Silk, sewing

per lb.

3 75

3 50

not pro.

3 50

3 50

2 00

Thread, assorted colors

do

75

70

75

65

1 10

75

Tape, white

per dozen

2 40

25

50

20

25

25

Thimbles

each

3

2

2

1 1/2

2

2

23 95 1/4

21 15 1/2

20 39 1/2

30 50

19 06

* Accepted.

--582--

A-Continued.

Schedule of proposals for supplying such quantities of small stores as may be required for the United States naval service at the navy-yard and station at Brooklyn, New York, during the year ending June 30, 1845.

Articles.

Henry S. Wyckoff.

W. F. Staats & Co.

Henry Suydam, sr.*

James St. John & Co.

Jenkins & Co.

Brushes, scrubbing

per dozen

$2 28

$2 25

$2 31

$2 31

Brushes, shaving

do

1 27

1 28

1 25

1 31

2 31

Brushes, clothes

do

5 25

5 12}

5 00

5 25

5 50

Brushes, shoe

do

2 27

2 28

2 25

2 31

2 31

Buttons, navy vest

per gross

4 30

5 00

4 28

4 31

4 37 1/2

Buttons, navy coat

do

9 56

10 00

9 50

9 75

9 62 1/2

Buttons, deadeye

do

38 1/2

42

37 1/2

42

44

Combs, coarse

per dozen

1 40

1 41

1 38

1 44

1 44

Combs, fine

do

1 25

1 30

1 25

1 31

1 31

Handkerchiefs, silk

do

13 50

15 00

13 00

13 25

14 00

Handkerchiefs, cotton

do

2 06

2 13

2 00

2 13 1/2

2 25

Blacking

do

90

92

87 1/2

1 00

89

Beeswax

per pound

50

51

50

56

52

Cotton, spool

per dozen

81

78

75

75

76

Glasses, looking

do

3 25

3 95

3 00

3 72

3 12

Kettles, mess

each

1 30

1 31 1/4

1 25

1 31 1/4

1 37 1/2

Knives, jack

per dozen

3 56 1/4

4 00

3 50

4 25

4 00

Needles

per M.

1 80

1 81 1/2

1 75

2 00

1 81

Mustard

per dozen

1 15

1 15

1 13

1 18

1 12 1/2

Pepper, black

do

80

82

75

76

80

Pots, tin

each

14

13

12}

14

15

Pans, mess

do

1 06

1 06

1 00

1 06

1 06

Razors

per dozen

4 00

3 62 1/2

3 50

4 00

3 75

Razor strops

do

3 00

2 62 1/2

2 50

3 00

2 75

Soap, brown

per pound

6 1/2

6 1/4

6

6 1/4

6 1/4

Soap, white

do

6 1/2

6 1/4

6

6}

6 1/4

Riband, hat

per piece

56

60

55

62

60

Scissors

per dozen

3 25

3 25

3 00

4 00

3 25

Spoons, iron

do

75

56

58:

75

Soap, shaving

do

76

87 1/2

75

88

80

Silk, sewing

per pound

8 00

8 12 1/2

8 00

8 50

8 00

Thimbles

per dozen

35

31 1/2

31

31 1/4

34

Tape

do

60

56 1/2

50

56 1/2

56

Thread

per pound

1 50

1 37 1/2

1 25

1 31

1 37 1/2

81 68 1/4

83 44 1/2

78 20

[9]4 42

83 78

* Accepted.

-583--

A—Continued.

Schedule of proposals for supplying such quantities of small, stores as may be required for the United States naval service at the navy-yard and station, Philadelphia, Pa., during the year ending June 30, 1845.

Articles.

George Floyd.

Isaac Porter & Son.

Shadrack Hill.*

Abraham Levy

John K. Graham.

Brushes, scrubbing

per doz.

1 50 & 2 00

$1 50

$1.00, 1.50, and 3.00.

Brushes, shaving

do

62 1/2

50

cts. 62 1/2.

