H.
[1913 Webster]

H
H (āch), the eighth letter of the English alphabet, is classed among the consonants, and is formed with the mouth organs in the same position as that of the succeeding vowel. It is used with certain consonants to form digraphs representing sounds which are not found in the alphabet, as sh, th, &thlig_;, as in shall, thing, &thlig_;ine (for zh see §274); also, to modify the sounds of some other letters, as when placed after c and p, with the former of which it represents a compound sound like that of tsh, as in charm (written also tch as in catch), with the latter, the sound of f, as in phase, phantom. In some words, mostly derived or introduced from foreign languages, h following c and g indicates that those consonants have the hard sound before e, i, and y, as in chemistry, chiromancy, chyle, Ghent, Ghibelline, etc.; in some others, ch has the sound of sh, as in chicane. See Guide to Pronunciation, §§ 153, 179, 181-3, 237-8.
[1913 Webster]

The name (aitch) is from the French ache; its form is from the Latin, and this from the Greek H, which was used as the sign of the spiritus asper (rough breathing) before it came to represent the long vowel, Gr. η. The Greek H is from Phœnician, the ultimate origin probably being Egyptian. Etymologically H is most closely related to c; as in E. horn, L. cornu, Gr. ke`ras; E. hele, v. t., conceal; E. hide, L. cutis, Gr. ky`tos; E. hundred, L. centum, Gr. "e-kat-on, Skr. &csdot_;ata.
[1913 Webster]

H piece (Mining), the part of a plunger pump which contains the valve.
[1913 Webster]

H
H (hä). (Mus.) The seventh degree in the diatonic scale, being used by the Germans for B natural. See B.
[1913 Webster]

H2O
H2O n. (āch`t&oomacr_;`ō"), The chemical formula for water.
Syn. -- water, hydrogen oxide.
[WordNet 1.5]

Ha
Ha (hä), interj. [AS.] An exclamation denoting surprise, joy, or grief. Both as uttered and as written, it expresses a great variety of emotions, determined by the tone or the context. When repeated, ha, ha, it is an expression of laughter, satisfaction, or triumph, sometimes of derisive laughter; or sometimes it is equivalent to “Well, it is so.”
[1913 Webster]

Ha-has, and inarticulate hootings of satirical rebuke. Carlyle.
[1913 Webster]

Haaf
Haaf (häf), n. [Of Scand. origin; cf. Icel. & Sw. haf the sea, Dan. hav, perh. akin to E. haven.] The deep-sea fishing for cod, ling, and tusk, off the Shetland Isles.
[1913 Webster]

Haak
Haak (hāk), n. (Zool.) A sea fish. See Hake. Ash.
[1913 Webster]

Haar
Haar (här), n. [See Hoar.] A fog; esp., a fog or mist with a chill wind. [Scot.] T. Chalmers.
[1913 Webster]

Habeas corpus
Ha"be*as cor"pus (hā"b&euptack_;*ăs kôr"pŭs). [L. you may have the body.] (Law) A writ having for its object to bring a party before a court or judge; especially, one to inquire into the cause of a person's imprisonment or detention by another, with the view to protect the right to personal liberty; also, one to bring a prisoner into court to testify in a pending trial. Bouvier.
[1913 Webster]

Habendum
Ha*ben"dum (h&adot_;*b&ebreve_;n"dŭm), n. [L., that must be had.] (Law) That part of a deed which follows the part called the premises, and determines the extent of the interest or estate granted; -- so called because it begins with the word Habendum. Kent.
[1913 Webster]

Haberdash
Hab"er*dash (hăb"&etilde_;r*dăsh), v. i. [See Haberdasher.] To deal in small wares. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

To haberdash in earth's base ware. Quarles.
[1913 Webster]

Haberdasher
Hab"er*dash`er (hăb"&etilde_;r*dăsh`&etilde_;r), n. [Prob. fr. Icel. hapurtask trumpery, trifles, perh. through French. It is possibly akin to E. haversack, and to Icel. taska trunk, chest, pocket, G. tasche pocket, and the orig. sense was perh., peddler's wares.] 1. A dealer in small wares, as tapes, pins, needles, and thread. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

2. A dealer in items of men's clothing, such as hats, gloves, neckties, etc.
[1913 Webster]

The haberdasher heapeth wealth by hats. Gascoigne.
[1913 Webster]

3. A dealer in drapery goods of various descriptions, as laces, silks, trimmings, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Haberdashery
Hab"er*dash`er*y (hăb"&etilde_;r*dăsh`&etilde_;r*&ybreve_;), n. The goods and wares sold by a haberdasher; also (Fig.), trifles. Burke.
[1913 Webster]

Haberdine
Hab`er*dine" (hăb`&etilde_;r*dēn" or hă"b&etilde_;r*d&ibreve_;n), n. [D. abberdaan, labberdaan; or a French form, cf. OF. habordeau, from the name of a Basque district, cf. F. Labourd, adj. Labourdin. The l was misunderstood as the French article.] A cod salted and dried. Ainsworth.
[1913 Webster]

Habergeon
Ha*ber"ge*on (h&adot_;*b&etilde_;r"j&euptack_;*&obreve_;n or hăb"&etilde_;r*jŭn), n. [F. haubergeon a small hauberk, dim. of OF. hauberc, F. haubert. See Hauberk.] Properly, a short hauberk, but often used loosely for the hauberk. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Habenaria
Habenaria prop. n. A genus of chiefly terrestrial orchids with tubers or fleshy roots often having long slender spurs and petals and lip lobes; it includes species formerly placed in the genus Gymnadeniopsis.
Syn. -- genus Habenaria.
[WordNet 1.5]

Habilatory
Hab"i*la*to*ry (hăb"&ibreve_;*l&adot_;*t&ouptack_;*r&ybreve_;), a. Of or pertaining to clothing; wearing clothes. Ld. Lytton.
[1913 Webster]

Habile
Hab"ile (hăb"&ibreve_;l), a. [F. habile, L. habilis. See Able, Habit.] Fit; qualified; also, apt. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Habiliment
Ha*bil"i*ment (h&adot_;*b&ibreve_;l"&ibreve_;*m&eitalic_;nt), n. [F. habillement, fr. habiller to dress, clothe, orig., to make fit, make ready, fr. habile apt, skillful, L. habilis. See Habile.] 1. A garment; an article of clothing. Camden.
[1913 Webster]

2. pl. Dress, in general. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Habilimented
Ha*bil"i*ment*ed, a. Clothed. Taylor (1630).
[1913 Webster]

Habilitate
Ha*bil"i*tate (h&adot_;*b&ibreve_;l"&ibreve_;*t&auptack_;t), a. [LL. habilitatus, p. p. of habilitare to enable.] Qualified or entitled. [Obs.] Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Habilitate
Ha*bil"i*tate (h&adot_;*b&ibreve_;l"&ibreve_;*tāt), v. t. To fit out; to equip; to qualify; to entitle. Johnson.
[1913 Webster]

Habilitation
Ha*bil`i*ta"tion (h&adot_;*b&ibreve_;l`&ibreve_;*tā"shŭn), n. [LL. habilitatio: cf. F. habilitation.] Equipment; qualification. [Obs.] Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Hability
Ha*bil"i*ty (h&adot_;*b&ibreve_;l"&ibreve_;*t&ybreve_;), n. [See Ability.] Ability; aptitude. [Obs.] Robynson (More's Utopia).
[1913 Webster]

Habit
Hab"it (hăb"&ibreve_;t) n. [OE. habit, abit, F. habit, fr. L. habitus state, appearance, dress, fr. habere to have, be in a condition; prob. akin to E. have. See Have, and cf. Able, Binnacle, Debt, Due, Exhibit, Malady.] 1. The usual condition or state of a person or thing, either natural or acquired, regarded as something had, possessed, and firmly retained; as, a religious habit; his habit is morose; elms have a spreading habit; esp., physical temperament or constitution; as, a full habit of body.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Biol.) The general appearance and manner of life of a living organism. Specifically, the tendency of a plant or animal to grow in a certain way; as, the deciduous habit of certain trees.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

3. Fixed or established custom; ordinary course of conduct; practice; usage; hence, prominently, the involuntary tendency or aptitude to perform certain actions which is acquired by their frequent repetition; as, habit is second nature; also, peculiar ways of acting; characteristic forms of behavior.
[1913 Webster]

A man of very shy, retired habits. W. Irving.
[1913 Webster]

4. Outward appearance; attire; dress; hence, a garment; esp., a closely fitting garment or dress worn by ladies; as, a riding habit.
[1913 Webster]

Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

There are, among the statues, several of Venus, in different habits. Addison.

5. Hence: The distinctive clothing worn commonly by nuns or monks; as, in the late 1900's many orders of nuns discarded their habits and began to dress as ordinary lay women.
[PJC]

Syn. -- Practice; mode; manner; way; custom; fashion. -- Habit, Custom. Habit is a disposition or tendency leading us to do easily, naturally, and with growing certainty, what we do often; custom is external, being habitual use or the frequent repetition of the same act. The two operate reciprocally on each other. The custom of giving produces a habit of liberality; habits of devotion promote the custom of going to church. Custom also supposes an act of the will, selecting given modes of procedure; habit is a law of our being, a kind of “second nature” which grows up within us.
[1913 Webster]

How use doth breed a habit in a man! Shak.
[1913 Webster]

He who reigns . . . upheld by old repute,
Consent, or custom
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Habit
Hab"it (hăb"&ibreve_;t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Habited; p. pr. & vb. n. Habiting.] [OE. habiten to dwell, F. habiter, fr. L. habitare to have frequently, to dwell, intens. fr. habere to have. See Habit, n.] 1. To inhabit. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

In thilke places as they [birds] habiten. Rom. of R.
[1913 Webster]

2. To dress; to clothe; to array.
[1913 Webster]

They habited themselves like those rural deities. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. To accustom; to habituate. [Obs.] Chapman.
[1913 Webster]

Habitability
Hab`it*a*bil"i*ty (hăb`&ibreve_;t*&adot_;*b&ibreve_;l"&ibreve_;*t&ybreve_;), n. Habitableness.
[1913 Webster]

Habitable
Hab"it*a*ble (hăb"&ibreve_;t*&adot_;*b'l), a. [F. habitable, L. habitabilis.] Capable of being inhabited; that may be inhabited or dwelt in; as, the habitable world. -- Hab"it*a*ble*ness, n. -- Hab"it*a*bly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

Habitacle
Hab"it*a*cle (hăb"&ibreve_;t*&adot_;*k'l), n. [F. habitacle dwelling place, binnacle, L. habitaculum dwelling place. See Binnacle, Habit, v.] A dwelling place. Chaucer. Southey.
[1913 Webster]

Habitan
Ha`bi`tan" (&adot_;`b&euptack_;`täN"), n. Same as Habitant, 2.
[1913 Webster]

General Arnold met an emissary . . . sent . . . to ascertain the feelings of the habitans or French yeomanry. W. Irving.
[1913 Webster]

Habitance
Hab"it*ance (hăb"&ibreve_;t*&aitalic_;ns), n. [OF. habitance, LL. habitantia.] Dwelling; abode; residence. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Habitancy
Hab"it*an*cy (hăb"&ibreve_;t*&aitalic_;n*s&ybreve_;), n. Same as Inhabitancy.
[1913 Webster]

Habitant
Hab"it*ant (hăb"&ibreve_;t*&aitalic_;nt), n. [F. habitant. See Habit, v. t.]
[1913 Webster]

1. An inhabitant; a dweller. Milton. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

2. [F. pron. &adot_;`b&euptack_;`täN"] An inhabitant or resident; -- a name applied to and denoting farmers of French descent or origin in Canada, especially in the Province of Quebec; -- usually in the plural.
[1913 Webster]

The habitants or cultivators of the soil. Parkman.
[1913 Webster]

Habitat
Hab"i*tat (hăb"&ibreve_;*tăt), n. [L., it dwells, fr. habitare. See Habit, v. t.] 1. (Biol.) The natural abode, locality or region of an animal or plant.
[1913 Webster]

2. Place where anything is commonly found.
[1913 Webster]

This word has its habitat in Oxfordshire. Earle.
[1913 Webster]

Habitation
Hab`i*ta"tion (hăb"&ibreve_;*tā"shŭn), n. [F. habitation, L. habitatio.] 1. The act of inhabiting; state of inhabiting or dwelling, or of being inhabited; occupancy. Denham.
[1913 Webster]

2. Place of abode; settled dwelling; residence; house.
[1913 Webster]

The Lord . . . blesseth the habitation of the just. Prov. iii. 33.
[1913 Webster]

Habitator
Hab"i*ta`tor (hăb"&ibreve_;*tā`t&etilde_;r), n. [L.] A dweller; an inhabitant. [Obs.] Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Habited
Hab"it*ed (hăb"&ibreve_;t*&ebreve_;d), p. p. & a. 1. Clothed; arrayed; dressed; as, he was habited like a shepherd.
[1913 Webster]

2. Fixed by habit; accustomed. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

So habited he was in sobriety. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

3. Inhabited. [Archaic]
[1913 Webster]

Another world, which is habited by the ghosts of men and women. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

Habitual
Ha*bit"ual (h&adot_;*b&ibreve_;t"&uuptack_;*&aitalic_;l; 135), a. [Cf. F. habituel, LL. habitualis. See Habit, n.] 1. Formed or acquired by habit or use.
[1913 Webster]

An habitual knowledge of certain rules and maxims. South.
[1913 Webster]

2. According to habit; established by habit; customary; constant; as, the habitual practice of sin.
[1913 Webster]

It is the distinguishing mark of habitual piety to be grateful for the most common and ordinary blessings. Buckminster.

Syn. -- Customary; accustomed; usual; common; wonted; ordinary; regular; familiar.

-- Ha*bit"u*al*ly, adv. -- Ha*bit"u*al*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Habituate
Ha*bit"u*ate (h&adot_;*b&ibreve_;t"&uuptack_;*āt), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Habituated (h&adot_;*b&ibreve_;t"&uuptack_;*ā`t&ebreve_;d); p. pr. & vb. n. Habituating (h&adot_;*b&ibreve_;t"&uuptack_;*ā`t&ibreve_;ng).] [L. habituatus, p. p. of habituare to bring into a condition or habit of body: cf. F. habituer. See Habit.] 1. To make accustomed; to accustom; to familiarize.
[1913 Webster]

Our English dogs, who were habituated to a colder clime. Sir K. Digby.
[1913 Webster]

Men are first corrupted . . . and next they habituate themselves to their vicious practices. Tillotson.
[1913 Webster]

2. To settle as an inhabitant. [Obs.] Sir W. Temple.
[1913 Webster]

Habituate
Ha*bit"u*ate (h&adot_;*b&ibreve_;t"&uuptack_;*&auptack_;t), a. Firmly established by custom; formed by habit; habitual. [R.] Hammond.
[1913 Webster]

Habituation
Ha*bit`u*a"tion (h&adot_;*b&ibreve_;t"&uuptack_;*ā"shŭn), n. [Cf. F. habituation.] The act of habituating, or accustoming; the state of being habituated.
[1913 Webster]

Habitude
Hab"i*tude (hăb"&ibreve_;*tūd), n. [F., fr. L. habitudo condition. See Habit.] 1. Habitual attitude; usual or accustomed state with reference to something else; established or usual relations. South.
[1913 Webster]

The same ideas having immutably the same habitudes one to another. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

The verdict of the judges was biased by nothing else than their habitudes of thinking. Landor.
[1913 Webster]

2. Habitual association, intercourse, or familiarity.
[1913 Webster]

To write well, one must have frequent habitudes with the best company. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. Habit of body or of action. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

It is impossible to gain an exact habitude without an infinite number of acts and perpetual practice. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Habitue
Ha`bi`tu`é" (&adot_;`b&euptack_;`t&usdot_;`&auptack_;"), n. [F., p. p. of habituer. See Habituate.] One who habitually frequents a place; as, an habitué of a theater.
[1913 Webster]

Habiture
Hab"i*ture (hăb"&ibreve_;*t&uuptack_;r; 135), n. Habitude. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Habitus
Hab"i*tus (hăb"&ibreve_;*tŭs), n. [L.] (Zool.) Habitude; mode of life; general appearance.
[1913 Webster]

Hable
Ha"ble (hā"b'l), a. See Habile. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Habnab
Hab"nab (hăb"năb), adv. [Hobnob.] By chance. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hachure
Hach"ure (hăch"&uuptack_;r), n. [F., fr. hacher to hack. See Hatching.] (Fine Arts) A short line used in drawing and engraving, especially in shading and denoting different surfaces, as in map drawing. See Hatching.
[1913 Webster]

Hacienda
Ha`ci*en"da (ä`th&euptack_;*&auptack_;n"d&adot_; or hä`s&ibreve_;*&ebreve_;n"d&adot_;), n. [Sp., fr. OSp. facienda employment, estate, fr. L. facienda, pl. of faciendum what is to be done, fr. facere to do. See Fact.] 1. A large estate where work of any kind is done, as agriculture, manufacturing, mining, or raising of animals; a cultivated farm, with a good house, in distinction from a farming establishment with rude huts for herdsmen, etc.; -- a word used in Spanish-American regions.
[1913 Webster]

2. The main residence of a hacienda{1}.
[PJC]

Hack
Hack (hăk), n. [See Hatch a half door.] 1. A frame or grating of various kinds; as, a frame for drying bricks, fish, or cheese; a rack for feeding cattle; a grating in a mill race, etc.
[1913 Webster]

2. Unburned brick or tile, stacked up for drying.
[1913 Webster]

Hack
Hack, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hacked (hăkt); p. pr. & vb. n. Hacking.] [OE. hakken, AS. haccian; akin to D. hakken, G. hacken, Dan. hakke, Sw. hacka, and perh. to E. hew. Cf. Hew to cut, Haggle.] 1. To cut irregulary, without skill or definite purpose; to notch; to mangle by repeated strokes of a cutting instrument; as, to hack a post.
[1913 Webster]

My sword hacked like a handsaw. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Fig.: To mangle in speaking. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Computers) To program (a computer) for pleasure or compulsively; especially, to try to defeat the security systems and gain unauthorized access to a computer.
[PJC]

4. To bear, physically or emotionally; as, he left the job because he couldn't hack the pressure. [Colloq.]
[PJC]

Hack
Hack, v. t. (Football) To kick the shins of (an opposing payer).
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hack
Hack, v. i. To cough faintly and frequently, or in a short, broken manner; as, a hacking cough.
[1913 Webster]

Hack
Hack, n. 1. A notch; a cut. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. An implement for cutting a notch; a large pick used in breaking stone.
[1913 Webster]

3. A hacking; a catch in speaking; a short, broken cough. Dr. H. More.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Football) A kick on the shins, or a cut from a kick. T. Hughes.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Computers) A clever computer program or routine within a program to accomplish an objective in a non-obvious fashion.
[PJC]

6. (Computers) A quick and inelegant, though functional solution to a programming problem.
[PJC]

7. A taxicab. [informal]
[PJC]

Hack saw, a handsaw having a narrow blade stretched in an iron frame, for cutting metal.
[1913 Webster]

Hack
Hack (hăk), n. [Shortened fr. hackney. See Hackney.]
[1913 Webster]

1. A horse, hackneyed or let out for common hire; also, a horse used in all kinds of work, or a saddle horse, as distinguished from hunting and carriage horses.
[1913 Webster]

2. A coach or carriage let for hire; a hackney coach; formerly, a coach with two seats inside facing each other; now, usually a taxicab.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

On horse, on foot, in hacks and gilded chariots. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hence: The driver of a hack; a taxi driver; a hackman.
[PJC]

3. A bookmaker who hires himself out for any sort of literary work; an overworked man; a drudge.
[1913 Webster]

Here lies poor Ned Purdon, from misery freed,
Who long was a bookseller's hack.
Goldsmith.
[1913 Webster]

4. A procuress.
[1913 Webster]

Hack
Hack, v. i. To ride or drive as one does with a hack horse; to ride at an ordinary pace, or over the roads, as distinguished from riding across country or in military fashion.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hack
Hack, a. Hackneyed; hired; mercenary. Wakefield.
[1913 Webster]

Hack writer, a hack; one who writes for hire. “A vulgar hack writer.” Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Hack
Hack, v. t. 1. To use as a hack; to let out for hire.
[1913 Webster]

2. To use frequently and indiscriminately, so as to render trite and commonplace.
[1913 Webster]

The word “remarkable” has been so hacked of late. J. H. Newman.
[1913 Webster]

Hack
Hack, v. i. 1. To be exposed or offered to common use for hire; to turn prostitute. Hanmer.
[1913 Webster]

2. To live the life of a drudge or hack. Goldsmith.
[1913 Webster]

Hackamore
Hack"a*more (hăk"&adot_;*mōr), n. [Cf. Sp. jaquima headstall of a halter.] A halter consisting of a long leather or rope strap and headstall, -- used for leading or tieing a pack animal. [Western U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

Hackberry
Hack"ber`ry (hăk"b&ebreve_;r`r&ybreve_;), n. (Bot.) A genus of trees (Celtis) related to the elm, but bearing drupes with scanty, but often edible, pulp. Celtis occidentalis is common in the Eastern United States. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Hackbolt
Hack"bolt` (hăk"bōlt`), n. (Zool.) The greater shearwater or hagdon. See Hagdon.
[1913 Webster]

Hackbuss
Hack"buss (hăk"bŭs), n. Same as Hagbut.
[1913 Webster]

Hackee
Hack"ee (hăk"ē), n. (Zool.) The chipmunk; also, the chickaree or red squirrel. [U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

Hackelia
Hackelia prop. n. A genus of plants with seeds that stick to clothing, including stickseed and some of the beggar's lice.
Syn. -- genus Hackelia, Lappula, genus Lappula.
[WordNet 1.5]

hacker
hack"er (hăk"&etilde_;r), n. One who, or that which, hacks. Specifically: A cutting instrument for making notches; esp., one used for notching pine trees in collecting turpentine; a hack.
[1913 Webster]

hackery
hack"er*y (hăk"&etilde_;r*&ybreve_;), n. [Hind. chhakrā.] A cart with wooden wheels, drawn by bullocks. [Bengal] Malcom.
[1913 Webster]

hackie
hack"ie (hăk"ē), n. The driver of a taxicab; a hackman. [Colloq.]
[PJC]

hackle
hac"kle (hăk"k'l), n. [See Heckle, and cf. Hatchel.]
[1913 Webster]

1. A comb for dressing flax, raw silk, etc.; a hatchel.
[1913 Webster]

2. Any flimsy substance unspun, as raw silk.
[1913 Webster]

3. One of the peculiar, long, narrow feathers on the neck of fowls, most noticeable on the cock, -- often used in making artificial flies; hence, any feather so used.
[1913 Webster]

4. An artificial fly for angling, made of feathers.
[1913 Webster]

Hackle
Hac"kle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hackled (hăk"k'ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Hackling (hăk"kl&ibreve_;ng).] 1. To separate, as the coarse part of flax or hemp from the fine, by drawing it through the teeth of a hackle or hatchel.
[1913 Webster]

2. To tear asunder; to break in pieces.
[1913 Webster]

The other divisions of the kingdom being hackled and torn to pieces. Burke.
[1913 Webster]

Hackly
Hac"kly (hăk"l&ybreve_;), a. [From Hackle.] 1. Rough or broken, as if hacked.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Min.) Having fine, short, and sharp points on the surface; as, the hackly fracture of metallic iron.
[1913 Webster]

Hackman
Hack"man (hăk"m&aitalic_;n), n.; pl. Hackmen (hăk"m&eitalic_;n). The driver of a hack or carriage for public hire.
[1913 Webster]

Hackmatack
Hack"ma*tack` (hăk"m&adot_;*tăk`), n. [Of American Indian origin.] (Bot.) The American larch (Larix Americana), a coniferous tree with slender deciduous leaves; also, its heavy, close-grained timber. Called also tamarack.
[1913 Webster]

Hackney
Hack"ney (-n&ybreve_;), n.; pl. Hackneys (-n&ibreve_;z). [OE. hakeney, hakenay; cf. F. haguenée a pacing horse, an ambling nag, OF. also haquenée, Sp. hacanea, OSp. facanea, D. hakkenei, also OF. haque horse, Sp. haca, OSp. faca; perh. akin to E. hack to cut, and nag, and orig. meaning, a jolting horse. Cf. Hack a horse, Nag.] 1. A horse for riding or driving; a nag; a pony. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. A horse or pony kept for hire.
[1913 Webster]

3. A carriage kept for hire; a hack; a hackney coach.
[1913 Webster]

4. A hired drudge; a hireling; a prostitute.
[1913 Webster]

Hackney
Hack"ney, a. Let out for hire; devoted to common use; hence, much used; trite; mean; as, hackney coaches; hackney authors.Hackney tongue.” Roscommon.


[1913 Webster]

Hackney
Hack"ney, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hackneyed (-n&ibreve_;d); p. pr. & vb. n. Hackneying.] 1. To devote to common or frequent use, as a horse or carriage; to wear out in common service; to make trite or commonplace; as, a hackneyed metaphor or quotation.
[1913 Webster]

Had I so lavish of my presence been,
So common-hackneyed in the eyes of men.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. To carry in a hackney coach. Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

Hackneyman
Hack"ney*man (-măn), n.; pl. Hackneymen (-m&ebreve_;n). A man who lets horses and carriages for hire.
[1913 Webster]

Hackster
Hack"ster (-st&etilde_;r), n. [From Hack to cut.] A bully; a bravo; a ruffian; an assassin. [Obs.] Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hacqueton
Hac"que*ton (hăk"k&euptack_;*t&obreve_;n), n. Same as Acton. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Had
Had (hăd), imp. & p. p. of Have. [OE. had, hafde, hefde, AS. hæfde.] See Have.
[1913 Webster]

Had as lief, Had rather, Had better, Had as soon, etc., with a nominative and followed by the infinitive without to, are well established idiomatic forms. The original construction was that of the dative with forms of be, followed by the infinitive. See Had better, under Better.
[1913 Webster]

And lever me is be pore and trewe.
[And more agreeable to me it is to be poor and true.]
C. Mundi (Trans.).
[1913 Webster]

Him had been lever to be syke.
[To him it had been preferable to be sick.]
Fabian.
[1913 Webster]

For him was lever have at his bed's head
Twenty bookes, clad in black or red, . . .
Than robes rich, or fithel, or gay sawtrie.
Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Gradually the nominative was substituted for the dative, and had for the forms of be. During the process of transition, the nominative with was or were, and the dative with had, are found.
[1913 Webster]

Poor lady, she were better love a dream. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

You were best hang yourself. Beau. & Fl.
[1913 Webster]

Me rather had my heart might feel your love
Than my unpleased eye see your courtesy.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

I hadde levere than my scherte,
That ye hadde rad his legende, as have I.
Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

I had as lief not be as live to be
In awe of such a thing as I myself.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

I had rather be a dog and bay the moon,
Than such a Roman.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

I had rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God, than to dwell in the tents of wickedness. Ps. lxxxiv. 10.
[1913 Webster]

Hadder
Had"der (hăd"d&etilde_;r), n. Heather; heath. [Obs.] Burton.
[1913 Webster]

Haddie
Had"die (-d&ibreve_;), n. (Zool.) The haddock. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Haddock
Had"dock (-dŭk), n. [OE. hadok, haddok, of unknown origin; cf. Ir. codog, Gael. adag, F. hadot.] (Zool.) A marine food fish (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), allied to the cod, inhabiting the northern coasts of Europe and America. It has a dark lateral line and a black spot on each side of the body, just back of the gills. Galled also haddie, and dickie.
[1913 Webster]

Norway haddock, a marine edible fish (Sebastes marinus) of Northern Europe and America. See Rose fish.
[1913 Webster]

Hade
Hade (hād), n. [Cf. AS. heald inclined, bowed down, G. halde declivity.] 1. The descent of a hill. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

2. (Mining) The inclination or deviation from the vertical of any mineral vein.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Geol. & Mining) The deviation of a fault plane from the vertical.

&hand_; The direction of the hade is the direction toward which the fault plane descends from an intersecting vertical line.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hade
Hade, v. i. (Mining) To deviate from the vertical; -- said of a vein, fault, or lode.
[1913 Webster]

Hades
Ha"des (hā"dēz), n. [Gr. "a`,dhs, "A'idhs; 'a priv. + 'idei^n to see. Cf. Un-, Wit.] The nether world (according to classical mythology, the abode of the shades, ruled over by Hades or Pluto); the invisible world; the grave.
[1913 Webster]

And death and Hades gave up the dead which were in them. Rev. xx. 13 (Rev. Ver.).
[1913 Webster]

Neither was he left in Hades, nor did his flesh see corruption. Acts ii. 31 (Rev. Ver.).
[1913 Webster]

And in Hades he lifted up his eyes, being in torments. Luke xvi. 23 (Rev. Ver.).
[1913 Webster]

Hadj
Hadj (hăj), n. [Ar. hajj, fr. hajja to set out, walk, go on a pilgrimage.] The pilgrimage to Mecca, performed by Muslims. It is the duty of Moslems to make a journey to Mecca at least once ina lifetime, or if that is not possible, three journeys to one of the alternate sacred sites. [Also spelled haj and hajj.]
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Hadji
Hadj"i (-&ibreve_;), n. [Ar. hājjī. See Hadj.] [Also spelled hajji and haji.] 1. A Muslim who has made a pilgrimage to Mecca; -- used among Orientals as a respectful salutation or a title of honor. G. W. Curtis.
[1913 Webster]

2. A Greek or Armenian who has visited the holy sepulcher at Jerusalem. Heyse.
[1913 Webster]

hadron
hadron n. (Physics) any elementary particle that interacts strongly with other particles.
[WordNet 1.5]

hadrosaur
hadrosaur n. Any member of the genus Hadrosaurus or family Hadrosauridae, an extinct family of heavy bipedal partly aquatic dinosaurs with duck-billed skull and webbed feet; of the Upper Cretaceous in North America.
Syn. -- hadrosaurus.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hadrosauridae
Hadrosauridae prop. n. A natural family of extinct reptiles including the duck-billed dinosaurs.
Syn. -- family Hadrosauridae.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hadrosaurus
Had`ro*sau"rus (hăd`r&ouptack_;*s&asuml_;"rŭs), n. [NL., fr. Gr. "adro`s thick + say^ros lizard.] (Paleon.) An American herbivorous dinosaur of great size, allied to the iguanodon. It is found in the Cretaceous formation.
[1913 Webster]

Haecceity
Haec*ce"i*ty (h&ebreve_;k*sē"&ibreve_;*t&ybreve_;), [L. hæcce this.] (Logic) Literally, this-ness. A scholastic term to express individuality or singleness; as, this book.
[1913 Webster]

Haemo-
Haemato-
Haema-
Haem"a- (h&ebreve_;m"&adot_;- or hē"m&adot_;-), Haem"a*to- (h&ebreve_;m"&adot_;*t&ouptack_;- or hē"m&adot_;*t&ouptack_;-), Haem"o- (h&ebreve_;m"&ouptack_;- or hē"m&ouptack_;-). [Gr. a"i^ma, a"i`matos, blood.] Combining forms indicating relation or resemblance to blood, association with blood; as, haemapod, haematogenesis, haemoscope.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Words from Gr. a"i^ma are written hema-, hemato-, hemo-, as well as haema-, haemato-, haemo-.
[1913 Webster]

Haemachrome
Haem"a*chrome (h&ebreve_;m"&adot_;*krōm or hē"m&adot_;-), n. [Haema- + Gr. chrw^ma color.] (Physiol. Chem.) Hematin.
[1913 Webster]

Haemacyanin
Haem`a*cy"a*nin (-sī"&adot_;*n&ibreve_;n), n. [Haema- + Gr. ky`anos a dark blue substance.] (Physiol. Chem.) A substance found in the blood of the octopus, which gives to it its blue color.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; When deprived of oxygen it is colorless, but becomes quickly blue in contact with oxygen, and is then generally called oxyhaemacyanin. A similar blue coloring matter has been detected in small quantity in the blood of other animals and in the bile.
[1913 Webster]

Haemacytometer
Haem`a*cy*tom"e*ter (-s&iuptack_;*t&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r), n. [Haema + Gr. ky`tos a hollow vessel + -meter.] (Physiol.) An apparatus for determining the number of corpuscles in a given quantity of blood.
[1913 Webster]

Haemad
Hae"mad (hē"măd), adv. [Haema- + L. ad toward.] (Anat.) Toward the haemal side; on the haemal side of; -- opposed to neurad.
[1913 Webster]

Haemadromometer
Haemadrometer
{ Haem`a*drom"e*ter (h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*dr&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r or hē`m&adot_;-), Haem`a*dro*mom"e*ter (-dr&ouptack_;*m&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r), } n. Same as Hemadrometer.
[1913 Webster]

Haemadromometry
Haemadrometry
{ Haem`a*drom"e*try (-dr&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*tr&ybreve_;),Haem`a*dro*mom"e*try (-dr&ouptack_;*m&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*tr&ybreve_;), } n. Same as Hemadrometry.
[1913 Webster]

Haemadromograph
Haem`a*drom"o*graph (-dr&obreve_;m"&ouptack_;*gr&adot_;f), n. [Haema- + Gr. dro`mos course + -graph.] (Physiol.) An instrument for registering the velocity of the blood.

Haemadynamometer
Haemadynameter
Hae`ma*dy*nam"e*ter (hē`m&adot_;*d&iuptack_;*năm"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r or h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*d&ibreve_;-) Hae`ma*dy`na*mom"e*ter (hē`m&adot_;*dī`n&adot_;*m&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r or h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*d&ibreve_;n`&adot_;-), Same as Hemadynamometer.
[1913 Webster]

Haemadynamics
Haema*dy*nam"ics (hē`m&adot_;*d&iuptack_;*năm"&ibreve_;ks or h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*d&ibreve_;-, n. Same as Hemadynamics.
[1913 Webster]

Haemal
Hae"mal (hē"m&aitalic_;l), a. [Gr. a"i^ma blood.] Pertaining to the blood or blood vessels; also, ventral. See Hemal.
[1913 Webster]

Haemaphaein
Haem`a*phae"in (h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*fē"&ibreve_;n or hē`m&adot_;-), n. [Haema- + Gr. faio`s dusky.] (Physiol.) A brownish substance sometimes found in the blood, in cases of jaundice.
[1913 Webster]

Haemapod
Haem"a*pod (h&ebreve_;m"&adot_;*p&obreve_;d or hē"m&adot_;*p&obreve_;d), n. [Haema + -pod.] (Zool.) An haemapodous animal. G. Rolleston.
[1913 Webster]

Haemapodous
Hae*map"o*dous (h&euptack_;*măp"&ouptack_;*dŭs), a. (Anat.) Having the limbs on, or directed toward, the ventral or hemal side, as in vertebrates; -- opposed to neuropodous.
[1913 Webster]

Haemapoietic
Haem`a*poi*et"ic (h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*poi*&ebreve_;t"&ibreve_;k or hē`m&adot_;-), a. [Haema- + Gr. poihtiko`s productive.] (Physiol.) Blood-forming; as, the haemapoietic function of the spleen.
[1913 Webster]

Haemapophysis
Haem`a*poph"y*sis (-p&obreve_;f"&ibreve_;*s&ibreve_;s), n. [NL.] Same as Hemapophysis. -- Haem`a*po*phys"i*al (-p&ouptack_;*f&ibreve_;z"&ibreve_;*&aitalic_;l), a.
[1913 Webster]

Haemastatics
Haem`a*stat"ics, n. Same as Hemastatics.
[1913 Webster]

Haematachometer
Haem`a*ta*chom"e*ter (-t&adot_;*k&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r), n. [Haema- + Gr. tachy`s swift + -meter.] (Physiol.) A form of apparatus (somewhat different from the hemadrometer) for measuring the velocity of the blood.
[1913 Webster]

Haematachometry
Haem`a*ta*chom"e*try (-tr&ybreve_;), n. (Physiol.) The measurement of the velocity of the blood.
[1913 Webster]

Haematemesis
Haem`a*tem"e*sis, n. Same as Hematemesis.
[1913 Webster]

Haematic
Hae*mat"ic (h&euptack_;*măt"&ibreve_;k), a. [Gr. a"imatiko`s] Of or pertaining to the blood; sanguine; brownish red.
[1913 Webster]

Haematic acid (Physiol.), a hypothetical acid, supposed to be formed from hemoglobin during its oxidation in the lungs, and to have the power of freeing carbonic acid from the sodium carbonate of the serum. Thudichum.
[1913 Webster]

Haematin
Haem"a*tin, n. Same as Hematin.
[1913 Webster]

Haematinometer
Haem`a*ti*nom"e*ter, n. Same as Hematinometer.
[1913 Webster]

Haematinometric
Haem`a*tin`o*met"ric, a. Same as Hematinometric.
[1913 Webster]

Haematite
Haem"a*tite, n. Same as Hematite.
[1913 Webster]

Haematitic
Haem`a*tit"ic (h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*t&ibreve_;t"&ibreve_;k), a. (Zool.) Of a blood-red color; crimson; (Bot.) brownish red.
[1913 Webster]

Haemato-
Haem"a*to- (h&ebreve_;m"&adot_;*t&ouptack_;- or hē"-), prefix. See Haema-.
[1913 Webster]

Haematoblast
Haem"a*to*blast (-blăst`), n. [Haemato- + -blast.] (Anat.) One of the very minute, disk-shaped bodies found in blood with the ordinary red corpuscles and white corpuscles; a third kind of blood corpuscle, supposed by some to be an early stage in the development of the red corpuscles; -- called also blood plaque, and blood plate.
[1913 Webster]

Haematocrya
Haem`a*toc"ry*a (t&obreve_;k"r&ibreve_;*&adot_;), n. pl. (Zool.) The cold-blooded vertebrates. Same as Hematocrya.
[1913 Webster]

Haematocryal
Haem`a*toc"ry*al (-&aitalic_;l), a. Cold-blooded.
[1913 Webster]

Haematocrystallin
Haem`a*to*crys"tal*lin, n. Same as Hematocrystallin.
[1913 Webster]

Haematodynamometer
Hae`ma*to*dy`na*mom"e*ter (hē`m&adot_;*t&ouptack_;*dī`n&adot_;*m&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r or h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*t&ouptack_;*d&ibreve_;n`&adot_;-), n. Same as Hemadynamometer.
[1913 Webster]

Haematogenesis
Haem`a*to*gen"e*sis (h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*t&ouptack_;*j&ebreve_;n"&euptack_;*s&ibreve_;s or hē`m&adot_;*t&ouptack_;-), n. [Haemato- + genesis.] (Physiol.) (a) The origin and development of blood. (b) The transformation of venous into arterial blood by respiration; hematosis.
[1913 Webster]

Haematogenic
Haem`a*to*gen"ic (-j&ebreve_;n"&ibreve_;k), a. (Physiol.) Relating to haematogenesis.
[1913 Webster]

Haematogenous
Haem`a*tog"e*nous (-t&obreve_;j"&euptack_;*nŭs), a. (Physiol.) Originating in the blood.
[1913 Webster]

Haematoglobulin
Haem`a*to*glob"u*lin, n. Same as Hematoglobulin.
[1913 Webster]

Haematoid
Haem"a*toid, a. Same as Hematoid.
[1913 Webster]

Haematoidin
Haem`a*toid"in, n. Same as Hematoidin.
[1913 Webster]

Haematoin
Hae*mat"o*in (h&euptack_;*măt"&ouptack_;*&ibreve_;n), n. [Haemato- + -in.] (Physiol. Chem.) A substance formed from the hematin of blood, by removal of the iron through the action of concentrated sulphuric acid. Two like bodies, called respectively haematoporphyrin and haematolin, are formed in a similar manner.
[1913 Webster]

Haematolin
Hae*mat"o*lin (-l&ibreve_;n), n. See Haematoin.
[1913 Webster]

Haematology
Haem`a*tol"o*gy (h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*t&obreve_;l"&ouptack_;*j&ybreve_; or hē`m&adot_;-), n. The science which treats of the blood. Same as Hematology.
[1913 Webster]

Haematolysis
Haem`a*tol"y*sis (h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*t&obreve_;l"&ibreve_;*s&ibreve_;s or h&ebreve_;`m&adot_;-), n. [NL.; haemato- + Gr. ly`sis a loosing, dissolving, fr. ly`ein to loose, dissolve.] (Physiol.) Dissolution of the red blood corpuscles with diminished coagulability of the blood; haemolysis. -- Haem`a*to*lyt"ic (#), a.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Haematometer
Haem`a*tom"e*ter (-t&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r), n. [Haemato- + -meter.] (Physiol.) (a) Same as Hemadynamometer. (b) An instrument for determining the number of blood corpuscles in a given quantity of blood.
[1913 Webster]

Haematophilina
Haem`a*to*phi*li"na (-t&ouptack_;*f&ibreve_;*lī"n&adot_;), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. a"i^ma, a"i`matos, blood + filei^n to love.] (Zool.) A division of Chiroptera, including the bloodsucking bats. See Vampire.
[1913 Webster]

Haematoplast
Haem"a*to*plast` (-plăst`), n. [Haemato- + Gr. pla`ssein to mold.] (Anat.) Same as Haematoblast.
[1913 Webster]

Haematoplastic
Haem`a*to*plas"tic (-plăs"t&ibreve_;k), a. [Haemato- + -plastic.] (Physiol.) Blood formative; -- applied to a substance in early fetal life, which breaks up gradually into blood vessels.
[1913 Webster]

Haematoporphyrin
Haem`a*to*por"phy*rin (-pôr"f&ibreve_;*r&ibreve_;n), n. [Haemato- + Gr. porfy`ra purple.] (Physiol. Chem.) See Haematoin.
[1913 Webster]

Haematosac
Haem"a*to*sac` (-săk`), n. [Haemato- + sac.] (Anat.) A vascular sac connected, beneath the brain, in many fishes, with the infundibulum.
[1913 Webster]

Haematoscope
Haem"a*to*scope` (-skōp`), n. A haemoscope.
[1913 Webster]

Haematosin
Haem`a*to"sin (h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*tō"s&ibreve_;n or h&euptack_;*măt"&ouptack_;*s&ibreve_;n), n. (Physiol. Chem.) Hematin. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Haematosis
Haem`a*to"sis, n. Same as Hematosis.
[1913 Webster]

Haematotherma
Haem`a*to*ther"ma (h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*t&ouptack_;*th&etilde_;r"m&adot_; or hē`m&adot_;-), n. pl. (Zool.) Same as Hematotherma.
[1913 Webster]

Haematothermal
Haem`a*to*ther"mal (-m&aitalic_;l), a. Warm-blooded; homoiothermal.
[1913 Webster]

Haematothorax
Haem`a*to*tho"rax, n. Same as Hemothorax.
[1913 Webster]

Haematoxylin
Haem`a*tox"y*lin (-t&obreve_;ks"&ibreve_;*l&ibreve_;n), n. [See Haematoxylon.] (Chem.) The coloring principle of logwood. It is obtained as a yellow crystalline substance, C16H14O6, with a sweetish taste. Formerly called also hematin.
[1913 Webster]

Haematoxylon
Haem`a*tox"y*lon (-l&obreve_;n), n. [NL., fr. Gr. a"i^ma blood + xy`lon wood.] (Bot.) A genus of leguminous plants containing but a single species, the Haematoxylon Campechianum or logwood tree, native in Yucatan.
[1913 Webster]

Haematozoon
Haem`a*to*zo"on (-t&ouptack_;*zō"&obreve_;n), n.; pl. Haematozoa (-&adot_;). [NL., fr. Gr. a"i^ma, a"i`matos, blood + zw^,on animal.] (Zool.) A parasite inhabiting the blood; esp.: (a) Certain species of nematodes of the genus Filaria, sometimes found in the blood of man, the horse, the dog, etc. (b) The trematode, Bilharzia haematobia, which infests the inhabitants of Egypt and other parts of Africa, often causing death.
[1913 Webster]

Haemic
Hae"mic (hē"m&ibreve_;k or h&ebreve_;m"&ibreve_;k), a. Pertaining to the blood; hemal.
[1913 Webster]

Haemin
Hae"min (hā"m&ibreve_;n), n. Same as Hemin.
[1913 Webster]

Haemo-
Haem"o- (h&ebreve_;m"&ouptack_;- or hē"m&ouptack_;-), prefix. See Haema-.
[1913 Webster]

Haemochrome
Haem"o*chrome (-krōm), n. Same as Haemachrome.
[1913 Webster]

Haemochromogen
Haem`o*chro"mo*gen (-krō"m&ouptack_;*j&ebreve_;n), n. [Haemochrome + -gen.] (Physiol. Chem.) A body obtained from hemoglobin, by the action of reducing agents in the absence of oxygen.
[1913 Webster]

Haemochromometer
Haem`o*chro*mom"e*ter (-kr&ouptack_;*m&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r), n. [Haemochrome + -meter.] (Physiol. Chem.) An apparatus for measuring the amount of hemoglobin in a fluid, by comparing it with a solution of known strength and of normal color.
[1913 Webster]

Haemocyanin
Haem`o*cy"a*nin (-sī"&adot_;*n&ibreve_;n), n. Same as Haemacyanin.
[1913 Webster]

Haemocytolysis
Haem`o*cy*tol"y*sis (-s&iuptack_;*t&obreve_;l"&ibreve_;*s&ibreve_;s), n. [NL., fr. Gr. a"i^ma blood + ky`tos hollow vessel + ly`ein to loosen, dissolve.] (Physiol.) See Haemocytotrypsis.
[1913 Webster]

Haemocytometer
Haem`o*cy*tom"e*ter, n. See Haemacytometer.
[1913 Webster]

Haemocytotrypsis
Haem`o*cy`to*tryp"sis (-sī`t&ouptack_;*tr&ibreve_;p"s&ibreve_;s), n. [NL., fr. Gr. a"i^ma blood + ky`tos hollow vessel + tri`bein to rub, grind.] (Physiol.) A breaking up of the blood corpuscles, as by pressure, in distinction from solution of the corpuscles, or haemocytolysis.
[1913 Webster]

Haemodromograph
Haem`o*drom"o*graph (-dr&ouptack_;*m&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r), n. Same as Haemadromograph.
[1913 Webster]

Haemodromometer
Haem`o*dro*mom"e*ter(-dr&ouptack_;*m&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r),n.Same as Hemadrometer.

