Page 363

[335]

PROCEEDINGS OF THE HART INQUIRY
MONDAY, APRIL 17, 1944
TWENTY-NINTH DAY
                                         PEARL HARBOR, TERRITORY OF HAWAII. 
The examination met at 9:28 a. m.

Present:

Admiral Thomas C. Hart, U. S. Navy, Retired, examining officer and his counsel.

Ship's Clerk Charles O. Lee, U. S. Naval Reserve, reporter.

The examining officer decided to postpone the reading of the record of proceedings of the twenty-eighth day of the examination until such time as it shall be reported ready, and in the meantime to proceed with the examination.

No witnesses not otherwise connected with the examination were present.

Rear Admiral Charles H. McMorris, U. S. Navy, who had previously testified, was called before the examining officer, informed that his oath previously taken was still binding, and stated that he had read over the testimony given by him on the nineteenth day of the examination, pronounced it correct, was duly warned, and withdrew.

Lieutenant William B. Stephenson, U. S. Naval Reserve, who had previously testified, was called before the examining officer, informed that his oath previously taken was still binding, and stated that he had read over the testimony given by him on the twenty-eighth day of the examination, pronounce it correct, was duly warned, and withdrew.

A witness called by the examining officer entered and was informed of the subject matter of the examination as set forth in the preface to the testimony of Rear Admiral W. W. Smith, Record Page 32.

The witness was duly sworn.

Examined by the examining officer:

1. Q. Please state your name, rank, and present station.

A. Rear Admiral Howard F. Kingman, U. S. Navy, Commander Battleship Division Two.

2. Q. What duties were you performing during the calendar year 1941?

A. I returned from duty on the Asiatic Station to duty at Navy Department, Washington, May, 1941. Upon my arrival in Washington, I was assigned to duty in the Office of Naval Intelligence as head of the Domestic Intelligence Branch. I remained on this duty until early in October, 1941, when I was assigned the duty of Assistant Director of Naval Intelligence under Captain T. S. Wilkinson. I continued on this duty throughout the year 1941.

3. Q. Admiral, while you were serving as Assistant Director of Naval Intelligence, did your duties in any way bring you into contact

Page 364

with the activities of the Intelligence Offices of the several Naval Districts?

A. As Assistant Director, I had no direct contact or supervision over the administration or activities within the several Naval Districts' intelligence organizations.

4. Q. Prior to that time, while you were the head of the Domestic Branch, will you please outline your relations in connection with the District Intelligence Offices?

[336]

A. The officer in charge of Domestic Intelligence Branch, Office of Naval Intelligence, sometimes referred to as Branch "B", has direct control and supervision over the activities of the several Naval Districts' intelligence organizations within the continental limits of the United States. In this capacity, the head of the Domestic Intelligence Branch does have a general good over-all knowledge of what is being done in the intelligence field in the several Districts. The Office of Naval Intelligence did not, however, during the period in question, attempt to issue detailed instructions or control the details of operation within each Naval District. The policy of O. N. I., at that time, was very definitely set forth to the effect that each District Commandant would execute the general policies established by O. N. I. and carry out the broad directives in such manner as the Commandant felt best suited the organization within his District.

5. Q. Admiral, will you please extend the answer to the previous question so as to set forth relations between the Office of Naval Intelligence and the District Intelligence Office of the Fourteenth Naval District (Honolulu).

A. The intelligence organization in the Fourteenth Naval District being far removed from Washington, had a somewhat different status from those District intelligence organizations within the continental limits of the United States which could be more easily controlled and directed from Washington. Consequently, the details of administration with regard to "investigative activities" within the Fourteenth Naval District were left more to the direct control and supervision of the District Commandant than was done in those Districts which were closely connected to Washington.

6. Q. Admiral, do you know of any expression by the then Commandant of the Fourteenth Naval District of his views with regard to any of the activities of the District Intelligence Office of that District during 1941?

A. I recall that the District Commandant was somewhat concerned about the "investigative activities" being carried on by some of the inexperienced personnel on duty at that time in the Fourteenth Naval District's Intelligence organization. I believe that the Commandant of the Fourteenth Naval District mentioned this matter and stated to the Navy Department the fact that he was somewhat concerned in regard thereto. To the best of my memory, this matter was covered in a personal letter from the Commandant to the Chief of Naval Operations.

T. Q. Admiral, where do you believe this letter to have been filed?

A. I could not say because I believe this letter was a personal letter to Admiral Stark and I have no knowledge as to where or how he filed his personal correspondence. This letter was shown to me by the

Page 365

Director of Naval Intelligence at that time, Captain A. G. Kirk, and I recall having made a pencil memorandum in regard to the particular paragraph in question. I believe that this memorandum could be found in the files of the Office of Naval Intelligence, Branch "B".

Note: The examining officer caused a search to be made of the files of the Domestic Intelligence Branch (Branch "B") of the Office of Naval Intelligence, but was unable to locate the pencil memorandum mentioned by the witness.

8. Q. Admiral, at the time that you were the head of the Domestic Intelligence Branch, did you have any information relating to the activities of certain persons known in Hawaii as "consular agents"'

A. None whatsoever that I can recall at this time.

9. Q. You do not then recall certain recommendations with respect to the prosecution of such agents under the law requiring agents of alien governments [337] to register with the State Department?

A. I can recall nothing of a specific nature in regard to this matter having been undertaken in the Fourteenth Naval District. However, I do recall that the whole matter of consular agents in all Districts was a matter of discussion at one of the joint intelligence meetings held in Washington. The heads of the three intelligence agencies, namely, M. I. D., O. N. I., and F. B. I. constituted the membership of these meetings. The minutes of these meetings are filed in all three departments or offices and should be found in any one of them without difficulty. Copies were given-to O. N. I. and F. B. I and any one of them should have them. Perhaps Captain Waller; who relieved me as the officer in charge of Branch "B" could give further information on this subject.

Note: The documents mentioned by the witness have been identified by the examining officer as being titled "Minutes of Inter-Departmental Intelligence Conferences", now in the custody of the Head of the Counter-Intelligence Branch (formerly Domestic Intelligence) of the Office of Naval Intelligence, Navy Department.

The examining officer did not desire to further examine this witness.

The examining officer informed the witness that he was privileged to make any further statement covering anything relating to the subject matter of the examination which he thought should be a matter of record in connection therewith, which had not been fully brought out by the previous questioning.

The witness stated that he had nothing further to say.

The witness was duly warned and withdrew.

The examination then, at 11 a. m., was adjourned to await the call of the examining officer.


This HTML document was created by GT_HTML 6.0d 12/24/96 11:24 AM.