Brushes, shoe

do

3 75

2 50

1.75, 2.75, and, 3.50.

Brushes, clothes

do

1.31, 2.25, 3.25, and 4.25.

Buttons, navy, vest

per gross

$2 00

2 25

1.80 per 100.

Buttons, navy, coat

do

5 00

6 00

Buttons, deadeye

per 100

2 50

cts. 20 per gross.

Blacking

per doz.

50

cts. 50, 62 & $1.

4.25.

Beeswax

per lb.

40

50

cts. 37 1/2.

Combs, coarse, dressing

per doz.

75

1 20

1.00, 1.25, and 1.35.

Combs, fine, ivory

do

1 00

1 08

1.05, 1.25, and 1.50.

Cotton, spools

do

50

56

cts. 25, 45, 52, and 62.

Handkerchiefs, cotton

do

1 50

2 50

1.50 and 1.25.

Handkerchiefs, silk

do

8 00

7 50

2.75 and 4.50.

Knives, jack

do

2 00

2 00

1.25, 1.50, and 2.00.

Kettles, mess

do

$7 20

4 00

1 00

10.00 per dozen.

Looking glasses

do

1 25

1.25 to 13.00.

Mustard

do

65

1 25

1.124 to 1.37 1/2.

Needles

per M.

1 50

1 75

1.00 to 2.00.

Pans, mess, tin

per doz.

1 70

3 50

75

0.75, 2.50, and 9.50.

Pots, tin

do

1 75

2 50

1 20

1.50 to 2.00.

Pepper

do

50

95

cts. 95.

Razors

do

2 50

5 00

3.50, 4.50, and 5.50.

Razor strops

do

1 50

2 00

1.62 1/2

Riband, hat

per piece

44 & 60

50 & 75

cts. 25 and 50.

Soap-

Winchester's brown,

per lb.

4 1/2

cts. 7 1/2.

white

do

74

cts. 8.

shaving

per doz.

75

50

cts. 12 1/2 per lb.

Scissors

do

2 00

3 00

1.75, 3.00, 3.50, and 4.00.

Spoons

do

24

7.00 and 3.00.

Silk, sewing

per lb.

7 50

8 00

8.00 and 8.75.

Thread, white-brown

do

87 1/2

75

0.25, 1.25, and 1,40.

Thread, black

do

87 1/2

75

0.25, 1.25, and 1.40.

Thread, blue

do

87 1/2

75

0.25, 1.25, and 1.40.

Tape, white.

per doz.

37 1/2

46 & 50

cts. 5, 6, and 8.

Thimbles

do

1 75 p. gross

cts. 25 and 50 per doz.

* Accepted.

--584--

A—Continued.

Schedule of proposals for supplying such quantities of small stores as may be required for the United States naval service at the navy-yard and station, Pensacola, Florida, during the year ending June 30, 1845.

Articles.

J. M. Standard.*

D. Davidson.

Brushes, scrubbing

each

$0 31 1/4

$0 20

Brushes, shaving

per dozen

1 25

1 20

Brushes, shoe

do

2 50

2 40

Brushes, clothes

each

62 1/2

70

Buttons, navy, vest

per dozen

75

50

Buttons, navy, coat

do

1 00

90

Buttons, deadeye

do

3 1/2

5

Handkerchiefs, cotton

each

10

30

Handkerchiefs, silk

do

30

80

Looking-glasses

do

25

20

Kettles, mess

do

1 25

1 50

Pans, mess

do

1 25

1 00

Pans, tin

per dozen

2 50

2 40

Pots, tin

do

2 00

2 40

Razors

each

50

37 1/2

Razor strops

do

25

95,

Scissors

do

25

20

Spoons

per dozen

37 1/2

60

Thimbles

do

12

60

Beeswax

per pound

33 1/2

40

Soap, Winchester's brown

So

4 1/2

8

Soap, white

do

7

8

Soap, shaving

per dozen

75

1 20

Blacking, boxes

do

1 00

1 50

Combs, coarse, dressing

do

1 00

1 20

Combs, fine, ivory

do

1 25

3 00

Cotton, spools

do

50

1 00

Knives, jack

do

2 25

3 60

Mustard

do

2 00

1 40

Pepper

do

60

1 40

Riband, hat

per piece

1 00

1 00

Needles

per M.