Haemodynameter
Hae`mo*dy*nam"e*ter (hē`m&ouptack_;*d&iuptack_;*năm"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r or h&ebreve_;m`&ouptack_;*d&ibreve_;-), n. Same as Hemadynamics.
[1913 Webster]

Haemoglobin
Haem`o*glo"bin, n. Same as Hemoglobin.
[1913 Webster]

Haemoglobinometer
Haem`o*glo`bin*om"e*ter (-&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r), n. [Haemoglobin + -meter.] Same as Hemochromometer.
[1913 Webster]

Haemol
Hae"mol (hē"mōl), n. [Gr. a"i^ma blood.] (Chem.) A dark brown powder containing iron, prepared by the action of zinc dust as a reducing agent upon the coloring matter of the blood, used medicinally as a hematinic.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Haemolutein
Haem`o*lu"te*in (-lū"t&euptack_;*&ibreve_;n), n. [Haemo- + corpus luteum.] (Physiol.) See Hematoidin.
[1913 Webster]

Haemolytic
Haemolysis
Hae*mol"y*sis (h&euptack_;*m&obreve_;l"&ibreve_;*s&ibreve_;s), n., Haem`o*lyt"ic (h&ebreve_;m`&ouptack_;*l&ibreve_;t"*&ibreve_;c or hē`m&ouptack_;-), a. (Physiol.) Same as Haematolysis, Haematolytic.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Haemomanometer
Haem`o*ma*nom"e*ter (-m&adot_;*n&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r), n. [Haemo- + manometer.] Same as Hemadynamometer.
[1913 Webster]

Haemometer
Hae*mom"e*ter (h&euptack_;*m&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r), n. [Haemo- + -meter.] (Physiol.) Same as Hemadynamometer.
[1913 Webster]

Haemony
Hae"mo*ny (hē"m&ouptack_;*n&ybreve_;), n. [L. Haemonia a name of Thessaly, the land of magic.] A plant described by Milton as “of sovereign use against all enchantments.”
[1913 Webster]

Haemoplastic
Hae`mo*plas"tic, a. Same as Haematoplastic.
[1913 Webster]

Haemorrhoidal
Haem"or*rhoid"al, a. Same as Hemorrhoidal.
[1913 Webster]

Haemoscope
Haem"o*scope (h&ebreve_;m"&ouptack_;*skōp or hē"m&ouptack_;-), n. [Haemo- + -scope.] (Physiol.) An instrument devised by Hermann, for regulating and measuring the thickness of a layer of blood for spectroscopic examination.
[1913 Webster]

Haemostatic
Haem`o*stat"ic (-stăt"&ibreve_;k), a. Same as Hemostatic.
[1913 Webster]

Haemotachometer
Haem`o*ta*chom"e*ter (-t&adot_;*k&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r), n. Same as Haematachometer.
[1913 Webster]

Haemotachometry
Haem`o*ta*chom"e*try (-tr&ybreve_;), n. Same as Haematachometry.
[1913 Webster]

Haf
Haf (häf), imp. of Heave. Hove. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Haffle
Haf"fle (hăf"f'l), v. i. [Cf. G. haften to cling, stick to, Prov. G., to stop, stammer.] To stammer; to speak unintelligibly; to prevaricate. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

hafnium
haf"ni*um (hăf"nē*ŭm or häf"nē*ŭm), n. A metallic element of atomic number 72 present together with zirconium to the extent of 1% to 5% in zirconium minerals. It is a poisonous, ductile metal with a brilliant silver luster, has an atomic weight of 178.49, and has a high melting point (2227° C). It is used in nuclear reactors, and incandescent lamps as a scavenger of oxygen and nitrogen. See also norium.
[1913 Webster]

Haft
Haft (h&adot_;ft), n. [AS. hæft; akin to D. & G. heft, Icel. hepti, and to E. heave, or have. Cf. Heft.] 1. A handle; that part of an instrument or vessel taken into the hand, and by which it is held and used; -- said chiefly of a knife, sword, or dagger; the hilt.
[1913 Webster]

This brandish'd dagger
I'll bury to the haft in her fair breast.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. A dwelling. [Scot.] Jamieson.
[1913 Webster]

Haft
Haft, v. t. To set in, or furnish with, a haft; as, to haft a dagger.
[1913 Webster]

Hafter
Haft"er (-&etilde_;r), n. [Cf. G. haften to cling or stick to, and E. haffle.] A caviler; a wrangler. [Obs.] Baret.
[1913 Webster]

Hag
Hag (hăg), n. [OE. hagge, hegge, witch, hag, AS. hægtesse; akin to OHG. hagazussa, G. hexe, D. heks, Dan. hex, Sw. häxa. The first part of the word is prob. the same as E. haw, hedge, and the orig. meaning was perh., wood woman, wild woman. √12.] 1. A witch, sorceress, or enchantress; also, a wizard. [Obs.] “[Silenus] that old hag.” Golding.
[1913 Webster]

2. An ugly old woman. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. A fury; a she-monster. Crashaw.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Zool.) An eel-like marine marsipobranch (Myxine glutinosa), allied to the lamprey. It has a suctorial mouth, with labial appendages, and a single pair of gill openings. It is the type of the order Hyperotreta. Called also hagfish, borer, slime eel, sucker, and sleepmarken.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Zool.) The hagdon or shearwater.
[1913 Webster]

6. An appearance of light and fire on a horse's mane or a man's hair. Blount.
[1913 Webster]

Hag moth (Zool.), a moth (Phobetron pithecium), the larva of which has curious side appendages, and feeds on fruit trees. -- Hag's tooth (Naut.), an ugly irregularity in the pattern of matting or pointing.
[1913 Webster]

Hag
Hag, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hagged (hăgd); p. pr. & vb. n. Hagging.] To harass; to weary with vexation.
[1913 Webster]

How are superstitious men hagged out of their wits with the fancy of omens. L'Estrange.
[1913 Webster]

Hag
Hag, n. [Scot. hag to cut; cf. E. hack.] 1. A small wood, or part of a wood or copse, which is marked off or inclosed for felling, or which has been felled.
[1913 Webster]

This said, he led me over hoults and hags;
Through thorns and bushes scant my legs I drew.
Fairfax.
[1913 Webster]

2. A quagmire; mossy ground where peat or turf has been cut. Dugdale.
[1913 Webster]

Hagberry
Hag"ber`ry (hăg"b&ebreve_;r`r&ybreve_;), n. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Prunus (Prunus Padus); the bird cherry. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Hagborn
Hag"born` (-bôrn`), a. Born of a hag or witch. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hagbut
Hag"but (-bŭt), n. [OF. haquebute, prob. a corruption of D. haakbus; haak hook + bus gun barrel. See Hook, and 2d Box, and cf. Arquebus.] A harquebus, of which the but was bent down or hooked for convenience in taking aim. [Written also haguebut and hackbuss.]
[1913 Webster]

Hagbutter
Hag"but*ter (hăg"bŭt*t&etilde_;r), n. A soldier armed with a hagbut or arquebus. [Written also hackbutter.] Froude.
[1913 Webster]

Hagdon
Hag"don (hăg"d&obreve_;n), n. (Zool.) One of several species of sea birds of the genus Puffinus; esp., Puffinus major, the greater shearwarter, and Puffinus Stricklandi, the black hagdon or sooty shearwater; -- called also hagdown, haglin, and hag. See Shearwater.
[1913 Webster]

Hagfish
Hag"fish`(-f&ibreve_;sh`),n.(Zoöl.) See Hag, 4.
[1913 Webster]

Haggada
Hag*ga"da (hăg*gä"d&adot_;), n.; pl. Haggadoth (-dōth). [Rabbinic haggādhā, fr. Heb. higgīdh to relate.] A story, anecdote, or legend in the Talmud, to explain or illustrate the text of the Old Testament. [Written also hagada.]
[1913 Webster]

Haggard
Hag"gard (hăg"g&etilde_;rd), a. [F. hagard; of German origin, and prop. meaning, of the hegde or woods, wild, untamed. See Hedge, 1st Haw, and -ard.] 1. Wild or intractable; disposed to break away from duty; untamed; as, a haggard or refractory hawk. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. [For hagged, fr. hag a witch, influenced by haggard wild.] Having the expression of one wasted by want or suffering; hollow-eyed; having the features distorted or wasted by pain; wild and wasted, or anxious in appearance; as, haggard features, eyes.
[1913 Webster]

Staring his eyes, and haggard was his look. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Haggard
Hag"gard, n. [See Haggard, a.] 1. (Falconry) A young or untrained hawk or falcon.
[1913 Webster]

2. A fierce, intractable creature.
[1913 Webster]

I have loved this proud disdainful haggard. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. [See Haggard, a., 2.] A hag. [Obs.] Garth.
[1913 Webster]

Haggard
Hag"gard, n. [See 1st Haw, Hedge, and Yard an inclosed space.] A stackyard. [Prov. Eng.] Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Haggardly
Hag"gard*ly, adv. In a haggard manner. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Hagged
Hag"ged (-g&ebreve_;d), a. Like a hag; lean; ugly. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Haggis
Hag"gis (-g&ibreve_;s), n. [Scot. hag to hack, chop, E. hack. Formed, perhaps, in imitation of the F. hachis (E. hash), fr. hacher.] A Scotch pudding made of the heart, liver, lights, etc., of a sheep or lamb, minced with suet, onions, oatmeal, etc., highly seasoned, and boiled in the stomach of the same animal; minced head and pluck. [Written also haggiss, haggess, and haggies.]
[1913 Webster]

Haggish
Hag"gish (-g&ibreve_;sh), a. Like a hag; ugly; wrinkled.
[1913 Webster]

But on us both did haggish age steal on. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Haggishly
Hag"gish*ly, adv. In the manner of a hag.
[1913 Webster]

Haggle
Hag"gle (hăg"g'l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Haggled (-g'ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Haggling (-gl&ibreve_;ng).] [Freq. of Scot. hag, E. hack. See Hack to cut.] To cut roughly or hack; to cut into small pieces; to notch or cut in an unskillful manner; to make rough or mangle by cutting; as, a boy haggles a stick of wood.
[1913 Webster]

Suffolk first died, and York, all haggled o'er,
Comes to him, where in gore he lay insteeped.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Haggle
Hag"gle, v. i. To be difficult in bargaining; to stick at small matters; to chaffer; to higgle.
[1913 Webster]

Royalty and science never haggled about the value of blood. Walpole.
[1913 Webster]

Haggle
Hag"gle, n. The act or process of haggling. Carlyle.
[1913 Webster]

Haggler
Hag"gler (hăg"gl&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who haggles or is difficult in bargaining.
[1913 Webster]

2. One who forestalls a market; a middleman between producer and dealer in London vegetable markets.
[1913 Webster]

Hagiarchy
Ha"gi*ar`chy (hā"j&ibreve_;*är`k&ybreve_;), n. [Gr. "a`gios sacred, holy + -archy.] A sacred government; government by holy orders of men. Southey.
[1913 Webster]

Hagiocracy
Ha`gi*oc"ra*cy (-&obreve_;k"r&adot_;*s&ybreve_;), n. [Gr. "a`gios holy, and kratei^n to govern.] Government by a priesthood; hierarchy.
[1913 Webster]

Hagiographa
Ha`gi*og"ra*pha (hă`g&euptack_;*&obreve_;g"r&adot_;*f&adot_; or hā`j&ibreve_;*&obreve_;g"r&adot_;*f&adot_;), n. pl. [L., fr. Gr. "agio`grafa (sc. bibli`a), fr. "agio`grafos written by inspiration; "a`gios sacred, holy + gra`fein to write.] 1. The last of the three Jewish divisions of the Old Testament, comprising Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Canticles, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles, or that portion of the Old Testament not contained in the Law (Tora) and the Prophets (Nevi'im) -- it is also called in Hebrew the Ketuvim. Together with the Tora and Nevi'im, it comprises the Hebrew Bible, which is called in Hebrew the Tanach, a vocalization of the first letters of its three parts.
[1913 Webster + RP]

2. (R. C. Ch.) The lives of the saints. Brande & C.
[1913 Webster]

Hagiographal
Ha`gi*og"ra*phal (-f&aitalic_;l), Pertaining to the hagiographa, or to sacred writings.
[1913 Webster]

Hagiographer
Ha`gi*og"ra*pher (-f&etilde_;r), n. One of the writers of the hagiographa; a writer of lives of the saints. Shipley.
[1913 Webster]

hagiographical
hagiographic
ha`gi*o*graph"ic (hă`g&euptack_;*&obreve_;*gr&adot_;f"&ibreve_;k), ha`gi*o*graph"ic*al (hă`g&euptack_;*&obreve_;*gr&adot_;f"&ibreve_;k*&aitalic_;l), 1. of or pertaining to the Hagiographa, or to sacred writings; -- same as hagiographal.
[PJC]

2. of or pertaining to hagiography.
[PJC]

Hagiography
Ha`gi*og"ra*phy (-f&ybreve_;; 277), n. Same as Hagiographa.
[1913 Webster]

Hagiolatry
Ha`gi*ol"a*try (-&obreve_;l"&adot_;*tr&ybreve_;), n. [Gr. "a`gios sacred + &unr_; worship.] The invocation or worship of saints.
[1913 Webster]

Hagiologist
Ha`gi*ol"o*gist (-&ouptack_;*j&ibreve_;st), n. One who treats of the sacred writings; a writer of the lives of the saints; a hagiographer. Tylor.
[1913 Webster]

Hagiologists have related it without scruple. Southey.
[1913 Webster]

Hagiology
Ha`gi*ol"o*gy (-j&ybreve_;), n. [Gr. "a`gios sacred + -logy.] The history or description of the sacred writings or of sacred persons; a narrative of the lives of the saints; a catalogue of saints. J. H. Newman.
[1913 Webster]

Hagioscope
Ha"gi*o*scope` (hā"j&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*skōp`), n. [Gr. "a`gios sacred + -scope.] An opening made in the interior walls of a cruciform church to afford a view of the altar to those in the transepts; -- called, in architecture, a squint. Hook.
[1913 Webster]

hagridden
hag-ridden
hag"-rid`den, hag"rid`den (hăg"r&ibreve_;d`d'n), a. Ridden by a hag or witch; hence, afflicted with nightmares; tormented or harassed by nightmares or unreasonable fears. Beattie. Cheyne.
Syn. -- tormented.
[1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]

hagridden . . . by visions of an imminent heaven or hell upon earth C. S. Lewis

Hagseed
Hag"seed` (hăg"sēd), n. The offspring of a hag. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hagship
Hag"ship, n. The state or title of a hag. Middleton.
[1913 Webster]

Hag-taper
Hag"-ta`per (-tā`p&etilde_;r), n. [Cf. 1st Hag, and Hig-taper.] (Bot.) The great woolly mullein (Verbascum Thapsus).
[1913 Webster]

Haguebut
Hague"but (hăg"bŭt), n. See Hagbut.
[1913 Webster]

Hague Tribunal
Hague Tribunal (hāg). The permanent court of arbitration created by the “International Convention for the Pacific Settle of International Disputes.”, adopted by the International Peace Conference of 1899. It is composed of persons of known competency in questions of international law, nominated by the signatory powers. From these persons an arbitration tribunal is chosen by the parties to a difference submitted to the court. On the failure of the parties to agree directly on the arbitrators, each chooses two arbitrators, an umpire is selected by them, by a third power, or by two powers selected by the parties.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hah
Hah (hä), interj. Same as Ha.
[1913 Webster]

Ha-ha
Ha-ha" (hä*hä"), n. [See Haw-haw.] A sunk fence; a fence, wall, or ditch, not visible till one is close upon it. [Written also haw-haw.]
[1913 Webster]

Haidingerite
Hai"ding*er*ite (hī"d&ibreve_;ng*&etilde_;r*īt), n. (Min.) A mineral consisting chiefly of the arseniate of lime; -- so named in honor of W. Haidinger, of Vienna.
[1913 Webster]

Haiduck
Hai"duck (hī"d&usdot_;k), n. [G. haiduck, heiduck, fr. Hung. hajdu.] Formerly, a mercenary foot soldier in Hungary, now, a halberdier of a Hungarian noble, or an attendant in German or Hungarian courts. [Written also hayduck, haiduk, heiduc, heyduck, and heyduk.]
[1913 Webster]

Haik
Haik (hāk; Ar. hä*&euptack_;k), n. [Ar. hāïk, fr. hāka to weave.] A large piece of woolen or cotton cloth worn by Arabs as an outer garment. [Written also hyke.] Heyse.
[1913 Webster]

Haikal
Hai"kal (hī"k&aitalic_;l), n. The central chapel of the three forming the sanctuary of a Coptic church. It contains the high altar, and is usually closed by an embroidered curtain.
[1913 Webster]

Haikwan
Hai"kwan" (hī"kwän"), n. [Chin. 'hai-kuan.] Chinese maritime customs.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Haikwan tael
Haikwan tael. A Chinese weight (1/10 catty) equivalent to 11/3 oz. or 37.801 g.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hail
Hail (hāl), n. [OE. hail, ha&yogh_;el, AS. hægel, hagol; akin to D., G., Dan., & Sw. hagel; Icel. hagl; cf. Gr. ka`chlhx pebble.] Small roundish masses of ice precipitated from the clouds, where they are formed by the congelation of vapor. The separate masses or grains are called hailstones.
[1913 Webster]

Thunder mixed with hail,
Hail mixed with fire, must rend the Egyptian sky.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hail
Hail, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Hailed (hāld); p. pr. & vb. n. Hailing.] [OE. hailen, AS. hagalian.] To pour down particles of ice, or frozen vapors.
[1913 Webster]

Hail
Hail, v. t. To pour forcibly down, as hail. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hail
Hail, a. Healthy. See Hale (the preferable spelling).
[1913 Webster]

Hail
Hail, v. t. [OE. hailen, heilen, Icel. heill hale, sound, used in greeting. See Hale sound.] 1. To call loudly to, or after; to accost; to salute; to address.
[1913 Webster]

2. To name; to designate; to call.
[1913 Webster]

And such a son as all men hailed me happy. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hail
Hail, v. i. 1. To declare, by hailing, the port from which a vessel sails or where she is registered; hence, to sail; to come; -- used with from; as, the steamer hails from New York.
[1913 Webster]

2. To report as one's home or the place from whence one comes; to come; -- with from. [Colloq.] C. G. Halpine.
[1913 Webster]

Hail
Hail, interj. [See Hail, v. t.] An exclamation of respectful or reverent salutation, or, occasionally, of familiar greeting.Hail, brave friend.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

All hail. See in the Vocabulary. -- Hail Mary, a form of prayer made use of in the Roman Catholic Church in invocation of the Virgin. See Ave Maria.
[1913 Webster]

Hail
Hail, n. A wish of health; a salutation; a loud call. “Their puissant hail.” M. Arnold.
[1913 Webster]

The angel hail bestowed. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hail-fellow
Hail"-fel`low (-f&ebreve_;l`l&ouptack_;), n. An intimate companion.
[1913 Webster]

Hail-fellow well met. Lyly.
[1913 Webster]

Hailse
Hailse (hāls), v. t. [OE. hailsen, Icel. heilsa. Cf. Hail to call to.] To greet; to salute. [Obs.] P. Plowman.
[1913 Webster]

Hailshot
Hail"shot` (hāl"sh&obreve_;t`), n. pl. Small shot which scatter like hailstones. [Obs.] Hayward.
[1913 Webster]

Hailstone
Hail"stone` (-stōn`), n. A single particle of ice falling from a cloud; a frozen raindrop; a pellet of hail.
[1913 Webster]

Hailstorm
Hail"storm` (-stôrm`), n. A storm accompanied with hail; a shower of hail.
[1913 Webster]

Haily
Hail"y (-&ybreve_;), a. Of hail.Haily showers.” Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Hain
Hain (hān), v. t. [Cf. Sw. hägn hedge, inclosure, Dan. hegn hedge, fence. See Hedge.] To inclose for mowing; to set aside for grass. “A ground . . . hained in.” Holland.
[1913 Webster]

Hain't
Hain't (hānt). A contraction of have not or has not; as, I hain't, he hain't, we hain't. [Colloq. or illiterate speech.] [Written also han't.]
[1913 Webster]

Hair
Hair (hâr), n. [OE. her, heer, hær, AS. h&aemacr_;r; akin to OFries. hēr, D. & G. haar, OHG. & Icel. hār, Dan. haar, Sw. hår; cf. Lith. kasa.] 1. The collection or mass of filaments growing from the skin of an animal, and forming a covering for a part of the head or for any part or the whole of the body.
[1913 Webster]

2. One the above-mentioned filaments, consisting, in vertebrate animals, of a long, tubular part which is free and flexible, and a bulbous root imbedded in the skin.
[1913 Webster]

Then read he me how Sampson lost his hairs. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

And draweth new delights with hoary hairs. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hair (human or animal) used for various purposes; as, hair for stuffing cushions.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Zool.) A slender outgrowth from the chitinous cuticle of insects, spiders, crustaceans, and other invertebrates. Such hairs are totally unlike those of vertebrates in structure, composition, and mode of growth.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Bot.) An outgrowth of the epidermis, consisting of one or of several cells, whether pointed, hooked, knobbed, or stellated. Internal hairs occur in the flower stalk of the yellow frog lily (Nuphar).
[1913 Webster]

6. A spring device used in a hair-trigger firearm.
[1913 Webster]

7. A haircloth. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

8. Any very small distance, or degree; a hairbreadth.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Hairs is often used adjectively or in combination; as, hairbrush or hair brush, hair dye, hair oil, hairpin, hair powder, a brush, a dye, etc., for the hair.
[1913 Webster]

Against the hair, in a rough and disagreeable manner; against the grain. [Obs.] “You go against the hair of your professions.” Shak. -- Hair bracket (Ship Carp.), a molding which comes in at the back of, or runs aft from, the figurehead. -- Hair cells (Anat.), cells with hairlike processes in the sensory epithelium of certain parts of the internal ear. -- Hair compass, Hair divider, a compass or divider capable of delicate adjustment by means of a screw. -- Hair glove, a glove of horsehair for rubbing the skin. -- Hair lace, a netted fillet for tying up the hair of the head. Swift. -- Hair line, a line made of hair; a very slender line. -- Hair moth (Zool.), any moth which destroys goods made of hair, esp. Tinea biselliella. -- Hair pencil, a brush or pencil made of fine hair, for painting; -- generally called by the name of the hair used; as, a camel's hair pencil, a sable's hair pencil, etc. -- Hair plate, an iron plate forming the back of the hearth of a bloomery fire. -- Hair powder, a white perfumed powder, as of flour or starch, formerly much used for sprinkling on the hair of the head, or on wigs. -- Hair seal (Zool.), any one of several species of eared seals which do not produce fur; a sea lion. -- Hair seating, haircloth for seats of chairs, etc. -- Hair shirt, a shirt, or a band for the loins, made of horsehair, and worn as a penance. -- Hair sieve, a strainer with a haircloth bottom. -- Hair snake. See Gordius. -- Hair space (Printing), the thinnest metal space used in lines of type. -- Hair stroke, a delicate stroke in writing. -- Hair trigger, a trigger so constructed as to discharge a firearm by a very slight pressure, as by the touch of a hair. Farrow. -- Not worth a hair, of no value. -- To a hair, with the nicest distinction. -- To split hairs, to make distinctions of useless nicety.
[1913 Webster]

hair ball
hairball
hair"ball`, hair" ball` (hâr"b&ebreve_;l`), n. a compact mass of hair that forms in the stomach of animals as a result of licking fur; as, the cat coughed up a hairball right on the new rug. [wns=1 + 2]
[WordNet 1.5]

Hairbell
Hair"bell` (hâr"b&ebreve_;l`), n. (Bot.) See Harebell.
[1913 Webster]

Hairbird
Hair"bird` (hâr"b&etilde_;rd`), n. (Zool.) The chipping sparrow.
[1913 Webster]

Hairbrained
Hair"brained` (hâr"brānd`), a. See Harebrained.

Hair's breadth
Hairbreadth
Hair"breadth` (-br&ebreve_;dth), Hair's" breadth` (hârz"-). The diameter or breadth of a hair; a very small distance; sometimes, definitely, the forty-eighth part of an inch. [Also spelled hairsbreadth.]
[1913 Webster]

Every one could sling stones at an hairbreadth and not miss. Judg. xx. 16.
[1913 Webster]

Hairbreadth
Hair"breadth`, a. Having the breadth of a hair; very narrow; as, a hairbreadth escape.
[1913 Webster]

Hair-brown
Hair"-brown` (-broun`), a. Of a clear tint of brown, resembling brown human hair. It is composed of equal proportions of red and green.
[1913 Webster]

Hairbrush
Hair"brush` (-brŭsh`), n. A brush for cleansing and smoothing the hair.
[1913 Webster]

Haircloth
Hair"cloth` (-kl&obreve_;th`), n. Stuff or cloth made wholly or in part of hair.
[1913 Webster]

Hairdresser
Hair"dress`er (-dr&ebreve_;s`&etilde_;r), n. One who dresses or cuts hair; a barber.
[1913 Webster]

hairdressing
hairdressing n. a toiletry for the hair.
Syn. -- hairtonic, hair oil, hair grease.
[WordNet 1.5]

Haired
Haired (hârd), a. 1. Having hair. “A beast haired like a bear.” Purchas.
[1913 Webster]

2. In composition: Having (such) hair; as, red-haired.
[1913 Webster]

Hairen
Hai"ren (hâr"&eitalic_;n), a. [AS. h&aemacr_;ren.] Hairy. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

His hairen shirt and his ascetic diet. J. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

Hair grass
Hair" grass` (gr&adot_;s`). (Bot.) A grass with very slender leaves or branches; as the Agrostis scabra, and several species of Aira or Deschampsia.
[1913 Webster]

Hairiness
Hair"i*ness (-&ibreve_;*n&ebreve_;s), n. 1. The state of abounding, or being covered, with hair. Johnson.
[1913 Webster]

2. The quality of being hairy.
[PJC]

Hairless
Hair"less, a. Destitute of hair; bald. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

hairlike
hairlike adj. 1. shaped like a hair; long and slender.
Syn. -- capillary.
[PJC]

2. long and slender with a very fine internal diameter.
Syn. -- capillary.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

hairline
hairline n. 1. a very thin line.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. the natural margin formed by hair on the head, especially the edge of growth of hair on the forehead; as, a receding hairline.
[WordNet 1.5]

hairnet
hair"net` n. a small net that some women wear over their hair to keep it in place.
[WordNet 1.5]

hairpiece
hair"piece` n. a covering or bunch of human or artificial hair used for disguise or adornment; a toupee.
Syn. -- false hair, postiche, toupee.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hairpin
Hair"pin` (-p&ibreve_;n`), n. A pin, usually forked, or of bent wire, for fastening the hair in place, -- used by women.
[1913 Webster]

Hair-salt
Hair"-salt` (-s&asuml_;lt`), n. [A translation of G. haarsalz.] (Min.) A variety of native Epsom salt occurring in silky fibers.
[1913 Webster]

Hairsplitter
Hair"split`ter (-spl&ibreve_;t`t&etilde_;r), n. One who makes excessively fine or needless distinctions in reasoning; one who quibbles. “The caviling hairsplitter.” De Quincey.
[1913 Webster]

Hairsplitting
Hair"split`ting (-t&ibreve_;ng), a. Making excessively fine or trivial distinctions in reasoning; overly subtle. -- n. The act or practice of making trivial distinctions.
[1913 Webster]

The ancient hairsplitting technicalities of special pleading. Charles Sumner.
[1913 Webster]

Hairspring
Hair"spring` (-spr&ibreve_;ng`), n. (Horology) The slender recoil spring which regulates the motion of the balance in a timepiece.
[1913 Webster]

Hairstreak
Hair"streak` (-strēk`), n. A butterfly of the genus Thecla; as, the green hairstreak (Thecla rubi).
[1913 Webster]

Hairtail
Hair"tail` (-tāl`), n. (Zool.) Any species of marine fishes of the genus Trichiurus; esp., Trichiurus lepturus of Europe and America. They are long and like a band, with a slender, pointed tail. Called also bladefish.
[1913 Webster]

Hair worm
Hair" worm` (wûrm`). (Zool.) A nematoid worm of the genus Gordius, resembling a hair. See Gordius.
[1913 Webster]

Hairy
Hair"y (-&ybreve_;), a. 1. Bearing or covered with hair; made of or resembling hair; rough with hair; hirsute.
[1913 Webster]

His mantle hairy, and his bonnet sedge. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Very complicated, difficult, or involved; as, a hairy problem; a hairy equation. [Colloq.]
[PJC]

3. Dangerous or frightening; as, a hairy encounter with a mugger.
[PJC]

Haiti
Haiti n. 1. a country on the island of Hispaniola.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. an island in the West Indies.
Syn. -- Hispaniola, Hayti.
[WordNet 1.5]

Haitian
Hai"ti*an (hā"t&ibreve_;*&aitalic_;n), a. & n. Same as Haytian; -- now the preferred spelling.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

hajj
haj
haj, hajj n. A pilgrimage to Mecca; every Muslim must make this journey at least once. [Also spelled hadj.]
Syn. -- hadj, haj.
[WordNet 1.5]

hajji
haji
haj"i, haj"ji (hä"j&euptack_;), n. One who has made a journey to Mecca; Same as hadji.
[PJC]

Haje
Ha"je (hä"j&euptack_;), n. [Ar. hayya snake.] (Zool.) The Egyptian asp or cobra (Naja haje.) It is related to the cobra of India, and like the latter has the power of inflating its neck into a hood. Its bite is very venomous. It is supposed to be the snake by means of whose bite Cleopatra committed suicide, and hence is sometimes called Cleopatra's snake or asp. See Asp.
[1913 Webster]

Hake
Hake (hāk), n. [See Hatch a half door.] A drying shed, as for unburned tile.
[1913 Webster]

Hake
Hake, n. [Also haak.] [Akin to Norweg. hakefisk, lit., hook fish, Prov. E. hake hook, G. hecht pike. See Hook.] (Zool.) One of several species of marine gadoid fishes, of the genera Phycis, Merlucius, and allies. The common European hake is Merlucius vulgaris; the American silver hake or whiting is Merlucius bilinearis. Two American species (Phycis chuss and Phycis tenius) are important food fishes, and are also valued for their oil and sounds. Called also squirrel hake, and codling.
[1913 Webster]

Hake
Hake (hāk), v. i. To loiter; to sneak. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Hake's-dame
Hake's"-dame` (hāks"dām`), n. See Forkbeard.
[1913 Webster]

Haketon
Hak"e*ton (hăk"&euptack_;*t&obreve_;n), n. Same as Acton. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hakim
Ha*kim" (h&adot_;*kēm"), n. [Ar. hakīm.] A wise man; a physician, esp. a Muslim. [India]
[1913 Webster]

Hakim
Ha"kim (hä"kēm), n. [Ar. hākim.] A Muslim title for a ruler; a judge. [India]
[1913 Webster]

Hal
Hal (hâl), prop. n. Harold; -- a nickname.
[PJC]

HAL
HAL (hâl), prop. n. The name of an intelligent computer in the movie 2001, directed by Stanley Kubrick.
[PJC]

Halacha
Ha*la"cha (h&adot_;*lä"k&adot_;), n.; pl. Halachoth (-kōth). [Heb. halāchāh.] The general term for the Hebrew oral or traditional law; one of two branches of exposition in the Midrash. See Midrash.
[1913 Webster]

Halation
Ha*la"tion (h&auptack_;*lā"shŭn), n. (Photog.) An appearance as of a halo of light, surrounding the edges of dark objects in a photographic picture.
[1913 Webster]

Halberd
Hal"berd (h&obreve_;l"b&etilde_;rd; 277), n. [F. hallebarde; of German origin; cf. MHG. helmbarte, G. hellebarte; prob. orig., an ax to split a helmet, fr. G. barte a broad ax (orig. from the same source as E. beard; cf. Icel. barða, a kind of ax, skegg beard, skeggja a kind of halberd) + helm helmet; but cf. also MHG. helm, halm, handle, and E. helve. See Beard, Helmet.] (Mil.) An ancient long-handled weapon, of which the head had a point and several long, sharp edges, curved or straight, and sometimes additional points. The heads were sometimes of very elaborate form. [Written also halbert.]
[1913 Webster]

Halberdier
Hal`berd*ier" (h&obreve_;`b&etilde_;rd*ēr"), n. [F. hallebardier.] One who is armed with a halberd. Strype.
[1913 Webster]

Halberd-shaped
Hal"berd-shaped` (-shāpt`), a. Hastate.
[1913 Webster]

Halcyon
Hal"cy*on (hăl"s&ibreve_;*&obreve_;n), n. [L. halcyon, alcyon, Gr. "alkyw`n, 'alkyw`n: cf. F. halcyon.] (Zool.) A kingfisher. By modern ornithologists restricted to a genus including a limited number of species having omnivorous habits, as the sacred kingfisher (Halcyon sancta) of Australia.
[1913 Webster]

Amidst our arms as quiet you shall be
As halcyons brooding on a winter sea.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Halcyon
Hal"cy*on, a. 1. Pertaining to, or resembling, the halcyon, which was anciently said to lay her eggs in nests on or near the sea during the calm weather about the winter solstice.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence: Calm; quiet; peaceful; undisturbed; happy. “Deep, halcyon repose.” De Quincy.
[1913 Webster]

Halcyonian
Hal`cy*o"ni*an (hăl`s&ibreve_;*ō"n&ibreve_;*&aitalic_;n), a. Halcyon; calm.
[1913 Webster]

Halcyonoid
Hal"cy*o*noid (hăl"s&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*noid), a. & n. [Halcyon + -oid.] (Zool.) See Alcyonoid.
[1913 Webster]

Hale
Hale (hāl), a. [Written also hail.] [OE. heil, Icel. heill; akin to E. whole. See Whole.] Sound; entire; healthy; robust; not impaired; as, a hale body.
[1913 Webster]

Last year we thought him strong and hale. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Hale
Hale, n. Welfare. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

All heedless of his dearest hale. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Hale
Hale (hāl or h&asuml_;l; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Haled (hāld or h&asuml_;ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Haling.] [OE. halen, halien; cf. AS. holian, to acquire, get. See Haul.] To pull; to drag; to haul. See Haul. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Easier both to freight, and to hale ashore. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

As some dark priest hales the reluctant victim. Shelley.
[1913 Webster]

Halenia
Halenia n. A genus of herbs of Eurasia and the Americas: spurred gentians.
Syn. -- genus Halenia.
[WordNet 1.5]

Halesia
Ha*le"si*a (h&adot_;*lē"zh&ibreve_;*&adot_;), n. [NL.] (Bot.) A genus of American shrubs containing several species, called snowdrop trees, or silver-bell trees. They have showy, white flowers, drooping on slender pedicels.
[1913 Webster]

Half
Half (häf), a. [AS. healf, half, half; as a noun, half, side, part; akin to OS., OFries., & D. half, G. halb, Sw. half, Dan. halv, Icel. hālfr, Goth. halbs. Cf. Halve, Behalf.] 1. Consisting of a moiety, or half; as, a half bushel; a half hour; a half dollar; a half view.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The adjective and noun are often united to form a compound.
[1913 Webster]

2. Consisting of some indefinite portion resembling a half; approximately a half, whether more or less; partial; imperfect; as, a half dream; half knowledge.
[1913 Webster]

Assumed from thence a half consent. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Half ape (Zool.), a lemur. -- Half back. (Football) See under 2d Back. -- Half bent, the first notch, for the sear point to enter, in the tumbler of a gunlock; the halfcock notch. -- Half binding, a style of bookbinding in which only the back and corners are in leather. -- Half boarder, one who boards in part; specifically, a scholar at a boarding school who takes dinner only. -- Half-breadth plan (Shipbuilding), a horizontal plan of one half a vessel, divided lengthwise, showing the lines. -- Half cadence (Mus.), a cadence on the dominant. -- Half cap, a slight salute with the cap. [Obs.] Shak. -- At half cock, the position of the cock of a gun when retained by the first notch. -- Half hitch, a sailor's knot in a rope; half of a clove hitch. -- Half hose, short stockings; socks. -- Half measure, an imperfect or weak line of action. -- Half note (Mus.), a minim, one half of a semibreve. -- Half pay, half of the wages or salary; reduced pay; as, an officer on half pay. -- Half price, half the ordinary price; or a price much reduced. -- Half round. (a) (Arch.) A molding of semicircular section. (b) (Mech.) Having one side flat and the other rounded; -- said of a file. -- Half shift (Mus.), a position of the hand, between the open position and the first shift, in playing on the violin and kindred instruments. See Shift. -- Half step (Mus.), a semitone; the smallest difference of pitch or interval, used in music. -- Half tide, the time or state of the tide equally distant from ebb and flood. -- Half time, half the ordinary time for work or attendance; as, the half-time system. -- Half tint (Fine Arts), a middle or intermediate tint, as in drawing or painting. See Demitint. -- Half truth, a statement only partially true, or which gives only a part of the truth. Mrs. Browning. -- Half year, the space of six months; one term of a school when there are two terms in a year.
[1913 Webster]

Half
Half, adv. In an equal part or degree; in some part approximating a half; partially; imperfectly; as, half-colored, half done, half-hearted, half persuaded, half conscious.Half loth and half consenting.” Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Their children spoke halfin the speech of Ashdod. Neh. xiii. 24.
[1913 Webster]

Half
Half (häf), n.; pl. Halves (hävz). [AS. healf. See Half, a.] 1. Part; side; behalf. [Obs.] Wyclif.
[1913 Webster]

The four halves of the house. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. One of two equal parts into which anything may be divided, or considered as divided; -- sometimes followed by of; as, a half of an apple.
[1913 Webster]

Not half his riches known, and yet despised. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

A friendship so complete
Portioned in halves between us.
Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Better half. See under Better. -- In half, in two; an expression sometimes used improperly instead of in halves or into halves; as, to cut in half. [Colloq.] Dickens. -- In one's half or On one's half, in one's behalf; on one's part. [Obs.] -- To cry halves, to claim an equal share with another. -- To go halves, to share equally between two.
[1913 Webster]

Half
Half, v. t. To halve. [Obs.] See Halve. Sir H. Wotton.
[1913 Webster]

Half-and-half
Half`-and-half", n. A mixture of two malt liquors, esp. porter and ale, in about equal parts. Dickens.
[1913 Webster]

halfback
halfback n. (Football) A person who plays the position of halfback{2} on a football team.
Syn. -- running back.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. The position of either of two players on a football team who typically begins each play behind the line and on either side of the quarterback.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

half-baked
half-baked a. 1. Insufficiently or poorly planned or thought out; impractical or unrealistic; as, a half-baked proposal; half-baked ideas; -- of plans, theories, proposals, etc.
[PJC]

2. Insufficiently cooked; -- of food.
[PJC]

Halfbeak
Half"beak` (häf"bēk), n. (Zool.) Any slender, marine fish of the genus Hemirhamphus, or of the family Hemiramphidae, having an elongated protruding lower jaw; -- called also balahoo.
[1913 Webster]

Half blood
Half" blood` (häf"blŭd`). 1. The relation between persons born of the same father or of the same mother, but not of both; as, a brother or sister of the half blood. See Blood, n., 2 and 4.
[1913 Webster]

2. A person so related to another.
[1913 Webster]

3. A person whose father and mother are of different races; a half-breed.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; In the 2d and 3d senses usually with a hyphen.
[1913 Webster]

Half-blooded
Half"-blood`ed, a. 1. Proceeding from a male and female of different breeds or races; having only one parent of good stock; as, a half-blooded sheep.
[1913 Webster]

2. Degenerate; mean. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Half-boot
Half"-boot` (häf"b&oomacr_;t`), n. A boot with a short top covering only the ankle. See Cocker, and Congress boot, under Congress.
[1913 Webster]

Half-bound
Half"-bound` (-bound`), n. Having only the back and corners in leather, as a book.
[1913 Webster]

Half-bred
Half"-bred` (-br&ebreve_;d`), a. 1. Half-blooded. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

2. Imperfectly acquainted with the rules of good-breeding; not well trained. Atterbury.
[1913 Webster]

Half-breed
Half"-breed` (-brēd`), a. Half-blooded.
[1913 Webster]

Half-breed
Half"-breed`, n. A person who is half-blooded; the offspring of parents of different races, especially of the American Indian and the white race.
[1913 Webster]

Half-brother
Half"-broth`er (-brŭth`&etilde_;r), n. A brother by one parent, but not by both.
[1913 Webster]

Half-caste
Half"-caste` (-k&adot_;st), n. One born of a European parent on the one side, and of a Hindu or Muslim on the other. Also adjective; as, half-caste parents.
[1913 Webster]

Half-clammed
Half"-clammed` (-klămd`), a. Half-filled. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Lions' half-clammed entrails roar for food. Marston.
[1913 Webster]

Halfcock
Half"cock` (-k&obreve_;k`), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Halfcocked(-k&obreve_;kt); p. pr. & vb. n. Halfcocking.] To set the cock of (a firearm) at the first notch.
[1913 Webster]

To go off half-cocked, To go off halfcocked. (a) To be discharged prematurely, or with the trigger at half cock; -- said of a firearm. (b) To do or say something without due thought or care. [Colloq. or Low]
[1913 Webster]

Half-cracked
Half"-cracked` (-krăkt`), a. Half-demented; half-witted. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Half-deck
Half"-deck` (-d&ebreve_;k`), n. 1. (Zool.) A shell of the genus Crepidula; a boat shell. See Boat shell.
[1913 Webster]

2. See Half deck, under Deck.
[1913 Webster]

Half-decked
Half"-decked` (-d&ebreve_;kt), a. Partially decked.
[1913 Webster]

The half-decked craft . . . used by the latter Vikings. Elton.
[1913 Webster]

Halfen
Half"en (-'n), a. [From Half.] Wanting half its due qualities. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Halfendeal
Half"en*deal` (-'n*dēl`), adv. [OE. halfendele. See Half, and Deal.] Half; by the half part. [Obs.] Chaucer. -- n. A half part. [Obs.] R. of Brunne.
[1913 Webster]

Halfer
Half"er (-&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who possesses or gives half only; one who shares. [Obs.] Bp. Montagu.
[1913 Webster]

2. A male fallow deer gelded. Pegge (1814).
[1913 Webster]

Half-faced
Half"-faced` (-fāst`), a. Showing only part of the face; wretched looking; meager. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Half-fish
Half"-fish` (-f&ibreve_;sh`), n. (Zool.) A salmon in its fifth year of growth. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Half-hatched
Half"-hatched` (-hăcht`), a. Imperfectly hatched; as, half-hatched eggs. Gay.
[1913 Webster]

Half-heard
Half"-heard` (-h&etilde_;rd`), a. Imperfectly or partly heard; not heard to the end.
[1913 Webster]

And leave half-heard the melancholy tale. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Half-hearted
halfhearted
half"heart`ed, Half"-heart`ed (-härt`&ebreve_;d), a. 1. Wanting in heart or spirit; ungenerous; unkind. B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

2. Lacking zeal or courage; performed with less than a full effort; lukewarm; unenthusiastic; as, a half-hearted attempt; -- of actions. [wns=1] H. James.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

half-holiday
half-holiday n. a day on which half of the day is free from work or duty; a holiday of one half of a day.
[WordNet 1.5]

Half-hourly
Half"-hour`ly (-our`l&ybreve_;), a. Done or happening at intervals of half an hour.
[1913 Webster]

Half-learned
Half"-learned` (häf"l&etilde_;rnd`), a. Imperfectly learned.
[1913 Webster]

Half-length
Half"-length` (-l&ebreve_;ngth`), a. Of half the whole or ordinary length, as a picture.
[1913 Webster]

Half-life
Half"-life` (häf"līf`), n. (Physics) the time it takes for one-half of a substance decaying in a first-order reaction to be destroyed. For radioactive substances, it is the time required for one-half of the initial amount of the radioactive isotope to decay. The half-lifeis a measure of the rate of the reaction being observed. For processes that are true first-order processes, such as radioactive decay, the half-life is independent of the quantity of material present, and it is thus a constant. The time it takes for one-half the remaining quantity of a radioactive isotope to decay will be the same regardless of how far the decay process has advanced. Some chemical reactions are also first order, and may be characterized as having a half-life. However, for chemical reactions the half-life will depend upon temperature and in some cases other environmental conditions, whereas for radioactive isotopes the rate of decay is largely independent of the environment.
[PJC]

half-light
half-light n. a grayish light (as at dawn or dusk or in dim interiors).
[WordNet 1.5]

Half-mast
Half"-mast` (-m&adot_;st`), n. A point some distance below the top of a mast or staff; as, a flag a half-mast (a token of mourning, etc.).
[1913 Webster]

Half-moon
Half"-moon` (-m&oomacr_;n`), n. 1. The moon at the quarters, when half its disk appears illuminated.
[1913 Webster]

2. The shape of a half-moon; a crescent.
[1913 Webster]

See how in warlike muster they appear,
In rhombs, and wedges, and half-moons, and wings.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Fort.) An outwork composed of two faces, forming a salient angle whose gorge resembles a half-moon; -- now called a ravelin.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Zool.) A marine, sparoid, food fish of California (Caesiosoma Californiense). The body is ovate, blackish above, blue or gray below. Called also medialuna.
[1913 Webster]

Half nelson
Half nelson. (Wrestling) A hold in which one arm is thrust under the corresponding arm of the opponent, generally behind, and the hand placed upon the back of his neck. In the full nelson both hands are so placed.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Halfness
Half"ness (häf"n&ebreve_;s), n. The quality of being half; incompleteness. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

As soon as there is any departure from simplicity, and attempt at halfness, or good for me that is not good for him, my neighbor feels the wrong. Emerson.
[1913 Webster]

