Page 471

[431]

PROCEEDINGS OF THE HART INQUIRY
THURSDAY, JUNE 15, 1944
FORTY-SECOND DAY
                                                        NAVY DEPARTMENT,
                                                        Washington, D. C. 

The examination met at 11 a.m.

Present:

Admiral Thomas C. Hart, U. S. Navy, Retired, examining officer, and his counsel.

Ship's Clerk Charles O. Lee, U. S. Naval Reserve, reporter.

The record of proceedings of the sixteenth through the forty-first days, both inclusive, of the examination was read and approved.

No witnesses not otherwise connected with the examination were present.

Rear Admiral R. E. Schuirmann, U. S. Navy, who had previously testified, was called before the examining officer, informed that his oath previously taken was still binding, and stated that he had read over the testimony given by him on the thirty-ninth day of the examination, pronounced it correct, was duly warned, and withdrew.

The examining officer read and introduced in evidence a letter, dated 6 June 1944, to Admiral Thomas C. Hart, U. S. Navy, Retired, examining officer, from Rear Admiral Joel W. Bunkley, U.S. Navy, Retired, who had previously testified, accompanying the return of the transcript of his testimony and attesting, under his former oath, that the testimony given by him on the fortieth day of the examination was correct, appended hereto marked "Exhibit 41".

The examining officer read and introduced in evidence a letter dated 9 June 1944, to Admiral Thomas C. Hart, U. S. Navy. Retired, examining officer, from Admiral Royal E. Ingersoll, U. S. Navy, who had previously testified, accompanying the return of the transcript of his testimony and attesting, under his former oath, that the testimony given by him on the fortieth and forty-first days of the examination was correct; appended hereto marked "Exhibit 42".

The examining officer made the following statement: Throughout the foregoing examination, the examining officer has attempted to limit the number of witnesses called to the minimum compatible with the necessary coverage of the subject matter designated in the precept. There are many additional witnesses within the naval service who have knowledge of facts pertinent to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor of 7 December 1941. However, it was felt that their knowledge and opportunities for observation were the same as officers who were examined and their testimony would be cumulative, rather than productive of new information.

Page 472

There are two officers within the naval service whom the examining officer would have called as witnesses in the latter days of the examination if it had been practicable so to do. The officers in question are Captain A. H. McCollum, U. S. Navy, the Chief of the Far Eastern Section of the Office of Naval Intelligence during the latter part of 1941, and Commander A. D. Kramer, [433] U. S. Navy, then attached to the Far Eastern Section and acting as liaison officer between that Section and the Communications Intelligence Section. While it would be desirable to have their testimony in this record, it is not felt to he of sufficient moment to warrant either calling them to Washington or proceeding to their current stations, which are at a great distance.

The examining officer did not desire to call any more witnesses.

The record of proceedings of the forty-second day of the examination was read and approved, and the examination being finished, then at 11:30 a.m., adjourned to await the action of the convening authority.

THOMAS C. HART,

Admiral, U. S. Navy, Retired,

Examining Officer.


This HTML document was created by GT_HTML 6.0d 12/25/96 9:57 AM.