50

5 00

Thread, white, black, blue

per pound

1 25

1 20

Tape, white

per dozen

12 1/2

75

Sewing silk

per pound

6 00

8 00

34 29

47 38 1/2

• Accepted.

--585--

B.

Schedule of proposals for furnishing fresh meat, vegetables, and other supplies, at the navy-yard at Washington, D. C., during the year ending June 30, 1845.

Names.

Fresh meat, per pound.

Vegetables and other supplies.

John Hoover

3 9/10 cents

3 9/10 per ration of vegetables.

James H. Riley

4 do

4 cents per pound.

Henry Walker

1 3/4 do

1 3/4 do.

Fred. Speicer

2 1/2 do

2 1/2 do.

James Rhodes

5 do

At market price.

Philip Otterback*

5 1/2 do

4 1/2 cents per pound.

Charles Unger

2 1/4 do

At market price.

S. J. Little

3 3/10 do

Do.

* Accepted; all others having withdrawn, or neglected to enter into contract, as required.

Schedule of proposals for furnishing such quantities of fresh beef and vegetables as may be required for the United States naval service at the navy-yard at Portsmouth, N. H., during the year ending December 31, 1844.

Names.

Beef, per pound.

Vegetables/per pound.

Benjamin Kingsbury

5 cents

1/2 cent

Horatio Fogg

7 do

2 do.

Thomas Currier*

5 do

3/7 do.

Samuel P. Wiggin

5 do

1/2 do.

* Accepted.

--586--

B—Continued.

Schedule of proposals for furnishing, such quantities of fresh beef and vegetables as may. be required for the United States naval service at the navy-yard at Charlestown, Mass., during the year ending December 31, 1844.

Names.

Beef, per pound.

Vegetables, per pound.

John Gordon & Co.*

3 3/4 cents

5/8 cent.

Potter & Leland

3 3/4 do

3/4 do.

* Accepted.

Schedule of proposals for furnishing such quantities of fresh beef and vegetables as may be required for the United States naval service at the navy-yard and station at Brooklyn, N. Y., during the half-year ending June 30, 1844.

Names.

Beef, per 100 pounds.

Vegetables, per 100 pounds.

George Haws*

$3 80

$1 00

B. W. J. S. Valentine

4 00

1 00

*Accepted.

Schedule of proposals for furnishing such quantities of fresh beef and vegetables as may be required for the United States naval service at the navy-yard and station at Brooklyn, N. Y., during the year ending June 30, 1845.

Names.

Beef, per 100 pounds.

Vegetables, per 100 pounds.

James Tilby

$5 74

$1 37

George Daggitt

5 96

1 48

George Haws*

5 56

1 25

J. Conrey

6 12

1 39

William J. Pell

5 80

1 63

* Accepted.

--587—

B-Continued.

Schedule of proposals for furnishing such quantities of fresh beef and vegetables' as may be required for the United States naval service at Philadelphia navy-yard and station, during the year ending December 31, 1844.

Names.

Beef, per 100 pounds.

Vegetables, per pound.

David Corliss

$3 00

1 1/2 cents.

David Woelpper*

2 99

1 1/2 do.

Lawrence Shuster

3 37 1/2

2 do.

Henry Aykroyds

5 00

Thomas Higgins

3 16

George Purdy

3 20

2 do.

* Accepted.

Schedule of proposals for furnishing such quantities of fresh beef and vegetables as may be required for the United States naval service at Norfolk navy-yard and station, during the year ending December 31, 1844.

Names.

Beef, per pound.

Vegetables, per pound.

Potatoes, per bushel.

William Ward*

6 1/2 cents

1 1/4 cents

65 cents.

E. Vain

6 1/2 do

2 do

68 do.