Halfpace
Half"pace` (-pās`), n. (Arch.) A platform of a staircase where the stair turns back in exactly the reverse direction of the lower flight. See Quarterpace.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; This term and quarterpace are rare or unknown in the United States, platform or landing being used instead.
[1913 Webster]

halfpence
half"pence (hā"p&ebreve_;ns), n. an English coin worth half a penny; -- no longer minted.
Syn. -- halfpenny, ha'penny.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

half-penny
halfpenny
half"pen*ny, half"-pen*ny (hā"p&ebreve_;n*n&ybreve_; or häf"-; 277), n.;pl. Half-pence (-p&eitalic_;ns) or Half-pennies(-p&ebreve_;n*n&ibreve_;z). An English coin of the value of half a penny, no longer minted; also, the value of half a penny.
Syn. -- ha'penny.
[1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]

halfpennyworth
halfpennyworth n. the amount that can be bought for a halfpenny.
Syn. -- ha'p'orth.
[WordNet 1.5]

Half-pike
Half"-pike` (häf"pīk`), n. (Mil.) A short pike, sometimes carried by officers of infantry, sometimes used in boarding ships; a spontoon. Tatler.
[1913 Webster]

Half-port
Half"-port` (-pōrt`), n. (Naut.) One half of a shutter made in two parts for closing a porthole.
[1913 Webster]

Half-ray
Half"-ray` (-rā`), n. (Geom.) A straight line considered as drawn from a center to an indefinite distance in one direction, the complete ray being the whole line drawn to an indefinite distance in both directions.
[1913 Webster]

Half-read
Half"-read` (-r&ebreve_;d`), a. Informed by insufficient reading; superficial; shallow. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Half seas over
Half" seas` o"ver (sēz` ō"v&etilde_;r). Half drunk. [Slang: used only predicatively.] Spectator.
[1913 Webster]

Half-sighted
Half"-sight`ed (-sīt`&ebreve_;d), a. Seeing imperfectly; having weak discernment. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Half-sister
Half"-sis`ter (-s&ibreve_;s`t&etilde_;r), n. A sister by one parent only.
[1913 Webster]

Half-strained
Half"-strained` (häf"strānd`), a. Half-bred; imperfect. [R.] “A half-strained villain.” Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Half-sword
Half"-sword` (häf"sōrd`), n. Half the length of a sword; close fight. “At half-sword.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Half-timbered
Half"-tim`bered (häf"t&ibreve_;m`b&etilde_;rd), a. (Arch.) Constructed of a timber frame, having the spaces filled in with masonry; -- said of buildings.
[1913 Webster]

halftime
half"time` n. an intermission between the first and second half of a game, especially a football game. Also used attributively, as the halftime entertainment
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Half-tone
Half tone
{ Half tone, or Half"-tone` }, n. 1. (Fine Arts) An intermediate or middle tone in a painting, engraving, photograph, etc.; a middle tint, neither very dark nor very light.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

2. (Music) A half step.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

3. A print obtained by the half-tone photo-engraving process. [wns=1]
[PJC]

4. the etched plate used to reproduce a half-tone illustration. [wns=4]
Syn. -- halftone engraving, photoengraving.
[WordNet 1.5]

Half-tone
Half"-tone` (häf"tōn`), a. Having, consisting of, or pertaining to, half tones; specif. (Photo-engraving), pertaining to or designating plates, processes, or the pictures made by them, in which gradation of tone in the photograph is reproduced by a graduated system of dotted and checkered spots, usually nearly invisible to the unaided eye, produced by the interposition between the camera and the object of a screen. The name alludes to the fact that this process was the first that was practically successful in reproducing the half tones of the photograph.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Half-tongue
Half"-tongue` (häf"tŭng`), n. (O. Law) A jury, for the trial of a foreigner, composed equally of citizens and aliens.
[1913 Webster]

half-tracked
half-track
half-track, half-tracked adj. having caterpillar treads on the rear and wheels in front; as, half-track armored vehicles.
Syn. -- half-track.
[WordNet 1.5]

half-track
half-track n. a half-tracked vehicle; -- used mostly of armored military vehicles.
[PJC]

half-truth
half"-truth` (häf"tr&oomacr_;th), n.; pl. half-truths (häf"tr&oomacr_;&thlig_;z)`. a partially true statement, especially one intended to deceive or mislead.
[WordNet 1.5]

Halfway
Half"way` (häf"wā`), adv. In the middle; at half the distance; imperfectly; partially; as, he halfway yielded.
[1913 Webster]

Temples proud to meet their gods halfway. Young.
[1913 Webster]

Halfway
Half"way`, a. Equally distant from the extremes; situated at an intermediate point; midway; as, at the halfway mark. [wns=1]
Syn. -- center(prenominal), middle(prenominal), midway.
[1913 Webster]

2. partial. [wns=2]
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

3. including only half or a portion; incomplete; as, halfway measures. [wns=3]
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Halfway covenant, a practice among the Congregational churches of New England, between 1657 and 1662, of permitting baptized persons of moral life and orthodox faith to enjoy all the privileges of church membership, save the partaking of the Lord's Supper. They were also allowed to present their children for baptism.
[1913 Webster]

halfway house
half"way house`, 1. an inn or place of call midway on a journey.
[1913 Webster]

2. A residence for former convicts, persons recovering from mental illness, or from drug or alcohol addiction, serving as an intermediate environment between total confinement and complete freedom, and having structured programs designed to ease successful reintegration into society.
[PJC]

Half-wit
Half"-wit` (-w&ibreve_;t`), n. A foolish person; a dolt; a blockhead; a dunce. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Half-witted
Half"-wit`ted (-t&ebreve_;d), a. Weak in intellect; silly.
[1913 Webster]

Half-yearly
Half"-year`ly (-yēr`l&ybreve_;), a. Two in a year; semiannual. -- adv. Twice in a year; semiannually.
[1913 Webster]

Halibut
Hal"i*but (h&obreve_;l"&ibreve_;*bŭt; 277), n. [OE. hali holy + but, butte, flounder; akin to D. bot, G. butte; cf. D. heilbot, G. heilbutt. So named as being eaten on holidays. See Holy, Holiday.] (Zool.) A large, northern, marine flatfish (Hippoglossus vulgaris), of the family Pleuronectidae. It often grows very large, weighing more than three hundred pounds. It is an important food fish. [Written also holibut.]
[1913 Webster]

Halichondriae
Hal`i*chon"dri*ae (hăl`&ibreve_;*k&obreve_;n"dr&ibreve_;*ē), prop. n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. "a`ls, "alo`s, sea + cho`ndros cartilage.] (Zool.) An order of sponges, having simple siliceous spicules and keratose fibers; -- called also Keratosilicoidea.
[1913 Webster]

Halicore
Hal"i*core (hăl"&ibreve_;*kōr; L. h&adot_;*l&ibreve_;k"&ouptack_;*rē), n. [NL., fr. Gr. "a`ls sea + ko`rh maiden.] Same as Dugong.
[1913 Webster]

Halidom
Hal"i*dom (hăl"&ibreve_;*dŭm), n. [AS. hāligdōm holiness, sacrament, sanctuary, relics; hālig holy + -dōm, E. -dom. See Holy.] 1. Holiness; sanctity; sacred oath; sacred things; sanctuary; -- used chiefly in oaths. [Archaic]
[1913 Webster]

So God me help and halidom. Piers Plowman.
[1913 Webster]

By my halidom, I was fast asleep. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Holy doom; the Last Day. [R.] Shipley.
[1913 Webster]

Halieutics
Hal`i*eu"tics (-ū"t&ibreve_;ks), n. [L. halieuticus pertaining to fishing, Gr. "alieytiko`s.] A treatise upon fish or the art of fishing; ichthyology.
[1913 Webster]

Halimas
Hal"i*mas (-măs), a. [See Hallowmas.] The feast of All Saints; Hallowmas. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Halimodendron
Halimodendron n. A genus of trees consisting of one species, the salt tree.
Syn. -- genus Halimodendron.
[WordNet 1.5]

Haliographer
Ha`li*og"ra*pher (hā`l&ibreve_;*&obreve_;g"r&adot_;*f&etilde_;r or hăl`&ibreve_;-), n. One who writes about or describes the sea.
[1913 Webster]

Haliography
Ha`li*og"ra*phy (-f&ybreve_;), n. [Gr. "a`ls the sea + -graphy.] Description of the sea; the science that treats of the sea.
[1913 Webster]

Haliotidae
Haliotidae prop. n. A natural family of mollusks including the abalone (Haliotis).
Syn. -- family Haliotidae.
[WordNet 1.5]

Haliotis
Ha`li*o"tis (hā`l&ibreve_;*ō"t&ibreve_;s or hăl`&ibreve_;-), prop. n. [NL., fr. Gr. "a`ls sea + o'y^s, 'wto`s, ear.] (Zool.) A genus of marine shells; the ear-shells. See Abalone.
[1913 Webster]

Haliotoid
Ha"li*o*toid` (hā"l&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*toid` or hăl"&ibreve_;-), a. [Haliotis + -oid.] (Zool.) Like or pertaining to the genus Haliotis; ear-shaped.
[1913 Webster]

Halisauria
Hal`i*sau"ri*a (hăl`&ibreve_;*s&asuml_;"r&ibreve_;*&adot_;), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. "a`ls, "alo`s, sea + say^ros.] (Paleon.) The Enaliosauria.
[1913 Webster]

Halite
Ha"lite (hā"līt or hăl"īt), n. [Gr. "a`ls salt.] (Min.) Native salt; sodium chloride.
[1913 Webster]

Halituous
Ha*lit"u*ous (h&adot_;*l&ibreve_;t"&uuptack_;*ŭs; 135), a. [L. halitus breath, vapor, fr. halare to breathe: cf. F. halitueux.] Produced by, or like, breath; vaporous. Boyle.
[1913 Webster]

Halk
Halk (h&asuml_;k), n. A nook; a corner. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hall
Hall (h&asuml_;l), n. [OE. halle, hal, AS. heal, heall; akin to D. hal, OS. & OHG. halla, G. halle, Icel. höll, and prob. from a root meaning, to hide, conceal, cover. See Hell, Helmet.] 1. A building or room of considerable size and stateliness, used for public purposes; as, Westminster Hall, in London.
[1913 Webster]

2. (a) The chief room in a castle or manor house, and in early times the only public room, serving as the place of gathering for the lord's family with the retainers and servants, also for cooking and eating. It was often contrasted with the bower, which was the private or sleeping apartment.
[1913 Webster]

Full sooty was her bower and eke her hall. Chaucer.

Hence, as the entrance from outside was directly into the hall: (b) A vestibule, entrance room, etc., in the more elaborated buildings of later times. Hence: (c) Any corridor or passage in a building.
[1913 Webster]

3. A name given to many manor houses because the magistrate's court was held in the hall of his mansion; a chief mansion house. Cowell.
[1913 Webster]

4. A college in an English university (at Oxford, an unendowed college).
[1913 Webster]

5. The apartment in which English university students dine in common; hence, the dinner itself; as, hall is at six o'clock.
[1913 Webster]

6. Cleared passageway in a crowd; -- formerly an exclamation. [Obs.] “A hall! a hall!” B. Jonson.

Syn. -- Entry; court; passage. See Vestibule.
[1913 Webster]

Hallage
Hall"age (-&auptack_;j; 48), n. (O. Eng. Law) A fee or toll paid for goods sold in a hall.

Hallelujah
Halleluiah
{ Hal`le*lu"iah, Hal`le*lu"jah } (hăl`l&euptack_;*lū"y&adot_;), n. & interj. [Heb. See Alleluia.] Praise ye Jehovah; praise ye the Lord; -- an exclamation used chiefly in songs of praise or thanksgiving to God, and as an expression of gratitude or adoration. Rev. xix. 1 (Rev. Ver. )
[1913 Webster]

So sung they, and the empyrean rung
With Hallelujahs.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

In those days, as St. Jerome tells us,“any one as he walked in the fields, might hear the plowman at his hallelujahs.” Sharp.
[1913 Webster]

Hallelujatic
Hal`le*lu*jat"ic (-l&uuptack_;*yăt"&ibreve_;k), a. Pertaining to, or containing, hallelujahs. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Halliard
Hal"liard (hăl"y&etilde_;rd), n. See Halyard.
[1913 Webster]

Hallidome
Hal"li*dome (hăl"l&ibreve_;*dōm), n. Same as Halidom.
[1913 Webster]

Hallier
Hal"li*er (hăl"l&ibreve_;*&etilde_;r or h&asuml_;l"y&etilde_;r), n. [From Hale to pull.] A kind of net for catching birds.
[1913 Webster]

Hall-mark
Hall"-mark` (h&asuml_;l"märk`), n. 1. The official stamp of the Goldsmiths' Company and other assay offices, in the United Kingdom, on gold and silver articles, attesting their purity.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, [figuratively]: A distinguishing characteristic or characteristics; as, a word or phrase lacks the hall-mark of the best writers.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Halloa
Hal*loa" (hăl*lō"). See Halloo.
[1913 Webster]

Halloo
Hal*loo" (hăl*l&oomacr_;"), n. [Perh. fr. ah + lo; cf. AS. ealā, G. halloh, F. haler to set (a dog) on. Cf. Hollo, interj.] A loud exclamation; a call to invite attention or to incite a person or an animal; a shout.
[1913 Webster]

List! List! I hear
Some far off halloo break the silent air.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Halloo
Hal*loo", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Hallooed (-l&oomacr_;d"); p. pr. & vb. n. Hallooing.] To cry out; to exclaim with a loud voice; to call to a person, as by the word halloo.
[1913 Webster]

Country folks hallooed and hooted after me. Sir P. Sidney.
[1913 Webster]

Halloo
Hal*loo", v. t. 1. To encourage with shouts.
[1913 Webster]

Old John hallooes his hounds again. Prior.
[1913 Webster]

2. To chase with shouts or outcries.
[1913 Webster]

If I fly . . . Halloo me like a hare. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. To call or shout to; to hail. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Halloo
Hal*loo", interj. [OE. halow. See Halloo, n.] An exclamation to call attention or to encourage one. Now mostly replaced by hello.
[1913 Webster]

Hallow
Hal"low (hăl"l&ouptack_;), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hallowed(-l&ouptack_;d); p. pr. & vb. n. Hallowing.] [OE. halowen, halwien, halgien, AS. hālgian, fr. hālig holy. See Holy.] To make holy; to set apart for holy or religious use; to consecrate; to treat or keep as sacred; to reverence.Hallowed be thy name.” Matt. vi. 9.
[1913 Webster]

Hallow the Sabbath day, to do no work therein. Jer. xvii. 24.
[1913 Webster]

His secret altar touched with hallowed fire. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

In a larger sense . . . we can not hallow this ground [Gettysburg]. A. Lincoln.
[1913 Webster]

hallowed
hallowed adj. belonging to or derived from or associated with a divine power; made holy. Opposite of unholy. [Narrower terms: beatified, blessed ; blessed ; consecrated, sacred, sanctified ] Also See: consecrated, consecrate, sacred.
Syn. -- holy.
[WordNet 1.5]

Halloween
Hal`low*een" (hăl`l&ouptack_;*ēn"), n. The evening preceding Allhallows or All Saints' Day (November 1); also the entire day, October 31. It is often marked by parties or celebrations, and sometimes by pranks played by young people. [Scot.] Burns.
Syn. -- Hallowe'en, Allhallows Eve.
[1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]

Hallowmas
Hal"low*mas (hăl"l&ouptack_;*m&adot_;s), n. [See Mass the eucharist.] The feast of All Saints, or Allhallows.
[1913 Webster]

To speak puling, like a beggar at Hallowmas. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Halloysite
Hal*loy"site (hăl*loi"sīt), n. [Named after Omalius d'Halloy.] (Min.) A claylike mineral, occurring in soft, smooth, amorphous masses, of a whitish color.
[1913 Webster]

Hallstattian
Hallstatt
{ Hall"statt (häl"stät; -shtät), Hall*stat"ti*an (häl*stät"t&ibreve_;*&aitalic_;n) }, a. Of or pertaining to Hallstatt, Austria, or the Hallstatt civilization.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

-- Hallstatt civilization or Hallstattian civilization, a prehistoric civilization of central Europe, variously dated at from 1000 to 1500 b. c. and usually associated with the Celtic or Alpine race. It was characterized by expert use of bronze, a knowledge of iron, possession of domestic animals, agriculture, and artistic skill and sentiment in manufacturing pottery, ornaments, etc.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.] The Hallstattian civilization flourished chiefly in Carinthia, southern Germany, Switzerland, Bohemia, Silesia, Bosnia, the southeast of France, and southern Italy. J. Deniker.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.] -- Hallstattian epoch, the first iron age, represented by the Hallstatt civilization.

[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hallucal
Hal"lu*cal (hăl"l&uuptack_;*k&aitalic_;l), a. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the hallux.
[1913 Webster]

Hallucinate
Hal*lu"ci*nate (hăl*lū"s&ibreve_;*nāt), v. i. [L. hallucinatus, alucinatus, p. p. of hallucinari, alucinari, to wander in mind, talk idly, dream.] 1. To wander; to go astray; to err; to blunder; -- used of mental processes. [R.] Byron.
[1913 Webster]

2. Specifically: To perceive a non-existent object or phenomenon; to believe that one is experiencing something which in reality does not exist; to experience a hallucination{2}.
[PJC]

hallucinate
hal*lu"ci*nate (hăl*lū"s&ibreve_;*nāt), v. t. To experience (something nonexistent) as an hallucination{2}.
[PJC]

hallucinating
hallucinating adj. Experiencing hallucinations.
Syn. -- delirious.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Hallucination
Hal*lu`ci*na"tion (-nā"shŭn), n. [L. hallucinatio: cf. F. hallucination.] 1. The act of hallucinating; a wandering of the mind; error; mistake; a blunder.
[1913 Webster]

This must have been the hallucination of the transcriber. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Med.) The perception of objects which have no reality, or of sensations which have no corresponding external cause, arising from disorder of the nervous system, as in delirium tremens; delusion.
[1913 Webster]

Hallucinations are always evidence of cerebral derangement and are common phenomena of insanity. W. A. Hammond.
[1913 Webster]

Hallucinator
Hal*lu"ci*na`tor (hăl*lū"s&ibreve_;*nā`t&etilde_;r), n. [L.] One whose judgment and acts are affected by hallucinations; one who errs on account of his hallucinations. N. Brit. Rev.
[1913 Webster]

Hallucinatory
Hal*lu"ci*na*to*ry (-n&adot_;*t&ouptack_;*r&ybreve_;), a. Partaking of, having the character of, or tending to produce, hallucinations; as, hallucinatory visions.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

hallucinogen
hal*lu"ci*no*gen n. A substance capable of producing hallucinations when ingested; a hallucinogenic substance; as, LSD is a powerful hallucinogen.
[WordNet 1.5]

hallucinogenic
hal*lu"ci*no*gen`ic adj. 1. capable of producing hallucinations; as, LSD is a powerful hallucinogenic drug.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hallux
Hal"lux (hăl"lŭks), n. [NL., fr. L. hallex, allex.] (Anat.) The first, or preaxial, digit of the hind limb, corresponding to the pollux in the fore limb; the great toe; the hind toe of birds.
[1913 Webster]

hallway
hall"way n. an interior passage or corridor in a building, onto which rooms open.
Syn. -- hall.
[WordNet 1.5]

Halm
Halm (h&asuml_;m), n. (Bot.) Same as Haulm.
[1913 Webster]

Halma
Hal"ma (hăl"m&adot_;), n. [NL., fr. Gr. "a`lma, fr. "a`llesqai to leap.] (Greek Antiq.) The long jump, with weights in the hands, -- the most important of the exercises of the Pentathlon.
[1913 Webster]

Halma
Hal"ma (hăl"m&adot_;), n. A game played on a board having 256 squares, by two persons with 19 men each, or by four with 13 men each, starting from different corners and striving to place each his own set of men in a corresponding position in the opposite corner by moving them or by jumping them over those met in progress.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Halo
Ha"lo (hā"l&ouptack_;), n.; pl. Halos (-lōz). [L. halos, acc. halo, Gr. "a`lws a thrashing floor, also (from its round shape) the disk of the sun or moon, and later a halo round it; cf. Gr. e'ily`ein to enfold, 'ely`ein to roll round, L. volvere, and E. voluble.] 1. A luminous circle, usually prismatically colored, round the sun or moon, and supposed to be caused by the refraction of light through crystals of ice in the atmosphere. Connected with halos there are often white bands, crosses, or arches, resulting from the same atmospheric conditions.
[1913 Webster]

2. A circle of light; especially, the bright ring represented in painting as surrounding the heads of saints and other holy persons; a glory; a nimbus.
[1913 Webster]

3. An ideal glory investing, or affecting one's perception of, an object.
[1913 Webster]

4. A colored circle around a nipple; an areola.
[1913 Webster]

Halo
Ha"lo, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Haloed (-lōd); p. pr. & vb. n. Haloing.] To form, or surround with, a halo; to encircle with, or as with, a halo.
[1913 Webster]

The fire
That haloed round his saintly brow.
Southey.
[1913 Webster]

halobacterium
halobacter
halobacter, halobacterium n.; pl. halobacteria (?), or halobacters (#). Any halophilic bacterium of the archaebacteria group, expecially of the genera Halobacterium and Halococcus, which live in saline environments such as the Dead Sea or salt flats.
Syn. -- halobacteria, halobacter.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Halocarpus
Halocarpus n. A genus of dioecious trees or shrubs of New Zealand; similar in habit to Dacrydium.
Syn. -- genus Halocarpus.
[WordNet 1.5]

Haloed
Ha"loed (hā"lōd), a. Surrounded with a halo; invested with an ideal glory; glorified.
[1913 Webster]

Some haloed face bending over me. C. Bronté.
[1913 Webster]

Halogen
Hal"o*gen (hăl"&ouptack_;*j&ebreve_;n), n. [Gr. "a`ls, "alo`s, salt + -gen: cf. F. halogène.] (Chem.) An electro-negative element or radical, which, by combination with a metal, forms a haloid salt; especially, chlorine, fluorine, bromine, and iodine; sometimes, also cyanogen. See Chlorine family, under Chlorine.
[1913 Webster]

Halogenous
Ha*log"e*nous (h&adot_;*l&obreve_;j"&euptack_;*nŭs), a. Of the nature of a halogen.
[1913 Webster]

Haloid
Ha"loid (hā"loid or hăl"oid), a. [Gr. "a`ls, "alo`s salt + -oid: cf. F. haloïde.] (Chem.) Resembling salt; -- said of certain binary compounds consisting of a metal united to a negative element or radical, and now chiefly applied to the chlorides, bromides, iodides, and sometimes also to the fluorides and cyanides. -- n. A haloid substance.
[1913 Webster]

Halomancy
Hal"o*man`cy (hăl"&ouptack_;*măn`s&ybreve_;), n. See Alomancy.
[1913 Webster]

Halometer
Ha*lom"e*ter (h&adot_;*l&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r), n. [Gr. "a`ls, "alo`s, salt + -meter.] An instrument for measuring the forms and angles of salts and crystals; a goniometer.
[1913 Webster]

Halones
Ha*lo"nes (h&adot_;*lō"nēz), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. "a`lwn, "a`lwnos, a halo.] (Biol.) Alternating transparent and opaque white rings which are seen outside the blastoderm, on the surface of the developing egg of the hen and other birds.
[1913 Webster]

Halophyte
Hal"o*phyte (hăl"&ouptack_;*fīt), n. [Gr. "a`ls, "alo`s, salt + fyto`n a plant.] (Bot.) A plant found growing in salt marshes, or in the sea.
[1913 Webster]

Haloscope
Ha"lo*scope (hā"l&ouptack_;*skōp), n. [Halo + -scope.] An instrument for exhibition or illustration of the phenomena of halos, parhelia, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

Halotrichite
Hal*o*tri"chite (hăl*&ouptack_;*trī"kīt), n. [Gr. "a`ls sea + qri`x, tricho`s, hair.] (Min.) An iron alum occurring in silky fibrous aggregates of a yellowish white color.
[1913 Webster]

Haloxyline
Ha*lox"y*line, n. [Gr. "a`ls, "alo`s, salt + xy`lon wood.] An explosive mixture, consisting of sawdust, charcoal, niter, and ferrocyanide of potassium, used as a substitute for gunpowder.
[1913 Webster]

Halp
Halp (hälp), imp. of Help. Helped. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Halpace
Hal"pace (hăl"pās), n. (Arch.) See Haut pas.
[1913 Webster]

Hals
Hals (h&asuml_;ls), n. [AS. heals; akin to D., G., & Goth. hals. See Collar.] The neck or throat. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Do me hangen by the hals. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Halse
Halse (h&asuml_;ls), v. t. [AS. healsian.] 1. To embrace about the neck; to salute; to greet. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Each other kissed glad
And lovely halst.
Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. To adjure; to beseech; to entreat. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

O dere child, I halse thee,
In virtue of the Holy Trinity.
Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Halse
Halse, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Halsed (h&asuml_;lst); p. pr. & vb. n. Halsing.] [Cf. Hawser.] To haul; to hoist. [Obs.] Grafton
[1913 Webster]

Halsening
Hal"sen*ing (h&asuml_;l"s&ebreve_;n*&ibreve_;ng), a. Sounding harshly in the throat; inharmonious; rough. [Obs.] Carew.
[1913 Webster]

Halser
Hals"er (h&asuml_;s"&etilde_;r), n. See Hawser. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Halt
Halt (h&asuml_;lt), 3d pers. sing. pres. of Hold, contraction for holdeth. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Halt
Halt (h&asuml_;lt), n. [Formerly alt, It. alto, G. halt, fr. halten to hold. See Hold.] A stop in marching or walking, or in any action; arrest of progress.
[1913 Webster]

Without any halt they marched. Clarendon.
[1913 Webster]

[Lovers] soon in passion's war contest,
Yet in their march soon make a halt.
Davenant.
[1913 Webster]

Halt
Halt, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Halted; p. pr. & vb. n. Halting.] 1. To hold one's self from proceeding; to hold up; to cease progress; to stop for a longer or shorter period; to come to a stop; to stand still.
[1913 Webster]

2. To stand in doubt whether to proceed, or what to do; to hesitate; to be uncertain.
[1913 Webster]

How long halt ye between two opinions? 1 Kings xviii. 21.
[1913 Webster]

Halt
Halt (h&asuml_;lt), v. t. (Mil.) To cause to cease marching; to stop; as, the general halted his troops for refreshment.
[1913 Webster]

Halt
Halt, a. [AS. healt; akin to OS., Dan., & Sw. halt, Icel. haltr, halltr, Goth. halts, OHG. halz.] Halting or stopping in walking; lame.
[1913 Webster]

Bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind. Luke xiv. 21.
[1913 Webster]

Halt
Halt, n. The act of limping; lameness.
[1913 Webster]

Halt
Halt, v. i. [OE. halten, AS. healtian. See Halt, a.]
[1913 Webster]

1. To walk lamely; to limp.
[1913 Webster]

2. To have an irregular rhythm; to be defective.
[1913 Webster]

The blank verse shall halt for it. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Halter
Halt"er (-&etilde_;r), n. One who halts or limps; a cripple.
[1913 Webster]

Halter
Hal"ter (h&asuml_;l"t&etilde_;r), n. [OE. halter, helter, helfter, AS. hælftre; akin to G. halfter, D. halfter, halster, and also to E. helve. See Helve.] A strong strap or cord. Especially: (a) A rope or strap, with or without a headstall, for leading or tying a horse. (b) A rope for hanging malefactors; a noose. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

No man e'er felt the halter draw
With good opinion of the law.
Trumbull.
[1913 Webster]

Halter
Hal"ter, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Haltered (-t&etilde_;rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Haltering.] To tie by the neck with a rope, strap, or halter; to put a halter on; to subject to a hangman's halter. “A haltered neck.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Halteres
Hal*te"res (hăl*tē"rēz), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. "alth^res weights used in jumping, fr. "a`llesqai to leap.] (Zool.) Balancers; the rudimentary hind wings of Diptera.
[1913 Webster]

Halter-sack
Hal"ter-sack` (h&asuml_;l"t&etilde_;r*săk`), n. A term of reproach, implying that one is fit to be hanged. [Obs.] Beau. & Fl.
[1913 Webster]

Haltingly
Halt"ing*ly (h&asuml_;lt"&ibreve_;ng*l&ybreve_;), adv. In a halting or limping manner.
[1913 Webster]

Halvans
Hal"vans (hăl"v&aitalic_;nz), n. pl. (Mining) Impure ore; dirty ore. Raymond.
[1913 Webster]

Halve
Hal"ve (häl"v&eitalic_;), n. A half. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Halve
Halve (häv), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Halved (hävd); p. pr. & vb. n. Halving.] [From Half.] 1. To divide into two equal parts; as, to halve an apple; to be or form half of.
[1913 Webster]

So far apart their lives are thrown
From the twin soul that halves their own.
M. Arnold.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Arch.) To join, as two pieces of timber, by cutting away each for half its thickness at the joining place, and fitting together.
[1913 Webster]

3. Of a hole, match, etc., to reach or play in the same number of strokes as an opponent.

Halved
Halved (hävd), a. Appearing as if one side, or one half, were cut away; dimidiate.
[1913 Webster]

Halves
Halves (hävz), n., pl. of Half.
[1913 Webster]

By halves, by one half at once; halfway; fragmentarily; partially; incompletely.
[1913 Webster]

I can not believe by halves; either I have faith, or I have it not. J. H. Newman.
[1913 Webster]

To go halves. See under Go.
[1913 Webster]

Halwe
Hal"we (häl"w&eitalic_;), n. [OE., fr. AS. hālga. See Holy.] A saint. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Halyard
Hal"yard (hăl"y&etilde_;rd), n. [Hale, v. t. + yard.] (Naut.) A rope or tackle for hoisting or lowering yards, sails, flags, etc. [Written also halliard, haulyard.]
[1913 Webster]

Halysites
Hal`y*si"tes (hăl`&ibreve_;*sī"tēz), n. [NL., fr. Gr. "a`lysis a chain.] (Paleon.) A genus of Silurian fossil corals; the chain corals. See Chain coral, under Chain.
[1913 Webster]

Ham
Ham (häm), n. Home. [North of Eng.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Ham
Ham (hăm), n. [AS. ham; akin to D. ham, dial. G. hamme, OHG. hamma. Perh. named from the bend at the ham, and akin to E. chamber. Cf. Gammon ham.]
[1913 Webster]

1. (Anat.) The region back of the knee joint; the popliteal space; the hock.
[1913 Webster]

2. The thigh of any animal; especially, the thigh of a hog cured by salting and smoking.
[1913 Webster]

A plentiful lack of wit, together with most weak hams. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Ham
Ham (hăm), n. 1. [Short for hamfatter.] a person who performs in a showy or exaggerated style; -- used especially of actors. Also used attributively, as, a ham actor.
[PJC]

2. The licensed operator of an amateur radio station.
[PJC]

Ham
Ham (hăm), v. i. (Theater) To act with exaggerated voice and gestures; to overact.
[PJC]

ham it up to act in a showy fashion or to act so as to attract attention; to ham. [Colloq.]
[PJC]

Hamadryad
Ham"a*dry`ad (hăm"&adot_;*drī`ăd), n.; pl. E. Hamadryads (-ădz), L. Hamadryades (-drī"&adot_;*dēz). [L. Hamadryas, -adis, Gr. "Amadrya`s; "a`ma together + dry^s oak, tree: cf. F. hamadryade. See Same, and Tree.]
[1913 Webster]

1. (Class. Myth.) A tree nymph whose life ended with that of the particular tree, usually an oak, which had been her abode.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) A large venomous East Indian snake (Ophiophagus bungarus), allied to the cobras.
[1913 Webster]

Hamadryas
Ha*ma"dry*as (h&adot_;*mā"dr&ibreve_;*ăs), n. [L., a hamadryad. See Hamadryad.] (Zool.) The sacred baboon of Egypt (Cynocephalus Hamadryas).
[1913 Webster]

Hamal
Ha*mal" (h&adot_;*mäl"), n. [Written also hammal, hummaul, hamaul, khamal, etc.] [Turk. & Ar. hammāl, fr. Ar. hamala to carry.] In Turkey and other Oriental countries, a porter or burden bearer; specif., in Western India, a palanquin bearer.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hamamelidaceae
Hamamelidaceae n. A natural family of plants comprising the genera Hamamelis; Corylopsis; Fothergilla; Liquidambar; Parrotia; and other small genera.
Syn. -- family Hamamelidaceae, witch-hazel family.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hamamelidae
Hamamelidae n. a group of chiefly woody plants considered among the most primitive of angiosperms; they have a perianth poorly developed or lacking, and flowers often unisexual and often in catkins and often wind pollinated. The group contains 23 families including the Betulaceae and Fagaceae (includes the Amentiferae); sometimes it is classified as a superorder.
Syn. -- subclass Hamamelidae.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hamamelidanthum
Hamamelidanthum n. A genus of fossil plants of the Oligocene having flowers resembling those of the witch hazel; found in Baltic region.
Syn. -- genus Hamamelidanthum.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hamamelidoxylon
Hamamelidoxylon n. A genus of fossil plants having wood identical with or similar to that of the witch hazel.
Syn. -- genus Hamamelidoxylon.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hamamelis
Ham`a*me"lis (hăm`&adot_;*mē"l&ibreve_;s), n. [NL., fr. Gr. "amamhli`s a kind of medlar or service tree; "a`ma at the same time + mh^lon an apple, any tree fruit.] (Bot.) A genus of plants which includes the witch-hazel (Hamamelis Virginica), a preparation of which is used medicinally.
[1913 Webster]

Hamate
Ha"mate (hā"m&auptack_;t), a. [L. hamatus, fr. hamus hook.] Hooked; bent at the end into a hook; hamous.
[1913 Webster]

Hamated
Ha"ma*ted (hā"m&auptack_;*t&ebreve_;d), a. Hooked, or set with hooks; hamate. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Hamatum
Ha*ma"tum (h&adot_;*mā"tŭm), n. [NL., fr. L. hamatus hooked.] (Anat.) See Unciform.
[1913 Webster]

Hamble
Ham"ble (hăm"b'l), v. t. [OE. hamelen to mutilate, AS. hamelian; akin to OHG. hamalōn to mutilate, hamal mutilated, ham mutilated, Icel. hamla to mutilate. Cf. Hamper to fetter.] To hamstring. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hamburg
Ham"burg (-bûrg), n. A commercial city of Germany, near the mouth of the Elbe.
[1913 Webster]

Black Hamburg grape. See under Black. -- Hamburg edging, a kind of embroidered work done by machinery on cambric or muslin; -- used for trimming. -- Hamburg lake, a purplish crimson pigment resembling cochineal.
[1913 Webster]

Hame
Hame (hām), n. Home. [Scot. & O. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Hame
Hame, n. [Scot. haims, hammys, hems, OE. ham; cf. D. haam.] One of the two curved pieces of wood or metal, in the harness of a draught horse, to which the traces are fastened. They are fitted upon the collar, or have pads fitting the horse's neck attached to them.
[1913 Webster]

Hamel
Ham"el (hăm"&ebreve_;l), v. t. [Obs.] Same as Hamble.
[1913 Webster]

Hamesucken
Hamesecken
{ Hame"seck`en (hām"s&ebreve_;k`'n), Hame"suck`en (-sŭk`'n), } n. [AS. hāmsōcn. See Home, and Seek.] (Scots Law) The felonious seeking and invasion of a person in his dwelling house. Bouvier.
[1913 Webster]

Hamfatter
Ham"fat`ter (hăm"făt`t&etilde_;r), n. [From a negro minstrel song called “The ham-fat man.”] A low-grade actor or performer; a ham. [Theatrical Slang]
Syn. -- ham.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

ham-handed
ham-fisted
ham-fisted ham-handed adj. not skillful in physical movement especially with the hands; clumsy; bungling; -- also used metaphorically of actions; as, ham-handed governmental interference.
Syn. -- bumbling, bungling, butterfingered, handless, heavy-handed, left-handed.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hamiform
Ha"mi*form (hā"m&ibreve_;*fôrm), a. [L. hamus hook + -form.] Hook-shaped.
[1913 Webster]

Hamilton period
Ham"il*ton pe"ri*od (hăm"&ibreve_;l*tŭn pē"r&ibreve_;*ŭd). (Geol.) A subdivision of the Devonian system of America; -- so named from Hamilton, Madison Co., New York. It includes the Marcellus, Hamilton, and Genesee epochs or groups. See the Chart of Geology.
[1913 Webster]

Haminoea
Haminoea n. A common genus of marine bubble shells of the Pacific coast of North America.
Syn. -- genus Haminoea.
[WordNet 1.5]

Haminura
Ham`i*nu"ra (hăm`&ibreve_;*nū"r&adot_;), n. (Zool.) A large edible river fish (Erythrinus macrodon) of Guiana.
[1913 Webster]

Hamite
Ha"mite (hā"mīt), n.[L. hamus hook.] (Paleon.) A fossil cephalopod of the genus Hamites, related to the ammonites, but having the last whorl bent into a hooklike form.
[1913 Webster]

Hamite
Ham"ite (hăm"īt), n. A descendant of Ham, Noah's second son. See Gen. x. 6-20.
[1913 Webster]

Hamitic
Ham*it"ic (hăm*&ibreve_;t"&ibreve_;k), a. Pertaining to Ham or his descendants.
[1913 Webster]

Hamitic languages, the group of languages spoken mainly in the Sahara, Egypt, Galla, and Somâli Land, and supposed to be allied to the Semitic. Keith Johnston.
[1913 Webster]

Hamlet
Ham"let (hăm"l&ebreve_;t), n. [OE. hamelet, OF. hamelet, dim. of hamel, F. hameau, LL. hamellum, a dim. of German origin; cf. G. heim home. √220. See Home.] A small village; a little cluster of houses in the country.
[1913 Webster]

The country wasted, and the hamlets burned. Dryden.

Syn. -- Village; neighborhood. See Village.
[1913 Webster]

Hamleted
Ham"let*ed, p. a. Confined to a hamlet. Feltham.
[1913 Webster]

Hammer
Ham"mer (hăm"m&etilde_;r), n. [OE. hamer, AS. hamer, hamor; akin to D. hamer, G. & Dan. hammer, Sw. hammare, Icel. hamarr, hammer, crag, and perh. to Gr. 'a`kmwn anvil, Skr. açman stone.] 1. An instrument for driving nails, beating metals, and the like, consisting of a head, usually of steel or iron, fixed crosswise to a handle.
[1913 Webster]

With busy hammers closing rivets up. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Something which in form or action resembles the common hammer; as: (a) That part of a clock which strikes upon the bell to indicate the hour. (b) The padded mallet of a piano, which strikes the wires, to produce the tones. (c) (Anat.) The malleus. See under Ear. (d) (Gun.) That part of a gunlock which strikes the percussion cap, or firing pin; the cock; formerly, however, a piece of steel covering the pan of a flintlock musket and struck by the flint of the cock to ignite the priming. (e) Also, a person or thing that smites or shatters; as, St. Augustine was the hammer of heresies.
[1913 Webster]

He met the stern legionaries [of Rome] who had been the “massive iron hammers” of the whole earth. J. H. Newman.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Athletics) A spherical weight attached to a flexible handle and hurled from a mark or ring. The weight of head and handle is usually not less than 16 pounds.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Atmospheric hammer, a dead-stroke hammer in which the spring is formed by confined air. -- Drop hammer, Face hammer, etc. See under Drop, Face, etc. -- Hammer fish. See Hammerhead. -- Hammer hardening, the process of hardening metal by hammering it when cold. -- Hammer shell (Zool.), any species of Malleus, a genus of marine bivalve shells, allied to the pearl oysters, having the wings narrow and elongated, so as to give them a hammer-shaped outline; -- called also hammer oyster. -- To bring to the hammer, to put up at auction.
[1913 Webster]

Hammer
Ham"mer, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hammered (-m&etilde_;rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Hammering.] 1. To beat with a hammer; to beat with heavy blows; as, to hammer iron.
[1913 Webster]

2. To form or forge with a hammer; to shape by beating.Hammered money.” Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. To form in the mind; to shape by hard intellectual labor; -- usually with out.
[1913 Webster]

Who was hammering out a penny dialogue. Jeffry.
[1913 Webster]

Hammer
Ham"mer, v. i. 1. To be busy forming anything; to labor hard as if shaping something with a hammer.
[1913 Webster]

Whereon this month I have been hammering. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. To strike repeated blows, literally or figuratively.
[1913 Webster]

Blood and revenge are hammering in my head. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hammerable
Ham"mer*a*ble (-&adot_;*b'l), a. Capable of being/formed or shapeo by a hammer. Sherwood.
[1913 Webster]

Hammer-beam
Ham"mer-beam` (-bēm`), n. (Gothic Arch.) A member of one description of roof truss, called hammer-beam truss, which is so framed as not to have a tiebeam at the top of the wall. Each principal has two hammer-beams, which occupy the situation, and to some extent serve the purpose, of a tiebeam.
[1913 Webster]

Hammer break
Ham"mer break. (Elec.) An interrupter in which contact is broken by the movement of an automatically vibrating hammer between a contact piece and an electromagnet, or of a rapidly moving piece mechanically driven.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hammercloth
Ham"mer*cloth` (-kl&obreve_;th; 115), n. [Prob. fr. D. hemel heaven, canopy, tester (akin to G. himmel, and perh. also to E. heaven) + E. cloth; or perh. a corruption of hamper cloth.] The cloth which covers a coach box.
[1913 Webster]

Hammer-dressed
Ham"mer-dressed` (-dr&ebreve_;st`), a. Having the surface roughly shaped or faced with the stonecutter's hammer; -- said of building stone.
[1913 Webster]

Hammerer
Ham"mer*er (-&etilde_;r), n. One who works with a hammer.
[1913 Webster]

Hammer-harden
Ham"mer-hard`en (-härd`'n), v. t. To harden, as a metal, by hammering it in the cold state.
[1913 Webster]

Hammerhead
Ham"mer*head` (-h&ebreve_;d`), n. 1. (Zool.) A shark of the genus Sphyrna or Zygaena, having the eyes set on projections from the sides of the head, which gives it a hammer shape. The Sphyrna zygaena is found in the North Atlantic. Called also hammer fish, and balance fish.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) A fresh-water fish; the stone-roller.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Zool.) An African fruit bat (Hypsignathus monstrosus); -- so called from its large blunt nozzle.
[1913 Webster]

Hammerkop
Ham"mer*kop (hăm"m&etilde_;r*k&obreve_;p), n. (Zool.) A bird of the Heron family; the umber.
[1913 Webster]

Hammer-less
Ham"mer-less, a. (Firearms) Without a visible hammer; -- said of a gun having a cock or striker concealed from sight, and out of the way of an accidental touch.
[1913 Webster]

Hammer lock
Hammer lock. (Wrestling) A hold in which an arm of one contestant is held twisted and bent behind his back by his opponent.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hammerman
Ham"mer*man (-m&aitalic_;n), n.; pl. Hammermen (-m&eitalic_;n). A hammerer; a forgeman.
[1913 Webster]

hamming
ham"ming n. poor acting by a ham actor; see ham.
Syn. -- overacting.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hammochrysos
Ham`mo*chry"sos (hăm`m&ouptack_;*krī"s&obreve_;s), n. [L., fr. Gr. "ammo`chrysos; "a`mmos, 'a`mmos, sand + chryso`s gold.] A stone with spangles of gold color in it.
[1913 Webster]

Hammock
Ham"mock (hăm"m&obreve_;k), n. [A word of Indian origin: cf. Sp. hamaca. Columbus, in the Narrative of his first voyage, says: “A great many Indians in canoes came to the ship to-day for the purpose of bartering their cotton, and hamacas, or nets, in which they sleep.”] 1. A swinging couch or bed, usually made of netting or canvas about six feet long and three feet wide, suspended by clews or cords at the ends.
[1913 Webster]

2. A piece of land thickly wooded, and usually covered with bushes and vines. Used also adjectively; as, hammock land. [Southern U. S.] Bartlett.
[1913 Webster]

Hammock nettings (Naut.), formerly, nets for stowing hammocks; now, more often, wooden boxes or a trough on the rail, used for that purpose.

Hamous
Hamose
{ Ha*mose" (h&auptack_;*mōs"), Ha"mous (hā"mŭs), }[L. hamus hook.] (Bot.) Having the end hooked or curved.
[1913 Webster]

Hamper
Ham"per (hăm"p&etilde_;r), n. [Contr. fr. hanaper.] A large basket, usually with a cover, used for the packing and carrying of articles; as, a hamper of wine; a clothes hamper; an oyster hamper, which contains two bushels.
[1913 Webster]

Hamper
Ham"per, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hampered (-p&etilde_;rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Hampering.] To put in a hamper.
[1913 Webster]

Hamper
Ham"per, v. t. [OE. hamperen, hampren, prob. of the same origin as E. hamble.] To put a hamper or fetter on; to shackle; to insnare; to inveigle; to entangle; hence, to impede in motion or progress; to embarrass; to encumber.Hampered nerves.” Blackmore.
[1913 Webster]

A lion hampered in a net. L'Estrange.
[1913 Webster]

They hamper and entangle our souls. Tillotson.
[1913 Webster]

Hamper
Ham"per, n. [See Hamper to shackle.] 1. A shackle; a fetter; anything which impedes. W. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Naut.) Articles ordinarily indispensable, but in the way at certain times. Ham. Nav. Encyc.
[1913 Webster]

Top hamper (Naut.), unnecessary spars and rigging kept aloft.
[1913 Webster]

Hamshackle
Ham"shac`kle (hăm"shăk`'l), v. t. [Ham + shackle.] To fasten (an animal) by a rope binding the head to one of the fore legs; as, to hamshackle a horse or cow; hence, to bind or restrain; to curb.
[1913 Webster]

Hamster
Ham"ster (-st&etilde_;r), n. [G. hamster.] (Zool.) A small European rodent (Cricetus frumentarius). It is remarkable for having a pouch on each side of the jaw, under the skin, and for its migrations. Hamsters are commonly kept as a pets.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Hamstring
Ham"string` (hăm"str&ibreve_;ng`), n. (Anat.) One of the great tendons situated in each side of the ham, or space back of the knee, and connected with the muscles of the back of the thigh.
[1913 Webster]

Hamstring
Ham"string`, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hamstrung; p. pr. & vb. n. Hamstringing. See String.] To lame or disable by cutting the tendons of the ham or knee; to hough; hence, to cripple; to incapacitate; to disable.
[1913 Webster]

So have they hamstrung the valor of the subject by seeking to effeminate us all at home. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hamular
Ham"u*lar (hăm"&uuptack_;*l&etilde_;r), a. Hooked; hooklike; hamate; as, the hamular process of the sphenoid bone.
[1913 Webster]

Hamulate
Ham"u*late (-l&auptack_;t), a. Furnished with a small hook; hook-shaped. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Hamule
Ham"ule (-ūl), n. [L. hamulus.] A little hook.
[1913 Webster]

Hamulose
Ham"u*lose` (-&uuptack_;*lōs`), a. [L. hamulus, dim. of hamus a hook.] Bearing a small hook at the end. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Hamulus
Ham"u*lus (-lŭs), n.; pl. Hamuli (-lī). [L., a little hook.] 1. (Anat.) A hook, or hooklike process.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) A hooked barbicel of a feather.
[1913 Webster]

Han
Han (hăn), contr. inf. & plural pres. of Haven. To have; have. [Obs.] Piers Plowman.
[1913 Webster]

Him thanken all, and thus they han an end. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hanap
Han"ap (-ăp), n. [F. hanap. See Hanaper.] A rich goblet, esp. one used on state occasions. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hanaper
Han"a*per (-&adot_;*p&etilde_;r), n. [LL. hanaperium a large vase, fr. hanapus vase, bowl, cup (whence F. hanap); of German origin; cf. OHG. hnapf, G. napf, akin to AS. hnæp cup, bowl. Cf. Hamper, Nappy, n.] A kind of basket, usually of wickerwork, and adapted for the packing and carrying of articles; a hamper.
[1913 Webster]

Hanaper office, an office of the English court of chancery in which writs relating to the business of the public, and the returns to them, were anciently kept in a hanaper or hamper. Blackstone.
[1913 Webster]

Hance
Hance (h&adot_;ns), v. t. [See Enhance.] To raise; to elevate. [Obs.] Lydgate.

Hanch
Hance
{ Hance (hăns), Hanch (hănch), } n. [See Hanse.] 1. (Arch.) See Hanse.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Naut.) A sudden fall or break, as the fall of the fife rail down to the gangway.
[1913 Webster]

Hand
Hand (hănd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. hönd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hinþan to seize (in comp.). Cf. Hunt.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in man and monkeys, and the corresponding part in many other animals; manus; paw. See Manus.
[1913 Webster]

2. That which resembles, or to some extent performs the office of, a human hand; as: (a) A limb of certain animals, as the foot of a hawk, or any one of the four extremities of a monkey. (b) An index or pointer on a dial; as, the hour or minute hand of a clock.
[1913 Webster]

3. A measure equal to a hand's breadth, -- four inches; a palm. Chiefly used in measuring the height of horses.
[1913 Webster]

4. Side; part; direction, either right or left.
[1913 Webster]

On this hand and that hand, were hangings. Ex. xxxviii. 15.
[1913 Webster]

The Protestants were then on the winning hand. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

5. Power of performance; means of execution; ability; skill; dexterity.
[1913 Webster]

He had a great mind to try his hand at a Spectator. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

6. Actual performance; deed; act; workmanship; agency; hence, manner of performance.
[1913 Webster]

To change the hand in carrying on the war. Clarendon.
[1913 Webster]

Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by my hand. Judges vi. 36.
[1913 Webster]

7. An agent; a servant, or laborer; a workman, trained or competent for special service or duty; a performer more or less skillful; as, a deck hand; a farm hand; an old hand at speaking.
[1913 Webster]

A dictionary containing a natural history requires too many hands, as well as too much time, ever to be hoped for. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

I was always reckoned a lively hand at a simile. Hazlitt.
[1913 Webster]

8. Handwriting; style of penmanship; as, a good, bad, or running hand. Hence, a signature.
[1913 Webster]

I say she never did invent this letter;
This is a man's invention and his hand.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Some writs require a judge's hand. Burril.
[1913 Webster]

9. Personal possession; ownership; hence, control; direction; management; -- usually in the plural. “Receiving in hand one year's tribute.” Knolles.
[1913 Webster]

Albinus . . . found means to keep in his hands the government of Britain. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

10. Agency in transmission from one person to another; as, to buy at first hand, that is, from the producer, or when new; at second hand, that is, when no longer in the producer's hand, or when not new.
[1913 Webster]

11. Rate; price. [Obs.] “Business is bought at a dear hand, where there is small dispatch.” Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

12. That which is, or may be, held in a hand at once; as: (a) (Card Playing) The quota of cards received from the dealer. (b) (Tobacco Manuf.) A bundle of tobacco leaves tied together.
[1913 Webster]

13. (Firearms) The small part of a gunstock near the lock, which is grasped by the hand in taking aim.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Hand is used figuratively for a large variety of acts or things, in the doing, or making, or use of which the hand is in some way employed or concerned; also, as a symbol to denote various qualities or conditions, as: (a) Activity; operation; work; -- in distinction from the head, which implies thought, and the heart, which implies affection. “His hand will be against every man.” Gen. xvi. 12.(b) Power; might; supremacy; -- often in the Scriptures. “With a mighty hand . . . will I rule over you.” Ezek. xx. 33. (c) Fraternal feeling; as, to give, or take, the hand; to give the right hand. (d) Contract; -- commonly of marriage; as, to ask the hand; to pledge the hand.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Hand is often used adjectively or in compounds (with or without the hyphen), signifying performed by the hand; as, hand blow or hand-blow, hand gripe or hand-gripe: used by, or designed for, the hand; as, hand ball or handball, hand bow, hand fetter, hand grenade or hand-grenade, handgun or hand gun, handloom or hand loom, handmill or hand organ or handorgan, handsaw or hand saw, hand-weapon: measured or regulated by the hand; as, handbreadth or hand's breadth, hand gallop or hand-gallop. Most of the words in the following paragraph are written either as two words or in combination.
[1913 Webster]

Hand bag, a satchel; a small bag for carrying books, papers, parcels, etc. -- Hand basket, a small or portable basket. -- Hand bell, a small bell rung by the hand; a table bell. Bacon. -- Hand bill, a small pruning hook. See 4th Bill. -- Hand car. See under Car. -- Hand director (Mus.), an instrument to aid in forming a good position of the hands and arms when playing on the piano; a hand guide. -- Hand drop. See Wrist drop. -- Hand gallop. See under Gallop. -- Hand gear (Mach.), apparatus by means of which a machine, or parts of a machine, usually operated by other power, may be operated by hand. -- Hand glass. (a) A glass or small glazed frame, for the protection of plants. (b) A small mirror with a handle. -- Hand guide. Same as Hand director (above). -- Hand language, the art of conversing by the hands, esp. as practiced by the deaf and dumb; dactylology. -- Hand lathe. See under Lathe. -- Hand money, money paid in hand to bind a contract; earnest money. -- Hand organ (Mus.), a barrel organ, operated by a crank turned by hand. -- Hand plant. (Bot.) Same as Hand tree (below). -- Hand rail, a rail, as in staircases, to hold by. Gwilt. -- Hand sail, a sail managed by the hand. Sir W. Temple. -- Hand screen, a small screen to be held in the hand. -- Hand screw, a small jack for raising heavy timbers or weights; (Carp.) a screw clamp. -- Hand staff (pl. Hand staves), a javelin. Ezek. xxxix. 9. -- Hand stamp, a small stamp for dating, addressing, or canceling papers, envelopes, etc. -- Hand tree (Bot.), a lofty tree found in Mexico (Cheirostemon platanoides), having red flowers whose stamens unite in the form of a hand. -- Hand vise, a small vise held in the hand in doing small work. Moxon. -- Hand work, or Handwork, work done with the hands, as distinguished from work done by a machine; handiwork. -- All hands, everybody; all parties. -- At all hands, On all hands, on all sides; from every direction; generally. -- At any hand, At no hand, in any (or no) way or direction; on any account; on no account. “And therefore at no hand consisting with the safety and interests of humility.” Jer. Taylor. -- At first hand, At second hand. See def. 10 (above). -- At hand. (a) Near in time or place; either present and within reach, or not far distant. “Your husband is at hand; I hear his trumpet.” Shak. (b) Under the hand or bridle. [Obs.] “Horses hot at hand.” Shak. -- At the hand of, by the act of; as a gift from. “Shall we receive good at the hand of God and shall we not receive evil?” Job ii. 10. -- Bridle hand. See under Bridle. -- By hand, with the hands, in distinction from instrumentality of tools, engines, or animals; as, to weed a garden by hand; to lift, draw, or carry by hand. -- Clean hands, freedom from guilt, esp. from the guilt of dishonesty in money matters, or of bribe taking. “He that hath clean hands shall be stronger and stronger.” Job xvii. 9. -- From hand to hand, from one person to another. -- Hand in hand. (a) In union; conjointly; unitedly. Swift. (b) Just; fair; equitable.

As fair and as good, a kind of hand in hand comparison. Shak.

-- Hand over hand, Hand over fist, by passing the hands alternately one before or above another; as, to climb hand over hand; also, rapidly; as, to come up with a chase hand over hand. -- Hand over head, negligently; rashly; without seeing what one does. [Obs.] Bacon. -- Hand running, consecutively; as, he won ten times hand running. -- Hands off! keep off! forbear! no interference or meddling! -- Hand to hand, in close union; in close fight; as, a hand to hand contest. Dryden. -- Heavy hand, severity or oppression. -- In hand. (a) Paid down. “A considerable reward in hand, and . . . a far greater reward hereafter.” Tillotson. (b) In preparation; taking place. Chaucer. “Revels . . . in hand.” Shak. (c) Under consideration, or in the course of transaction; as, he has the business in hand. -- In one's hand or In one's hands. (a) In one's possession or keeping. (b) At one's risk, or peril; as, I took my life in my hand. -- Laying on of hands, a form used in consecrating to office, in the rite of confirmation, and in blessing persons. -- Light hand, gentleness; moderation. -- Note of hand, a promissory note. -- Off hand, Out of hand, forthwith; without delay, hesitation, or difficulty; promptly. “She causeth them to be hanged up out of hand.” Spenser. -- Off one's hands, out of one's possession or care. -- On hand, in present possession; as, he has a supply of goods on hand. -- On one's hands, in one's possession care, or management. -- Putting the hand under the thigh, an ancient Jewish ceremony used in swearing. -- Right hand, the place of honor, power, and strength. -- Slack hand, idleness; carelessness; inefficiency; sloth. -- Strict hand, severe discipline; rigorous government. -- To bear a hand (Naut.), to give help quickly; to hasten. -- To bear in hand, to keep in expectation with false pretenses. [Obs.] Shak. -- To be hand and glove with or To be hand in glove with. See under Glove. -- To be on the mending hand, to be convalescent or improving. -- To bring up by hand, to feed (an infant) without suckling it. -- To change hand. See Change. -- To change hands, to change sides, or change owners. Hudibras. -- To clap the hands, to express joy or applause, as by striking the palms of the hands together. -- To come to hand, to be received; to be taken into possession; as, the letter came to hand yesterday. -- To get hand, to gain influence. [Obs.]

Appetites have . . . got such a hand over them. Baxter.

-- To get one's hand in, to make a beginning in a certain work; to become accustomed to a particular business. -- To have a hand in, to be concerned in; to have a part or concern in doing; to have an agency or be employed in. -- To have in hand. (a) To have in one's power or control. Chaucer. (b) To be engaged upon or occupied with. -- To have one's hands full, to have in hand all that one can do, or more than can be done conveniently; to be pressed with labor or engagements; to be surrounded with difficulties. -- To have the (higher) upper hand, or To get the (higher) upper hand, to have, or get, the better of another person or thing. -- To his hand, To my hand, etc., in readiness; already prepared. “The work is made to his hands.” Locke. -- To hold hand, to compete successfully or on even conditions. [Obs.] Shak. -- To lay hands on, to seize; to assault. -- To lend a hand, to give assistance. -- To lift the hand against, or To put forth the hand against, to attack; to oppose; to kill. -- To live from hand to mouth, to obtain food and other necessaries as want compels, without previous provision. -- To make one's hand, to gain advantage or profit. -- To put the hand unto, to steal. Ex. xxii. 8. -- To put the last hand to or To put the finishing hand to, to make the last corrections in; to complete; to perfect. -- To set the hand to, to engage in; to undertake.

That the Lord thy God may bless thee in all that thou settest thine hand to. Deut. xxiii. 20.

-- To stand one in hand, to concern or affect one. -- To strike hands, to make a contract, or to become surety for another's debt or good behavior. -- To take in hand. (a) To attempt or undertake. (b) To seize and deal with; as, he took him in hand. -- To wash the hands of, to disclaim or renounce interest in, or responsibility for, a person or action; as, to wash one's hands of a business. Matt. xxvii. 24. -- Under the hand of, authenticated by the handwriting or signature of; as, the deed is executed under the hand and seal of the owner.

[1913 Webster]

Hand
Hand (hănd), n. A gambling game played by American Indians, consisting of guessing the whereabouts of bits of ivory or the like, which are passed rapidly from hand to hand.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hand
Hand (hănd), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Handed; p. pr. & vb. n. Handing.] 1. To give, pass, or transmit with the hand; as, he handed them the letter.
[1913 Webster]

2. To lead, guide, or assist with the hand; to conduct; as, to hand a lady into a carriage.
[1913 Webster]

3. To manage; as, I hand my oar. [Obs.] Prior.
[1913 Webster]

4. To seize; to lay hands on. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

5. To pledge by the hand; to handfast. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

6. (Naut.) To furl; -- said of a sail. Totten.
[1913 Webster]

To hand down, to transmit in succession, as from father to son, or from predecessor to successor; as, fables are handed down from age to age; to forward to the proper officer (the decision of a higher court); as, the Clerk of the Court of Appeals handed down its decision. -- To hand over, to yield control of; to surrender; to deliver up.
[1913 Webster]

Hand
Hand, v. i. To cooperate. [Obs.] Massinger.
[1913 Webster]

handbag
hand"bag` n. a small bag usually made of cloth, leather or a similar imitation material, and often having a strap to permit carrying it by slinging it over a shoulder, used by women to carry money and small personal items or accessories; as, she had to search under the cosmetics, hankies, and medicines in her handbag to find a comb.
Syn. -- bag, pocketbook, purse.
[WordNet 1.5]

Handball
Hand"ball` (hănd"b&asuml_;l`), n. 1. A small ball, usually made of rubber, thrown or struck with the hand in various games.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

2. A game played with such a ball, as by players striking it to and fro between them with the hands, or, when played in a walled court or against a single wall, striking it in turns against a wall, until one side or the other fails to return the ball.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Handbarrow
Hand"bar`row (hănd"băr`r&ouptack_;), n. A frame or barrow, without a wheel, carried by hand.
[1913 Webster]

handbasin
handbasin n. A small basin used for washing thehands; as, `wash-hand basin' is a British term.
Syn. -- washbasin, washbowl, lavabo, wash-hand basin.
[WordNet 1.5]

handbasket
hand"bask*et n. a container that is usually woven and has handles.
Syn. -- basket.
[WordNet 1.5]

go to hell in a handbasket to deteriorate substantially and quickly; as, after they lost the contract, the company's profits went to hell in a handbasket.
[PJC]

handbell
handbell n. a bell that is held in the hand.
[WordNet 1.5]

Handbill
Hand"bill` (-b&ibreve_;l`), n. 1. A loose, printed sheet, to be distributed by hand.
[1913 Webster]

2. A pruning hook. [Usually written hand bill.]
[1913 Webster]

Handbook
Hand"book` (-b&oobreve_;k`), n. [Hand + book; cf. AS. handbōc, or G. handbuch.] 1. A book of reference, to be carried in the hand; a manual; a guidebook.
[1913 Webster]

2. A book containing reference information for a specific field; as, the Handbook of Chemistry.
[PJC]

hand-brake
handbrake
hand"brake`, hand"-brake` n. a brake operated by hand, used to stop a vehicle or keep it stationary; it usually operates by a mechanical linkage.
Syn. -- handbrake, emergency, emergency brake, parking brake.
[WordNet 1.5]

Handbreadth
Hand"breadth` (-br&ebreve_;dth`), n. A space equal to the breadth of the hand; a palm. Ex. xxxvii. 12.
Syn. -- handsbreadth.
[1913 Webster]

handbuild
handbuild v. t. to make without a wheel; of pottery.
Syn. -- coil.
[WordNet 1.5]

handcar
handcar n. a small railroad car propelled by hand or by a small motor.
[WordNet 1.5]

Handcart
Hand"cart`, n. A cart drawn or pushed by hand.
[1913 Webster]

Handcloth
Hand"cloth` (-kl&obreve_;th`; 115), n. A handkerchief.
[1913 Webster]

handcolor
handcolor v. t. to add color to (a black-and-white image) using an instrument held in the hand; as, Some old photographs are handcolored.
Syn. -- color by hand.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Handcraft
Hand"craft` (-kr&adot_;ft`), n. Same as Handicraft.
[1913 Webster]

hand-craft
handcraft
hand"craft`, hand"-craft` v. t. to make (something) by hand.
[WordNet 1.5]

hand-crafted
hand-crafted adj. made by hand or by a hand process. Contrasted to machine-made. [Narrower terms: camp-made ; hand-loomed, handwoven ; handsewn, handstitched ; overhand, oversewn )]
Syn. -- handmade.
[WordNet 1.5]

Handcraftsman
Hand"crafts`man (-m&aitalic_;n), n.; pl. -men (-m&eitalic_;n). A handicraftsman.
[1913 Webster]

Handcuff
Hand"cuff` (-kŭf`), n. [AS. handcops; hand hand + cosp, cops, fetter. The second part was confused with E. cuffs,] A fastening, consisting of an iron ring around the wrist, usually connected by a chain with one on the other wrist; a manacle; -- usually in the plural.
[1913 Webster]

Handcuff
Hand"cuff` (hănd"kŭf`), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Handcuffed (-kŭft`); p. pr. & vb. n. Handcuffing.] To apply handcuffs to; to manacle. Hay (1754).
[1913 Webster]

hand-down
hand-down adj. same as hand-me-down.
Syn. -- hand-me-down, secondhand, used.
[WordNet 1.5]

Handed
Hand"ed, a. 1. With hands joined; hand in hand.
[1913 Webster]

Into their inmost bower,
Handed they went.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Having a peculiar or characteristic hand.
[1913 Webster]

As poisonous tongued as handed. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Handed is used in composition in the sense of having (such or so many) hands; as, bloody-handed; free-handed; heavy-handed; left-handed; single-handed.
[1913 Webster]

hander
hand"er (hănd"&etilde_;r), n. One who hands over or transmits; a conveyer in succession. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

handfast
hand"fast` (hănd"f&adot_;st`), n. 1. Hold; grasp [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Custody; power of confining or keeping. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. A contract; specifically, an espousal. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

handfast
hand"fast`, a. Fast by contract; betrothed by joining hands. [Obs.] Bale.
[1913 Webster]

handfast
hand"fast`, v. t. [imp. & p. p. handfasted; p. pr. & vb. n. handfasting.] 1. To pledge; to bind. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

2. To betroth by joining hands, in order to permit cohabitation, before the formal celebration of marriage; in some parts of Scotland it was in effect to marry provisionally, permitting cohabitation for a year, after which the marriage could be formalized or dissolved. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster +PJC]

&hand_; Handfasting was a simple contract of agreement under which cohabitation was permitted for a year, at the end of which time the contract could be either dissolved or made permanent by a formal marriage. Such marriages, at first probably not intended to be temporary, are supposed to have originated in Scotland from a scarcity of clergy, and to have existed at times in other countries.
[Century Dict. 1906.]

handfast
hand"fast`, a. [G. handfest; hand hand + fest strong. See Fast.] Strong; steadfast.[R.] Carlyle.
[1913 Webster]

handfastly
hand"fast`ly, adv. In a handfast or publicly pledged manner. [Obs.] Holinshed.
[1913 Webster]

handfish
hand"fish` (hănd"f&ibreve_;sh`), n. (Zool.) The frogfish.
[1913 Webster]

handful
hand"ful (hănd"f&usdot_;l), n.; pl. handfuls (hănd"f&usdot_;lz). [AS. handfull.] 1. As much as the hand will grasp or contain. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

2. A hand's breadth; four inches. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Knap the tongs together about a handful from the bottom. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

3. A small quantity or number.
[1913 Webster]

This handful of men were tied to very hard duty. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

4. A person, task, or situation, which is the most that one can manage; as, my two-year-old is a handful.
[PJC]

To have one's handful, to have one's hands full; to have all one can do. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

They had their handful to defend themselves from firing. Sir. W. Raleigh.
[1913 Webster]

hand-hole
hand"-hole` (hănd"hōl`), n. (Steam Boilers) A small hole in a boiler for the insertion of the hand in cleaning, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Hand-hole plate, the cover of a hand-hole.
[1913 Webster]

handicap
hand"i*cap (hăn"d&ibreve_;*kăp), n. [From hand in cap; -- perh. in reference to an old mode of settling a bargain by taking pieces of money from a cap.] 1. An allowance of a certain amount of time or distance in starting, granted in a race to the competitor possessing inferior advantages; or an additional weight or other hindrance imposed upon the one possessing superior advantages, in order to equalize, as much as possible, the chances of success; as, the handicap was five seconds, or ten pounds, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

2. A race, for horses or men, or any contest of agility, strength, or skill, in which there is an allowance of time, distance, weight, or other advantage, to equalize the chances of the competitors.
[1913 Webster]

3. An old game at cards. [Obs.] Pepys.
[1913 Webster]

4. a physical or mental disability of the body which makes normal human activities more difficult or impossible; as, his deformed leg was a major handicap in walking.
[PJC]

5. any disadvantage that makes an activity more difficult or impossible; as, insufficient capital was a big handicap in competing against Microsoft.
[PJC]

Handicap
Hand"i*cap, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Handicapped (-kăpt); p. pr. & vb. n. Handicapping.] To encumber with a handicap in any contest; hence, in general, to place at disadvantage; as, the candidate was heavily handicapped.
[1913 Webster]

Handicapper
Hand"i*cap`per (-kăp`p&etilde_;r), n. One who determines the conditions of a handicap.
[1913 Webster]

Handicapped
Hand"i*capped (hănd"&ibreve_;*kăpt), a. suffering from a handicap (in senses 4 or 5); disabled; at a disadvantage.
[PJC]

Handicraft
Hand"i*craft (hănd"&ibreve_;*kr&adot_;ft), n. [For handcraft, influenced by handiwork; AS. handcræft.] 1. A trade requiring skill of hand; manual occupation; handcraft. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

2. A man who earns his living by handicraft; a handicraftsman. [R.] Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Handicraftsman
Hand"i*crafts`man (-kr&adot_;fts`m&aitalic_;n), n.; pl. -men (-m&eitalic_;n). A man skilled or employed in handcraft. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Handily
Hand"i*ly (-&ibreve_;*l&ybreve_;), adv. [See Handy.] In a handy manner; skillfully; conveniently.
[1913 Webster]

Handiness
Hand"i*ness, n. The quality or state of being handy.
[1913 Webster]

Handiron
Hand"i`ron (-ī`ŭrn), n. See Andiron. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Handiwork
Hand"i*work` (-&ibreve_;*wûrk`), n. [OE. handiwerc, AS. handgeweorc; hand hand + geweorc work; prefix ge- + weorc. See Work.] Work done by the hands; hence, any work done personally.
[1913 Webster]

The firmament showeth his handiwork. Ps. xix. 1.
[1913 Webster]

Handkercher
Hand"ker*cher (hă&nsmacr_;"k&etilde_;r*ch&etilde_;r), n. A handkerchief. [Obs. or Colloq.] Chapman (1654). Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Handkerchief
Hand"ker*chief (hă&nsmacr_;"k&etilde_;r*ch&ibreve_;f; 277), n. [Hand + kerchief.] 1. A piece of cloth, usually square and often fine and elegant, carried for wiping the face or hands.
[1913 Webster]

2. A piece of cloth shaped like a handkerchief to be worn about the neck; a neckerchief; a neckcloth.
[1913 Webster]

Handle
Han"dle (hăn"d'l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Handled (-d'ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Handling (-dl&ibreve_;ng).] [OE. handlen, AS. handlian; akin to D. handelen to trade, G. handeln. See Hand.] 1. To touch; to feel with the hand; to use or hold with the hand.
[1913 Webster]

Handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh. Luke xxiv. 39.
[1913 Webster]

About his altar, handling holy things. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. To manage in using, as a spade or a musket; to wield; often, to manage skillfully.
[1913 Webster]

That fellow handles his bow like a crowkeeper. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. To accustom to the hand; to work upon, or take care of, with the hands.
[1913 Webster]

The hardness of the winters forces the breeders to house and handle their colts six months every year. Sir W. Temple.
[1913 Webster]

4. To receive and transfer; to have pass through one's hands; hence, to buy and sell; as, a merchant handles a variety of goods, or a large stock.
[1913 Webster]

5. To deal with; to make a business of.
[1913 Webster]

They that handle the law knew me not. Jer. ii. 8.
[1913 Webster]

6. To treat; to use, well or ill.
[1913 Webster]

How wert thou handled being prisoner? Shak.
[1913 Webster]

7. To manage; to control; to practice skill upon.
[1913 Webster]

You shall see how I will handle her. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

8. To use or manage in writing or speaking; to treat, as a theme, an argument, or an objection.
[1913 Webster]

We will handle what persons are apt to envy others. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

To handle without gloves. See under Glove. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Handle
Han"dle (hăn"d'l), v. i. To use the hands.
[1913 Webster]

They have hands, but they handle not. Ps. cxv. 7.
[1913 Webster]

Handle
Han"dle, n. [AS. handle. See Hand.] 1. That part of vessels, instruments, etc., which is held in the hand when used or moved, as the haft of a sword, the knob of a door, the bail of a kettle, etc.
[1913 Webster]

2. That of which use is made; the instrument for effecting a purpose; a tool. South.
[1913 Webster]

To give a handle, to furnish an occasion or means.
[1913 Webster]

Handleable
Han"dle*a*ble (-&adot_;*b'l), a. Capable of being handled.
[1913 Webster]

handlebar
han"dle*bar` n. The curved bar connected by a shaft to the front wheel of a bicycle or motorcycle, positioned nearly horizontally in front of the rider's seat, designed to be gripped by the rider while riding, and used to steer the vehicle. Usually used in the plural; as, don't let go of the handlbars.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

handled
handled adj. fitted with or having having a handle; as, a handled magnifying glass is easier to use. Opposite of handleless.
[WordNet 1.5]

-handled
-handled suff. having a usually specified type of handle; as, a pearl-handled revolver; a long-handled shovel.
[WordNet 1.5]

handleless
handleless adj. having no handle; as, sleek cabinets with apparently handleless doors. Opposite of handled.
[WordNet 1.5]

handler
handler n. 1. one who trains or exhibits animals.
Syn. -- animal trainer.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. someone in charge of training an athlete (especially a boxer) or a team. The term is used sometimes sarcastically of political consultants: “the president's handlers”.
Syn. -- coach, manager.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Handless
Hand"less (hănd"l&ebreve_;s), a. Without a hand. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

handline
handline n. a fishing line managed principally by hand.
Syn. -- hand line.
[WordNet 1.5]

Handling
Han"dling (hăn"dl&ibreve_;ng), n. [AS. handlung.] 1. A touching, controlling, managing, using, etc., with the hand or hands, or as with the hands. See Handle, v. t.
[1913 Webster]

The heavens and your fair handling
Have made you master of the field this day.
Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Drawing, Painting, etc.) The mode of using the pencil or brush, etc.; style of touch. Fairholt.
[1913 Webster]

handlock
handlock n. a metal loop that can be locked around the wrist, usually used in pairs; a handcuff.
Syn. -- handcuffs, handcuff, cuffs, cuff, manacle.
[WordNet 1.5]

hand-loomed
hand-loomed adj. Woven on a handloom; -- of fabrics, rugs, or carpets.
Syn. -- handwoven.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Handmade
Hand"made` (hănd"mād`), a. Manufactured by hand; as, handmade shoes. Contrasted with machine-made.

Handmaiden
Handmaid
{ Hand"maid` (hănd"mād`), Hand"maid`en (hănd"mād`'n), } n. A maid that waits at hand; a female servant or attendant. [wns=2]
[1913 Webster]

2. Something or someone serving in a subordinate position; as, theology should be the handmaiden of ethics. [wns=1]
Syn. -- handmaid, servant.
[WordNet 1.5]

hand-me-down
hand-me-down adj. 1. obtained or used after prior use by another person. the term hand-me-down is often used of clothing previously worn by older family members. The term may also be used metaphorically of ideas.
Syn. -- hand-down, secondhand, used.
[WordNet 1.5]

hand-me-down
hand-me-down n. An outgrown garment given to one person after use by another; -- usually transferred between members of a family or close friends; as, because she was the youngest of four girls, the clothes she wore were always hand-me-downs.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

handoff
handoff n. (Football) A football play in which one player hands the ball to a teammate.
[WordNet 1.5]

hand-operated
hand-operated adj. 1. requiring hand manipulation for operation; not automatic or machine-driven; as, a hand-operated winch. Opposite of automatic or powered.
Syn. -- non-automatic.
[WordNet 1.5]

hand-out
handout
hand"out, hand"-out n. 1. money or an object given in or as in a charitable gesture; -- also used of government disbursements to individuals for welfare; as, government hand-outs to welfare clients.
[PJC]

2. a printed circular distributed gratis, usually for political or advertising purposes.
[PJC]

3. a printed statement distributed, usually to the news media.
[PJC]

handover
handover n. The act of relinquishing property or authority etc. to another; as, the handover of occupied territory to the original posssessors; the handover of power from the military back to the civilian authorities.
[WordNet 1.5]

hand-picked
hand-picked adj. carefully selected; as, a hand-picked jury; the company's president groomed his hand-picked successor.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

handrail
hand"rail` n. a rail{1} at the side of staircase or balcony to prevent people from falling; -- shaped so as to be conveniently gripped with the hand; as, please hold onto the handrail when crossing the walkway.
Syn. -- bannister, banister, balustrade, balusters.
[WordNet 1.5]

handrest
hand"rest` n. a support for the hand.
[WordNet 1.5]

hands
hands n. 1. a person's power or discretionary action; as, my fate is in your hands.
Syn. -- custody.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. The force of workers available; as, all hands on deck.
Syn. -- work force, manpower, men.
[WordNet 1.5]

A dictionary containing a natural history requires too many hands, as well as too much time, ever to be hoped for. Locke.

Handsaw
Hand"saw` (hănd"s&asuml_;`) n. A saw used with one hand.
[1913 Webster]

handsbreadth
handsbreadth n. any unit of length based on the breadth of the human hand.
Syn. -- handbreath.
[WordNet 1.5]

Handsel
Hand"sel (hănd"s&ebreve_;l), n. [Written also hansel.] [OE. handsal, hansal, hansel, AS. handselena giving into hands, or more prob. fr. Icel. handsal; hand hand + sal sale, bargain; akin to AS. sellan to give, deliver. See Sell, Sale. ] 1. A sale, gift, or delivery into the hand of another; especially, a sale, gift, delivery, or using which is the first of a series, and regarded as an omen for the rest; a first installment; an earnest; as the first money received for the sale of goods in the morning, the first money taken at a shop newly opened, the first present sent to a young woman on her wedding day, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Their first good handsel of breath in this world. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

Our present tears here, not our present laughter,
Are but the handsels of our joys hereafter.
Herrick.
[1913 Webster]

2. Price; payment. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Handsel Monday, the first Monday of the new year, when handsels or presents are given to servants, children, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Handsel
Hand"sel, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Handseled or Handselled (hănd"s&ebreve_;ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Handseling or Handselling.] [Written also hansel.] [OE handsellen, hansellen; cf. Icel. hadsala, handselja. See Handsel, n.] 1. To give a handsel to.
[1913 Webster]

2. To use or do for the first time, esp. so as to make fortunate or unfortunate; to try experimentally.
[1913 Webster]

No contrivance of our body, but some good man in Scripture hath handseled it with prayer. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

handset
handset n. (Electronics) The mouthpiece and earpiece of a communications device mounted on a single handle; as, when the telephone rings, pick up the handset.
Syn. -- French telephone.
[WordNet 1.5]

handsewn
handsewn adj. sewn by hand rather than machine.
Syn. -- handstitched.
[WordNet 1.5]

handstand
handstand n. The gymnastic act of supporting oneself by one's hands alone in an upside down position; as, to do handstands for exercise.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Handsome
Hand"some (hăn"sŭm; 277), a. [Compar. Handsomer (-&etilde_;r); superl. Handsomest.] [Hand + -some. It at first meant, dexterous; cf. D. handzaam dexterous, ready, limber, manageable, and E. handy.] 1. Dexterous; skillful; handy; ready; convenient; -- applied to things as persons. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

That they [engines of war] be both easy to be carried and handsome to be moved and turned about. Robynson (Utopia).
[1913 Webster]

For a thief it is so handsome as it may seem it was first invented for him. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. Agreeable to the eye or to correct taste; having a pleasing appearance or expression; attractive; having symmetry and dignity; comely; -- expressing more than pretty, and less than beautiful; as, a handsome man or woman; a handsome garment, house, tree, horse.
[1913 Webster]

3. Suitable or fit in action; marked with propriety and ease; graceful; becoming; appropriate; as, a handsome style, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Easiness and handsome address in writing. Felton.
[1913 Webster]

4. Evincing a becoming generosity or nobleness of character; liberal; generous.
[1913 Webster]

Handsome is as handsome does. Old Proverb.
[1913 Webster]

5. Ample; moderately large.
[1913 Webster]

He . . . accumulated a handsome sum of money. V. Knox.
[1913 Webster]

To do the handsome thing, to act liberally. [Colloq.]

Syn. -- Handsome, Pretty. Pretty applies to things comparatively small, which please by their delicacy and grace; as, a pretty girl, a pretty flower, a pretty cottage. Handsome rises higher, and is applied to objects on a larger scale. We admire what is handsome, we are pleased with what is pretty. The word is connected with hand, and has thus acquired the idea of training, cultivation, symmetry, and proportion, which enters so largely into our conception of handsome. Thus Drayton makes mention of handsome players, meaning those who are well trained; and hence we speak of a man's having a handsome address, which is the result of culture; of a handsome horse or dog, which implies well proportioned limbs; of a handsome face, to which, among other qualities, the idea of proportion and a graceful contour are essential; of a handsome tree, and a handsome house or villa. So, from this idea of proportion or suitableness, we have, with a different application, the expressions, a handsome fortune, a handsome offer.
[1913 Webster]

Handsome
Hand"some, v. t. To render handsome. [Obs.] Donne
[1913 Webster]

Handsomely
Hand"some*ly, adv. 1. In a handsome manner.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Naut.) Carefully; in shipshape style.
[1913 Webster]

Handsomeness
Hand"some*ness, n. The quality of being handsome.
[1913 Webster]

Handsomeness is the mere animal excellence, beauty the mere imaginative. Hare.
[1913 Webster]

Handspike
Hand"spike` (hănd"spīk`), n. A bar or lever, generally of wood, used in a windlass or capstan, for heaving anchor, and, in modified forms, for various purposes.
[1913 Webster]

Handspring
Hand"spring` (-spr&ibreve_;ng), n. A somersault made with the assistance of the hands placed upon the ground.
[1913 Webster]

handstitched
handstitched adj. same as handsewn.
Syn. -- handsewn.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hand-tight
Hand"-tight` (-tīt`), a. As tight as can be made by the hand; as, to tighten the nut hand-tight. Totten.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

hand-to-hand
hand-to-hand adj. close to one's adversary; -- of combat; as, hand-to-hand fighting.
Syn. -- at close quarters(predicate).
[WordNet 1.5]

handwash
handwash v. to wash by hand, launder by hand; -- contrasted to machine-wash.
[WordNet 1.5]

handwear
handwear n. clothing for the hands, especially gloves.
[WordNet 1.5]

Handwheel
Hand"wheel` (-hwēl), n. (Mach.) Any wheel worked by hand; esp., one the rim of which serves as the handle by which a valve, car brake, or other part is adjusted.
[1913 Webster]

Hand-winged
Hand"-winged` (hănd"w&ibreve_;ngd`), a. (Zool.) Having wings that are like hands in the structure and arrangement of their bones; -- said of bats. See Cheiroptera.
[1913 Webster]

handwoven
handwoven adj. same as hand-loomed; as, a handwoven tablecloth.
Syn. -- hand-loomed.
[WordNet 1.5]

Handwriting
Hand"writ`ing (-rīt"&ibreve_;ng), n. 1. The cast or form of writing peculiar to each hand or person; chirography.
[1913 Webster]

2. That which is written by hand; manuscript.
[1913 Webster]

The handwriting on the wall, a doom pronounced; an omen of disaster. Dan. v. 5.
[1913 Webster]

hand-written
handwritten
handwritten, hand-written adj. written by hand.
Syn. -- handwritten.
[WordNet 1.5]

Handy
Hand"y (hănd"&ybreve_;), a. [Compar. Handier (-&ibreve_;*&etilde_;r); superl. Handiest.] [OE. hendi, AS. hendig (in comp.), fr. hand hand; akin to D. handig, Goth. handugs clever, wise.] 1. Performed by the hand. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

To draw up and come to handy strokes. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Skillful in using the hand; dexterous; ready; adroit. “Each is handy in his way.” Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. Ready to the hand; near; also, suited to the use of the hand; convenient; valuable for reference or use; as, my tools are handy; a handy volume.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Naut.) Easily managed; obedient to the helm; -- said of a vessel.
[1913 Webster]

Handy-dandy
Hand"y-dan`dy (hănd"&ybreve_;*dăn`d&ybreve_;), n. A child's play, one child guessing in which closed hand the other holds some small object, winning the object if right and forfeiting an equivalent if wrong; hence, forfeit. Piers Plowman.
[1913 Webster]

Handyfight
Hand"y*fight` (hănd"&ybreve_;*fīt`), n. A fight with the hands; boxing. “Pollux loves handyfights.” B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

Handygripe
Hand"y*gripe` (hănd"&ybreve_;*grīp`), n. Seizure by, or grasp of, the hand; also, close quarters in fighting. Hudibras.
[1913 Webster]

Handystroke
Hand"y*stroke` (hănd"&ybreve_;*strōk`), n. A blow with the hand.
[1913 Webster]

Handywork
Hand"y*work` (hănd"&ybreve_;*wûrk`), n. See Handiwork.
[1913 Webster]

Hang
Hang (hăng), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hanged (hăngd) or Hung (hŭng); p. pr. & vb. n. Hanging. The use of hanged is preferable to that of hung, when reference is had to death or execution by suspension, and it is also more common.] [OE. hangen, hongien, v. t. & i., AS. hangian, v. i., fr. hōn, v. t. (imp. heng, p. p. hongen); akin to OS. hangōn, v. i., D. hangen, v. t. & i., G. hangen, v. i, hängen, v. t., Icel. hanga, v. i., Goth. hāhan, v. t. (imp. haíhah), hāhan, v. i. (imp. hahaida), and perh. to L. cunctari to delay. √37. ] 1. To suspend; to fasten to some elevated point without support from below; -- often used with up or out; as, to hang a coat on a hook; to hang up a sign; to hang out a banner.
[1913 Webster]

2. To fasten in a manner which will allow of free motion upon the point or points of suspension; -- said of a pendulum, a swing, a door, gate, etc.
[1913 Webster]

3. To fit properly, as at a proper angle (a part of an implement that is swung in using), as a scythe to its snath, or an ax to its helve. [U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

4. To put to death by suspending by the neck; -- a form of capital punishment; as, to hang a murderer.
[1913 Webster]

5. To cover, decorate, or furnish by hanging pictures, trophies, drapery, and the like, or by covering with paper hangings; -- said of a wall, a room, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Hung be the heavens with black. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

And hung thy holy roofs with savage spoils. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

6. To paste, as paper hangings, on the walls of a room.
[1913 Webster]

7. To hold or bear in a suspended or inclined manner or position instead of erect; to droop; as, he hung his head in shame.
[1913 Webster]

Cowslips wan that hang the pensive head. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

8. To prevent from reaching a decision, esp. by refusing to join in a verdict that must be unanimous; as, one obstinate juror can hang a jury.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

To hang down, to let fall below the proper position; to bend down; to decline; as, to hang down the head, or, elliptically, to hang the head. -- To hang fire (Mil.), to be slow in communicating fire through the vent to the charge; as, the gun hangs fire; hence, to hesitate, to hold back as if in suspense.
[1913 Webster]

Hang
Hang, v. i. 1. To be suspended or fastened to some elevated point without support from below; to dangle; to float; to rest; to remain; to stay.
[1913 Webster]

2. To be fastened in such a manner as to allow of free motion on the point or points of suspension.
[1913 Webster]

3. To die or be put to death by suspension from the neck. [R.] “Sir Balaam hangs.” Pope.
[1913 Webster]

4. To hold for support; to depend; to cling; -- usually with on or upon; as, this question hangs on a single point. “Two infants hanging on her neck.” Peacham.
[1913 Webster]

5. To be, or be like, a suspended weight.
[1913 Webster]

Life hangs upon me, and becomes a burden. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

6. To hover; to impend; to appear threateningly; -- usually with over; as, evils hang over the country.
[1913 Webster]

7. To lean or incline; to incline downward.
[1913 Webster]

To decide which way hung the victory. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

His neck obliquely o'er his shoulder hung. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

8. To slope down; as, hanging grounds.
[1913 Webster]

9. To be undetermined or uncertain; to be in suspense; to linger; to be delayed.
[1913 Webster]

A noble stroke he lifted high,
Which hung not, but so swift with tempest fell
On the proud crest of Satan.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

10. (Cricket, Tennis, etc.) Of a ball: To rebound unexpectedly or unusually slowly, due to backward spin on the ball or imperfections of ground.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

11. (Baseball) to fail to curve, break, or drop as intended; -- said of pitches, such as curve balls or sliders.
[PJC]

12. (Computers) to cease to operate normally and remain suspended in some state without performing useful work; -- said of computer programs, computers, or individual processes within a program; as, when using Windows 3.1, my system would hang and need rebooting several times a day. this situation could be caused by bugs within an operating system or within a program, or incompatibility between programs or between programs and the hardware.
[PJC]

To hang around, to loiter idly about. -- To hang back, to hesitate; to falter; to be reluctant. “If any one among you hangs back.” Jowett (Thucyd.). -- To hang by the eyelids. (a) To hang by a very slight hold or tenure. (b) To be in an unfinished condition; to be left incomplete. -- To hang in doubt, to be in suspense. -- To hang on (with the emphasis on the preposition), to keep hold; to hold fast; to stick; to be persistent, as a disease. -- To hang on the lips To hang on the words, etc., to be charmed by eloquence. -- To hang out. (a) To be hung out so as to be displayed; to project. (b) To be unyielding; as, the juryman hangs out against an agreement; to hold out. [Colloq.] (c) to loiter or lounge around a particular place; as, teenageers tend to hang out at the mall these days. -- To hang over. (a) To project at the top. (b) To impend over. -- To hang to, to cling. -- To hang together. (a) To remain united; to stand by one another. “We are all of a piece; we hang together.” Dryden. (b) To be self-consistent; as, the story does not hang together. [Colloq.] -- To hang upon. (a) To regard with passionate affection. (b) (Mil.) To hover around; as, to hang upon the flanks of a retreating enemy.
[1913 Webster]

Hang
Hang, n. 1. The manner in which one part or thing hangs upon, or is connected with, another; as, the hang of a scythe.
[1913 Webster]

2. Connection; arrangement; plan; as, the hang of a discourse. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

3. A sharp or steep declivity or slope. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

To get the hang of, to learn the method or arrangement of; hence, to become accustomed to. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

hangar
hang"ar n. a large building at an airport where aircraft can be stored and maintained.
Syn. -- airdock, repair shed.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hangbird
Hang"bird` (hăng"b&etilde_;rd`), n. (Zool.) The Baltimore oriole (Icterus galbula); -- so called because its nest is suspended from the limb of a tree. See Baltimore oriole.
[1913 Webster]

Hang-by
Hang"-by` (-bī`), n.; pl. Hang-bies (-bīz`). A dependent; a hanger-on; -- so called in contempt. B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

Hangdog
Hang"dog` (-d&obreve_;g`), n. A base, degraded person; a sneak; a gallows bird.
[1913 Webster]

Hangdog
Hang"dog`, a. Low; sneaking; ashamed.
[1913 Webster]

The poor colonel went out of the room with a hangdog look. Thackeray.
[1913 Webster]

Hanger
Hang"er (-&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who hangs, or causes to be hanged; a hangman.
[1913 Webster]

2. That by which a thing is suspended. Especially: (a) A strap hung to the girdle, by which a dagger or sword is suspended. (b) (Mach.) A part that suspends a journal box in which shafting runs. See Illust. of Countershaft. (c) A bridle iron.
[1913 Webster]

3. That which hangs or is suspended, as a sword worn at the side; especially, in the 18th century, a short, curved sword.
[1913 Webster]

4. A steep, wooded declivity. [Eng.] Gilbert White.
[1913 Webster]

Hanger-on
Hang"er-on` (-&obreve_;n`), n.; pl. Hangers-on (-&etilde_;rz-&obreve_;n`). One who hangs on, or sticks to, a person, place, or service; a dependent; one who adheres to others' society longer than he is wanted. Goldsmith.
[1913 Webster]

Hanging
Hang"ing, a. 1. Requiring, deserving, or foreboding death by the halter. “What a hanging face!” Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. Suspended from above; pendent; as, hanging shelves.
[1913 Webster]

3. Adapted for sustaining a hanging object; as, the hanging post of a gate, the post which holds the hinges.
[1913 Webster]

Hanging compass, a compass suspended so that the card may be read from beneath. -- Hanging garden, a garden sustained at an artificial elevation by any means, as by the terraces at Babylon. -- Hanging indentation. See under Indentation. -- Hanging rail (Arch.), that rail of a door or casement to which hinges are attached. -- Hanging side (Mining), the overhanging side of an inclined or hading vein. -- Hanging sleeves. (a) Strips of the same stuff as the gown, hanging down the back from the shoulders. (b) Loose, flowing sleeves. -- Hanging stile. (Arch.) (a) That stile of a door to which hinges are secured. (b) That upright of a window frame to which casements are hinged, or in which the pulleys for sash windows are fastened. -- Hanging wall (Mining), the upper wall of inclined vein, or that which hangs over the miner's head when working in the vein.
[1913 Webster]

Hanging
Hang"ing, n. 1. The act of suspending anything; the state of being suspended.
[1913 Webster]

2. Death by suspension; execution by a halter.
[1913 Webster]

3. That which is hung as lining or drapery for the walls of a room, as tapestry, paper, etc., or to cover or drape a door or window; -- used chiefly in the plural.
[1913 Webster]

Now purple hangings clothe the palace walls. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Hangman
Hang"man (hăng"m&aitalic_;n), n.; pl. Hangmen (-m&eitalic_;n). One who hangs another; esp., one who makes a business of hanging; a public executioner; -- sometimes used as a term of reproach, without reference to office. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hangmanship
Hang"man*ship, n. The office or character of a hangman.
[1913 Webster]

Hangnail
Hang"nail` (-nāl`), n. [A corruption of agnail.] A small piece or sliver of skin which hangs loose, near the root of a finger nail. Holloway.
[1913 Webster]

Hangnest
Hang"nest` (-n&ebreve_;st`), n. 1. A nest that hangs like a bag or pocket.
[1913 Webster]

2. A bird which builds such a nest; a hangbird.
[1913 Webster]

hangover
hangover n. 1. An unpleasant feeling, such as a headache, occurring as an aftereffect from the use of drugs (especially alcohol).
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

2. an official who remains in office after his term.
Syn. -- holdover.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hank
Hank (hă&nsmacr_;k), n. [Cf. Dan. hank handle, Sw. hank a band or tie, Icel. hanki hasp, clasp, hönk, hangr, hank, coil, skein, G. henkel, henk, handle; all probably akin to E. hang. See Hang.] 1. A parcel consisting of two or more skeins of yarn or thread tied together.
[1913 Webster]

2. A rope or withe for fastening a gate. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

3. Hold; influence.
[1913 Webster]

When the devil hath got such a hank over him. Bp. Sanderson.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Naut.) A ring or eye of rope, wood, or iron, attached to the edge of a sail and running on a stay.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Wrestling) A throw in which a wrestler turns his left side to his opponent, twines his left leg about his opponent's right leg from the inside, and throws him backward.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hank
Hank, v. t. 1. [OE. hanken.] To fasten with a rope, as a gate. [Prov. Eng.] Wright.
[1913 Webster]

2. To form into hanks.
[1913 Webster]

Hanker
Han"ker (hă&nsmacr_;"k&etilde_;r), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Hankered (-k&etilde_;rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Hankering.] [Prob. fr. hang; cf. D. hunkeren, hengelen.] 1. To long (for) with a keen appetite and uneasiness; to have a vehement desire; -- usually with for or after; as, to hanker after fruit; to hanker after the diversions of the town. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

He was hankering to join his friend. J. A. Symonds.
[1913 Webster]

2. To linger in expectation or with desire. Thackeray.
[1913 Webster]

Hankeringly
Han"ker*ing*ly, adv. In a hankering manner.
[1913 Webster]

Hankey-pank
Hankey-pankey
Han"key-pan"key, Han"key-pank` (hă&nsmacr_;"k&ybreve_;*pă&nsmacr_;"k&ybreve_;), n. [Cf. Hocus-pocus.] [Also spelled hanky-panky.] 1. Professional cant; the chatter of conjurers to divert attention from their tricks; hence, jugglery. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

2. Illegal or unethical behavior, usually surreptitious; as, the boss got suspicious when profits seemed lower than expected, and hired an investigator to see if any hankey-pankey was going on. [Informal]
[PJC]

3. Extramarital sexual relations, especially adultery. [Colloq.]
[PJC]

hankie
hankie n. Same as handkerchief.
Syn. -- handkerchief, hanky, hankey.
[WordNet 1.5]

hanky
hanky n. Same as handkerchief.
Syn. -- handkerchief, hankie, hankey.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hanover
Hanover n. the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hanoverian
Han`o*ve"ri*an (hăn`&ouptack_;*vē"r&ibreve_;*&aitalic_;n), a. Of or pertaining to Hanover or its people, or to the House of Hanover in England.
[1913 Webster]

Hanoverian
Han`o*ve"ri*an, n. A native or naturalized inhabitant of Hanover; one of the House of Hanover.
[1913 Webster]

Hansa
Han"sa (hăn"s&adot_;), n. See 2d Hanse.
[1913 Webster]

Hansard
Han"sard (-s&etilde_;rd), n. An official report of proceedings in the British Parliament; -- so called from the name of the publishers.
[1913 Webster]

Hansard
Han"sard, n. A merchant of one of the Hanse towns. See the Note under 2d Hanse.
[1913 Webster]

Hanse
Hanse (hăns), n. [Cf. F. anse handle, anse de panier surbased arch, flat arch, vault, and E. haunch hip.] (Arch.) That part of an elliptical or many-centered arch which has the shorter radius and immediately adjoins the impost.
[1913 Webster]

Hanse
Hanse, n. [G. hanse, or F. hanse (from German), OHG. & Goth. hansa; akin to AS. hōs band, troop.] An association; a league or confederacy.
[1913 Webster]

Hanse towns (Hist.), certain commercial cities in Germany which associated themselves for the protection and enlarging of their commerce. The confederacy, called also Hansa and Hanseatic league, held its first diet in 1260, and was maintained for nearly four hundred years. At one time the league comprised eighty-five cities. Its remnants, Lübeck, Hamburg, and Bremen, are free cities, and are still frequently called Hanse towns.
[1913 Webster]

Hanseatic
Han`se*at"ic (hăn`s&euptack_;*ăt"&ibreve_;k), a. Pertaining to the Hanse towns, or to their confederacy.
[1913 Webster]

Hanseatic league. See under 2d Hanse.
[1913 Webster]

Hansel
Han"sel (hăn"s&ebreve_;l), n. & v. See Handsel.
[1913 Webster]

Hanselines
Han"sel*ines (hän"s&eitalic_;l*īnz), n. A sort of breeches. [Obs.] Chaucer.