* Accepted.

Schedule of proposals for furnishing such quantities of fresh beef and vegetables as maybe required for the United States naval service at Charleston station, S. C, during the year ending December 31, 1844.

Names.

Beef, per pound.

Vegetables, per pound.

Thomas Gates*

5 1/2 cents

5 1/2 cents

*Accepted.

-588--

B—Continued.

Schedule of proposals for furnishing such quantities of navy bread as may be required for the United States naval service at Charleston station, S. C, during the year ending December 31, 1844.

Names.

Navy bread.

Robert S. Millar*

3 1/2 cents per pound.

C. Datireux

$4 00 per 100 pounds.

* Accepted.

Schedule of proposals for furnishing such quantities of fresh beef and vegetables as may be required for the United States naval service at Pensacola navy-yard and station, during the year ending December 31, 1844.

Names.

Beef, per pound.

Vegetables, per pound.

William L. Williams

8 cents

4 cents.

William A. Bell

6 do

5 7/8 do.

Joseph Gonzalez

6 1/4 do

5 do.

J. C.Allen

5 1/2 do

5 1/2 do.

Francisco Moreno

5 3/4 do

3 1/4 do.

Francis Collins*

5 do

3 do.

* Accepted.

Schedule of proposals for supplying rice at the navy-yards at Norfolk and New York in 1844, under an advertisement dated October 2, 1844.

Names.

Article.

Price per 100 pounds.

Jonathan Lucas*

Rice

$4 00

--589--

C.

Schedule of proposals for freight of naval supplies to Rio de Janeiro, under the advertisement of August 5, 1844.

Names.

Price per barrel.

S. S. Williams

$0 99

Mayhew & Hamlin*

89

James Lawrence

90

W. H. Traub

1 00

Fairfield, Lincoln, & Co.

90

A. N. Davisson

95

Vernon Brown

73

Josiah S. Alexander

99

G.W. Guthrie†

80

Oliver Evans‡

85

T. A. Dwight

1 25

* Accepted.

Vessels offered did not pass inspection.

The exigencies of the service requiring expedition, the navy agent at Boston was instructed to accept the offer of the next lowest bidder at Boston. Mr. Evans's proposal, therefore, was not considered.

Schedule of proposals for freight to Hong Kong, China, received under an advertisement of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing dated August 20, 1844.

No.

Names.

Residence.

Price per barrel.

1

Mayhew & Hamlin

Boston

$1 23

2

Luther Bixby, jr.

Boston

2 50

3

George Browne

Boston

1 19

4

S. S. Williams

Washington

1 49

5

J. S. Alexander*

Boston

88

6

Vernon Brown

Boston

98

7

Sampson & Tappan

Boston

1 18

8

W. C. Fay

Boston

2 10

9

Isaac T. Smith

New York

2 50

10

F. A. Sprague

Boston

1 98

11

A. Kintzing, jr.

Philadelphia

1 25

12

J. L. Tyson

Baltimore

1 37

13

Thornton & Bayless

Baltimore

1 25

14

Henry Holmes

Baltimore

90

--590--

No.

Names.

Residence.

Price per barrel.

15

Ezra Muse

Boston

$0 90

16

Daniel L. Glackens

Philadelphia

1 23 1/2

17

William King

Philadelphia

1 55

18

Samuel Ovenshine

Philadelphia

1 40

19

Thomas Rutter

Philadelphia

1 64

20

J. S. Oakford

Philadelphia

1 20

21

A. S. Hobbs

Philadelphia

1 20

22

Joseph Haines

Philadelphia

1 44

23

E. Moses

Philadelphia

1 34

24

Charles Devlin

Philadelphia

1 70

Accepted.

Proposals for freight to Pensacola, under the advertisement of September 7, 1844.

Names.

Residence.

Price per barrel.

S. Connor & Co.

New York

$0 34

J. R. Cornick*

New York

24

Fernando Wood

New York

59

E. D. Hurlbert & Co.†

New York

34

D. H. Robertson

New York

1 00

B. Greenway & Co.

New York

33

James Larkin

New York

32

* Declined. † Accepted.