Hansom cab
Hansom
Han"som (hăn"sŭm), n., Han"som cab` (kăb`). [From the name of the inventor.] A light, low, two-wheeled covered carriage with the driver's seat elevated behind, the reins being passed over the top.
[1913 Webster]

He hailed a cruising hansom . . . “ 'Tis the gondola of London,” said Lothair. Beaconsfield.
[1913 Webster]

Han't
Han't (hānt; in England, hänt). A contraction of have not, or has not, used in illiterate speech. In the United States the commoner spelling is hain't.
[1913 Webster]

Hanukkah
Hanukka
{ Ha"nuk*ka, or Ha"nuk*kah (?) }, n. [Heb. khanukkāh.] The Jewish Feast of the Dedication, instituted by Judas Maccabaeus, his brothers, and the whole congregation of Israel, in 165 b. c., to commemorate the dedication of the new altar set up at the purification of the temple of Jerusalem to replace the altar which had been polluted by Antiochus Epiphanes of Syria (1 Maccabees i. 58, iv. 59). The feast, which is mentioned in John x. 22, is held for eight days (beginning with the 25th day of Kislev, corresponding to December), and is celebrated everywhere, chiefly as a festival of lights, by the Jews. [Also spelled Chanuka.]
Syn. -- Chanukah, Festival of Lights, Feast of Dedication, Feast of the Dedication.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hanuman
Han"u*man (h&adot_;n"&usdot_;*m&aitalic_;n), n. See Hoonoomaun.
[1913 Webster]

haoma
haoma n. A leafless East Indian vine (Sarcostemma acidum); its sour milky juice was formerly used to make an intoxicating drink.
Syn. -- soma, Sarcostemma acidum.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hap
Hap (hăp), v. t. [OE. happen.] To clothe; to wrap.
[1913 Webster]

The surgeon happed her up carefully. Dr. J. Brown.
[1913 Webster]

Hap
Hap, n. [Cf. Hap to clothe.] A cloak or plaid. [O. Eng. & Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Hap
Hap, n. [Icel. happ unexpected good luck. √39.] That which happens or comes suddenly or unexpectedly; also, the manner of occurrence or taking place; chance; fortune; accident; casual event; fate; luck; lot. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Whether art it was or heedless hap. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Cursed be good haps, and cursed be they that build
Their hopes on haps.
Sir P. Sidney.
[1913 Webster]

Loving goes by haps:
Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hap
Hap, v. i. [OE. happen. See Hap chance, and cf. Happen.] To happen; to befall; to chance. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Sends word of all that haps in Tyre. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Ha'penny
Ha'"pen*ny (hā"p&ebreve_;n*n&ybreve_;), n. A half-penny.
[1913 Webster]

Haphazard
Hap"haz`ard (hăp"hăz`&etilde_;rd or hăp`hăz"&etilde_;rd), n. [Hap + hazard.] Extra hazard; chance; accident; random.
[1913 Webster]

We take our principles at haphazard, upon trust. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

haphazard
hap"haz`ard (hăp"hăz`&etilde_;rd or hăp`hăz"&etilde_;rd), a. Determined by chance, whimsy, or guesswork; unplanned; aimless; random; -- used mostly of human actions.
[PJC]

Haphtarah
Haph*ta"rah (?), n.; pl. -taroth (#). [Heb. haphtārāh, prop., valedictory, fr. pātar to depart.] One of the lessons from the Nebiim (or Prophets) read in the Jewish synagogue on Sabbaths, feast days, fasts, and the ninth of Ab, at the end of the service, after the parashoth, or lessons from the Law. Such a practice is evidenced in Luke iv.17 and Acts xiii.15.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hapless
Hap"less (hăp"l&ebreve_;s), a. Without hap or luck; luckless; unfortunate; unlucky; unhappy; as, hapless youth; hapless maid. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Haplessly
Hap"less*ly, adv. In a hapless, unlucky manner.
[1913 Webster]

Haploid
Hap"loid (hăp"loid), a. [NL., fr. Gr. "aplo`os simple.] (Biol.) having half the number of chromosomes normally present in somatic cells; having only one chromosome of each type, and therefore having only one complete set of genes; Contrasted with diploid and polyploid. See also diploid. The germ cells of animals, the ovum and sperm cells, are haploid, whereas the somatic cells are diploid. Haploid variants of somatic cells may also be generated under certain conditions in the laboratory.
[PJC]

Haplomi
Ha*plo"mi (h&adot_;*plō"mī), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. "aplo`os simple + 'w^mos shoulder.] (Zool.) An order of freshwater fishes, including the true pikes, cyprinodonts, and blindfishes.
[1913 Webster]

haplosporidian
haplosporidian n. A parasite in invertebrates and lower vertebrates of no known economic importance.
[WordNet 1.5]

Haplostemonous
Hap`lo*stem"o*nous (hăp`l&ouptack_;*st&ebreve_;m"&ouptack_;*nŭs), a. [Gr. "aplo`os simple + sth`mwn a thread.] (Bot.) Having but one series of stamens, and that equal in number to the proper number of petals; isostemonous.
[1913 Webster]

Haply
Hap"ly (hăp"l&ybreve_;), adv. By hap, chance, luck, or accident; perhaps; it may be.
[1913 Webster]

Lest haply ye be found even to fight against God. Acts v. 39.
[1913 Webster]

Happed
Happed (hăpt), p. a. [From 1st Hap.] Wrapped; covered; cloaked. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

All happed with flowers in the green wood were. Hogg.
[1913 Webster]

Happen
Hap"pen (hăp"p'n), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Happened (-p'nd); p. pr. & vb. n. Happening.] [OE. happenen, hapnen. See Hap to happen.] 1. To come by chance; to come without previous expectation; to fall out.
[1913 Webster]

There shall no evil happen to the just. Prov. xii. 21.
[1913 Webster]

2. To take place; to occur.
[1913 Webster]

All these things which had happened. Luke xxiv. 14.
[1913 Webster]

To happen on, to meet with; to fall or light upon. “I have happened on some other accounts.” Graunt. -- To happen in, to make a casual call. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

happening
happening n. 1. something that happens; an occurrence; an event.
Syn. -- occurrence, natural event.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. Specifically: An event that is particularly interesting, noteworthy, or important.
[PJC]

3. An artistic or entertainment event that is unconventional, sometimes discontinuous, designed to evoke strong emotions, and sometimes involving participation by the audience.
[PJC]

Happily
Hap"pi*ly (hăp"p&ibreve_;*l&ybreve_;), adv. [From Happy.] 1. By chance; peradventure; haply. [Obs.] Piers Plowman.
[1913 Webster]

2. By good fortune; fortunately; luckily.
[1913 Webster]

Preferred by conquest, happily o'erthrown. Waller.
[1913 Webster]

3. In a happy manner or state; in happy circumstances; as, he lived happily with his wife.
[1913 Webster]

4. With address or dexterity; gracefully; felicitously; in a manner to insure success; with success.
[1913 Webster]

Formed by thy converse, happily to steer
From grave to gay, from lively to severe.
Pope.

Syn. -- Fortunately; luckily; successfully; prosperously; contentedly; dexterously; felicitously.
[1913 Webster]

Happiness
Hap"pi*ness, n. [From Happy.] 1. Good luck; good fortune; prosperity.
[1913 Webster]

All happiness bechance to thee in Milan! Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. An agreeable feeling or condition of the soul arising from good fortune or propitious happening of any kind; the possession of those circumstances or that state of being which is attended with enjoyment; the state of being happy; contentment; joyful satisfaction; felicity; blessedness.
[1913 Webster]

3. Fortuitous elegance; unstudied grace; -- used especially of language.
[1913 Webster]

Some beauties yet no precepts can declare,
For there's a happiness, as well as care.
Pope.

Syn. -- Happiness, Felicity, Blessedness, Bliss. Happiness is generic, and is applied to almost every kind of enjoyment except that of the animal appetites; felicity is a more formal word, and is used more sparingly in the same general sense, but with elevated associations; blessedness is applied to the most refined enjoyment arising from the purest social, benevolent, and religious affections; bliss denotes still more exalted delight, and is applied more appropriately to the joy anticipated in heaven.
[1913 Webster]

O happiness! our being's end and aim! Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Others in virtue place felicity,
But virtue joined with riches and long life;
In corporal pleasures he, and careless ease.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

His overthrow heaped happiness upon him;
For then, and not till then, he felt himself,
And found the blessedness of being little.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Happy
Hap"py (hăp"p&ybreve_;), a. [Compar. Happier (-p&ibreve_;*&etilde_;r); superl. Happiest.] [From Hap chance.] 1. Favored by hap, luck, or fortune; lucky; fortunate; successful; prosperous; satisfying desire; as, a happy expedient; a happy effort; a happy venture; a happy omen.
[1913 Webster]

Chymists have been more happy in finding experiments than the causes of them. Boyle.
[1913 Webster]

2. Experiencing the effect of favorable fortune; having the feeling arising from the consciousness of well-being or of enjoyment; enjoying good of any kind, as peace, tranquillity, comfort; contented; joyous; as, happy hours, happy thoughts.
[1913 Webster]

Happy is that people, whose God is the Lord. Ps. cxliv. 15.
[1913 Webster]

The learned is happy Nature to explore,
The fool is happy that he knows no more.
Pope.
[1913 Webster]

3. Dexterous; ready; apt; felicitous.
[1913 Webster]

One gentleman is happy at a reply, another excels in a in a rejoinder. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Happy family, a collection of animals of different and hostile propensities living peaceably together in one cage. Used ironically of conventional alliances of persons who are in fact mutually repugnant. -- Happy-go-lucky, trusting to hap or luck; improvident; easy-going.Happy-go-lucky carelessness.” W. Black.
[1913 Webster]

haptic
haptic adj. relating to or based on the sense of touch.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hapuku
Ha*pu"ku (h&adot_;*p&oomacr_;"k&oomacr_;), n. (Zool.) A large and valuable food fish (Polyprion prognathus) of New Zealand. It sometimes weighs one hundred pounds or more.
[1913 Webster]

Haquebut
Haque"but (hăk"bŭt), n. See Hagbut.
[1913 Webster]

n. 1. (Japan) suicide by self-disembowlment on a sword.
Syn. -- harikari.
[WordNet 1.5]

hara-kiri
harakiri
ha"ra*ki`ri, ha"ra-ki`ri (h&asuml_;"r&asuml_;*kē`r&ibreve_;), n. [Jap., stomach cutting.] A ritual form of suicide, by slashing the abdomen, formerly practiced in Japan, and commanded by the government in the cases of disgraced officials; disembowelment; -- also written, but incorrectly, hari-kari. W. E. Griffis.
[1913 Webster]

hari-kari
ha"ri-ka`ri An incorrect but common spelling and pronunciation of hara-kiri.
[PJC]

Harangue
Ha*rangue" (h&adot_;*răng"), n. [F. harangue: cf. Sp. arenga, It. aringa; lit., a speech before a multitude or on the hustings, It. aringo arena, hustings, pulpit; all fr. OHG. hring ring, anything round, ring of people, G. ring. See Ring.] A speech addressed to a large public assembly; a popular oration; a loud address to a multitude; in a bad sense, a noisy or pompous speech; declamation; ranting.
[1913 Webster]

Gray-headed men and grave, with warriors mixed,
Assemble, and harangues are heard.
Milton.

Syn. -- Harangue, Speech, Oration. Speech is generic; an oration is an elaborate and rhetorical speech; an harangue is a vehement appeal to the passions, or a noisy, disputatious address. A general makes an harangue to his troops on the eve of a battle; a demagogue harangues the populace on the subject of their wrongs.
[1913 Webster]

Harangue
Ha*rangue", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Harangued (h&adot_;*răngd"); p. pr. & vb. n. Haranguing.] [Cf. F. haranguer, It. aringare.] To make an harangue; to declaim.
[1913 Webster]

Harangue
Ha*rangue", v. t. To address by an harangue.
[1913 Webster]

Harangueful
Ha*rangue"ful (-f&usdot_;l), a. Full of harangue.
[1913 Webster]

Haranguer
Ha*rang"uer (h&adot_;*răng"&etilde_;r), n. One who harangues, or is fond of haranguing; a declaimer.
[1913 Webster]

With them join'd all th' haranguers of the throng,
That thought to get preferment by the tongue.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Harass
Har"ass (hăr"&aitalic_;s or h&adot_;*răs"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Harassed (hăr"&aitalic_;st or h&adot_;*răst"); p. pr. & vb. n. Harassing.] [F. harasser; cf. OF. harace a basket made of cords, harace, harasse,a very heavy and large shield; or harer to set (a dog) on.] To fatigue; to tire with repeated and exhausting efforts; esp., to weary by importunity, teasing, or fretting; to cause to endure excessive burdens or anxieties; -- sometimes followed by out.
[1913 Webster]

[Troops] harassed with a long and wearisome march. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Nature oppressed and harass'd out with care. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

Vext with lawyers and harass'd with debt. Tennyson.

Syn. -- To weary; jade; tire; perplex; distress; tease; worry; disquiet; chafe; gall; annoy; irritate; plague; vex; molest; trouble; disturb; torment.
[1913 Webster]

Harass
Har"ass, n. 1. Devastation; waste. [Obs.] Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Worry; harassment. [R.] Byron.
[1913 Webster]

harassed
harassed (hăr"&aitalic_;st or h&adot_;*răst"), adj. troubled persistently, especially with petty annoyances; as, harassed working mothers.
Syn. -- annoyed, harried, pestered.
[WordNet 1.5]

Harasser
Har"ass*er (-&etilde_;r), n. One who harasses.
[1913 Webster]

Harassment
Har"ass*ment (-m&eitalic_;nt), n. The act of harassing, or state of being harassed; worry; annoyance; anxiety.
[1913 Webster]

Little harassments which I am led to suspect do occasionally molest the most fortunate. Ld. Lytton.
[1913 Webster]

Harberous
Har"ber*ous (h&asuml_;r"b&etilde_;r*ŭs), a. Harborous. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

A bishop must be faultless, the husband of one wife, honestly appareled, harberous. Tyndale (1 Tim. iii. 2).
[1913 Webster]

Harbinger
Har"bin*ger (h&asuml_;r"b&ibreve_;n*j&etilde_;r), n. [OE. herbergeour, OF. herbergeor one who provides lodging, fr. herbergier to provide lodging, F. héberger, OF. herberge lodging, inn, F. auberge; of German origin. See Harbor.] 1. One who provides lodgings; especially, the officer of the English royal household who formerly preceded the court when traveling, to provide and prepare lodgings. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

2. A forerunner; a precursor; a messenger.
[1913 Webster]

I knew by these harbingers who were coming. Landor.
[1913 Webster]

Harbinger
Har"bin*ger, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Harbingered (h&asuml_;r"b&ibreve_;n*j&etilde_;rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Harbingering.] To usher in; to be a harbinger of. “Thus did the star of religious freedom harbinger the day.” Bancroft.
[1913 Webster]

Harbor
Har"bor (här"b&etilde_;r), n. [Written also harbour.] [OE. herbor, herberwe, herberge, Icel. herbergi (cf. OHG. heriberga), orig., a shelter for soldiers; herr army + bjarga to save, help, defend; akin to AS. here army, G. heer, OHG. heri, Goth. harjis, and AS. beorgan to save, shelter, defend, G. bergen. See Harry, 2d Bury, and cf. Harbinger.] 1. A station for rest and entertainment; a place of security and comfort; a refuge; a shelter.
[1913 Webster]

[A grove] fair harbour that them seems. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

For harbor at a thousand doors they knocked. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. Specif.: A lodging place; an inn. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Astrol.) The mansion of a heavenly body. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

4. A portion of a sea, a lake, or other large body of water, either landlocked or artificially protected so as to be a place of safety for vessels in stormy weather; a port or haven.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Glass Works) A mixing box for materials.
[1913 Webster]

Harbor dues (Naut.), fees paid for the use of a harbor. -- Harbor seal (Zool.), the common seal. -- Harbor watch, a watch set when a vessel is in port; an anchor watch.
[1913 Webster]

Harbor
Har"bor (här"b&etilde_;r), v. t. [Written also harbour.] [imp. & p. p. Harbored (-b&etilde_;rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Harboring.] [OE. herberen, herberwen, herbergen; cf. Icel. herbergja. See Harbor, n.] To afford lodging to; to entertain as a guest; to shelter; to receive; to give a refuge to; to indulge or cherish (a thought or feeling, esp. an ill thought); as, to harbor a grudge.
[1913 Webster]

Any place that harbors men. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

The bare suspicion made it treason to harbor the person suspected. Bp. Burnet.
[1913 Webster]

Let not your gentle breast harbor one thought of outrage. Rowe.
[1913 Webster]

Harbor
Har"bor, v. i. To lodge, or abide for a time; to take shelter, as in a harbor.
[1913 Webster]

For this night let's harbor here in York. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Harborage
Har"bor*age (-&auptack_;j), n. Shelter; entertainment.[R.]
[1913 Webster]

Where can I get me harborage for the night? Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Harborer
Har"bor*er (-&etilde_;r), n. One who, or that which, harbors.
[1913 Webster]

Geneva was . . . a harborer of exiles for religion. Strype.
[1913 Webster]

Harborless
Har"bor*less, a. Without a harbor; shelterless.
[1913 Webster]

Harbor master
Har"bor mas`ter (m&adot_;s`t&etilde_;r). An officer charged with the duty of executing the regulations respecting the use of a harbor.

Harbrough
Harborough
{ Har"bor*ough (-&ouptack_;), Har"brough (-br&ouptack_;), } n. [See Harbor.] A shelter. [Obs.]. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Harborous
Har"bor*ous (-b&etilde_;r*ŭs), a. Hospitable. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hard
Hard (härd), a. [Compar. Harder (-&etilde_;r); superl. Hardest.] [OE. hard, heard, AS. heard; akin to OS. & D. hard, G. hart, OHG. herti, harti, Icel. harðr, Dan. haard, Sw. hård, Goth. hardus, Gr. kraty`s strong, ka`rtos, kra`tos, strength, and also to E. -ard, as in coward, drunkard, -crat, -cracy in autocrat, democracy; cf. Skr. kratu strength, k&rsdot_; to do, make. Cf. Hardy.] 1. Not easily penetrated, cut, or separated into parts; not yielding to pressure; firm; solid; compact; -- applied to material bodies, and opposed to soft; as, hard wood; hard flesh; a hard apple.
[1913 Webster]

2. Difficult, mentally or judicially; not easily apprehended, decided, or resolved; as a hard problem.
[1913 Webster]

The hard causes they brought unto Moses. Ex. xviii. 26.
[1913 Webster]

In which are some things hard to be understood. 2 Peter iii. 16.
[1913 Webster]

3. Difficult to accomplish; full of obstacles; laborious; fatiguing; arduous; as, a hard task; a disease hard to cure.
[1913 Webster]

4. Difficult to resist or control; powerful.
[1913 Webster]

The stag was too hard for the horse. L'Estrange.
[1913 Webster]

A power which will be always too hard for them. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

5. Difficult to bear or endure; not easy to put up with or consent to; hence, severe; rigorous; oppressive; distressing; unjust; grasping; as, a hard lot; hard times; hard fare; a hard winter; hard conditions or terms.
[1913 Webster]

I never could drive a hard bargain. Burke.
[1913 Webster]

6. Difficult to please or influence; stern; unyielding; obdurate; unsympathetic; unfeeling; cruel; as, a hard master; a hard heart; hard words; a hard character.
[1913 Webster]

7. Not easy or agreeable to the taste; harsh; stiff; rigid; ungraceful; repelling; as, a hard style.
[1913 Webster]

Figures harder than even the marble itself. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

8. Rough; acid; sour, as liquors; as, hard cider.
[1913 Webster]

9. (Pron.) Abrupt or explosive in utterance; not aspirated, sibilated, or pronounced with a gradual change of the organs from one position to another; -- said of certain consonants, as c in came, and g in go, as distinguished from the same letters in center, general, etc.
[1913 Webster]

10. Wanting softness or smoothness of utterance; harsh; as, a hard tone.
[1913 Webster]

11. (Painting) (a) Rigid in the drawing or distribution of the figures; formal; lacking grace of composition. (b) Having disagreeable and abrupt contrasts in the coloring or light and shade.
[1913 Webster]

Hard cancer, Hard case, etc. See under Cancer, Case, etc. -- Hard clam, or Hard-shelled clam (Zool.), the quahog. -- Hard coal, anthracite, as distinguished from bituminous coal (soft coal). -- Hard and fast. (Naut.) See under Fast. -- Hard finish (Arch.), a smooth finishing coat of hard fine plaster applied to the surface of rough plastering. -- Hard lines, hardship; difficult conditions. -- Hard money, coin or specie, as distinguished from paper money. -- Hard oyster (Zool.), the northern native oyster. [Local, U. S.] -- Hard pan, the hard stratum of earth lying beneath the soil; hence, figuratively, the firm, substantial, fundamental part or quality of anything; as, the hard pan of character, of a matter in dispute, etc. See Pan. -- Hard rubber. See under Rubber. -- Hard solder. See under Solder. -- Hard water, water, which contains lime or some mineral substance rendering it unfit for washing. See Hardness, 3. -- Hard wood, wood of a solid or hard texture; as walnut, oak, ash, box, and the like, in distinction from pine, poplar, hemlock, etc. -- In hard condition, in excellent condition for racing; having firm muscles; -- said of race horses.

Syn. -- Solid; arduous; powerful; trying; unyielding; stubborn; stern; flinty; unfeeling; harsh; difficult; severe; obdurate; rigid. See Solid, and Arduous.
[1913 Webster]

Hard
Hard, adv. [OE. harde, AS. hearde.] 1. With pressure; with urgency; hence, diligently; earnestly.
[1913 Webster]

And prayed so hard for mercy from the prince. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

My father
Is hard at study; pray now, rest yourself.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. With difficulty; as, the vehicle moves hard.
[1913 Webster]

3. Uneasily; vexatiously; slowly. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. So as to raise difficulties. “The question is hard set.” Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

5. With tension or strain of the powers; violently; with force; tempestuously; vehemently; vigorously; energetically; as, to press, to blow, to rain hard; hence, rapidly; nimbly; as, to run hard.
[1913 Webster]

6. Close or near.
[1913 Webster]

Whose house joined hard to the synagogue. Acts xviii. 7.
[1913 Webster]

Hard by, near by; close at hand; not far off.Hard by a cottage chimney smokes.” Milton. -- Hard pushed, Hard run, greatly pressed; as, he was hard pushed or hard run for time, money, etc. [Colloq.] -- Hard up, closely pressed by want or necessity; without money or resources; as, hard up for amusements. [Slang]
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Hard in nautical language is often joined to words of command to the helmsman, denoting that the order should be carried out with the utmost energy, or that the helm should be put, in the direction indicated, to the extreme limit, as, Hard aport! Hard astarboard! Hard alee! Hard aweather! Hard up!
Hard is also often used in composition with a participle; as, hard-baked; hard-earned; hard-featured; hard-working; hard-won.

[1913 Webster]

Hard
Hard (härd), v. t. To harden; to make hard. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hard
Hard, n. A ford or passage across a river or swamp.
[1913 Webster]

hard-and-fast
hard-and-fast adj. invariable; firmly established; as, hard-and-fast regulations.
Syn. -- strict.
[WordNet 1.5]

hardass
hard"ass n. A person who strictly enforces rules and regulations. [vulgar slang]
[PJC]

hard-bound
hardcover
hardbacked
hardback
hard"back`, hard"backed`, hard"cov*er hard"-bound` adj. Having rigid front and back covers, usually boards covered with paper, cloth, or leather; -- of books. Contrasted with softcover and paperback.
[WordNet 1.5]

hardback
hard"back` n. A book with cardboard or cloth or leather covers; a hardcover book. Compare paperback.
Syn. -- hardcover.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hardbake
Hard"bake` (-bāk`), n. A sweetmeat of boiled brown sugar or molasses made with almonds, and flavored with orange or lemon juice, etc. Thackeray.
[1913 Webster]

hard-baked
hard-baked adj. baked until hard.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hardbeam
Hard"beam` (-bēm`), n. (Bot.) A tree of the genus Carpinus, of compact, horny texture; hornbeam.
[1913 Webster]

hard-boiled
hard-bitten
hard-bitten hard-boiled adj. not given to sentimentality or gentleness; -- of people; as, a hard-bitten character.
Syn. -- pugnacious, tough.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

hardboard
hard"board` n. a cheap hard material made from wood chips that are pressed together and bound with synthetic resin to form sheets, used in construction and various other purposes; -- called also particle board and chipboard.
Syn. -- chipboard.
[WordNet 1.5]

hard-boiled
hard-boiled adj. 1. same as hard-bitten.
Syn. -- hard-bitten, pugnacious.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. emotionally hardened; -- used of persons.
Syn. -- callous, case-hardened, hardened.
[WordNet 1.5]

3. cooked until the yolk is solid; -- used of eggs; as, a breakfast of pancakes and hard-boiled eggs.
[WordNet 1.5]

hardbound
hardbound adj. same as hardback; -- used of books.
[WordNet 1.5]

hardcover
hard"cov*er n. & a. Same as hardback n. and a.
Syn. -- hardback.
[WordNet 1.5]

Harden
Hard"en (härd"'n), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hardened (-'nd); p. pr. & vb. n. Hardening (-'n*&ibreve_;ng).] [OE. hardnen, hardenen.] 1. To make hard or harder; to make firm or compact; to indurate; as, to harden clay or iron.
[1913 Webster]

2. To accustom by labor or suffering to endure with constancy; to strengthen; to stiffen; to inure; also, to confirm in wickedness or shame; to make unimpressionable.Harden not your heart.” Ps. xcv. 8.
[1913 Webster]

I would harden myself in sorrow. Job vi. 10.
[1913 Webster]

Harden
Hard"en, v. i. 1. To become hard or harder; to acquire solidity, or more compactness; as, mortar hardens by drying.
[1913 Webster]

The deliberate judgment of those who knew him [A. Lincoln] has hardened into tradition. The Century.
[1913 Webster]

2. To become confirmed or strengthened, in either a good or a bad sense.
[1913 Webster]

They, hardened more by what might most reclaim. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hardenbergia
Hardenbergia prop. n. A small genus of Australian woody vines with small violet flowers; closely related to genus Kennedia.
Syn. -- genus Hardenbergia.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hardened
Hard"ened (-'nd), a. 1. Made hard, or harder, or compact; made unfeeling or callous; made obstinate or obdurate; confirmed in error or vice.

2. Rendered resistant to the effects of nearby explosions; as, a hardened missile silo; hardened warhead electronics.
[PJC]

3. Experienced and inured to hardship; as, hardened combat troops.
[PJC]

4. Strongly habituated to a certain type of behavior, and unlikely to change; as, a hardened criminal. Usually used only of behavior perceived negatively.
[PJC]

Syn. -- Impenetrable; hard; obdurate; callous; unfeeling; unsusceptible; insensible. See Obdurate.
[1913 Webster]

Hardener
Hard"en*er (-'n*&etilde_;r), n. One who, or that which, hardens; specif., one who tempers tools.
[1913 Webster]

Hardening
Hard"en*ing, n. 1. Making hard or harder.
[1913 Webster]

2. That which hardens, as a material used for converting the surface of iron into steel.
[1913 Webster]

Harder
Har"der (här"d&etilde_;r), n. (Zool.) A South African mullet, salted for food.
[1913 Webster]

Harderian
Har*de"ri*an (här*dē"r&ibreve_;*&aitalic_;n), a. (Anat.) A term applied to a lachrymal gland on the inner side of the orbit of many animals which have a third eyelid, or nictitating membrane. See Nictitating membrane, under Nictitate.
[1913 Webster]

Hard-favored
Hard"-fa`vored (härd"fā`v&etilde_;rd), a. Hard-featured; ill-looking; as, Vulcan was hard-favored. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Hard-favoredness
Hard"-fa`vored*ness, n. Coarseness of features.
[1913 Webster]

Hard-featured
Hard"-fea`tured (-fē`t&uuptack_;rd; 135), a. Having coarse, unattractive or stern features. Smollett.
[1913 Webster]

Hardfern
Hard"fern` (-f&etilde_;rn`), n. (Bot.) A species of fern (Lomaria borealis), growing in Europe and Northwestern America.
[1913 Webster]

Hard-fisted
Hard"-fist`ed (-f&ibreve_;st`&ebreve_;d), a. 1. Having hard or strong hands; as, a hard-fisted laborer.
[1913 Webster]

2. Close-fisted; covetous; niggardly. Bp. Hall.
[1913 Webster]

hard-fought
hard"-fought` (-f&asuml_;t`), a. Vigorously contested by both opponents; -- of contests; as, a hard-fought battle; a hard-fought primary election.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Hard grass
Hard" grass` (gr&adot_;s`). (Bot.) A name given to several different grasses, especially to the Roltböllia incurvata, and to the species of Aegilops, from one of which it is contended that wheat has been derived.
[1913 Webster]

Hardhack
Hard"hack` (-hăk`), n. (Bot.) A very astringent shrub (Spiraea tomentosa), common in pastures. The Potentilla fruticosa is also called by this name.
[1913 Webster]

Hard-handed
Hard"-hand`ed (-hănd`&ebreve_;d), a. Having hard hands, as a manual laborer.
[1913 Webster]

Hard-handed men that work in Athens here. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hardhead
Hard"head` (-h&ebreve_;d`), n. 1. Clash or collision of heads in contest. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) (a) The menhaden. See Menhaden. [Local, U. S.] (b) Block's gurnard (Trigla gurnardus) of Europe. (c) A California salmon; the steelhead. (d) The gray whale. See Gray whale, under Gray. (e) A coarse American commercial sponge (Spongia dura).
[1913 Webster]

hard-headed
hardheaded
hard"head`ed, hard"-head`ed, a. Having sound judgment; sagacious; shrewd; practical and pragmatic. -- Hard"-head`ed*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Hard-hearted
Hard"-heart`ed (-härt`&ebreve_;d), a. Unsympathetic; inexorable; cruel; pitiless. -- Hard"-heart`ed*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

hard-hitting
hard-hitting adj. 1. characterized by or full of force and vigor; forceful; as, a hard-hitting expose.
Syn. -- trenchant, vigorous.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. aggressive; as, a hard-hitting advertising campaign. Opposite of unaggressive.
Syn. -- high-pressure.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hardihead
Har"di*head (här"d&ibreve_;*h&ebreve_;d), n. Hardihood. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hardihood
Har"di*hood (här"d&ibreve_;*h&oobreve_;d), n. [Hardy + -hood.] Boldness, united with firmness and constancy of mind; bravery; intrepidity; also, audaciousness; impudence.
[1913 Webster]

A bound of graceful hardihood. Wordsworth.
[1913 Webster]

It is the society of numbers which gives hardihood to iniquity. Buckminster.

Syn. -- Intrepidity; courage; pluck; resolution; stoutness; audacity; effrontery; impudence.
[1913 Webster]

Hardily
Har"di*ly, adv. 1. Same as Hardly. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. Boldly; stoutly; resolutely. Wyclif.
[1913 Webster]

Hardiment
Har"di*ment (-m&eitalic_;nt), n. [OF. hardement. See Hardy.] Hardihood; boldness; courage; energetic action. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Changing hardiment with great Glendower. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hardiness
Har"di*ness (-d&ibreve_;*n&ebreve_;s), n. 1. Capability of endurance.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hardihood; boldness; firmness; assurance. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Plenty and peace breeds cowards; Hardness ever
Of hardiness is mother.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

They who were not yet grown to the hardiness of avowing the contempt of the king. Clarendon.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hardship; fatigue. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Hardish
Hard"ish (härd"&ibreve_;sh), a. Somewhat hard.
[1913 Webster]

Hard-labored
Hard"-la`bored (härd"lā`b&etilde_;rd), a. Wrought with severe labor; elaborate; studied. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Hardly
Hard"ly (härd"l&ybreve_;), adv. [AS. heardlice. See Hard.]
[1913 Webster]

1. In a hard or difficult manner; with difficulty.
[1913 Webster]

Recovering hardly what he lost before. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. Unwillingly; grudgingly.
[1913 Webster]

The House of Peers gave so hardly their consent. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. Scarcely; barely; not quite; not wholly.
[1913 Webster]

Hardly shall you find any one so bad, but he desires the credit of being thought good. South.
[1913 Webster]

4. Severely; harshly; roughly.
[1913 Webster]

He has in many things been hardly used. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

5. Confidently; hardily. [Obs.] Holland.
[1913 Webster]

6. Certainly; surely; indeed. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

hardly ever
hard"ly ev"er (härd"l&ybreve_; &ebreve_;v"&etilde_;r), adv. Seldom; rarely; almost never.
[PJC]

Hard-mouthed
Hard"-mouthed` (-mou&thlig_;d`), a. Not sensible to the bit; not easily governed; as, a hard-mouthed horse.
[1913 Webster]

Hardness
Hard"ness, n. [AS. heardness.] 1. The quality or state of being hard, literally or figuratively.
[1913 Webster]

The habit of authority also had given his manners some peremptory hardness. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Min.) The cohesion of the particles on the surface of a body, determined by its capacity to scratch another, or be itself scratched; -- measured among minerals on a scale of which diamond and talc form the extremes.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Chem.) The peculiar quality exhibited by water which has mineral salts dissolved in it. Such water forms an insoluble compound with soap, and is hence unfit for washing purposes.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; This quality is caused by the presence of calcium carbonate, causing temporary hardness which can be removed by boiling, or by calcium sulphate, causing permanent hardness which can not be so removed, but may be improved by the addition of sodium carbonate.
[1913 Webster]

hardnose
hard"nose n. A hard-nosed person; one who is realistic and pragmatic and is impatient with those who are not. [slang]
[PJC]

hard-nosed
hard-nosed adj. facing reality squarely; guided by practical experience and observation rather than theory; tough and pragmatic; as, a hard-nosed businessman.
Syn. -- down-to-earth, hardheaded, practical, pragmatic.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hardock
Har"dock (här"d&obreve_;k), n. [Obs.] See Hordock.
[1913 Webster]

hard-of-hearing
hard-of-hearing adj. having a reduced ability to hear, but not fully deaf; partly deaf.
Syn. -- hearing-impaired.
[WordNet 1.5]

hard-on
hard-on n. An erect penis; a penile erection. [slang or vulgar]
Syn. -- erection.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hardpan
Hard"pan` (härd"păn), n. The hard substratum. Same as Hard pan, under Hard, a.
[1913 Webster]

hard-pressed
hard-pressed adj. facing or experiencing trouble or difficulty; as, financially hard-pressed Mexican hotels are lowering their prices; they were hard-pressed to find a substitute on short notice; -- see distressed{1}.
Syn. -- distressed, hard put, in a bad way(predicate), in trouble(predicate).
[WordNet 1.5]

Hards
Hards (härdz), n. pl. [OE. herdes, AS. heordan; akin to G. hede.] The refuse or coarse part of flax; tow.
[1913 Webster]

Hard-shell
Hard"-shell` (härd"sh&ebreve_;l`), a. Unyielding; insensible to argument; uncompromising; strict. [Colloq., U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Hardship
Hard"ship (härd"sh&ibreve_;p), n. That which is hard to bear, as toil, privation, injury, injustice, etc. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Hardspun
Hard"spun`, a. Firmly twisted in spinning.
[1913 Webster]

Hard steel
Hard steel. Steel hardened by the addition of other elements, as manganese, phosphorus, or (usually) carbon.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

hard-surfaced
hard-surfaced adj. paved; -- of roads. Opposite of unpaved.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hard-tack
Hardtack
Hard"tack` or Hard"-tack` (härd"tăk`), n. 1. A name given by soldiers and sailors to a kind of unleavened hard biscuit or sea bread. Called also pilot biscuit, pilot bread, ship biscuit and ship bread
[1913 Webster]

2. Any of several mahogany trees, esp. the Cercocarpus betuloides. MW10
[PJC]

Hardtail
Hard"tail` (härd"tāl`), n. (Zool.) See Jurel.
[1913 Webster]

hard-to-please
hard-to-please adj. Requiring great patience and effort and skill; demanding; -- of persons. Opposite of undemanding.
Syn. -- harsh, demanding.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hard-visaged
Hard"-vis`aged (härd"v&ibreve_;z`&auptack_;jd; 48), a. Of a harsh or stern countenance; hard-featured. Burke.
[1913 Webster]

Hardware
Hard"ware` (härd"wâr`), n. 1. Ware made of metal, as cutlery, kitchen utensils, and the like; ironmongery.
[1913 Webster]

2. Any of the physical objects used in carrying out an activity, in contrast to the knowledge, skill, or theory required to perform the activity; mostly used collectively.
[PJC]

3. Specifically: (Computers) The sum of all the physical objects, such as the electrical, mechanical, and electronic devices which comprise a computer system; as, the typical PC hardware suite consists of a mainboard and a number of peripherals such as hard drives and speakers, connected by adapter cards, but the input and output from users occurs mostly through the keyboard and monitor; contrasted with software, the programs executed by the computer.
[PJC]

4. Specifically: (Military) The weapons, transport, and other physical objects used in conducting a war.
[PJC]

5. (Slang) Weapons, especially handguns, carried on the person; as, check your hardware at the door before entering.
[PJC]

hardwareman
hard"ware`man (härd"wâr`măn), n.; pl. Hardwaremen (härd"wâr`m&ebreve_;n). One who makes, or deals in, hardware.
[1913 Webster]

hard wired
hard-wired
hard"-wired", hard" wired" (härd"wīrd"), a. 1. (Computers) Contained within the circuitry of a computer or computer peripheral device, and not changeable by programming; -- of functions; as, error correction is hard-wired into the circuit of the disk drive, so it proceeds very rapidly.
[PJC]

2. Connected by a continuous electrical wire, rather than through a switch; as, the air-conditioner was hard-wired into the wall circuit, so moving it would require an electrician.
[PJC]

3. (Metaph.) Performed by an inborn pattern of neural circuits; instinctive; not learned; as, many bird songs are hard-wired, but some are learned.
[PJC]

People, as the cybernetic metaphor now has it, are “hard wired” to do good in order to enhance their own happiness. Andrew Delbanco (New York Times Magazine, May 7, 2000; p. 46).
[PJC]

hardwood
hard"wood` n. The wood of broad-leaved dicotyledonous trees (as distinguished from the wood of conifers); also items made from such wood; as, decorative hardwood.
[WordNet 1.5]

hardwood
hard"wood` adj. Made of the hard-to-cut wood of a broad-leaved tree, as e.g. oak; consisting of a hardwood; as, hardwood floors; -- of wood and wooden objects.
[WordNet 1.5]

hard-won
hard"-won` a. Acquired with difficulty; as, to squander one's hard-won fortune.
[PJC]

hardworking
hard"work`ing adj. 1. habitually working diligently and for long hours.
Syn. -- industrious, tireless, untiring.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hardy
Har"dy (här"d&ybreve_;), a. [Compar. Hardier (-d&ibreve_;*&etilde_;r); superl. Hardiest.] [F. hardi, p. p. fr. OF. hardir to make bold; of German origin, cf. OHG. hertan to harden, G. härten. See Hard, a.] 1. Bold; brave; stout; daring; resolute; intrepid.
[1913 Webster]

Hap helpeth hardy man alway. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. Confident; full of assurance; in a bad sense, morally hardened; shameless.
[1913 Webster]

3. Strong; firm; compact.
[1913 Webster]

[A] blast may shake in pieces his hardy fabric. South.
[1913 Webster]

4. Inured to fatigue or hardships; strong; capable of endurance; as, a hardy veteran; a hardy mariner.
[1913 Webster]

5. Able to withstand the cold of winter.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Plants which are hardy in Virginia may perish in New England. Half-hardy plants are those which are able to withstand mild winters or moderate frosts.
[1913 Webster]

Hardy
Har"dy, n. A blacksmith's fuller or chisel, having a square shank for insertion into a square hole in an anvil, called the hardy hole.
[1913 Webster]

Hare
Hare (hâr), v. t. [Cf. Harry, Harass.] To excite; to tease, harass, or worry; to harry. [Obs.] Locke.
[1913 Webster]

Hare
Hare, n. [AS. hara; akin to D. haas, G. hase, OHG. haso, Dan. & Sw. hare, Icel. hēri, Skr. çaça. √226.]
[1913 Webster]

1. (Zool.) A rodent of the genus Lepus, having long hind legs, a short tail, and a divided upper lip. It is a timid animal, moves swiftly by leaps, and is remarkable for its fecundity.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The species of hares are numerous. The common European hare is Lepus timidus. The northern or varying hare of America (Lepus Americanus), and the prairie hare (Lepus campestris), turn white in winter. In America, the various species of hares are commonly called rabbits.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Astron.) A small constellation situated south of and under the foot of Orion; Lepus.
[1913 Webster]

Hare and hounds, a game played by men and boys, two, called hares, having a few minutes' start, and scattering bits of paper to indicate their course, being chased by the others, called the hounds, through a wide circuit. -- Hare kangaroo (Zool.), a small Australian kangaroo (Lagorchestes Leporoides), resembling the hare in size and color, -- Hare's lettuce (Bot.), a plant of the genus Sonchus, or sow thistle; -- so called because hares are said to eat it when fainting with heat. Dr. Prior. -- Jumping hare. (Zool.) See under Jumping. -- Little chief hare, or Crying hare. (Zool.) See Chief hare. -- Sea hare. (Zool.) See Aplysia.
[1913 Webster]

Harebell
Hare"bell` (hâr"b&ebreve_;l`), n. (Bot.) A small, slender, branching plant (Campanula rotundifolia), having blue bell-shaped flowers; also, Scilla nutans, which has similar flowers; -- called also bluebell. [Written also hairbell.]
[1913 Webster]

E'en the light harebell raised its head. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Harebrained
Hare"brained` (hâr"brānd`), a. Wild; giddy; volatile; heedless. “A mad hare-brained fellow.” North (Plutarch). [Written also hairbrained.]
[1913 Webster]

Harefoot
Hare"foot` (-f&oobreve_;t`), n. 1. (Zool.) A long, narrow foot, carried (that is, produced or extending) forward; -- said of dogs.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) A tree (Ochroma Lagopus) of the West Indies, having the stamens united somewhat in the form of a hare's foot.
[1913 Webster]

Harefoot clover (Bot.), a species of clover (Trifolium arvense) with soft and silky heads.
[1913 Webster]

Hare-hearted
Hare"-heart`ed (-härt`&ebreve_;d), a. Timorous; timid; easily frightened. Ainsworth.
[1913 Webster]

Harehound
Hare"hound` (-hound`), n. See Harrier. A. Chalmers.
[1913 Webster]

Hareld
Har"eld (hăr"&ebreve_;ld), n. (Zool.) The long-tailed duck. See Old Squaw.
[1913 Webster]

Harelip
Hare"lip` (hâr"l&ibreve_;p`), n. A lip, commonly the upper one, having a fissure of perpendicular division like that of a hare. -- Hare"lipped` (-l&ibreve_;pt`), a.
[1913 Webster]

Harem
Ha"rem (hā"r&ebreve_;m; 277), n.[Ar. haram, orig., anything forbidden or sacred, fr. harama to forbid, prohibit.] [Written also haram and hareem.] 1. The apartments or portion of the house allotted to females in Muslim families.
[1913 Webster]

2. The family of wives and concubines belonging to one man, in Muslim countries; a seraglio.
[1913 Webster]

Harengiform
Ha*ren"gi*form (h&adot_;*r&ebreve_;n"j&ibreve_;*fôrm), a. [F. hareng herring (LL. harengus) + -form.] Herring-shaped.
[1913 Webster]

Hare's-ear
Hare's"-ear` (hârz"ēr`), n. (Bot.) An umbelliferous plant (Bupleurum rotundifolium); -- so named from the shape of its leaves. Dr. Prior.
[1913 Webster]

Hare's-foot fern
Hare's"-foot` fern` (-f&oobreve_;t` f&etilde_;rn`). (Bot.) A species of fern (Davallia Canariensis) with a soft, gray, hairy rootstock; -- whence the name.
[1913 Webster]

Hare's-tail
Hare's"-tail` (-tāl`), n. (Bot.) A kind of grass (Eriophorum vaginatum). See Cotton grass, under Cotton.
[1913 Webster]

Hare's-tail grass (Bot.), a species of grass (Lagurus ovatus) whose head resembles a hare's tail.
[1913 Webster]

Harfang
Har"fang (här"făng), n. [See Hare, n., and Fang.] (Zool.) The snowy owl.
[1913 Webster]

Hariali grass
Ha`ri*a"li grass` (hä`r&ibreve_;*ä"l&ibreve_; gr&adot_;s`). (Bot.) The East Indian name of the Cynodon Dactylon; dog's-grass.
[1913 Webster]

Haricot
Har"i*cot (hăr"&euptack_;*k&ouptack_;; F. &adot_;`r&euptack_;`k&ouptack_;"), n. [F.] 1. A ragout or stew of meat with beans and other vegetables.
[1913 Webster]

2. The ripe seeds, or the unripe pod, of the common string bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), used as a vegetable. Other species of the same genus furnish different kinds of haricots.
[1913 Webster]

Harier
Har"i*er (hăr"&ibreve_;*&etilde_;r), n. (Zool.) See Harrier.
[1913 Webster]

Harikari
Ha"ri*ka`ri (hä"r&ibreve_;*kä`r&ibreve_;), n. See Hara-kiri.
[1913 Webster]

Hariolation
Har`i*o*la"tion (hăr`&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*lā"shŭn), n. [See Ariolation.] Prognostication; soothsaying. [Obs.] Cockeram.
[1913 Webster]

Harish
Har"ish (hâr"&ibreve_;sh), a. Like a hare. [R.] Huloet.
[1913 Webster]

Hark
Hark (härk), v. i. [OE. herken. See Hearken.] To listen; to hearken. [Now rare, except in the imperative form used as an interjection, Hark! listen.] Hudibras.
[1913 Webster]

Hark away! Hark back! Hark forward! (Sporting), cries used to incite and guide hounds in hunting. -- To hark back, to go back for a fresh start, as when one has wandered from his direct course, or made a digression.
[1913 Webster] He must have overshot the mark, and must hark back. Haggard.
[1913 Webster] He harked back to the subject. W. E. Norris.

[1913 Webster]

Harken
Hark"en (härk"'n), v. t. & i. To hearken. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Harl
Harl (härl), n. [Cf. OHG. harluf noose, rope; E. hards refuse of flax.] 1. A filamentous substance; especially, the filaments of flax or hemp.
[1913 Webster]

2. A barb, or barbs, of a fine large feather, as of a peacock or ostrich, -- used in dressing artificial flies. [Written also herl.]
[1913 Webster]

Harle
Harle (härl), n. (Zool.) The red-breasted merganser.
[1913 Webster]

Harlech group
Har"lech group` (här"l&ebreve_;k gr&oomacr_;p`). [So called from Harlech in Wales.] (Geol.) A minor subdivision at the base of the Cambrian system in Wales.
[1913 Webster]

Harlequin
Har"le*quin (här"l&euptack_;*k&ibreve_;n or här"l&euptack_;*kw&ibreve_;n), n. [F. arlequin, formerly written also harlequin (cf. It, arlecchino), prob. fr. OF. hierlekin, hellequin, goblin, elf, which is prob. of German or Dutch origin; cf. D. hel hell. Cf. Hell, Kin.] A buffoon, dressed in parti-colored clothes, who plays tricks, often without speaking, to divert the bystanders or an audience; a merry-andrew; originally, a droll rogue of Italian comedy. Percy Smith.
[1913 Webster]

As dumb harlequin is exhibited in our theaters. Johnson.
[1913 Webster]

Harlequin bat (Zool.), an Indian bat (Scotophilus ornatus), curiously variegated with white spots. -- Harlequin beetle (Zool.), a very large South American beetle (Acrocinus longimanus) having very long legs and antennae. The elytra are curiously marked with red, black, and gray. -- Harlequin cabbage bug. (Zool.) See Calicoback. -- Harlequin caterpillar. (Zool.), the larva of an American bombycid moth (Euchaetes egle) which is covered with black, white, yellow, and orange tufts of hair. -- Harlequin duck (Zool.), a North American duck (Histrionicus histrionicus). The male is dark ash, curiously streaked with white. -- Harlequin moth. (Zool.) See Magpie Moth. -- Harlequin opal. See Opal. -- Harlequin snake (Zool.), See harlequin snake in the vocabulary.
[1913 Webster]

Harlequin
Har"le*quin (här"l&euptack_;*k&ibreve_;n or -kw&ibreve_;n), v. i. To play the droll; to make sport by playing ludicrous tricks.
[1913 Webster]

Harlequin
Har"le*quin, v. t. To remove or conjure away, as by a harlequin's trick.
[1913 Webster]

And kitten, if the humor hit
Has harlequined away the fit.
M. Green.
[1913 Webster]

Harlequinade
Har"le*quin*ade` (-ād`), n. [F. arleguinade.] A play or part of a play in which the harlequin is conspicuous; the part of a harlequin. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

harlequin snake
har"le*quin snake` n. any of several venomous New World snakes brilliantly banded in red and black and either yellow or white, especially the eastern coral snake, a small poisonous snake (Micrurus fulvius or Elaps fulvius), ringed with red and black, found in the Southeastern United States. They are widely distributed in Southern and Central America;
Syn. -- coral snake, New World coral snake.
[WordNet 1.5]

Harlock
Har"lock (här"l&obreve_;k), n. Probably a corruption either of charlock or hardock. Drayton.
[1913 Webster]

Harlot
Har"lot (-l&obreve_;t), n. [OE. harlot, herlot, a vagabond, OF. harlot, herlot, arlot; cf. Pr. arlot, Sp. arlote, It. arlotto; of uncertain origin.] 1. A churl; a common man; a person, male or female, of low birth. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

He was a gentle harlot and a kind. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. A person given to low conduct; a rogue; a cheat; a rascal. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

3. A woman who prostitutes her body for hire; a prostitute; a common woman; a strumpet.
[1913 Webster]

Harlot
Har"lot, a. Wanton; lewd; low; base. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Harlot
Har"lot, v. i. To play the harlot; to practice lewdness. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Harlotize
Har"lot*ize (-īz), v. i. To harlot. [Obs.] Warner.
[1913 Webster]

Harlotry
Har"lot*ry (-r&ybreve_;), n. 1. Ribaldry; buffoonery; a ribald story. [Obs.] Piers Plowman. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. The trade or practice of prostitution; habitual or customary lewdness. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. Anything meretricious; as, harlotry in art.
[1913 Webster]

4. A harlot; a strumpet; a baggage. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

He sups to-night with a harlotry. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Harm
Harm (härm), n. [OE. harm, hearm, AS. hearm; akin to OS. harm, G. harm grief, Icel. harmr, Dan. harme, Sw. harm; cf. OSlav. & Russ. sram' shame, Skr. çrama toil, fatigue.] 1. Injury; hurt; damage; detriment; misfortune.
[1913 Webster]

2. That which causes injury, damage, or loss.
[1913 Webster]

We, ignorant of ourselves,
Beg often our own harms.
Shak.

Syn. -- Mischief; evil; loss; injury. See Mischief.
[1913 Webster]

Harm
Harm, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Harmed (härmd); p. pr. & vb. n. Harming.] [OE. harmen, AS. hearmian. See Harm, n.] To hurt; to injure; to damage; to wrong.
[1913 Webster]

Though yet he never harmed me. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

No ground of enmity between us known
Why he should mean me ill or seek to harm.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Harmaline
Har"ma*line (här"m&adot_;*l&ibreve_;n or -lēn), n. [Cf. F. harmaline See Harmel.] (Chem.) An alkaloid found in the plant Peganum harmala. It forms bitter, yellow salts.
[1913 Webster]

Harmattan
Har*mat"tan (här*măt"t&aitalic_;n), n. [F. harmattan, prob. of Arabic origin.] A dry, hot wind, prevailing on the Atlantic coast of Africa, in December, January, and February, blowing from the interior or Sahara. It is usually accompanied by a haze which obscures the sun.
[1913 Webster]

Harmel
Har"mel (här"m&ebreve_;l), n. [Ar. harmal.] (Bot.) A kind of rue (Ruta sylvestris) growing in India. At Lahore the seeds are used medicinally and for fumigation.
[1913 Webster]

Harmful
Harm"ful (härm"f&usdot_;l), a. Full of harm; injurious; hurtful; mischievous. “ Most harmful hazards.” Strype.

--Harm"ful*ly, adv. -- Harm"ful*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Harmine
Har"mine (här"m&ibreve_;n or -mēn), n.[See Harmaline.] (Chem.) An alkaloid accompanying harmaline (in the Peganum harmala), and obtained from it by oxidation. It is a white crystalline substance.
[1913 Webster]

Harmless
Harm"less (härm"l&ebreve_;s), a. 1. Free from harm; unhurt; as, to give bond to save another harmless.
[1913 Webster]

2. Free from power or disposition to harm; innocent; inoffensive. “ The harmless deer.” Drayton

Syn. -- Innocent; innoxious; innocuous; inoffensive; unoffending; unhurt; uninjured; unharmed.

--Harm"less*ly, adv.- Harm"less*ness, n.

Harmonical
Harmonic
Har*mon"ic (här*m&obreve_;n"&ibreve_;k), Har*mon"ic*al (-&ibreve_;*k&aitalic_;l), a. [L. harmonicus, Gr. "armoniko`s; cf. F. harmonique. See Harmony.] 1. Concordant; musical; consonant; as, harmonic sounds.
[1913 Webster]

Harmonic twang! of leather, horn, and brass. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Mus.) Relating to harmony, -- as melodic relates to melody; harmonious; esp., relating to the accessory sounds or overtones which accompany the predominant and apparent single tone of any string or sonorous body.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Math.) Having relations or properties bearing some resemblance to those of musical consonances; -- said of certain numbers, ratios, proportions, points, lines, motions, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

Harmonic interval (Mus.), the distance between two notes of a chord, or two consonant notes. -- Harmonical mean (Arith. & Alg.), certain relations of numbers and quantities, which bear an analogy to musical consonances. -- Harmonic motion, the motion of the point A, of the foot of the perpendicular PA, when P moves uniformly in the circumference of a circle, and PA is drawn perpendicularly upon a fixed diameter of the circle. This is simple harmonic motion. The combinations, in any way, of two or more simple harmonic motions, make other kinds of harmonic motion. The motion of the pendulum bob of a clock is approximately simple harmonic motion. -- Harmonic proportion. See under Proportion. -- Harmonic series or Harmonic progression. See under Progression. -- Spherical harmonic analysis, a mathematical method, sometimes referred to as that of Laplace's Coefficients, which has for its object the expression of an arbitrary, periodic function of two independent variables, in the proper form for a large class of physical problems, involving arbitrary data, over a spherical surface, and the deduction of solutions for every point of space. The functions employed in this method are called spherical harmonic functions. Thomson & Tait. -- Harmonic suture (Anat.), an articulation by simple apposition of comparatively smooth surfaces or edges, as between the two superior maxillary bones in man; -- called also harmonia, and harmony. -- Harmonic triad (Mus.), the chord of a note with its third and fifth; the common chord.
[1913 Webster]

Harmonic
Har*mon"ic (här*m&obreve_;n"&ibreve_;k), n. (Mus.) A musical note produced by a number of vibrations which is a multiple of the number producing some other; an overtone. See Harmonics.
[1913 Webster]

Harmonica
Har*mon"i*ca (-&ibreve_;*k&adot_;), n. [Fem. fr. L. harmonicus harmonic. See Harmonic, n. ] 1. A musical instrument, consisting of a series of hemispherical glasses which, by touching the edges with the dampened finger, give forth the tones; it is now called the glass harmonica, to distinguish it from the common harmonica, formerly called the harmonicon.
[1913 Webster]

2. A toy instrument of strips of glass or metal hung on two tapes, and struck with hammers.
[1913 Webster]

3. A small wind musical instrument shaped like a flat bar with holes along the thin edges, held in the hand and producing notes from multiple vibrating reeds arranged inside along its length; it was formerly called the harmonicon. See harmonicon.
[PJC]

Harmonically
Har*mon"ic*al*ly (-&ibreve_;*k&aitalic_;l*l&ybreve_;), adv. 1. In an harmonical manner; harmoniously.
[1913 Webster]

2. In respect to harmony, as distinguished from melody; as, a passage harmonically correct.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Math.) In harmonical progression.
[1913 Webster]

Harmonicon
Har*mon"i*con (-&ibreve_;*k&obreve_;n), n. A small, flat, wind instrument of music, in which the notes are produced by the vibration of free metallic reeds; it is now called the harmonica.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Harmonics
Har*mon"ics (-&ibreve_;ks), n. 1. The doctrine or science of musical sounds.
[1913 Webster]

2. pl. (Mus.) Secondary and less distinct tones which accompany any principal, and apparently simple, tone, as the octave, the twelfth, the fifteenth, and the seventeenth. The name is also applied to the artificial tones produced by a string or column of air, when the impulse given to it suffices only to make a part of the string or column vibrate; overtones.
[1913 Webster]

Harmonious
Har*mo"ni*ous (här*mō"n&ibreve_;*ŭs), a. [Cf. F. harmonieux. See Harmony.] 1. Adapted to each other; having parts proportioned to each other; symmetrical.
[1913 Webster]

God hath made the intellectual world harmonious and beautiful without us. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

2. Acting together to a common end; agreeing in action or feeling; living in peace and friendship; as, an harmonious family.
[1913 Webster]

3. Vocally or musically concordant; agreeably consonant; symphonious.

-- Har*mo"ni*ous*ly, adv. -- Har*mo"ni*ous*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Harmoniphon
Har*mon"i*phon (här*m&obreve_;n"&ibreve_;*f&obreve_;n), n. [Gr. "armoni`a harmony + fwnh` sound.] (Mus.) An obsolete wind instrument with a keyboard, in which the sound, which resembled the oboe, was produced by the vibration of thin metallic plates, acted upon by blowing through a tube.
[1913 Webster]

Harmonist
Har"mo*nist (här"m&ouptack_;*n&ibreve_;st), n. [Cf. F. harmoniste.] 1. One who shows the agreement or harmony of corresponding passages of different authors, as of the four evangelists.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Mus.) One who understands the principles of harmony or is skillful in applying them in composition; a musical composer.

Harmonite
Harmonist
{ Har"mo*nist, Har"mo*nite (-nīt), } n. (Eccl. Hist.) One of a religious sect, founded in Würtemburg in the last century, composed of followers of George Rapp, a weaver. They had all their property in common. In 1803, a portion of this sect settled in Pennsylvania and called the village thus established, Harmony.
[1913 Webster]

Harmonium
Har*mo"ni*um (här*mō"n&ibreve_;*ŭm), n. [NL. See Harmony. ] A musical instrument, resembling a small organ and especially designed for church music, in which the tones are produced by forcing air by means of a bellows so as to cause the vibration of free metallic reeds. It is now made with one or two keyboards, and has pedals and stops.
[1913 Webster]

harmonizable
harmonizable adj. capable of being made harmonious or consistent.
[WordNet 1.5]

Harmonization
Har`mo*ni*za"tion (här`m&ouptack_;*n&ibreve_;*zā"shŭn), n. The act of harmonizing.
[1913 Webster]

Harmonize
Har"mo*nize (här"m&ouptack_;*nīz), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Harmonized (-nīzd); p. pr. & vb. n. Harmonizing (-nī"z&ibreve_;ng).] [Cf. F. harmoniser. ] 1. To agree in action, adaptation, or effect on the mind; to agree in sense or purport; as, the parts of a mechanism harmonize.
[1913 Webster]

2. To be in peace and friendship, as individuals, families, or public organizations.
[1913 Webster]

3. To agree in vocal or musical effect; to form a concord; as, the tones harmonize perfectly.
[1913 Webster]

Harmonize
Har"mo*nize, v. t. 1. To adjust in fit proportions; to cause to agree; to show the agreement of; to reconcile the apparent contradiction of.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Mus.) To accompany with harmony; to provide with parts, as an air, or melody.
[1913 Webster]

Harmonizer
Har"mo*ni`zer (-nī`z&etilde_;r), n. One who harmonizes.
[1913 Webster]

Harmonometer
Har`mo*nom"e*ter (-n&obreve_;m"&euptack_;*t&etilde_;r), n. [Gr. "armoni`a harmony + meter: cf. F. harmonometre.] An instrument for measuring the harmonic relations of sounds. It is often a monochord furnished with movable bridges.
[1913 Webster]

Harmony
Har"mo*ny (här"m&ouptack_;*n&ybreve_;), n.; pl. Harmonies (-n&ibreve_;z). [F. harmonie, L. harmonia, Gr. "armoni`a joint, proportion, concord, fr. "armo`s a fitting or joining. See Article.] 1. The just adaptation of parts to each other, in any system or combination of things, or in things intended to form a connected whole; such an agreement between the different parts of a design or composition as to produce unity of effect; as, the harmony of the universe.
[1913 Webster]

2. Concord or agreement in facts, opinions, manners, interests, etc.; good correspondence; peace and friendship; as, good citizens live in harmony.
[1913 Webster]

3. A literary work which brings together or arranges systematically parallel passages of historians respecting the same events, and shows their agreement or consistency; as, a harmony of the Gospels.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Mus.) (a) A succession of chords according to the rules of progression and modulation. (b) The science which treats of their construction and progression.
[1913 Webster]

Ten thousand harps, that tuned
Angelic harmonies.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Anat.) See Harmonic suture, under Harmonic.
[1913 Webster]

Close harmony, Dispersed harmony, etc. See under Close, Dispersed, etc. -- Harmony of the spheres. See Music of the spheres, under Music.

Syn. -- Harmony, Melody. Harmony results from the concord of two or more strains or sounds which differ in pitch and quality. Melody denotes the pleasing alternation and variety of musical and measured sounds, as they succeed each other in a single verse or strain.
[1913 Webster]

Harmost
Har"most (här"m&obreve_;st), n. [Gr. "armosth`s, fr. "armo`zein to join, arrange, command: cf. F. harmoste. See Harmony.] (Gr. Antiq.) A city governor or prefect appointed by the Spartans in the cities subjugated by them.
[1913 Webster]

Harmotome
Har"mo*tome (-m&ouptack_;*tōm), n. [Gr. "armo`s a joint + te`mnein to cut: cf. F. harmotome.] (Min.) A hydrous silicate of alumina and baryta, occurring usually in white cruciform crystals; cross-stone.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; A related mineral, called lime harmotome, and Phillipsite, contains lime in place of baryta. Dana.
[1913 Webster]

Harness
Har"ness (-n&ebreve_;s), n. [OE. harneis, harnes, OF. harneis, F. harnais, harnois; of Celtic origin; cf. Armor. harnez old iron, armor, W. haiarn iron, Armor. houarn, Ir. iarann, Gael. iarunn. Cf. Iron.] 1. Originally, the complete dress, especially in a military sense, of a man or a horse; hence, in general, armor.
[1913 Webster]

At least we'll die with harness on our back. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. The equipment of a draught or carriage horse, for drawing a wagon, coach, chaise, etc.; gear; tackling.
[1913 Webster]

3. The part of a loom comprising the heddles, with their means of support and motion, by which the threads of the warp are alternately raised and depressed for the passage of the shuttle.
[1913 Webster]

To die in harness, to die with armor on; hence, colloquially, to die while actively engaged in work or duty.
[1913 Webster]

Harness
Har"ness, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Harnessed (-n&ebreve_;st); p. pr. & vb. n. Harnessing.] [OE. harneisen; cf. F. harnacher, OF. harneschier.] 1. To dress in armor; to equip with armor for war, as a horseman; to array.
[1913 Webster]

Harnessed in rugged steel. Rowe.
[1913 Webster]

A gay dagger,
Harnessed well and sharp as point of spear.
Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. Fig.: To equip or furnish for defense. Dr. H. More.
[1913 Webster]

3. To make ready for draught; to equip with harness, as a horse. Also used figuratively.
[1913 Webster]

Harnessed to some regular profession. J. C. Shairp.
[1913 Webster]

Harnessed antelope. (Zool.) See Guib. -- Harnessed moth (Zool.), an American bombycid moth (Arctia phalerata of Harris), having, on the fore wings, stripes and bands of buff on a black ground.
[1913 Webster]

Harness cask
Har"ness cask` (k&adot_;sk`). (Naut.) A tub lashed to a vessel's deck and containing salted provisions for daily use; -- called also harness tub. W. C. Russell.
[1913 Webster]

Harnesser
Har"ness*er (-&etilde_;r), n. One who harnesses.
[1913 Webster]

Harns
Harns (härnz), n. pl. [Akin to Icel. hjarni, Dan. hierne.] The brains. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Harp
Harp (härp), n. [OE. harpe, AS. hearpe; akin to D. harp, G. harfe, OHG. harpha, Dan. harpe, Icel. & Sw. harpa.] 1. A musical instrument consisting of a triangular frame furnished with strings and sometimes with pedals, held upright, and played with the fingers.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Astron.) A constellation; Lyra, or the Lyre.
[1913 Webster]

3. A grain sieve. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Aeolian harp. See under Aeolian.
[1913 Webster]

Harp seal (Zool.), an arctic seal (Phoca Grœnlandica). The adult males have a light-colored body, with a harp-shaped mark of black on each side, and the face and throat black. Called also saddler, and saddleback. The immature ones are called bluesides; their fur is white, and they are killed and skinned to harvest the fur. -- Harp shell (Zool.), a beautiful marine gastropod shell of the genus Harpa, of several species, found in tropical seas. See Harpa.
[1913 Webster]

Harp
Harp, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Harped (härpt) p. pr. & vb. n. Harping.] [AS. hearpian. See Harp, n.] 1. To play on the harp.
[1913 Webster]

I heard the voice of harpers, harping with their harps. Rev. xiv. 2.
[1913 Webster]

2. To dwell on or recur to a subject tediously or monotonously in speaking or in writing; to refer to something repeatedly or continually; -- usually with on or upon.Harpings upon old themes.” W. Irving.
[1913 Webster]

Harping on what I am,
Not what he knew I was.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

To harp on one string, to dwell upon one subject with disagreeable or wearisome persistence. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Harp
Harp, v. t. To play on, as a harp; to play (a tune) on the harp; to develop or give expression to by skill and art; to sound forth as from a harp; to hit upon.
[1913 Webster]

Thou 'st harped my fear aright. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Harpa
Har"pa (här"p&adot_;), n. [L., harp.] (Zool.) A genus of marine univalve shells; the harp shells; -- so called from the form of the shells, and their ornamental ribs.
[1913 Webster]

Harpagon
Har"pa*gon (-g&obreve_;n), n. [L. harpago, Gr. "arpa`gh hook, rake.] A grappling iron. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Harper
Harp"er (härp"&etilde_;r), n. [AS. hearpere.] 1. A player on the harp; a minstrel.
[1913 Webster]

The murmuring pines and the hemlocks . . .
Stand like harpers hoar, with beards that rest on their bosoms.
Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

2. A brass coin bearing the emblem of a harp, -- formerly current in Ireland. B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

Harping
Harp"ing (härp"&ibreve_;ng), a. Pertaining to the harp; as, harping symphonies. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Harping iron
Harp"ing i`ron (ī`ŭrn). [F. harper to grasp strongly. See Harpoon.] A harpoon. Evelyn.
[1913 Webster]

Harpings
Harp"ings (-&ibreve_;ngz), n. pl. (Naut.) The fore parts of the wales, which encompass the bow of a vessel, and are fastened to the stem. [Written also harpins.] Totten.
[1913 Webster]

Harpist
Harp"ist, n. [Cf. F. harpiste.] A player on the harp; a harper. W. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Harpoon
Har*poon" (här*p&oomacr_;n"), n. [F. harpon, LL. harpo, perh. of Ger. origin, fr. the harp; cf. F. harper to take and grasp strongly, harpe a dog's claw, harpin boathook (the sense of hook coming from the shape of the harp); but cf. also Gr. "a`rph the kite, sickle, and E. harpy. Cf. Harp.] A spear or javelin used to strike and kill large fish, as whales; a harping iron. It consists of a long shank, with a broad, flat, triangular head, sharpened at both edges, and is thrown by hand, or discharged from a gun.
[1913 Webster]

Harpoon fork, a kind of hayfork, consisting of a bar with hinged barbs at one end and a loop for a rope at the other end, used for lifting hay from the load by horse power. -- Harpoon gun, a gun used in the whale fishery for shooting the harpoon into a whale.
[1913 Webster]

Harpoon
Har*poon", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Harpooned (-p&oomacr_;nd"); p. pr. & vb. n. Harpooning.] To strike, catch, or kill with a harpoon.
[1913 Webster]

Harpooneer
Har`poon*eer" (här`p&oomacr_;n*ēr"), n. An harpooner. Crabb.
[1913 Webster]

Harpooner
Har*poon"er (här*p&oomacr_;n"&etilde_;r), n. [Cf. F. harponneur.] One who throws the harpoon.
[1913 Webster]

Harpress
Harp"ress (härp"r&ebreve_;s), n. A female harper. [R.] Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Harpsichon
Harp"si*chon (härp"s&ibreve_;*k&obreve_;n), n. A harpsichord. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Harpsichord
Harp"si*chord (-kôrd), n. [OF. harpechorde, in which the harpe is of German origin. See Harp, and Chord.] (Mus.) A harp-shaped instrument of music set horizontally on legs, like the grand piano, with strings of wire, played by the fingers, by means of keys provided with quills, instead of hammers, for striking the strings. It is now superseded by the piano.
[1913 Webster]

harpsichordist
harpsichordist n. someone who plays the harpsichord.
[WordNet 1.5]

harpulla
harpulla n. A fast-growing tree of India and East Indies (Harpullia cupanioides) yielding a wood used especially for building.
Syn. -- Harpullia cupanioides.
[WordNet 1.5]

harpullia
harpullia n. any of various tree of the genus Harpullia.
[WordNet 1.5]

Harpy
Har"py (här"p&ybreve_;), n.; pl. Harpies (-p&ibreve_;z). [F. harpie, L. harpyia, Gr. "a`rpyia, from the root of "arpa`zein to snatch, to seize. Cf. Rapacious.] 1. (Gr. Myth.) A fabulous winged monster, ravenous and filthy, having the face of a woman and the body of a vulture, with long claws, and the face pale with hunger. Some writers mention two, others three.
[1913 Webster]

Both table and provisions vanished quite.
With sound of harpies' wings and talons heard.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. One who is rapacious or ravenous; an extortioner.
[1913 Webster]

The harpies about all pocket the pool. Goldsmith.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Zool.) (a) The European moor buzzard or marsh harrier (Circus aeruginosus). (b) A large and powerful, double-crested, short-winged American eagle (Thrasaëtus harpyia). It ranges from Texas to Brazil.
[1913 Webster]

Harpy bat (Zool.) (a) An East Indian fruit bat of the genus Harpyia (esp. Harpyia cephalotes), having prominent, tubular nostrils. (b) A small, insectivorous Indian bat (Harpiocephalus harpia). -- Harpy fly (Zool.), the house fly.
[1913 Webster]

Harquebuse
Harquebus
{ Har"que*bus Har"que*buse } (här"kw&euptack_;*bŭs), n. [See Arquebus.] A firearm with match holder, trigger, and tumbler, made in the second half of the 15th century. The barrel was about forty inches long. A form of the harquebus was subsequently called arquebus with matchlock.
[1913 Webster]

Harrage
Har"rage (hăr"r&auptack_;j; 48) v. t. [See Harry.] To harass; to plunder from. [Obs.] Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

Harre
Har"re (här"r&eitalic_;), n. [OE., fr. AS. heorr, híor.] A hinge. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Harridan
Har"ri*dan (hăr"r&ibreve_;*d&aitalic_;n), n. [F. haridelle a worn-out horse, jade.] A worn-out strumpet; a vixenish woman; a hag.
[1913 Webster]

Such a weak, watery, wicked old harridan, substituted for the pretty creature I had been used to see. De Quincey.
[1913 Webster]

harried
harried adj. same as harassed.
Syn. -- annoyed, harassed, pestered.
[WordNet 1.5]

Harrier
Har"ri*er (-&etilde_;r), n. [From Hare, n.] (Zool.) One of a small breed of hounds, used for hunting hares. [Written also harier.]
[1913 Webster]

Harrier
Har"ri*er, n. [From Harry.] 1. One who harries.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) One of several species of hawks or buzzards of the genus Circus which fly low and harry small animals or birds, -- as the European marsh harrier (Circus aeruginosus), and the hen harrier (Circus cyaneus).
[1913 Webster]

Harrier hawk (Zool.), one of several species of American hawks of the genus Micrastur.
[1913 Webster]

Harrisia
Harrisia prop. n. (Bot.) A genus of slender often treelike spiny cacti with solitary showy nocturnal white or pink flowers; Florida and Caribbean to South America.
Syn. -- genus Harrisia.
[WordNet 1.5]

Harrow
Har"row (hăr"r&ouptack_;), n. [OE. harowe, harwe, AS. hearge; cf. D. hark rake, G. harke, Icel. herfi harrow, Dan. harve, Sw. harf. √16.] 1. An implement of agriculture, usually formed of pieces of timber or metal crossing each other, and set with iron or wooden teeth. It is drawn over plowed land to level it and break the clods, to stir the soil and make it fine, or to cover seed when sown.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Mil.) An obstacle formed by turning an ordinary harrow upside down, the frame being buried.
[1913 Webster]

Bush harrow, a kind of light harrow made of bushes, for harrowing grass lands and covering seeds, or to finish the work of a toothed harrow. -- Drill harrow. See under 6th Drill. -- Under the harrow, subjected to actual torture with a toothed instrument, or to great affliction or oppression.
[1913 Webster]

Harrow
Har"row, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Harrowed (hăr"r&ouptack_;d); p. pr. & vb. n. Harrowing.] [OE. harowen, harwen; cf. Dan. harve. See Harrow, n.] 1. To draw a harrow over, as for the purpose of breaking clods and leveling the surface, or for covering seed; as, to harrow land.
[1913 Webster]

Will he harrow the valleys after thee? Job xxxix. 10.
[1913 Webster]

2. To break or tear, as with a harrow; to wound; to lacerate; to torment or distress; to vex.
[1913 Webster]

My aged muscles harrowed up with whips. Rowe.
[1913 Webster]

I could a tale unfold, whose lightest word
Would harrow up thy soul.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Harrow
Har"row, interj. [OF. harau, haro; fr. OHG. hara, hera, herot, or fr. OS. herod hither, akin to E. here.] Help! Halloo! An exclamation of distress; a call for succor; -- the ancient Norman hue and cry.Harrow and well away!” Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Harrow! alas! here lies my fellow slain. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Harrow
Har"row, v. t. [See Harry.] To pillage; to harry; to oppress. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Meaning thereby to harrow his people. Bacon
[1913 Webster]

Harrower
Har"row*er (hăr"r&ouptack_;*&etilde_;r), n. One who harrows.
[1913 Webster]

Harrower
Har"row*er, n. One who harries. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Harry
Har"ry (-r&ybreve_;), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Harried (-r&ibreve_;d); p. pr. & vb. n. Harrying.] [OE. harwen, herien, her&yogh_;ien, AS. hergian to act as an army, to ravage, plunder, fr. here army; akin to G. heer, Icel. herr, Goth. harjis, and Lith. karas war. Cf. Harbor, Herald, Heriot.]
[1913 Webster]

1. To strip; to pillage; to lay waste; as, the Northmen came several times and harried the land.
[1913 Webster]

To harry this beautiful region. W. Irving.
[1913 Webster]

A red squirrel had harried the nest of a wood thrush. J. Burroughs.
[1913 Webster]

2. To agitate; to worry; to harrow; to harass. Shak.

Syn. -- To ravage; plunder; pillage; lay waste; vex; tease; worry; annoy; harass.
[1913 Webster]

Harry
Har"ry, v. i. To make a predatory incursion; to plunder or lay waste. [Obs.] Beau. & Fl.
[1913 Webster]

Harry
Har"ry (hăr"r&ybreve_;), prop. n. Harold or Henry; a nickname.
[PJC]

Harsh
Harsh (härsh), a. [Compar. Harsher (härsh"&etilde_;r); superl. Harshest.] [OE. harsk; akin to G. harsch, Dan. harsk rancid, Sw. härsk; from the same source as E. hard. See Hard, a.] 1. Rough; disagreeable; grating; esp.: (a) disagreeable to the touch.Harsh sand.” Boyle. (b) disagreeable to the taste. “Berries harsh and crude.” Milton. (c) disagreeable to the ear.Harsh din.” Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Unpleasant and repulsive to the sensibilities; austere; crabbed; morose; abusive; abusive; severe; rough.
[1913 Webster]

Clarence is so harsh, so blunt. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Though harsh the precept, yet the preacher charmed. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Painting, Drawing, etc.) Having violent contrasts of color, or of light and shade; lacking in harmony.
[1913 Webster]

Harshly
Harsh"ly, adv. In a harsh manner; gratingly; roughly; rudely.
[1913 Webster]

'T will sound harshly in her ears. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Harshness
Harsh"ness, n. The quality or state of being harsh.
[1913 Webster]

O, she is
Ten times more gentle than her father's crabbed,
And he's composed of harshness.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

'Tis not enough no harshness gives offense,
The sound must seem an echo to the sense.
Pope.

Syn. -- Acrimony; roughness; sternness; asperity; tartness. See Acrimony.
[1913 Webster]

Harslet
Hars"let (härs"l&ebreve_;t), n. See Haslet.
[1913 Webster]

Hart
Hart (härt), n. [OE. hart, hert, heort, AS. heort, heorot; akin to D. hert, OHG. hiruz, hirz, G. hirsch, Icel. hjörtr, Dan. & Sw. hjort, L. cervus, and prob. to Gr. kerao`s horned, ke`ras horn. √230. See Horn.] (Zool.) A stag; the male of the red deer. See the Note under Buck.
[1913 Webster]

Goodliest of all the forest, hart and hind. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

hartebeest
hartebeest n. 1. large African antelope with lyre-shaped horns that curve backward.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hartebeest
Hartbeest
Hart"beest`, Har"te*beest` (-bēst`), n. [D. hertebeest. See Hart, and Beast.] 1. (Zool.) A large South African antelope (Alcelaphus caama), formerly much more abundant than it is now. The face and legs are marked with black, the rump with white. [Written also hartebeest, and hartebest.]
[1913 Webster]

2. Any anteleope of the genus Alcelaphus and certain species of Darnaliscus.
[PJC]

Harten
Hart"en (-'n), v. t. To hearten; to encourage; to incite. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Hartford
Hart"ford (härt"f&etilde_;rd), n. The Hartford grape, a variety of grape first raised at Hartford, Connecticut, from the Northern fox grape. Its large dark-colored berries ripen earlier than those of most other kinds.
[1913 Webster]

Hart's clover
Hart's" clo`ver (härts" klō`v&etilde_;r). (Bot.) Melilot or sweet clover. See Melilot.
[1913 Webster]

Hart's-ear
Hart's"-ear` (-ēr`), n. (Bot.) An Asiatic species of Cacalia (Cacalia Kleinia), used medicinally in India.
[1913 Webster]

Hartshorn
Harts"horn` (-hôrn`), n. 1. The horn or antler of the hart, or male red deer.
[1913 Webster]

2. Spirits of hartshorn (see below); volatile salts.
[1913 Webster]

Hartshorn plantain (Bot.), an annual species of plantain (Plantago Coronopus); -- called also buck's-horn. Booth. -- Hartshorn shavings, originally taken from the horns of harts, are now obtained chiefly by planing down the bones of calves. They afford a kind of jelly. Hebert. -- Salt of hartshorn (Chem.), an impure solid carbonate of ammonia, obtained by the destructive distillation of hartshorn, or any kind of bone; volatile salts. Brande & C.-- Spirits of hartshorn (Chem.), a solution of ammonia in water; -- so called because formerly obtained from hartshorn shavings by destructive distillation. Similar ammoniacal solutions from other sources have received the same name.
[1913 Webster]

Hart's-tongue
Hart's"-tongue` (härts"tŭng`), n. (Bot.) (a) A common British fern (Scolopendrium vulgare), rare in America. (b) A West Indian fern, the Polypodium Phyllitidis of Linnaeus. It is also found in Florida.
[1913 Webster]

Hartwort
Hart"wort` (härt"wûrt`), n. (Bot.) A coarse umbelliferous plant of Europe (Tordylium maximum).
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The name is often vaguely given to other plants of the same order, as species of Seseli and Bupleurum.
[1913 Webster]

Harum-scarum
Har"um-scar"um (hâr"ŭm*skâr"ŭm), a. [Cf. hare,v. t., and scare, v. t.] Wild; giddy; flighty; rash; thoughtless. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

They had a quarrel with Sir Thomas Newcome's own son, a harum-scarum lad. Thackeray.
[1913 Webster]

Haruspication
Ha*rus`pi*ca"tion (h&adot_;*rŭs`p&ibreve_;*kā"shŭn), n. See Haruspicy. Tylor.
[1913 Webster]

Haruspice
Ha*rus"pice (h&adot_;*rŭs"p&ibreve_;s), n. [F., fr. L. haruspex.] A diviner of ancient Rome. Same as Aruspice.
[1913 Webster]

Haruspicy
Ha*rus"pi*cy (-p&ibreve_;*s&ybreve_;), n. The art or practices of haruspices. See Aruspicy.
[1913 Webster]

Harvest
Har"vest (här"v&ebreve_;st), n. [OE. harvest, hervest, AS. hærfest autumn; akin to LG. harfst, D. herfst, OHG. herbist, G. herbst, and prob. to L. carpere to pluck, Gr. karpo`s fruit. Cf. Carpet.] 1. The gathering of a crop of any kind; the ingathering of the crops; also, the season of gathering grain and fruits, late summer or early autumn.
[1913 Webster]

Seedtime and harvest . . . shall not cease. Gen. viii. 22.
[1913 Webster]

At harvest, when corn is ripe. Tyndale.
[1913 Webster]

2. That which is reaped or ready to be reaped or gathered; a crop, as of grain (wheat, maize, etc.), or fruit.
[1913 Webster]

Put ye in the sickle, for the harvest is ripe. Joel iii. 13.
[1913 Webster]

To glean the broken ears after the man
That the main harvest reaps.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. The product or result of any exertion or labor; gain; reward.
[1913 Webster]

The pope's principal harvest was in the jubilee. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

The harvest of a quiet eye. Wordsworth.
[1913 Webster]

Harvest fish (Zool.), a marine fish of the Southern United States (Stromateus alepidotus); -- called whiting in Virginia. Also applied to the dollar fish. -- Harvest fly (Zool.), an hemipterous insect of the genus Cicada, often called locust. See Cicada. -- Harvest lord, the head reaper at a harvest. [Obs.] Tusser. -- Harvest mite (Zool.), a minute European mite (Leptus autumnalis), of a bright crimson color, which is troublesome by penetrating the skin of man and domestic animals; -- called also harvest louse, and harvest bug. -- Harvest moon, the moon near the full at the time of harvest in England, or about the autumnal equinox, when, by reason of the small angle that is made by the moon's orbit with the horizon, it rises nearly at the same hour for several days. -- Harvest mouse (Zool.), a very small European field mouse (Mus minutus). It builds a globular nest on the stems of wheat and other plants. -- Harvest queen, an image representing Ceres, formerly carried about on the last day of harvest. Milton. -- Harvest spider. (Zool.) See Daddy longlegs.
[1913 Webster]

Harvest
Har"vest, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Harvested; p. pr. & vb. n. Harvesting.] To reap or gather, as any crop.
[1913 Webster]

Harvester
Har"vest*er (-&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who harvests; a machine for cutting and gathering grain; a reaper.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) A harvesting ant.
[1913 Webster]

Harvest-home
Har"vest-home" (-hōm), n. 1. The gathering and bringing home of the harvest; the time of harvest.
[1913 Webster]

Showed like a stubble land at harvest-home. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. The song sung by reapers at the feast made at the close of the harvest; the feast itself. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. A service of thanksgiving, at harvest time, in the Church of England and in the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States.
[1913 Webster]

4. The opportunity of gathering treasure. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Harvesting
Har"vest*ing, a. & n., from Harvest, v. t.
[1913 Webster]

Harvesting ant (Zool.), any species of ant which gathers and stores up seeds for food. Many species are known.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The species found in Southern Europe and Palestine are Aphenogaster structor and Aphenogaster barbara; that of Texas, called agricultural ant, is Pogonomyrmex barbatus or Myrmica molifaciens; that of Florida is Pogonomyrmex crudelis. See Agricultural ant, under Agricultural.
[1913 Webster]

Harvestless
Har"vest*less, a. Without harvest; lacking in crops; barren.Harvestless autumns.” Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

harvest-lice
harvest-lice n. An erect perennial Old World herb (Agrimonia eupatoria) of dry grassy habitats.
Syn. -- Agrimonia eupatoria.
[WordNet 1.5]

Harvestman
Har"vest*man (-m&aitalic_;n), n.; pl. Harvestmen (-m&eitalic_;n). 1. A man engaged in harvesting. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) See Daddy longlegs, 1.
[1913 Webster]

Harvestry
Har"vest*ry (-r&ybreve_;), n. The act of harvesting; also, that which is harvested. Swinburne.
[1913 Webster]

Harvey process
Har"vey proc"ess (?). (Metal.) A process of hardening the face of steel, as armor plates, invented by Hayward A. Harvey of New Jersey, consisting in the additional carburizing of the face of a piece of low carbon steel by subjecting it to the action of carbon under long-continued pressure at a very high heat, and then to a violent chilling, as by a spray of cold water. This process gives an armor plate a thick surface of extreme hardness supported by material gradually decreasing in hardness to the unaltered soft steel at the back.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hary
Har"y (hăr"&ybreve_;), v. t. [Cf. OF. harier to harass, or E. harry, v. t.] To draw; to drag; to carry off by violence. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Has
Has (hăz), 3d pers. sing. pres. of Have.
[1913 Webster]

Hasard
Has"ard (-&etilde_;rd), n. Hazard. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hase
Hase (hāz), v. t. [Obs.] See Haze, v. t.
[1913 Webster]

Hash
Hash (hăsh), n. [Formerly hachey, hachee, F. hachis, fr. hacher to hash; of German origin; cf. G. hippe sickle, OHG. hippa, for happia. Cf. Hatchet.] 1. That which is hashed or chopped up; meat and vegetables, especially such as have been already cooked, chopped into small pieces and mixed.
[1913 Webster]

2. A new mixture of old matter; a second preparation or exhibition.
[1913 Webster]

I can not bear elections, and still less the hash of them over again in a first session. Walpole.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hashish. [slang]
[PJC]

Hash
Hash, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hashed (hăsht); p. pr. & vb. n. Hashing.] [From Hash, n.: cf. F. hacher to hash.] To chop into small pieces; to mince and mix; as, to hash meat. Hudibras.