--591--

C-—Continued.

Schedule of offers for freight of naval stores to Port Praya, Cape de Verds, February, 1844.

Names.

Price.

W. W. McLaine

$1 50 per barrel, dry.

2 00 per barrel, wet.

1 50 measured goods.

D. H. Robertson

1 20 per barrel.

W. W. Pratt*

95 per barrel.

* Accepted.

Schedule of offers for freight of naval stores to Monrovia, under the advertisement of April 1, 1844.

Names.

Price per barrel.

Badger & Peck

$1 50

Gossler & Co.

1 28

W. McLain,* for American Colonization Society

1 25

W. W. Pratt

1 48

J. T. Smith

1 90

* Accepted.

--592--

D.

Schedule of proposals received for clothing and clothing materials for the United States navy for the year ending 30th June, 1845, under an advertisement of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, dated April 11, 1844.

Names.

Residence.

Blue cloth pea jackets.

Blue cloth monkey jackets.

Blue cloth round jackets.

Blue pilot cloth trowsers.

Blue ordinary cloth trowsers.

Blue flannel shirts.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

W. S. Duvall

New York

$9 00

$6 50

$6 87

$5 00

$4 87

$4 00

$3 51

$3 07

$3 51

$3 07

$1 81

$1 57

J. M. Hammond

Boston

7 75

7 50

7 25

7 00

5 00

4 75

3 56

3 50

3 56

3 50

2 00

1 95

Ezra Hammond

Boston

8 00

7 50

7 50

7 13

5 00

4 13

3 62 1/2

3 37 1/2

3 62 1/2

3 62 1/2

2 00

1 94

Pleasants & Read

Philadelphia

9 25

7 50

7 00

5 75

6 75

5 00

4 20

3 80

4 70

3 85

2 00

1 70

T. Whitmarsh

Boston

8 40

6 90

6 65

5 40

6 20

4 96

3 98

3 50

1 60

1 25

Jacob Sleeper

Boston

7 00

6 00

4 25

3 95

4 30

4 00

3 50

2 75

1 75

1 50

Kent, Kendall, & Atwater

New York

9 20

8 20

7 45

C 50

6 60

5 80

4 40

4 00

3 90

3 60

1 68

1 45

Gale, Roberts, & Haskell

Boston

7 99

6 24

5 97

4 75

5 49

4 49

3 49

3 00

3 85

3 25

1 74

1 49

Grant & Barton*

New York

5 50

4 60

5 00

4 00

5 50

4 60

3 50

3 00

3 50

3 00

1 70

1 60

A. Watson

New York

7 50

5 50

5 00

3 50

1 25

D. G. Fuller

Concord, N. H.

8 37

6 50

8 00

6 25

6 42

4 75

4 12

3 62

4 12

3 62

1 75

1 62

L. Timberlake

New York

5 95

4 75

5 95

4 75

6 25

5 00

3 00

2 75

4 25

3 50

1 50

1 30

H. G. K. Calef

Boston

6 50

6 00

4 20

3 90

4 20

4 05

3 20

2 84

1 70

1 55

I. Foster

Boston

7 90

6 78

6 23

5 11

5 63

4 78

3 70

3 37

1 52

1 27

M. Barnard

Boston

8 31

6 85

6 60

5 36

6 10

4 87

3 95

3 45

1 58

1 21

* Accepted.

--592--

D.

Schedule of proposals received for clothing and clothing materials for the United States navy for the year ending 30th June, 1845, under an advertisement of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, dated April 11, 1844.

Names.

Residence.

Blue cloth pea jackets.

Blue cloth monkey jackets.

Blue cloth round jackets.

Blue pilot cloth trowsers.

Blue ordinary cloth trowsers.