Hashish
Hasheesh
{ Hash"eesh Hash"ish } (hăsh"ēsh), n. [Ar. hashīsh.] A slightly acrid gum resin produced by the common hemp (Cannabis sativa), of the variety Indica, when cultivated in a warm climate; also, the tops of the plant, from which the resinous product is obtained. It is narcotic, and has long been used in the East for its intoxicating effect. The active psychoactive principle has been identified as tetrahydrocannabinol. See Bhang, and Ganja.
Syn. -- hash.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

hashmark
hash"mark` n. (Mil.) an insignia worn on the uniform to indicate years of service.
Syn. -- service stripe, hash mark.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hask
Hask (hăsk), n. [See Hassock.] A basket made of rushes or flags, as for carrying fish. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Haslet
Has"let (hăs"l&ebreve_;t), n. [F. hâtelettes broil, for hastelettes, fr. F. haste spit; cf. L. hasta spear, and also OHG. harst gridiron.] The edible viscera, as the heart, liver, etc., of a beast, esp. of a hog. [Written also harslet.]
[1913 Webster]

Hasp
Hasp (h&adot_;sp), n. [OE. hasp, hesp, AS. hæpse; akin to G. haspe, häspe, Sw. & Dan. haspe, Icel. hespa.]
[1913 Webster]

1. A clasp, especially a metal strap permanently fast at one end to a staple or pin, while the other passes over a staple, and is fastened by a padlock or a pin; also, a metallic hook for fastening a door.
[1913 Webster]

2. A spindle to wind yarn, thread, or silk on.
[1913 Webster]

3. An instrument for cutting the surface of grass land; a scarifier.
[1913 Webster]

Hasp
Hasp, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hasped (h&adot_;spt); p. pr. & vb. n. Hasping.] [AS. hæpsian.] To shut or fasten with a hasp.
[1913 Webster]

hassle
hassle n. 1. An inconvenience caused by difficulties encountered trying to accomplish a task; as, finding a parking place in midtown is always a hassle.
Syn. -- fuss, trouble, bother.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. disorderly fighting; an angry dispute or disturbance. [wns=2]
Syn. -- hassle, scuffle, tussle, rough-and-tumble.
[WordNet 1.5]

hassle
hassle v. i. 1. to dispute or quarrel, often over petty disagreements.
[PJC]

2. To expend excessive time and energy trying to accomplish a task.
[PJC]

hassle
hassle v. t. to repeatedly annoy; as, He is known to hassle his staff when he is overworked.
Syn. -- harass, harry, chivy, chivvy, chevy, chevvy, beset, plague, molest, provoke.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hassock
Has"sock (hăs"sŭk), n. [Scot. hassock, hassik, a besom, anything bushy, a large, round turf used as a seat, OE. hassok sedgy ground, W. hesgog sedgy, hesg sedge, rushes; cf. Ir. seisg, and E. sedge.] 1. A rank tuft of bog grass; a tussock. Forby.
[1913 Webster]

2. A small stuffed cushion or footstool, for kneeling on in church, or for home use.
[1913 Webster]

And knees and hassocks are well nigh divorced. Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

Hast
Hast (hăst), 2d pers. sing. pres. of Have, contr. of havest. [Archaic]

Hastated
Hastate
{ Has"tate (hăs"t&auptack_;t), Has"ta*ted (hās"t&auptack_;*t&ebreve_;d), } a. [L. hastatus, fr. hasta spear. Cf. Gad, n.] Shaped like the head of a halberd; triangular, with the basal angles or lobes spreading; as, a hastate leaf.
[1913 Webster]

Haste
Haste (hāst), n. [OE. hast; akin to D. haast, G., Dan., Sw., & OFries. hast, cf. OF. haste, F. hâte (of German origin); all perh. fr. the root of E. hate in a earlier sense of, to pursue. See Hate.] 1. Celerity of motion; speed; swiftness; dispatch; expedition; -- applied only to voluntary beings, as men and other animals.
[1913 Webster]

The king's business required haste. 1 Sam. xxi. 8.
[1913 Webster]

2. The state of being urged or pressed by business; hurry; urgency; sudden excitement of feeling or passion; precipitance; vehemence.
[1913 Webster]

I said in my haste, All men are liars. Ps. cxvi. 11.
[1913 Webster]

To make haste, to hasten.

Syn. -- Speed; quickness; nimbleness; swiftness; expedition; dispatch; hurry; precipitance; vehemence; precipitation. -- Haste, Hurry, Speed, Dispatch. Haste denotes quickness of action and a strong desire for getting on; hurry includes a confusion and want of collected thought not implied in haste; speed denotes the actual progress which is made; dispatch, the promptitude and rapidity with which things are done. A man may properly be in haste, but never in a hurry. Speed usually secures dispatch.
[1913 Webster]

Haste
Haste, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Hasted; p. pr. & vb. n. Hasting.] [OE. hasten; akin to G. hasten, D. haasten, Dan. haste, Sw. hasta, OF. haster, F. hâter. See Haste, n.] To hasten; to hurry. [Archaic]
[1913 Webster]

I 'll haste the writer. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

They were troubled and hasted away. Ps. xlviii. 5.
[1913 Webster]

Hasten
Has"ten (hās"'n), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hastened (hās"'nd); p. pr. & vb. n. Hastening (hās"'n*&ibreve_;ng).] To press; to drive or urge forward; to push on; to precipitate; to accelerate the movement of; to expedite; to hurry.
[1913 Webster]

I would hasten my escape from the windy storm. Ps. lv. 8.
[1913 Webster]

Hasten
Has"ten, v. i. To move with celerity; to be rapid in motion; to act speedily or quickly; to go quickly.
[1913 Webster]

I hastened to the spot whence the noise came. De Foe.
[1913 Webster]

Hastener
Has"ten*er (-&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who hastens.
[1913 Webster]

2. That which hastens; especially, a stand or reflector used for confining the heat of the fire to meat while roasting before it.
[1913 Webster]

Hastif
Has"tif (hās"t&ibreve_;f), a. [OF. See Hastive.] Hasty. [Obs.] Chaucer. -- Has"tif*ly, adv. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hastile
Has"tile (hăs"tīl or -t&ibreve_;l), a. [L. hasta a spear.] (Bot.) Same as Hastate. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Hastily
Has"ti*ly (hās"t&ibreve_;*l&ybreve_;), adv. [From Hasty.] 1. In haste; with speed or quickness; speedily; nimbly.
[1913 Webster]

2. Without due reflection; precipitately; rashly.
[1913 Webster]

We hastily engaged in the war. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

3. Passionately; impatiently. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hastiness
Has"ti*ness, n. The quality or state of being hasty; haste; precipitation; rashness; quickness of temper.
[1913 Webster]

Hastings
Has"tings (-t&ibreve_;ngz), n. pl. [From Haste, v.] Early fruit or vegetables; especially, early pease. Mortimer.
[1913 Webster]

Hastings sands
Has"tings sands` (săndz`). (Geol.) The lower group of the Wealden formation; -- so called from its development around Hastings, in Sussex, England.
[1913 Webster]

Hastive
Has"tive (-t&ibreve_;v), a. [OF. hastif. See Haste, n., and cf. Hastif.] Forward; early; -- said of fruits. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hasty
Has"ty (hās"t&ybreve_;), a. [Compar. Hastier (-t&ibreve_;*&etilde_;r); superl. Hastiest.] [Akin to D. haastig, G., Sw., & Dan. hastig. See Haste, n.] 1. Involving haste; done, made, etc., in haste; as, a hasty retreat; a hasty sketch.
[1913 Webster]

2. Demanding haste or immediate action. [R.] Chaucer.Hasty employment.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. Moving or acting with haste or in a hurry; hurrying; hence, acting without deliberation; precipitate; rash; easily excited; eager.
[1913 Webster]

Seest thou a man that is hasty in his words? There is more hope of a fool than of him. Prov. xxix. 20.
[1913 Webster]

The hasty multitude
Admiring entered.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Be not hasty to go out of his sight. Eccl. viii. 3.
[1913 Webster]

4. Made or reached without deliberation or due caution; as, a hasty conjecture, inference, conclusion, etc., a hasty resolution.
[1913 Webster]

5. Proceeding from, or indicating, a quick temper.
[1913 Webster]

Take no unkindness of his hasty words. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

6. Forward; early; first ripe. [Obs.] “As the hasty fruit before the summer.” Is. xxviii. 4.
[1913 Webster]

Hasty pudding
Has"ty pud"ding (hās"t&ybreve_; p&usdot_;d"d&ibreve_;ng). 1. A thick batter pudding made of Indian meal stirred into boiling water; mush. [U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

2. A batter or pudding made of flour or oatmeal, stirred into boiling water or milk. [Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Hat
Hat (hät), a. Hot. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hat
Hat, sing. pres. of Hote to be called. Cf. Hatte. [Obs.] “That one hat abstinence.” Piers Plowman.
[1913 Webster]

Hat
Hat (hăt), n. [AS. hæt, hætt; akin to Dan. hat, Sw. hatt, Icel. hattr a hat, höttr hood, D. hoed hat, G. hut, OHG. huot, and prob. to L. cassis helmet. √13. Cf. Hood.] A covering for the head; esp., one with a crown and brim, made of various materials, and worn by men or women for protecting the head from the sun or weather, or for ornament.
[1913 Webster]

Hat block, a block on which hats are formed or dressed. -- To pass around the hat, to take up a collection of voluntary contributions, which are often received in a hat. [Colloq.] Lowell.
[1913 Webster]

Hatable
Hat"a*ble (hāt"&adot_;*b'l), a. [From Hate.] Capable of being, or deserving to be, hated; odious; detestable.
[1913 Webster]

Hatband
Hat"band` (hăt"bănd`), n. A band round the crown of a hat; sometimes, a band of black cloth, crape, etc., worn as a badge of mourning.
[1913 Webster]

Hatbox
Hat"box` (-b&obreve_;ks`), n. A box for a hat.
[1913 Webster]

Hatch
Hatch (hăch), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hatched (hăcht); p. pr. & vb. n. Hatching.] [F. hacher to chop, hack. See Hash.] 1. To cross with lines in a peculiar manner in drawing and engraving. See Hatching.
[1913 Webster]

Shall win this sword, silvered and hatched. Chapman.
[1913 Webster]

Those hatching strokes of the pencil. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. To cross; to spot; to stain; to steep. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

His weapon hatched in blood. Beau. & Fl.
[1913 Webster]

Hatch
Hatch, v. t. [OE. hacchen, hetchen; akin to G. hecken, Dan. hekke; cf. MHG. hagen bull; perh. akin to E. hatch a half door, and originally meaning, to produce under a hatch. √12.] 1. To produce, as young, from an egg or eggs by incubation, or by artificial heat; to produce young from (eggs); as, the young when hatched. Paley.
[1913 Webster]

As the partridge sitteth on eggs, and hatcheth them not. Jer. xvii. 11.
[1913 Webster]

For the hens do not sit upon the eggs; but by keeping them in a certain equal heat they [the husbandmen] bring life into them and hatch them. Robynson (More's Utopia).
[1913 Webster]

2. To contrive or plot; to form by meditation, and bring into being; to originate and produce; to concoct; as, to hatch mischief; to hatch heresy. Hooker.
[1913 Webster]

Fancies hatched
In silken-folded idleness.
Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Hatch
Hatch, v. i. To produce young; -- said of eggs; to come forth from the egg; -- said of the young of birds, fishes, insects, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Hatch
Hatch, n. 1. The act of hatching.
[1913 Webster]

2. Development; disclosure; discovery. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. The chickens produced at once or by one incubation; a brood.
[1913 Webster]

Hatch
Hatch, n. [OE. hacche, AS. hæc, cf. haca the bar of a door, D. hek gate, Sw. häck coop, rack, Dan. hekke manger, rack. Prob. akin to E. hook, and first used of something made of pieces fastened together. Cf. Heck, Hack a frame.] 1. A door with an opening over it; a half door, sometimes set with spikes on the upper edge.
[1913 Webster]

In at the window, or else o'er the hatch. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. A frame or weir in a river, for catching fish.
[1913 Webster]

3. A flood gate; a sluice gate. Ainsworth.
[1913 Webster]

4. A bedstead. [Scot.] Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

5. An opening in the deck of a vessel or floor of a warehouse which serves as a passageway or hoistway; a hatchway; also; a cover or door, or one of the covers used in closing such an opening.
[1913 Webster]

6. (Mining) An opening into, or in search of, a mine.
[1913 Webster]

Booby hatch, Buttery hatch, Companion hatch, etc. See under Booby, Buttery, etc. -- To batten down the hatches (Naut.), to lay tarpaulins over them, and secure them with battens. -- To be under hatches, to be confined below in a vessel; to be under arrest, or in slavery, distress, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Hatch
Hatch, v. t. To close with a hatch or hatches.
[1913 Webster]

'T were not amiss to keep our door hatched. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hatch-boat
Hatch"-boat` (hăch"bōt`), n. (Naut.) A vessel whose deck consists almost wholly of movable hatches; -- used mostly in the fisheries.
[1913 Webster]

hatched
hatched adj. [p. p. from hatch, v. i.] produced from an egg.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hatchel
Hatch"el (-&ebreve_;l; 277), n. [OE. hechele, hekele; akin to D. hekel, G. hechel, Dan. hegle, Sw. häkla, and prob. to E. hook. See Hook, and cf. Hackle, Heckle.] An instrument with long iron teeth set in a board, for cleansing flax or hemp from the tow, hards, or coarse part; a kind of large comb; -- called also hackle and heckle.
[1913 Webster]

Hatchel
Hatch"el, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hatcheled or Hatchelled (-&ebreve_;ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Hatcheling or Hatchelling.] [OE. hechelen, hekelen; akin to D. hekelen, G. hecheln, Dan. hegle, Sw. häkla. See Hatchel, n.] 1. To draw through the teeth of a hatchel, as flax or hemp, so as to separate the coarse and refuse parts from the fine, fibrous parts.
[1913 Webster]

2. To tease; to worry; to torment. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Hatcheler
Hatch"el*er (-&etilde_;r), n. One who uses a hatchel.
[1913 Webster]

Hatcher
Hatch"er (-&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who hatches, or that which hatches; a hatching apparatus; an incubator.
[1913 Webster]

2. One who contrives or originates; a plotter.
[1913 Webster]

A great hatcher and breeder of business. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Hatchery
Hatch"er*y (-&ybreve_;), n. A house for hatching fish, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Hatchet
Hatch"et (-&ebreve_;t), n. [F. hachette, dim. of hache ax. See 1st Hatch, Hash.] 1. A small ax with a short handle, to be used with one hand.
[1913 Webster]

2. Specifically, a tomahawk.
[1913 Webster]

Buried was the bloody hatchet. Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

hatchet face, a thin, sharp face, like the edge of a hatchet; hence: hatchet-faced, sharp-visaged. Dryden. -- To bury the hatchet, to make peace or become reconciled. -- To take up the hatchet, to make or declare war. The last two phrases are derived from the practice of the American Indians.

hatchet man
hatchet man n. 1. A person hired to murder or physically attack another; a hit man.
[PJC]

2. A person who deliberately tries to ruin the reputation of another, often unscrupulously, by slander or other malicious communication, often with a political motive, and sometimes for pay.
[PJC]

Hatchettite
Hatchettine
{ Hatch"et*tine (hăch"&ebreve_;t*t&ibreve_;n), Hatch"et*tite (-t&ibreve_;t), } n. [Named after the discoverer, Charles Hatchett.] (Min.) Mineral tallow; a waxy or spermaceti-like substance, commonly of a greenish yellow color.
[1913 Webster]

Hatching
Hatch"ing, n. [See 1st Hatch.] A mode of execution in engraving, drawing, and miniature painting, in which shading is produced by lines crossing each other at angles more or less acute; -- called also crosshatching.
[1913 Webster]

Hatchment
Hatch"ment (-m&eitalic_;nt), n. [Corrupt. fr. achievement.]
[1913 Webster]

1. (Her.) A sort of panel, upon which the arms of a deceased person are temporarily displayed, -- usually on the walls of his dwelling. It is lozenge-shaped or square, but is hung cornerwise. It is used in England as a means of giving public notification of the death of the deceased, his or her rank, whether married, widower, widow, etc. Called also achievement.
[1913 Webster]

His obscure funeral;
No trophy, sword, or hatchment o'er his bones.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. A sword or other mark of the profession of arms; in general, a mark of dignity.
[1913 Webster]

Let there be deducted, out of our main potation,
Five marks in hatchments to adorn this thigh.
Beau. & Fl.
[1913 Webster]

Hatchure
Hatch"ure (-&uuptack_;r; 135), n. Same as Hachure.
[1913 Webster]

Hatchway
Hatch"way` (-wā`), n. A square or oblong opening in a deck or floor, affording passage from one deck or story to another; the entrance to a cellar.
[1913 Webster]

Hate
Hate (hāt), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hated; p. pr. & vb. n. Hating.] [OE. haten, hatien, AS. hatian; akin to OS. hatan, hatōn to be hostile to, D. haten to hate, OHG. hazzēn, hazzōn, G. hassen, Icel. & Sw. hata, Dan. hade, Goth. hatan, hatjan. √36. Cf. Hate, n., Heinous.]
[1913 Webster]

1. To have a great aversion to, with a strong desire that evil should befall the person toward whom the feeling is directed; to dislike intensely; to detest; as, to hate one's enemies; to hate hypocrisy.
[1913 Webster]

Whosoever hateth his brother is a murderer. 1 John iii. 15.
[1913 Webster]

2. To be very unwilling; followed by an infinitive, or a substantive clause with that; as, to hate to get into debt; to hate that anything should be wasted.
[1913 Webster]

I hate that he should linger here. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Script.) To love less, relatively. Luke xiv. 26.

Syn. -- To Hate, Abhor, Detest, Abominate, Loathe. Hate is the generic word, and implies that one is inflamed with extreme dislike. We abhor what is deeply repugnant to our sensibilities or feelings. We detest what contradicts so utterly our principles and moral sentiments that we feel bound to lift up our voice against it. What we abominate does equal violence to our moral and religious sentiments. What we loathe is offensive to our own nature, and excites unmingled disgust. Our Savior is said to have hated the deeds of the Nicolaitanes; his language shows that he loathed the lukewarmness of the Laodiceans; he detested the hypocrisy of the scribes and Pharisees; he abhorred the suggestions of the tempter in the wilderness.
[1913 Webster]

Hate
Hate, n. [OE. hate, hete, AS. hete; akin to D. haat, G. hass, Icel. hatr, SW. hat, Dan. had, Goth. hatis. Cf. Hate, v.] Strong aversion coupled with desire that evil should befall the person toward whom the feeling is directed; as exercised toward things, intense dislike; hatred; detestation; -- opposed to love.
[1913 Webster]

For in a wink the false love turns to hate. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Hateful
Hate"ful (-f&usdot_;l), a. 1. Manifesting hate or hatred; malignant; malevolent. [Archaic or R.]
[1913 Webster]

And worse than death, to view with hateful eyes
His rival's conquest.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. Exciting or deserving great dislike, aversion, or disgust; odious.
[1913 Webster]

Unhappy, wretched, hateful day! Shak.

Syn. -- Odious; detestable; abominable; execrable; loathsome; abhorrent; repugnant; malevolent.

-- Hate"ful*ly, adv. -- Hate"ful*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Hatel
Hat"el (hāt"&ebreve_;l), a. Hateful; detestable. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

hatemonger
hatemonger n. one who arouses hatred for others by speech or writing.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hater
Hat"er (hāt"&etilde_;r), n. One who hates.
[1913 Webster]

An enemy to God, and a hater of all good. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Hath
Hath (hăth), v., 3d pers. sing. pres. of Have, contracted from haveth. Has. [Archaic.]
[1913 Webster]

What hath God wrought? Samuel F. B. Morse [The first message sent by telegraph, from Mr. Morse, at the chamber of the Supreme Court (then in the United States Capitol) to his assistant Albert Vail at the Mount Clair Depot in Baltimore in 1844. Mr. Morse allowed Annie Ellsworth, the daughter of a friend, to choose the words, which she took from Numbers xxiii. 23.]
[PJC]

Hatiora
Hatiora n. A small genus of South American epiphytic or lithophytic cacti.
Syn. -- genus Hatiora.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hatless
Hat"less (hăt"l&ebreve_;s), a. Having no hat.
[1913 Webster]

hatpin
hatpin n. a long sturdy pin used by women to secure a hat to their hair.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hatrack
Hat"rack` (hăt"răk`), n. A hatstand; hattree.
[1913 Webster]

Hatred
Ha"tred (hā"tr&ebreve_;d), n. [OE. hatred, hatreden. See Hate, and cf. Kindred.] Strong aversion; intense dislike; hate; an affection of the mind awakened by something regarded as evil.

Syn. -- Odium; ill will; enmity; hate; animosity; malevolence; rancor; malignity; detestation; loathing; abhorrence; repugnance; antipathy. See Odium.
[1913 Webster]

Hatstand
Hat"stand` (hăt"stănd`), n. A stand of wood or iron, with hooks or pegs upon which to hang hats, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Hatte
Hat"te (hät"t&eitalic_;), pres. & imp. sing. & pl. of Hote, to be called. See Hote. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

A full perilous place, purgatory it hatte. Piers Plowman.
[1913 Webster]

Hatted
Hat"ted (hăt"t&ebreve_;d), a. Covered with a hat.
[1913 Webster]

Hatter
Hat"ter (-t&etilde_;r), v. t. [Prov. E., to entangle; cf. LG. verhaddern, verheddern, verhiddern.] To tire or worry; -- with out. [Obs.] Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Hatter
Hat"ter, n. One who makes or sells hats.
[1913 Webster]

Hatteria
Hat*te"ri*a (hăt*tē"r&ibreve_;*&adot_;), n. [NL.] (Zool.) A New Zealand lizard, which, in anatomical character, differs widely from all other existing lizards. It is the only living representative of the order Rhynchocephala, of which many Mesozoic fossil species are known; -- called also Sphenodon, tuatara, and Tuatera.
[1913 Webster]

Hatting
Hat"ting (hăt"t&ibreve_;ng), n. The business of making hats; also, stuff for hats.
[1913 Webster]

Hatti-sherif
Hat"ti-sher`if (hăt"t&ibreve_;*sh&ebreve_;r`&ibreve_;f or hät"tē*sh&auptack_;*rēf"), n. [Turk., fr. Ar. khatt a writing + sherīf noble.] A irrevocable Turkish decree countersigned by the sultan.
[1913 Webster]

Hattree
Hat"tree` (hăt"trē`), n. A hatstand.
[1913 Webster]

Haubergeon
Hau*ber"ge*on (h&asuml_;*b&etilde_;r"j&euptack_;*&obreve_;n), n. See Habergeon.
[1913 Webster]

Hauberk
Hau"berk (h&asuml_;"b&etilde_;rk), n. [OF. hauberc, halberc, F. haubert, OHG. halsberc; hals neck + bergan to protect, G. bergen; akin to AS. healsbeorg, Icel. hālsbjörg. See Collar, and Bury, v. t.] A coat of mail; especially, the long coat of mail of the European Middle Ages, as contrasted with the habergeon, which is shorter and sometimes sleeveless. By old writers it is often used synonymously with habergeon. See Habergeon. [Written variously hauberg, hauberque, hawberk, etc.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Helm, nor hawberk's twisted mail. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Hauerite
Hau"er*ite (h&asuml_;"&etilde_;r*īt), n. [Named after Von Hauer, of Vienna.] (Min.) Native sulphide of manganese, a reddish brown or brownish black mineral.
[1913 Webster]

Haugh
Haugh (h&asuml_;), n. [See Haw a hedge.] A low-lying meadow by the side of a river. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

On a haugh or level plain, near to a royal borough. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Haught
Haught (h&asuml_;t), a. [See Haughty.] High; elevated; hence, haughty; proud. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Haughtily
Haugh"ti*ly (h&asuml_;"t&ibreve_;*l&ybreve_;), adv. [From Haughty.] In a haughty manner; arrogantly.
[1913 Webster]

Haughtiness
Haugh"ti*ness, n. [For hauteinness. See Haughty.] The quality of being haughty; disdain; arrogance.

Syn. -- Arrogance; disdain; contemptuousness; superciliousness; loftiness. -- Haughtiness, Arrogance, Disdain. Haughtiness denotes the expression of conscious and proud superiority; arrogance is a disposition to claim for one's self more than is justly due, and enforce it to the utmost; disdain in the exact reverse of condescension toward inferiors, since it expresses and desires others to feel how far below ourselves we consider them. A person is haughty in disposition and demeanor; arrogant in his claims of homage and deference; disdainful even in accepting the deference which his haughtiness leads him arrogantly to exact.
[1913 Webster]

Haughty
Haugh"ty (h&asuml_;"t&ybreve_;), a. [Compar. Haughtier (h&asuml_;"t&ibreve_;*&etilde_;r); superl. Haughtiest.] [OE. hautein, F. hautain, fr. haut high, OF. also halt, fr. L. altus. See Altitude.]
[1913 Webster]

1. High; lofty; bold. [Obs. or Archaic]
[1913 Webster]

To measure the most haughty mountain's height. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Equal unto this haughty enterprise. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. Disdainfully or contemptuously proud; arrogant; overbearing.
[1913 Webster]

A woman of a haughty and imperious nature. Clarendon.
[1913 Webster]

3. Indicating haughtiness; as, a haughty carriage.
[1913 Webster]

Satan, with vast and haughty strides advanced,
Came towering.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Haul
Haul (h&asuml_;l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hauled (h&asuml_;ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Hauling.] [OE. halen, halien, F. haler, of German or Scand. origin; akin to AS. geholian to acquire, get, D. halen to fetch, pull, draw, OHG. holōn, halōn, G. holen, Dan. hale to haul, Sw. hala, and to L. calare to call, summon, Gr. kalei^n to call. Cf. Hale, v. t., Claim. Class, Council, Ecclesiastic.] 1. To pull or draw with force; to drag.
[1913 Webster]

Some dance, some haul the rope. Denham.
[1913 Webster]

Thither they bent, and hauled their ships to land. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Romp-loving miss
Is hauled about in gallantry robust.
Thomson.
[1913 Webster]

2. To transport by drawing, as with horses or oxen; as, to haul logs to a sawmill.
[1913 Webster]

When I was seven or eight years of age, I began hauling all the wood used in the house and shops. U. S. Grant.
[1913 Webster]

To haul over the coals. See under Coal. -- To haul the wind (Naut.), to turn the head of the ship nearer to the point from which the wind blows.
[1913 Webster]

Haul
Haul, v. i. 1. (Naut.) To change the direction of a ship by hauling the wind. See under Haul, v. t.
[1913 Webster]

I . . . hauled up for it, and found it to be an island. Cook.
[1913 Webster]

2. To pull apart, as oxen sometimes do when yoked.
[1913 Webster]

To haul around (Naut.), to shift to any point of the compass; -- said of the wind. -- To haul off (Naut.), to sail closer to the wind, in order to get farther away from anything; hence, to withdraw; to draw back.
[1913 Webster]

Haul
Haul, n. 1. A pulling with force; a violent pull.
[1913 Webster]

2. A single draught of a net; as, to catch a hundred fish at a haul.
[1913 Webster]

3. That which is caught, taken, or gained at once, as by hauling a net.
[1913 Webster]

4. Transportation by hauling; the distance through which anything is hauled, as freight in a railroad car; as, a long haul or short haul.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Rope Making) A bundle of about four hundred threads, to be tarred.
[1913 Webster]

Haulabout
Haul"a*bout` (h&asuml_;l"&adot_;*bout`), n. A bargelike vessel with steel hull, large hatchways, and coal transporters, for coaling war vessels from its own hold or from other colliers.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Haulage
Haul"age (-&auptack_;j), n. Act of hauling; as, the haulage of cars by an engine; charge for hauling.
[1913 Webster]

Hauler
Haul"er (-&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who hauls.
[1913 Webster]

2. A trucking company; a freight transporter using trucks.
[PJC]

haulier
haulier n. a haulage contractor.
Syn. -- hauler.
[WordNet 1.5]

Haulm
Haulm (h&asuml_;m), n. [OE. halm, AS. healm; akin to D., G., Dan., & Sw. halm, Icel. hālmr, L. calamus reed, cane, stalk, Gr. kalamo`s. Cf. Excel, Culminate, Culm, Shawm, Calamus.] The denuded stems or stalks of such crops as buckwheat and the cereal grains, beans, etc.; straw.
[1913 Webster]

Haulm
Haulm, n. A part of a harness; a hame.
[1913 Webster]

Hauls
Hauls (h&asuml_;ls), n. [Obs.] See Hals.
[1913 Webster]

Haulse
Haulse (h&asuml_;ls), v. [Obs.] See Halse.
[1913 Webster]

Hault
Hault (h&asuml_;lt), a. [OF. hault, F. haut. See Haughty.] Lofty; haughty. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Through support of countenance proud and hault. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Haum
Haum (h&asuml_;m), n. See Haulm, stalk. Smart.
[1913 Webster]

Haunce
Haunce (h&adot_;ns), v. t. To enhance. [Obs.] Lydgate.
[1913 Webster]

Haunch
Haunch (hänch; 277), n. [F. hanche, of German origin; cf. OD. hancke, hencke, and also OHG. ancha; prob. not akin to E. ankle.] 1. The hip; the projecting region of the lateral parts of the pelvis and the hip joint; the hind part.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of meats: The leg and loin taken together; as, a haunch of venison.
[1913 Webster]

Haunch bone. See Innominate bone, under Innominate. -- Haunches of an arch (Arch.), the parts on each side of the crown of an arch. (See Crown, n., 11.) Each haunch may be considered as from one half to two thirds of the half arch.
[1913 Webster]

Haunched
Haunched (häncht), a. Having haunches.
[1913 Webster]

Haunt
Haunt (hänt; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Haunted; p. pr. & vb. n. Haunting.] [F. hanter; of uncertain origin, perh. from an assumed LL. ambitare to go about, fr. L. ambire (see Ambition); or cf. Icel. heimta to demand, regain, akin to heim home (see Home). √36.] 1. To frequent; to resort to frequently; to visit pertinaciously or intrusively; to intrude upon.
[1913 Webster]

You wrong me, sir, thus still to haunt my house. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Those cares that haunt the court and town. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

2. To inhabit or frequent as a specter; to visit as a ghost or apparition; -- said of spirits or ghosts, especially of dead people; as, the murdered man haunts the house where he died.
[1913 Webster]

Foul spirits haunt my resting place. Fairfax.
[1913 Webster]

3. To practice; to devote one's self to. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

That other merchandise that men haunt with fraud . . . is cursed. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Leave honest pleasure, and haunt no good pastime. Ascham.
[1913 Webster]

4. To accustom; to habituate. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Haunt thyself to pity. Wyclif.
[1913 Webster]

Haunt
Haunt, v. i. To persist in staying or visiting.
[1913 Webster]

I've charged thee not to haunt about my doors. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Haunt
Haunt, n. 1. A place to which one frequently resorts; as, drinking saloons are the haunts of tipplers; a den is the haunt of wild beasts.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; In Old English the place occupied by any one as a dwelling or in his business was called a haunt.
[1913 Webster]

Often used figuratively.
[1913 Webster] The household nook,
The haunt of all affections pure.
Keble.
[1913 Webster] The feeble soul, a haunt of fears. Tennyson.

[1913 Webster]

2. The habit of resorting to a place. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

The haunt you have got about the courts. Arbuthnot.
[1913 Webster]

3. Practice; skill. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Of clothmaking she hadde such an haunt. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Haunted
Haunt"ed, a. Inhabited by, or subject to the visits of, apparitions; frequented by a ghost.
[1913 Webster]

All houses wherein men have lived and died
Are haunted houses.
Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

Haunter
Haunt"er (-&etilde_;r), n. One who, or that which, haunts.
[1913 Webster]

Haurient
Hau"ri*ent (h&asuml_;"r&ibreve_;*&eitalic_;nt), a. [L. hauriens, p. pr. of haurire to breathe.] (Her.) In pale, with the head in chief; -- said of the figure of a fish, as if rising for air.
[1913 Webster]

Hausen
Hau"sen (h&asuml_;"s&ebreve_;n), n. [G.] (Zool.) A large sturgeon (Acipenser huso syn. Huso huso) from the region of the Black Sea; also called Beluga. It is sometimes twelve feet long, and provides the highest quality caviar.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Hausse
Hausse (h&asuml_;s), n. [F.] (Gun.) A kind of graduated breech sight for a small arm, or a cannon.
[1913 Webster]

Haustellata
Haus`tel*la"ta (h&asuml_;s`t&ebreve_;l*lā"t&adot_;), n. pl. [NL., fr. haustellum, fr. L. haurire, haustum, to draw water, to swallow. See Exhaust.] (Zool.) An artificial division of insects, including all those with a sucking proboscis.
[1913 Webster]

Haustellate
Haus"tel*late (h&asuml_;s"t&ebreve_;l*l&auptack_;t or h&asuml_;s*t&ebreve_;l"l&auptack_;t), a. [See Haustellata.] (Zool.) Provided with a haustellum, or sucking proboscis. -- n. One of the Haustellata.
[1913 Webster]

Haustellum
Haus*tel"lum (h&asuml_;s*t&ebreve_;l"lŭm), n.; pl. Haustella (-l&adot_;). [NL.] (Zool.) The sucking proboscis of various insects. See Lepidoptera, and Diptera.
[1913 Webster]

Haustorium
Haus*to"ri*um (h&asuml_;s*tō"r&ibreve_;*ŭm), n.; pl. Haustoria (h&asuml_;s*tō"r&ibreve_;*&adot_;). [LL., a well, fr. L. haurire, haustum, to drink.] (Bot.) One of the suckerlike rootlets of such plants as the dodder and ivy. R. Brown.
[1913 Webster]

Haut
Haut (h&asuml_;t), a. [F. See Haughty.] Haughty. [Obs.] “Nations proud and haut.” Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hautboy
Haut"boy (hō"boi), n. [F. hautbois, lit., high wood; haut high + bois wood. So called on account of its high tone. See Haughty, Bush; and cf. Oboe.] 1. (Mus.) A wind instrument, sounded through a reed, and similar in shape to the clarinet, but with a thinner tone. Now more commonly called oboe. See Illust. of Oboe.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) A sort of strawberry (Fragaria elatior).
[1913 Webster]

Hautboyist
Haut"boy*ist (hō"boi*&ibreve_;st), n. [Cf. F. hautboïste.] A player on the hautboy.
[1913 Webster]

Hautein
Hau"tein (hō"t&auptack_;n), a. [See Haughty.] 1. Haughty; proud. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. High; -- said of the voice or flight of birds. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hauteur
Hau`teur" (hō`t&etilde_;r"), n. [F., fr. haut high. See Haughty.] Haughty manner or spirit; haughtiness; pride; arrogance.
[1913 Webster]

Hautgout
Haut`goût" (hō`g&oomacr_;"), n. [F.] High relish or flavor; high seasoning.
[1913 Webster]

Hautpas
Haut`pas" (hō`pä"), n. [F. haut high + pas step.] A raised part of the floor of a large room; a platform for a raised table or throne. See Dais.
[1913 Webster]

Hauynite
Ha"üy*nite (ä"w&euptack_;*nīt), n. [From the French mineralogist Haüy.] (Min.) A blue isometric mineral, characteristic of some volcanic rocks. It is a silicate of alumina, lime, and soda, with sulphate of lime.
[1913 Webster]

Havana
Ha*van"a (h&adot_;*văn"&adot_;), prop. a. Of or pertaining to Havana, the capital of the island of Cuba; as, an Havana cigar; -- formerly sometimes written Havannah. -- n. An Havana cigar.
[1913 Webster]

Young Frank Clavering stole his father's Havannahs, and . . . smoked them in the stable. Thackeray.
[1913 Webster]

Havanese
Hav`an*ese" (hăv`ăn*ēz" or -ēs"), a. Of or pertaining to Havana, in Cuba. -- n. sing. & pl. A native or inhabitant, or the people, of Havana.
[1913 Webster]

Have
Have (hăv), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Had (hăd); p. pr. & vb. n. Having. Indic. present, I have, thou hast, he has; we, ye, they have.] [OE. haven, habben, AS. habben (imperf. hæfde, p. p. gehæfd); akin to OS. hebbian, D. hebben, OFries. hebba, OHG. habēn, G. haben, Icel. hafa, Sw. hafva, Dan. have, Goth. haban, and prob. to L. habere, whence F. avoir. Cf. Able, Avoirdupois, Binnacle, Habit.] 1. To hold in possession or control; to own; as, he has a farm.
[1913 Webster]

2. To possess, as something which appertains to, is connected with, or affects, one.
[1913 Webster]

The earth hath bubbles, as the water has. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

He had a fever late. Keats.
[1913 Webster]

3. To accept possession of; to take or accept.
[1913 Webster]

Break thy mind to me in broken English; wilt thou have me? Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. To get possession of; to obtain; to get. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

5. To cause or procure to be; to effect; to exact; to desire; to require.
[1913 Webster]

I had the church accurately described to me. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Wouldst thou have me turn traitor also? Ld. Lytton.
[1913 Webster]

6. To bear, as young; as, she has just had a child.
[1913 Webster]

7. To hold, regard, or esteem.
[1913 Webster]

Of them shall I be had in honor. 2 Sam. vi. 22.
[1913 Webster]

8. To cause or force to go; to take. “The stars have us to bed.” Herbert.Have out all men from me.” 2 Sam. xiii. 9.
[1913 Webster]

9. To take or hold (one's self); to proceed promptly; -- used reflexively, often with ellipsis of the pronoun; as, to have after one; to have at one or at a thing, i. e., to aim at one or at a thing; to attack; to have with a companion. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

10. To be under necessity or obligation; to be compelled; followed by an infinitive.
[1913 Webster]

Science has, and will long have, to be a divider and a separatist. M. Arnold.
[1913 Webster]

The laws of philology have to be established by external comparison and induction. Earle.
[1913 Webster]

11. To understand.
[1913 Webster]

You have me, have you not? Shak.
[1913 Webster]

12. To put in an awkward position; to have the advantage of; as, that is where he had him. [Slang]
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Have, as an auxiliary verb, is used with the past participle to form preterit tenses; as, I have loved; I shall have eaten. Originally it was used only with the participle of transitive verbs, and denoted the possession of the object in the state indicated by the participle; as, I have conquered him, I have or hold him in a conquered state; but it has long since lost this independent significance, and is used with the participles both of transitive and intransitive verbs as a device for expressing past time. Had is used, especially in poetry, for would have or should have.
[1913 Webster]

Myself for such a face had boldly died. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

To have a care, to take care; to be on one's guard. -- To have (a man) out, to engage (one) in a duel. -- To have done (with). See under Do, v. i. -- To have it out, to speak freely; to bring an affair to a conclusion. -- To have on, to wear. -- To have to do with. See under Do, v. t.