Blue flannel shirts.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

W. S. Duvall

New York

$9 00

$6 50

$6 87

$5 00

$4 87

$4 00

$3 51

$3 07

$3 51

$3 07

$1 81

§1 57

J. M. Hammond

Boston

7 75

7 50

7 25

7 00

5 00

4 75

3 56

3 50

3 56

3 50

2 00

1 95

Ezra Hammond

Boston

8 00

7 50

7 50

7 13

5 00

4 13

3 62 1/2

3 37 1/2

3 62 1/2

3 62 1/2

2 00

1 94

Pleasants & Read

Philadelphia

9 25

7 50

7 00

5 75

6 75

5 00

4 20

3 80

4 70

3 85

2 00

1 70

T. Whitmarsh

Boston

8 40

6 90

6 65

5 40

6 20

4 96

3 98

3 50

1 60

1 25

Jacob Sleeper

Boston

7 00

6 00

4 25

3 95

4 30

4 00

3 50

2 75

1 75

1 50

Kent, Kendall, & Atwater

New York

9 20

8 20

7 45

6 50

6 60

5 80

4 40

4 00

3 90

3 60

1 68

1 45

Gale, Roberts, & Haskell

Boston

7 99

6 24

5 97

4 75

5 49

4 49

3 49

3 00

3 85

3 25

1 74

1 49

Grant & Barton*

New York

5 50

4 60

5 00

4 00

5 50

4 60

3 50

3 00

3 50

3 00

1 70

1 60

A. Watson

New York

7 50

5 50

5 00

3 50

1 25

D. G. Fuller

Concord, N. H.

8 37

6 50

8 00

6 25

6 42

4 75

4 12

3 62

4 12

3 62

1 75

1 62

L. Timberlake

New York

5 95

4 75

5 95

4 75

6 25

5 00

3 00

2 75

4 25

3 50

1 50

1 30

H. G. K. Calef

Boston

6 50

6 00

4 20

3 90

4 20

4 05

3 20

2 84

1 70

1 55

I. Foster

Boston

7 90

6 78

6 23

5 11

5 63

4 78

3 70

3 37

1 52

1 27

M. Barnard

Boston

8 31

6 85

6 60

5 36

6 10

4 87

3 95

3 45

1 58

1 21

* Accepted.

--593--

D—Continued.

Names.

Residence.

Blue flannel under shirts.

White flannel drawers.

Russia linen frocks.

Russia linen trowsers.

White duck frocks.

White duck trowsers.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

Men.

Boys.

W. S. Duvall

New York

$1 10

$1 07

$1 00

$0 94

$0 87

$0 81

$0 70

§0 65

$0 68

$0 64

$0 65

$0 60

J. M. Hammond

Boston

1 35

1 32

1 00

95

1 00

90

58

56

90

86

58

56

Ezra Hammond

Boston

1 37 1/2

1 34 1/2

1 00

90

80

80

58

53

90

58

Pleasants & Read

Philadelphia

1 45

1 13

1 00

88

90

85

75

65

85

80

65

60

T. Whitmarsh

Boston

1 20

1 10

1 00

85

80

70

60

55

65

60

63

58

Jacob Sleeper

Boston

85

85

80

70

85

75

65

60

50

50

50

50

Kent, Kendall, & Atwater

New York

1 35

1 25

1 05

95

85

75

75

65

1 00

92

75

70

Gale, Roberts, & Haskell

Boston

89

74

89

80

79

75

63

58

59

55

58

54

Grant & Barton*

New York

80

70

60

50

1 30

1 06

75

60

65

50

60

55

A. Watson

New York

1 00

70

75

65

85

65

D. G. Fuller

Concord, N. H.

90

80

87 1/2

75

82

70

60

55

75

65

58

55

L. Timberlake

New York

1 25

1 10

60

55

90

85

85

75

50

50

50

50

H. G. K. Calef

Boston

96

90

75

75

87

70

70

55

51

48

52

49

I. Foster

Boston

1 17

1 05

67

60

50

45

55

50

50

45

M. Barnard

Boston

1 20

1 08

75

70

58

54

62

59

60

58

* Accepted.

--594--