Syn. -- To possess; to own. See Possess.
[1913 Webster]

Haveless
Have"less, a. Having little or nothing. [Obs.] Gower.
[1913 Webster]

Havelock
Hav"e*lock (hăv"&euptack_;*l&obreve_;k), n. [From Havelock, an English general distinguished in India in the rebellion of 1857.] A light cloth covering for the head and neck, used by soldiers as a protection from sunstroke.
[1913 Webster]

Haven
Ha"ven (hā"v'n), n. [AS. hæfene; akin to D. & LG. haven, G. hafen, MHG. habe, Dan. havn, Icel. höfn, Sw. hamn; akin to E. have, and hence orig., a holder; or to heave (see Heave); or akin to AS. hæf sea, Icel. & Sw. haf, Dan. hav, which is perh. akin to E. heave.] 1. A bay, recess, or inlet of the sea, or the mouth of a river, which affords anchorage and shelter for shipping; a harbor; a port.
[1913 Webster]

What shipping and what lading 's in our haven. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Their haven under the hill. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

2. A place of safety; a shelter; an asylum. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

The haven, or the rock of love. Waller.
[1913 Webster]

Haven
Ha"ven, v. t. To shelter, as in a haven. Keats.
[1913 Webster]

Havenage
Ha"ven*age (-&auptack_;j), n. Harbor dues; port dues.
[1913 Webster]

Havened
Ha"vened (hā"v'nd), p. a. Sheltered in a haven.
[1913 Webster]

Blissful havened both from joy and pain. Keats.
[1913 Webster]

Havener
Ha"ven*er (hā"v'n*&etilde_;r), n. A harbor master. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Haver
Ha"ver (hăv"&etilde_;r), n. A possessor; a holder. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Haver
Hav"er, n. [D. haver; akin to G. haber.] The oat; oats. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Haver bread, oaten bread. -- Haver cake, oaten cake. Piers Plowman. -- Haver grass, the wild oat. -- Haver meal, oatmeal.
[1913 Webster]

Haver
Ha"ver (hā"v&etilde_;r), v. i. [Etymol. uncertain.] To maunder; to talk foolishly; to chatter. [Scot.] Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Haversack
Hav"er*sack (hăv"&etilde_;r*săk), n. [F. havresac, G. habersack, sack for oats. See 2d Haver, and Sack a bag.]
[1913 Webster]

1. A bag for oats or oatmeal. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

2. A bag or case, usually of stout cloth, in which a soldier carries his rations when on a march; -- distinguished from knapsack.
[1913 Webster]

3. A gunner's case or bag used to carry cartridges from the ammunition chest to the piece in loading.
[1913 Webster]

Haversian
Ha*ver"sian (h&adot_;*v&etilde_;r"sh&aitalic_;n), a. Pertaining to, or discovered by, Clopton Havers, an English physician of the seventeenth century.
[1913 Webster]

Haversian canals (Anat.), the small canals through which the blood vessels ramify in bone.
[1913 Webster]

Havier
Hav"ier (hā"y&etilde_;r), n. [Formerly haver, prob. fr. Half; cf. L. semimas emasculated, prop., half male.] A castrated deer.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Haviers, or stags which have been gelded when young, have no horns. Encyc. of Sport.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Havildar
Hav`il*dar" (hăv`&ibreve_;l*där"), n. In the British Indian armies, a noncommissioned officer of native soldiers, corresponding to a sergeant.
[1913 Webster]

Havildar major, a native sergeant major in the East Indian army.
[1913 Webster]

Having
Hav"ing (hăv"&ibreve_;ng), n. Possession; goods; estate.
[1913 Webster]

I 'll lend you something; my having is not much. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Havior
Hav"ior (hāv"y&etilde_;r), n. [OE. havour, a corruption of OF. aveir, avoir, a having, of same origin as E. aver a work horse. The h is due to confusion with E. have.] Behavior; demeanor. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Havoc
Hav"oc (hăv"&obreve_;k), n. [W. hafog devastation, havoc; or, if this be itself fr. E. havoc, cf. OE. havot, or AS. hafoc hawk, which is a cruel or rapacious bird, or F. hai, voux! a cry to hounds.] Wide and general destruction; devastation; waste.
[1913 Webster]

As for Saul, he made havoc of the church. Acts viii. 3.
[1913 Webster]

Ye gods, what havoc does ambition make
Among your works!
Addison.
[1913 Webster]

Havoc
Hav"oc, v. t. To devastate; to destroy; to lay waste.
[1913 Webster]

To waste and havoc yonder world. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Havoc
Hav"oc, interj. [See Havoc, n.] A cry in war as the signal for indiscriminate slaughter. Toone.
[1913 Webster]

Do not cry havoc, where you should but hunt
With modest warrant.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Cry 'havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war! Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Haw
Haw (h&asuml_;), n. [OE. hawe, AS. haga; akin to D. haag headge, G. hag, hecke, Icel. hagi pasture, Sw. hage, Dan. have garden. √12. Cf. Haggard, Ha-ha, Haugh, Hedge.]
[1913 Webster]

1. A hedge; an inclosed garden or yard.
[1913 Webster]

And eke there was a polecat in his haw. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. The fruit of the hawthorn. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Haw
Haw, n. [Etymol. uncertain.] (Anat.) The third eyelid, or nictitating membrane. See Nictitating membrane, under Nictitate.
[1913 Webster]

Haw
Haw, n. [Cf. ha an interjection of wonder, surprise, or hesitation.] An intermission or hesitation of speech, with a sound somewhat like haw! also, the sound so made. “Hums or haws.” Congreve.
[1913 Webster]

Haw
Haw, v. i. To stop, in speaking, with a sound like haw; to speak with interruption and hesitation.
[1913 Webster]

Cut it short; don't prose -- don't hum and haw. Chesterfield.
[1913 Webster]

hemming and hawing speaking hesitantly and inarticulately, with numerous pauses and interjections.
[PJC]

Haw
Haw, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Hawed (h&asuml_;d); p. pr. & vb. n. Hawing.] [Written also hoi.] [Perhaps connected with here, hither; cf., however, F. huhau, hurhau, hue, interj. used in turning a horse to the right, G. hott, , interj. used in calling to a horse.] To turn to the near side, or toward the driver; -- said of cattle or a team: a word used by teamsters in guiding their teams, and most frequently in the imperative. See Gee.
[1913 Webster]

To haw and gee, or To haw and gee about, to go from one thing to another without good reason; to have no settled purpose; to be irresolute or unstable. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Haw
Haw, v. t. To cause to turn, as a team, to the near side, or toward the driver; as, to haw a team of oxen.
[1913 Webster]

To haw and gee, or To haw and gee about, to lead this way and that at will; to lead by the nose; to master or control. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Hawaiian
Ha*wai"ian (h&adot_;*wī"y&aitalic_;n), prop. a. Belonging to Hawaii or the Sandwich Islands, or to the people of Hawaii. -- n. A native of Hawaii.
[1913 Webster]

Hawebake
Hawe"bake` (h&asuml_;"bāk`), n. Probably, the baked berry of the hawthorn tree, that is, coarse fare. See 1st Haw, 2. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hawfinch
Haw"finch` (h&asuml_;"f&ibreve_;nch`), n. (Zool.) The common European grosbeak (Coccothraustes vulgaris); -- called also cherry finch, and coble.
[1913 Webster]

Haw-haw
Haw-haw" (h&asuml_;*h&asuml_;), n. [Duplication of haw a hedge.] 1. See Ha-ha.
[1913 Webster]

2. a loud laugh that sounds like a horse neighing. [wns=1]
Syn. -- hee-haw, horselaugh, ha-ha.
[WordNet 1.5]

3. a sunken fence (so as not to interfere with the view). [wns=3]
Syn. -- haha.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hawhaw
Haw*haw", v. i. [Of imitative origin.] To laugh boisterously. [Colloq. U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

We haw-haw'd, I tell you, for more than half an hour. Major Jack Downing.
[1913 Webster]

Hawk
Hawk (h&asuml_;k), n. [OE. hauk (prob. fr. Icel.), havek, AS. hafoc, heafoc; akin to D. havik, OHG. habuh, G. habicht, Icel. haukr, Sw. hök, Dan. hög, prob. from the root of E. heave.] (Zool.) One of numerous species and genera of rapacious birds of the family Falconidae. They differ from the true falcons in lacking the prominent tooth and notch of the bill, and in having shorter and less pointed wings. Many are of large size and grade into the eagles. Some, as the goshawk, were formerly trained like falcons. In a more general sense the word is not infrequently applied, also, to true falcons, as the sparrow hawk, pigeon hawk, duck hawk, and prairie hawk.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Among the common American species are the red-tailed hawk (Buteo borealis); the red-shouldered (Buteo lineatus); the broad-winged (Buteo Pennsylvanicus); the rough-legged (Archibuteo lagopus); the sharp-shinned (Accipiter fuscus). See Fishhawk, Goshawk, Marsh hawk, under Marsh, Night hawk, under Night.
[1913 Webster]

Bee hawk (Zool.), the honey buzzard. -- Eagle hawk. See under Eagle. -- Hawk eagle (Zool.), an Asiatic bird of the genus Spizaetus, or Limnaetus, intermediate between the hawks and eagles. There are several species. -- Hawk fly (Zool.), a voracious fly of the family Asilidae. See Hornet fly, under Hornet. -- Hawk moth. (Zool.) See Hawk moth, in the Vocabulary. -- Hawk owl. (Zool.) (a) A northern owl (Surnia ulula) of Europe and America. It flies by day, and in some respects resembles the hawks. (b) An owl of India (Ninox scutellatus). -- Hawk's bill (Horology), the pawl for the rack, in the striking mechanism of a clock.
[1913 Webster]

Hawk
Hawk (h&asuml_;k), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Hawked (h&asuml_;kt); p. pr. & vb. n. Hawking.] 1. To catch, or attempt to catch, birds by means of hawks trained for the purpose, and let loose on the prey; to practice falconry.
[1913 Webster]

A falconer Henry is, when Emma hawks. Prior.
[1913 Webster]

2. To make an attack while on the wing; to soar and strike like a hawk; -- generally with at; as, to hawk at flies. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

A falcon, towering in her pride of place,
Was by a mousing owl hawked at and killed.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hawk
Hawk, v. i. [W. hochi.] To clear the throat with an audible sound by forcing an expiratory current of air through the narrow passage between the depressed soft palate and the root of the tongue, thus aiding in the removal of foreign substances.
[1913 Webster]

Hawk
Hawk, v. t. To raise by hawking, as phlegm.
[1913 Webster]

Hawk
Hawk, n. [W. hoch.] An effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied with noise.
[1913 Webster]

Hawk
Hawk, v. t. [Akin to D. hauker a hawker, G. höken, höcken, to higgle, to retail, höke, höker, a higgler, huckster. See Huckster.] To offer for sale by outcry in the street; to carry (merchandise) about from place to place for sale; to peddle; as, to hawk goods or pamphlets.
[1913 Webster]

His works were hawked in every street. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Hawk
Hawk, n. (Masonry) A small board, with a handle on the under side, to hold mortar.
[1913 Webster]

Hawk boy, an attendant on a plasterer to supply him with mortar.
[1913 Webster]

hawksbill
hawkbill
hawk"bill`, hawks"bill` (-b&ibreve_;l`), n. (Zool.) A sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata), which yields the best quality of tortoise shell; -- called also caret.
Syn. -- hawksbill turtle, hawkbill, tortoiseshell turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata.
[1913 Webster]

Hawkbit
Hawk"bit` (-b&ibreve_;t`), n. (Bot.) The fall dandelion (Leontodon autumnale).
[1913 Webster]

Hawked
Hawked (h&asuml_;kt), a. Curved like a hawk's bill; crooked.
[1913 Webster]

Hawker
Hawk"er (h&asuml_;k"&etilde_;r), n. One who sells wares by crying them in the street; hence, a peddler or a packman. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Hawker
Hawk"er, v. i. To sell goods by outcry in the street. [Obs.] Hudibras.
[1913 Webster]

Hawker
Hawk"er, n. [Cf. AS. hafecere. See 1st Hawk.] A falconer.
[1913 Webster]

Hawkey
Hawk"ey (-&ybreve_;), n. See Hockey. Holloway.
[1913 Webster]

Hawk-eyed
Hawk"-eyed` (-īd`), a. Having very keen vision; sharp-sighted; discerning. [wns=1]
Syn. -- keen-sighted, lynx-eyed, quick-sighted, sharp-eyed, sharp-sighted.
[1913 Webster]

2. alert to possible danger. [wns=2]
Syn. -- argus-eyed, open-eyed, unsleeping, vigilant, wary, watchful.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hawkeye State
Hawk"eye` State. Iowa; -- a nickname of obscure origin.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hawk moth
Hawk" moth` (m&obreve_;th`; 115). (Zool.) Any moth of the family Sphingidae, of which there are numerous genera and species. They are large, handsome moths with long narrow forewings capable of powerful flight and hovering over flowers to feed. They fly mostly at twilight and hover about flowers like a humming bird, sucking the honey by means of a long, slender proboscis. The larvae are large, hairless caterpillars ornamented with green and other bright colors, and often with a caudal spine. See Sphinx, also Tobacco worm, and Tomato worm.
Syn. -- hawk moth, sphingid, sphinx moth, hummingbird moth.
[1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]

Tobacco Hawk Moth (Macrosila Carolina), and its Larva, the Tobacco Worm.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The larvae of several species of hawk moths feed on grapevines. The elm-tree hawk moth is Ceratomia Amyntor.
[1913 Webster]

hawk's-beard
hawk's-beard n. Any of various plants of the genus Crepis having loose heads of yellow flowers on top of a long branched leafy stem; found in the Northern hemisphere.
Syn. -- hawk's-beards.
[WordNet 1.5]

hawksbill
hawks"bill n. See hawkbill.
Syn. -- hawksbill turtle, hawkbill, tortoiseshell turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hawkweed
Hawk"weed` (-wēd`), n. (Bot.) (a) A plant of the genus Hieracium; -- so called from the ancient belief that birds of prey used its juice to strengthen their vision. (b) A plant of the genus Senecio (Senecio hieracifolius). Loudon.
[1913 Webster]

Hawm
Hawm (h&asuml_;m), n. See Haulm, straw.
[1913 Webster]

Hawm
Hawm, v. i. [Etymol. uncertain.] To lounge; to loiter. [Prov. Eng.] Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Hawse
Hawse (h&asuml_;z or h&asuml_;s; 277), n. [Orig. a hawse hole, or hole in the bow of the ship; cf. Icel. hals, hāls, neck, part of the bows of a ship, AS. heals neck. See Collar, and cf. Halse to embrace.] 1. A hawse hole. Harris.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Naut.) (a) The situation of the cables when a vessel is moored with two anchors, one on the starboard, the other on the port bow. (b) The distance ahead to which the cables usually extend; as, the ship has a clear or open hawse, or a foul hawse; to anchor in our hawse, or athwart hawse. (c) That part of a vessel's bow in which are the hawse holes for the cables.
[1913 Webster]

Athwart hawse. See under Athwart. -- Foul hawse, a hawse in which the cables cross each other, or are twisted together. -- Hawse block, a block used to stop up a hawse hole at sea; -- called also hawse plug. -- Hawse piece, one of the foremost timbers of a ship, through which the hawse hole is cut. -- Hawse plug. Same as Hawse block (above). -- To come in at the hawse holes, to enter the naval service at the lowest grade. [Cant] -- To freshen the hawse, to veer out a little more cable and bring the chafe and strain on another part.
[1913 Webster]

hawsepipe
hawsehole
hawse"hole`, hawse"pipe` n. a hole in the bow of a ship, through which the anchor rope or cable passes.
Syn. -- hawse, hawsepipe.
[1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]

Hawser
Haws"er (h&asuml_;z"&etilde_;r or h&asuml_;s"&etilde_;r), n. [From F. hausser to lift, raise (cf. OF. hausserée towpath, towing, F. haussière hawser), LL. altiare, fr. L. altus high. See Haughty.] A large rope made of three strands each containing many yarns.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Three hawsers twisted together make a cable; but it nautical usage the distinction between cable and hawser is often one of size rather than of manufacture.
[1913 Webster]

Hawser iron, a calking iron.
[1913 Webster]

Hawser-laid
Haws"er-laid` (-lād`), a. Made in the manner of a hawser. Cf. Cable-laid, and see Illust. of Cordage.
[1913 Webster]

Hawthorn
Haw"thorn` (h&asuml_;"thôrn`), n. [AS. hagaþorn, hægþorn. See Haw a hedge, and Thorn.] (Bot.) A thorny shrub or tree (the Crataegus oxyacantha), having deeply lobed, shining leaves, small, roselike, fragrant flowers, and a fruit called haw. It is much used in Europe for hedges, and for standards in gardens. The American hawthorn is Crataegus cordata, which has the leaves but little lobed.
[1913 Webster]

Gives not the hawthorn bush a sweeter shade
To shepherds?
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hay
Hay (hā), n. [AS. hege: cf. F. haie, of German origin. See Haw a hedge, Hedge.] 1. A hedge. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

2. A net set around the haunt of an animal, especially of a rabbit. Rowe.
[1913 Webster]

To dance the hay, to dance in a ring. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hay
Hay, v. i. To lay snares for rabbits. Huloet.
[1913 Webster]

Hay
Hay, n. [OE. hei, AS. hēg; akin to D. hooi, OHG. hewi, houwi, G. heu, Dan. & Sw. , Icel. hey, ha, Goth. hawi grass, fr. the root of E. hew. See Hew to cut.] Grass cut and cured for fodder.
[1913 Webster]

Make hay while the sun shines. Camden.
[1913 Webster]

Hay may be dried too much as well as too little. C. L. Flint.
[1913 Webster]

Hay cap, a canvas covering for a haycock. -- Hay fever (Med.), nasal catarrh accompanied with fever, and sometimes with paroxysms of dyspnœa, to which some persons are subject in the spring and summer seasons. It has been attributed to the effluvium from hay, and to the pollen of certain plants. It is also called hay asthma, hay cold, rose cold, and rose fever. -- Hay knife, a sharp instrument used in cutting hay out of a stack or mow. -- Hay press, a press for baling loose hay. -- Hay tea, the juice of hay extracted by boiling, used as food for cattle, etc. -- Hay tedder, a machine for spreading and turning new-mown hay. See Tedder.
[1913 Webster]

Hay
Hay, v. i. To cut and cure grass for hay.
[1913 Webster]

Haybird
Hay"bird` (hā"b&etilde_;rd`), n. (Zool.) (a) The European spotted flycatcher. (b) The European blackcap.
[1913 Webster]

Haybote
Hay"bote` (hā"bōt`), n. [See Hay hedge, and Bote, and cf. Hedgebote.] (Eng. Law.) An allowance of wood to a tenant for repairing his hedges or fences; hedgebote. See Bote. Blackstone.
[1913 Webster]

Haycock
Hay"cock` (hā"k&obreve_;k`), n. A conical pile or heap of hay in the field.
[1913 Webster]

The tanned haycock in the mead. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hay-cutter
Hay"-cut`ter (hā"kŭt`t&etilde_;r), n. A machine in which hay is chopped short, as fodder for cattle.
[1913 Webster]

Hayfield
Hay"field` (hā"fēld`), n. A field where grass for hay has been cut; a meadow. Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

Hayfork
Hay"fork` (hā"fôrk`), n. A fork for pitching and tedding hay.
[1913 Webster]

Horse hayfork, a contrivance for unloading hay from the cart and depositing it in the loft, or on a mow, by horse power.
[1913 Webster]

Hayloft
Hay"loft` (hā"l&obreve_;ft`; 115), n. A loft or scaffold for hay.
[1913 Webster]

Haymaker
Hay"mak`er (hā"māk`&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who cuts and cures hay.
[1913 Webster]

2. A machine for curing hay in rainy weather.
[1913 Webster]

3. A forceful punch that results in someone being knocked down or knocked out; as, he delivered a haymaker to his opponent's jaw. [slang]
[PJC]

Haymaking
Hay"mak`ing, n. The operation or work of cutting grass and curing it for hay.
[1913 Webster]

Haymow
Hay"mow` (hā"mou`), n. 1. A mow or mass of hay laid up in a barn for preservation.
[1913 Webster]

2. The place in a barn where hay is deposited.
[1913 Webster]

Hayrack
Hay"rack` (hā"răk`), n. A frame mounted on the running gear of a wagon, and used in hauling hay, straw, sheaves, etc.; -- called also hay rigging and hay rig.
[1913 Webster]

Hayrake
Hay"rake` (hā"rāk`), n. A rake for collecting hay; especially, a large rake drawn by a horse or horses.
[1913 Webster]

Hayrick
Hay"rick` (-r&ibreve_;k`), n. A heap or pile of hay, usually covered with thatch for preservation in the open air.
[1913 Webster]

hayrig
hay"rig n. a frame attached to a wagon to increase the amount of hay it can carry.
Syn. -- hayrack, hay rigging.
[WordNet 1.5]

hayseed
hay"seed n. 1. a rural, unsophisticated person; also used in an extended sense for one who is not very intelligent or uninterested in culture.
Syn. -- yokel, rube, hick, yahoo, bumpkin, chawbacon.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. Seed from grass, especially that which falls out of hay.
[PJC]

Haystack
Hay"stack` (hā"stăk`), n. A stack or conical pile of hay in the open air.
[1913 Webster]

Haystalk
Hay"stalk` (hā"st&asuml_;k`), n. A stalk of hay.
[1913 Webster]

Haythorn
Hay"thorn` (hā"thôrn`), n. Hawthorn. R. Scot.
[1913 Webster]

Haytian
Hay"ti*an (hā"t&ibreve_;*&aitalic_;n), a. Of or pertaining to Haiti; now usually written Haitian. -- n. A native of Haiti. [Written also Haitian.]
[1913 Webster]

Hayward
Hay"ward (hā"w&etilde_;rd), n. [Hay a hedge + ward.] An officer who is appointed to guard hedges, and to keep cattle from breaking or cropping them, and whose further duty it is to impound animals found running at large.
[1913 Webster]

Hazard
Haz"ard (hăz"&etilde_;rd), n. [F. hasard, Sp. azar an unforeseen disaster or accident, an unfortunate card or throw at dice, prob. fr. Ar. zahr, zār, a die, which, with the article al the, would give azzahr, azzār.] 1. A game of chance played with dice. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. The uncertain result of throwing a die; hence, a fortuitous event; chance; accident; casualty.
[1913 Webster]

I will stand the hazard of the die. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. Risk; danger; peril; as, he encountered the enemy at the hazard of his reputation and life.
[1913 Webster]

Men are led on from one stage of life to another in a condition of the utmost hazard. Rogers.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Billiards) Holing a ball, whether the object ball (winning hazard) or the player's ball (losing hazard).
[1913 Webster]

5. Anything that is hazarded or risked, as the stakes in gaming. “Your latter hazard.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

6. (Golf) Any place into which the ball may not be safely played, such as bunkers, furze, water, sand, or other kind of bad ground.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hazard table, a table on which hazard is played, or any game of chance for stakes. -- To run the hazard, to take the chance or risk. -- to hazard, at risk; liable to suffer damage or loss.

Syn. -- Danger; risk; chance. See Danger.
[1913 Webster]

Hazard
Haz"ard, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hazarded; p. pr. & vb. n. Hazarding.] [Cf. F. hasarder. See Hazard, n.]
[1913 Webster]

1. To expose to the operation of chance; to put in danger of loss or injury; to venture; to risk.
[1913 Webster]

Men hazard nothing by a course of evangelical obedience. John Clarke.
[1913 Webster]

He hazards his neck to the halter. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

2. To venture to incur, or bring on.
[1913 Webster]

I hazarded the loss of whom I loved. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

They hazard to cut their feet. Landor.

Syn. -- To venture; risk; jeopard; peril; endanger.
[1913 Webster]

Hazard
Haz"ard (hăz"&etilde_;rd), v. i. To try the chance; to encounter risk or danger. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hazardable
Haz"ard*a*ble (-&adot_;*b'l), a. 1. Liable to hazard or chance; uncertain; risky. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

2. Such as can be hazarded or risked.
[1913 Webster]

Hazarder
Haz"ard*er (-&etilde_;r), n. 1. A player at the game of hazard; a gamester. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. One who hazards or ventures.
[1913 Webster]

Hazardize
Haz"ard*ize (-īz), n. A hazardous attempt or situation; hazard. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Herself had run into that hazardize. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Hazardous
Haz"ard*ous (-ŭs), a. [Cf. F. hasardeux.] Exposed to hazard; dangerous; risky.
[1913 Webster]

To enterprise so hazardous and high! Milton.

Syn. -- Perilous; dangerous; bold; daring; adventurous; venturesome; precarious; uncertain.

-- Haz"ard*ous*ly, adv. -- Haz"ard*ous*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

hazardousness
haz"ard*ous*ness n. the state of being dangerous.
Syn. -- perilousness, precariousness, danger.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hazardry
Haz"ard*ry (-r&ybreve_;), n. 1. Playing at hazard; gaming; gambling. [R.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. Rashness; temerity. [R.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Haze
Haze (hāz), n. [Cf. Icel. höss gray; akin to AS. hasu, heasu, gray; or Armor. aézen, ézen, warm vapor, exhalation, zephyr.] 1. Light vapor or smoke in the air which more or less impedes vision, with little or no dampness; a lack of transparency in the air; hence, figuratively, obscurity; dimness.
[1913 Webster]

O'er the sky
The silvery haze of summer drawn.
Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Above the world's uncertain haze. Keble.
[1913 Webster]

2. A state of confusion, uncertainty, or vagueness of thought or perception; as, after the explosion, people were wandering around in a haze.
[PJC]

Haze
Haze, v. i. To be hazy, or thick with haze. Ray.
[1913 Webster]

Haze
Haze, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hazed (hāzd); p. pr. & vb. n. Hazing.] [Also hase.] [Cf. Sw. haza to hamstring, fr. has hough, OD. hæssen ham.] 1. To harass by exacting unnecessary, disagreeable, or difficult work.
[1913 Webster]

2. To harass or annoy by playing abusive or shameful tricks upon; to humiliate by practical jokes; -- used esp. of college students, as an initiation rite into a fraternity or other group; as, the sophomores hazed a freshman.
[1913 Webster]

Hazel
Ha"zel (hā"z'l), n. [OE. hasel, AS. hæsel; akin to D. hazelaar, G. hazel, OHG. hasal, hasala, Icel. hasl, Dan & Sw. hassel, L. corylus, for cosylus.] 1. (Bot.) A shrub or small tree of the genus Corylus, as the Corylus avellana, bearing a nut containing a kernel of a mild, farinaceous taste; the filbert. The American species are Corylus Americana, which produces the common hazelnut, and Corylus rostrata. See Filbert. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

2. A miner's name for freestone. Raymond.
[1913 Webster]

Hazel earth, soil suitable for the hazel; a fertile loam. -- Hazel grouse (Zool.), a European grouse (Bonasa betulina), allied to the American ruffed grouse. -- Hazel hoe, a kind of grub hoe. -- Witch hazel. See Witch-hazel, and Hamamelis.
[1913 Webster]

Hazel
Ha"zel, a. 1. Consisting of hazels, or of the wood of the hazel; pertaining to, or derived from, the hazel; as, a hazel wand.
[1913 Webster]

I sit me down beside the hazel grove. Keble.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of a light brown color, like the hazelnut. “Thou hast hazel eyes.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hazeless
Haze"less (hāz"l&ebreve_;s), a. Destitute of haze. Tyndall.
[1913 Webster]

Hazelly
Ha"zel*ly (hā"z'l*l&ybreve_;), a. Of the color of the hazelnut; of a light brown. Mortimer.
[1913 Webster]

Hazelnut
Ha"zel*nut` (hā"z'l*nŭt`), n. [AS. hæselhnutu.] The nut of the hazel. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

hazelwood
hazelwood n. A reddish-brown wood and lumber from the heartwood of the sweet gum tree.
Syn. -- sweet gum, satin walnut, red gum.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hazelwort
Ha"zel*wort` (-wŭrt), n. (Bot.) The asarabacca.
[1913 Webster]

Hazily
Ha"zi*ly (hā"z&ibreve_;*l&ybreve_;), adv. In a hazy manner; mistily; obscurely; confusedly.
[1913 Webster]

Haziness
Ha"zi*ness, n. The quality or state of being hazy.
[1913 Webster]

Hazle
Ha"zle (hā"z'l), v. t. To make dry; to dry. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hazy
Ha"zy (hā"z&ybreve_;), a. [From Haze, n.] 1. Thick with haze; somewhat obscured with haze; not clear or transparent. “A tender, hazy brightness.” Wordsworth.
[1913 Webster]

2. Obscure; confused; not clear; as, a hazy argument; a hazy intellect. Mrs. Gore.
[1913 Webster]

H-bomb
H"-bomb` (āch"b&obreve_;mb`) n. The hydrogen bomb, a thermonuclear weapon that releases atomic energy by union of hydrogen nuclei at high temperatures to form helium. The force of its explosion may range from one to hundreds of megatons of TNT equivalent.
Syn. -- hydrogen bomb, fusion bomb, thermonuclear bomb.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

HDL
HDL (āch`dē*&ebreve_;l"), n. High density lipoprotein, a lipoprotein that transports cholesterol in the blood; high levels are thought to be associated with decreased risk of coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis; sometimes called good cholesterol. Contrasted with LDL.
Syn. -- high-density lipoprotein.
[WordNet 1.5]

He
He (hē), pron. [nom. He; poss. His (h&ibreve_;z); obj. Him (h&ibreve_;m); pl. nom. They (&thlig_;ā); poss. Their or Theirs (&thlig_;ârz or &thlig_;ārz); obj. Them (&thlig_;&ebreve_;m).] [AS. , masc., heó, fem., hit, neut.; pl. , or hie, hig; akin to OFries. hi, D. hij, OS. he, hi, G. heute to-day, Goth. himma, dat. masc., this, hina, accus. masc., and hita, accus. neut., and prob. to L. his this. √183. Cf. It.] 1. The man or male being (or object personified to which the masculine gender is assigned), previously designated; a pronoun of the masculine gender, usually referring to a specified subject already indicated.
[1913 Webster]

Thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee. Gen. iii. 16.
[1913 Webster]

Thou shalt fear the Lord thy God; him shalt thou serve. Deut. x. 20.
[1913 Webster]

2. Any one; the man or person; -- used indefinitely, and usually followed by a relative pronoun.
[1913 Webster]

He that walketh with wise men shall be wise. Prov. xiii. 20.
[1913 Webster]

3. Man; a male; any male person; -- in this sense used substantively. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

I stand to answer thee,
Or any he, the proudest of thy sort.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; When a collective noun or a class is referred to, he is of common gender. In early English, he referred to a feminine or neuter noun, or to one in the plural, as well as to noun in the masculine singular. In composition, he denotes a male animal; as, a he-goat.
[1913 Webster]

He
He (?), (Chem.) The chemical symbol for helium.
[PJC]

-head
-head (-h&ebreve_;d), suffix. A variant of -hood.
[1913 Webster]

Head
Head (h&ebreve_;d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. heáfod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. höfuð, Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubiþ. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. Chief, Cadet, Capital), and its origin is unknown.] 1. The anterior or superior part of an animal, containing the brain, or chief ganglia of the nervous system, the mouth, and in the higher animals, the chief sensory organs; poll; cephalon.
[1913 Webster]

2. The uppermost, foremost, or most important part of an inanimate object; such a part as may be considered to resemble the head of an animal; often, also, the larger, thicker, or heavier part or extremity, in distinction from the smaller or thinner part, or from the point or edge; as, the head of a cane, a nail, a spear, an ax, a mast, a sail, a ship; that which covers and closes the top or the end of a hollow vessel; as, the head of a cask or a steam boiler.
[1913 Webster]

3. The place where the head should go; as, the head of a bed, of a grave, etc.; the head of a carriage, that is, the hood which covers the head.
[1913 Webster]

4. The most prominent or important member of any organized body; the chief; the leader; as, the head of a college, a school, a church, a state, and the like. “Their princes and heads.” Robynson (More's Utopia).
[1913 Webster]

The heads of the chief sects of philosophy. Tillotson.
[1913 Webster]

Your head I him appoint. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

5. The place or honor, or of command; the most important or foremost position; the front; as, the head of the table; the head of a column of soldiers.
[1913 Webster]

An army of fourscore thousand troops, with the duke of Marlborough at the head of them. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

6. Each one among many; an individual; -- often used in a plural sense; as, a thousand head of cattle.
[1913 Webster]

It there be six millions of people, there are about four acres for every head. Graunt.
[1913 Webster]

7. The seat of the intellect; the brain; the understanding; the mental faculties; as, a good head, that is, a good mind; it never entered his head, it did not occur to him; of his own head, of his own thought or will.
[1913 Webster]

Men who had lost both head and heart. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

8. The source, fountain, spring, or beginning, as of a stream or river; as, the head of the Nile; hence, the altitude of the source, or the height of the surface, as of water, above a given place, as above an orifice at which it issues, and the pressure resulting from the height or from motion; sometimes also, the quantity in reserve; as, a mill or reservoir has a good head of water, or ten feet head; also, that part of a gulf or bay most remote from the outlet or the sea.
[1913 Webster]

9. A headland; a promontory; as, Gay Head. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

10. A separate part, or topic, of a discourse; a theme to be expanded; a subdivision; as, the heads of a sermon.
[1913 Webster]

11. Culminating point or crisis; hence, strength; force; height.
[1913 Webster]

Ere foul sin, gathering head, shall break into corruption. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

The indisposition which has long hung upon me, is at last grown to such a head, that it must quickly make an end of me or of itself. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

12. Power; armed force.
[1913 Webster]

My lord, my lord, the French have gathered head. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

13. A headdress; a covering of the head; as, a laced head; a head of hair. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

14. An ear of wheat, barley, or of one of the other small cereals.
[1913 Webster]

15. (Bot.) (a) A dense cluster of flowers, as in clover, daisies, thistles; a capitulum. (b) A dense, compact mass of leaves, as in a cabbage or a lettuce plant.
[1913 Webster]

16. The antlers of a deer.
[1913 Webster]

17. A rounded mass of foam which rises on a pot of beer or other effervescing liquor. Mortimer.
[1913 Webster]

18. pl. Tiles laid at the eaves of a house. Knight.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Head is often used adjectively or in self-explaining combinations; as, head gear or headgear, head rest. Cf. Head, a.
[1913 Webster]

A buck of the first head, a male fallow deer in its fifth year, when it attains its complete set of antlers. Shak. -- By the head. (Naut.) See under By. -- Elevator head, Feed head, etc. See under Elevator, Feed, etc. -- From head to foot, through the whole length of a man; completely; throughout. “Arm me, audacity, from head to foot.” Shak. -- Head and ears, with the whole person; deeply; completely; as, he was head and ears in debt or in trouble. [Colloq.] -- Head fast. (Naut.) See 5th Fast. -- Head kidney (Anat.), the most anterior of the three pairs of embryonic renal organs developed in most vertebrates; the pronephros. -- Head money, a capitation tax; a poll tax. Milton. -- Head pence, a poll tax. [Obs.] -- Head sea, a sea that meets the head of a vessel or rolls against her course. -- Head and shoulders. (a) By force; violently; as, to drag one, head and shoulders. “They bring in every figure of speech, head and shoulders.” Felton. (b) By the height of the head and shoulders; hence, by a great degree or space; by far; much; as, he is head and shoulders above them. -- Heads or tails or Head or tail, this side or that side; this thing or that; -- a phrase used in throwing a coin to decide a choice, question, or stake, head being the side of the coin bearing the effigy or principal figure (or, in case there is no head or face on either side, that side which has the date on it), and tail the other side. -- Neither head nor tail, neither beginning nor end; neither this thing nor that; nothing distinct or definite; -- a phrase used in speaking of what is indefinite or confused; as, they made neither head nor tail of the matter. [Colloq.] -- Head wind, a wind that blows in a direction opposite the vessel's course. -- off the top of my head, from quick recollection, or as an approximation; without research or calculation; -- a phrase used when giving quick and approximate answers to questions, to indicate that a response is not necessarily accurate. -- Out of one's own head, according to one's own idea; without advice or coöperation of another. -- Over the head of, beyond the comprehension of. M. Arnold. -- to go over the head of (a person), to appeal to a person superior to (a person) in line of command. -- To be out of one's head, to be temporarily insane. -- To come or draw to a head. See under Come, Draw. -- To give (one) the head, or To give head, to let go, or to give up, control; to free from restraint; to give license. “He gave his able horse the head.” Shak. “He has so long given his unruly passions their head.” South. -- To his head, before his face. “An uncivil answer from a son to a father, from an obliged person to a benefactor, is a greater indecency than if an enemy should storm his house or revile him to his head.” Jer. Taylor. -- To lay heads together, to consult; to conspire. -- To lose one's head, to lose presence of mind. -- To make head, or To make head against, to resist with success; to advance. -- To show one's head, to appear. Shak. -- To turn head, to turn the face or front. “The ravishers turn head, the fight renews.” Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Head
Head (h&ebreve_;d), a. Principal; chief; leading; first; as, the head master of a school; the head man of a tribe; a head chorister; a head cook.
[1913 Webster]

Head
Head (h&ebreve_;d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Headed; p. pr. & vb. n. Heading.] 1. To be at the head of; to put one's self at the head of; to lead; to direct; to act as leader to; as, to head an army, an expedition, or a riot. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. To form a head to; to fit or furnish with a head; as, to head a nail. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

3. To behead; to decapitate. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. To cut off the top of; to lop off; as, to head trees.
[1913 Webster]

5. To go in front of; to get in the front of, so as to hinder or stop; to oppose; hence, to check or restrain; as, to head a drove of cattle; to head a person; the wind heads a ship.
[1913 Webster]

6. To set on the head; as, to head a cask.
[1913 Webster]

To head off, to intercept; to get before; as, an officer heads off a thief who is escaping. “We'll head them off at the pass.” -- To head up, (a) to close, as a cask or barrel, by fitting a head to. (b) To serve as the leader of; as, to head up a team of investigators.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Head
Head, v. i. 1. To originate; to spring; to have its source, as a river.
[1913 Webster]

A broad river, that heads in the great Blue Ridge. Adair.
[1913 Webster]

2. To go or point in a certain direction; to tend; as, how does the ship head?
[1913 Webster]

3. To form a head; as, this kind of cabbage heads early.
[1913 Webster]

Headache
Head"ache` (h&ebreve_;d"āk`), n. Pain in the head; cephalalgia.Headaches and shivering fits.” Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Headachy
Head"ach`y, a. Afflicted with headache. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Headband
Head"band` (h&ebreve_;d"bănd`), n. 1. A fillet; a band for the head. “The headbands and the tablets.” Is. iii. 20.
[1913 Webster]

2. The band at each end of the back of a book.
[1913 Webster]

Headboard
Head"board` (h&ebreve_;d"bōrd`), n. A board or boarding which marks or forms the head of anything; as, the headboard of a bed; the headboard of a grave.

Headborrow
Headborough
{ Head"bor*ough Head"bor*row } (h&ebreve_;d"bŭr*&ouptack_;), n. 1. The chief of a frankpledge, tithing, or decennary, consisting of ten families; -- called also borsholder, boroughhead, boroughholder, and sometimes tithingman. See Borsholder. [Eng.] Blackstone.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Modern Law) A petty constable. [Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Head-cheese
Head"-cheese` (h&ebreve_;d"chēz`), n. A dish made of portions of the head, or head and feet, of swine, cut up fine, seasoned, and pressed into a cheeselike mass.
[1913 Webster]

Headdress
Head"dress` (h&ebreve_;d"dr&ebreve_;s`), n. 1. A covering or ornament for the head; a headtire; as, chiefs among the plains Indians had elaborate long headdresses with many feathers.
[1913 Webster]

Among birds the males very often appear in a most beautiful headdress, whether it be a crest, a comb, a tuft of feathers, or a natural little plume. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

2. A manner of dressing the hair or of adorning it, whether with or without a veil, ribbons, combs, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Headed
Head"ed, a. 1. Furnished with a head (commonly as denoting intellectual faculties); -- used in composition; as, clear-headed, long-headed, thick-headed; a many-headed monster.
[1913 Webster]

2. Formed into a head; as, a headed cabbage.
[1913 Webster]

Header
Head"er (h&ebreve_;d"&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who, or that which, heads nails, rivets, etc., esp. a machine for heading.
[1913 Webster]

2. One who heads a movement, a party, or a mob; head; chief; leader. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

3. (Arch.) (a) A brick or stone laid with its shorter face or head in the surface of the wall. (b) In framing, the piece of timber fitted between two trimmers, and supported by them, and carrying the ends of the tailpieces.
[1913 Webster]

4. A reaper for wheat, that cuts off the heads only.
[1913 Webster]

5. A fall or plunge head first, as while riding a bicycle, or a skateboard, or in bathing; -- sometimes, implying the striking of the head on the ground; as, to take a header. [Colloq.]
[PJC]

Headforemost
Headfirst
{ Head`first" (h&ebreve_;d"f&etilde_;rst`), Head`fore"most` (h&ebreve_;d`fōr"mōst`), } adv. With the head foremost; -- of motion.
[1913 Webster]

Headfish
Head"fish` (h&ebreve_;d"f&ibreve_;sh`), n. (Zool.) The sunfish (Mola).

Headgear
Head gear
Head" gear`, or Head"gear` (h&ebreve_;d"gēr`), n. 1. Headdress.
[1913 Webster]

2. Apparatus above ground at the mouth of a mine or deep well.
[1913 Webster]

Head-hunter
Head"-hunt`er (h&ebreve_;d"hŭnt`&etilde_;r), n. A member of any tribe or race of savages who have the custom of decapitating human beings and preserving their heads as trophies. The Dyaks of Borneo are the most noted head-hunters.
[1913 Webster]

2. A person whose profession is to find executives to fill open positions in corporations; an executive personnel recruiter; also, a company that performs a similar service.
[PJC]

-- Head"-hunt`ing, n.
[1913 Webster]

Headily
Head"i*ly (h&ebreve_;d"&ibreve_;*l&ybreve_;), adv. In a heady or rash manner; hastily; rashly; obstinately.
[1913 Webster]

Headiness
Head"i*ness, n. The quality of being heady.
[1913 Webster]

Heading
Head"ing, n. 1. The act or state of one who, or that which, heads; formation of a head.
[1913 Webster]

2. That which stands at the head; title; as, the heading of a paper.
[1913 Webster]

3. Material for the heads of casks, barrels, etc.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Mining, tunneling) (a) A gallery, drift, or adit in a mine; the vein above a drift. (b) The end of a drift or gallery; also, the working face at the end of a tunnel, gallery, drift, or adit from which the work is advanced.
[1913 Webster +RH]

5. (Sewing) The extension of a line ruffling above the line of stitch.
[1913 Webster]

6. (Masonry) That end of a stone or brick which is presented outward. Knight.
[1913 Webster]

Heading course (Arch.), a course consisting only of headers. See Header, n. 3 (a). -- Heading joint. (a) (Carp.) A joint, as of two or more boards, etc., at right angles to the grain of the wood. (b) (Masonry) A joint between two roussoirs in the same course.
[1913 Webster]

head-in-the-clouds
head-in-the-clouds adj. unable to concentrate on matters at hand; flighty[2].
Syn. -- flighty, scatterbrained.
[WordNet 1.5]

headlamp
head"lamp` (h&ebreve_;d"lămp`), n. A powerful light with a reflector, attached to the front of an automobile, locomotive, or other vehicle; called also headlight.
Syn. -- headlight.
[WordNet 1.5]

Headland
Head"land (h&ebreve_;d"lănd), n. 1. A cape; a promontory; a point of land projecting into the sea or other expanse of water. “Sow the headland with wheat.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. A ridge or strip of unplowed at the ends of furrows, or near a fence. Tusser.
[1913 Webster]

Headless
Head"less, a. [AS. heáfodleás.] 1. Having no head; beheaded; as, a headless body, neck, or carcass.
[1913 Webster]

2. Destitute of a chief or leader. Sir W. Raleigh.
[1913 Webster]

3. Destitute of understanding or prudence; foolish; rash; obstinate; mindless. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Witless headiness in judging or headless hardiness in condemning. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Headlight
Head"light` (h&ebreve_;d"līt`), n. (Engin.) A light, with a powerful reflector, placed at the front of a vehicle such as an automobile, truck, locomotive etc., to throw light on the road or track ahead of the vehicle at night, or in going through a dark tunnel; a headlamp.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Headline
Head"line` (-līn`), n. 1. (Print.) The line at the head or top of a page.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Naut.) See Headrope.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Journalism) A title for an article in a newspaper, sometimes one line, sometimes more, set in larger and bolder type than the body of the article and indicating the subject matter or content of the article.
[PJC]

4. A similar title at the top of the newspaper indicating the most important story of the day; also, a title for an illustration or picture.
[PJC]

headline
head"line` (-līn`), v. t. 1. To mention in a headline.
[PJC]

2. To furnish with a headline (senses 1, 3, or 4).
[PJC]

3. To publicise prominently in an advertisement.
[PJC]

headlinese
headlinese n. The abbreviated writing style of headline writers.
[WordNet 1.5]

headlock
head"lock` (Sport), n. A wrestling hold in which the opponent's head is locked between the crook of your elbow and the side of your body.
[WordNet 1.5]

Headlong
Head"long` (-l&obreve_;ng`; 115), adv. [OE. hedling, hevedlynge; prob. confused with E. long, a. & adv.]
[1913 Webster]

1. With the head foremost; headforemost; head first; as, to fall headlong. Acts i. 18.
[1913 Webster]

2. Rashly; precipitately; without deliberation.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hastily; without delay or respite.
[1913 Webster]

Headlong
Head"long, a. 1. Rash; precipitate; as, headlong folly.
[1913 Webster]

2. Steep; precipitous. [Poetic]
[1913 Webster]

Like a tower upon a headlong rock. Byron.
[1913 Webster]

Head-lugged
Head"-lugged` (-lŭgd`), a. Lugged or dragged by the head. [R.] “The head-lugged bear.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Headman
Head"man` (h&ebreve_;d"măn`), n.; pl. Headmen (-m&ebreve_;n`). [AS. heáfodman.] A head or leading man, especially of a village community.

Headmould shot
Headmold shot
{ Head"mold` shot", Head"mould` shot" } (-mōld` sh&obreve_;t`). (Med.) An old name for the condition of the skull, in which the bones ride, or are shot, over each other at the sutures. Dunglison.
[1913 Webster]

Headmost
Head"most` (-mōst`), a. Most advanced; most forward; as, the headmost ship in a fleet.
[1913 Webster]

Headnote
Head"note` (-nōt`), n. A note at the head of a page or chapter; in law reports, an abstract of a case, showing the principles involved and the opinion of the court.
[1913 Webster]

head-on
head-on adj. 1. characterized by direct opposition; as, a head-on confrontation.
Syn. -- head-to-head.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. Without evasion or compromise; as, his usual head-on fashion; to meet a problem head-on.
Syn. -- downright, flat-footed, forthright, foursquare, straightforward.
[WordNet 1.5]

3. Meeting front to front; used mostly of collisions between vehicles; as, a head-on automobile collision.
Syn. -- frontal.
[WordNet 1.5]

Headpan
Head"pan` (-păn`), n. [AS. heáfodpanne.] The brainpan. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Headpiece
Head"piece` (-pēs`), n. 1. Head.
[1913 Webster]

In his headpiece he felt a sore pain. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. A cap of defense; especially, an open one, as distinguished from the closed helmet of the Middle Ages.
[1913 Webster]

3. Understanding; mental faculty.
[1913 Webster]

Eumenes had the best headpiece of all Alexander's captains. Prideaux.
[1913 Webster]

4. An engraved ornament at the head of a chapter, or of a page.
[1913 Webster]

headpin
head"pin` (Bowling) n. The front pin in the triangular arrangement of ten pins.
Syn. -- kingpin.
[WordNet 1.5]

Headquarters
Head"quar`ters (-kw&asuml_;r`t&etilde_;rz), n. pl. [but sometimes used as a n. sing.] 1. The quarters or place of residence of any chief officer, as the general in command of an army, or the head of a police force; the place from which orders or instructions are issued; hence, the center of authority or order.
[1913 Webster]

The brain, which is the headquarters, or office, of intelligence. Collier.
[1913 Webster]

2. The main office from which an organization such as a commercial enterprise is managed; -- usually where the chief executive officer works.
[PJC]

Headrace
Head"race` (-rās`), n. See Race, a water course.
[1913 Webster]

Headroom
Head"room` (-r&oomacr_;m`), n. (Arch.) See Headway, 2. [Mostly Brit.]
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Headrope
Head"rope` (-rōp`), n. (Naut.) That part of a boltrope which is sewed to the upper edge or head of a sail.
[1913 Webster]

Headsail
Head"sail` (-sāl`), n. (Naut.) Any sail set forward of the foremast. Totten.
[1913 Webster]

Headshake
Head`shake` (-shāk`), n. A significant shake of the head, commonly as a signal of denial. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Headship
Head"ship, n. Authority or dignity; chief place.
[1913 Webster]

Headsman
Heads"man (h&ebreve_;dz"m&aitalic_;n), n.; pl. Headsmen (-m&eitalic_;n). An executioner who cuts off heads. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Headspring
Head"spring` (h&ebreve_;d"spr&ibreve_;ng`), n. Fountain; source.
[1913 Webster]

The headspring of our belief. Stapleton.
[1913 Webster]

Headstall
Head"stall` (-st&asuml_;l`), n. That part of a bridle or halter which encompasses the head. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Headstock
Head"stock` (-st&obreve_;k`), n. (Mach.) A part (usually separate from the bed or frame) for supporting some of the principal working parts of a machine; as: (a) The part of a lathe that holds the revolving spindle and its attachments; -- also called poppet head, the opposite corresponding part being called a tailstock. (b) The part of a planing machine that supports the cutter, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Headstone
Head"stone` (-stōn`), n. 1. The principal stone in a foundation; the chief or corner stone. Ps. cxviii. 22.
[1913 Webster]

2. The stone at the head of a grave.
[1913 Webster]

Headstrong
Head"strong` (-str&obreve_;ng`; 115), a. 1. Not easily restrained; ungovernable; obstinate; stubborn.
[1913 Webster]

Now let the headstrong boy my will control. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. Directed by ungovernable will, or proceeding from obstinacy; as, a headstrong course. Dryden.

Syn. -- Violent; obstinate; ungovernable; untractable; stubborn; unruly; venturesome; heady.
[1913 Webster]

Headstrongness
Head"strong`ness, n. Obstinacy. [R.] Gayton.
[1913 Webster]

heads-up
heads-up adj. maintaining presence of mind; alert and attentive; able to recognize and take quick advantage of opportunities; resourceful; as, he played good heads-up baseball.
Syn. -- wide-awake.
[WordNet 1.5]

heads-up
heads-up n. [From its use as an interjection to warn of impending danger.] a warning to be prepared for an imminent event.
[PJC]

Headtire
Head"tire` (-tīr`), n. 1. A headdress. “A headtire of fine linen.” 1 Esdras iii. 6.
[1913 Webster]

2. The manner of dressing the head, as at a particular time and place.
[1913 Webster]

Headwater
Head"wa`ter (-wā`), n. The source and upper part of a stream; -- commonly used in the plural; as, the headwaters of the Missouri.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Headway
Head"way` (-wûrk`), n. 1. The progress made by a ship in motion; hence, progress or success of any kind.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Arch.) Clear space under an arch, girder, and the like, sufficient to allow of easy passing underneath; clearance; headroom.
[1913 Webster]

headword
headword n. 1. a word that is qualified by a modifier.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. a word placed at the beginning of a line, paragraph, or short article (as in a dictionary or encyclopedia entry); the word which forms the title of an entry in a dictionary.
[WordNet 1.5]

Headwork
Head"work` (h&ebreve_;d"wûrk`), n. Mental labor.
[1913 Webster]

Heady
Head"y (h&ebreve_;d"&ybreve_;), a. [From Head.] 1. Willful; rash; precipitate; hurried on by will or passion; ungovernable.
[1913 Webster]

All the talent required is to be hot, to be heady, -- to be violent on one side or the other. Sir W. Temple.
[1913 Webster]

2. Apt to affect the head; intoxicating; strong.
[1913 Webster]

The liquor is too heady. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. Violent; impetuous. “A heady currance.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Heal
Heal (hēl), v. t. [See Hele.] To cover, as a roof, with tiles, slate, lead, or the like. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Heal
Heal, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Healed (hēld); p. pr. & vb. n. Healing.] [OE. helen, hælen, AS. h&aemacr_;lan, fr. hāl hale, sound, whole; akin to OS. hēlian, D. heelen, G. heilen, Goth. hailjan. See Whole.] 1. To make hale, sound, or whole; to cure of a disease, wound, or other derangement; to restore to soundness or health.
[1913 Webster]

Speak the word only, and my servant shall be healed. Matt. viii. 8.
[1913 Webster]

2. To remove or subdue; to cause to pass away; to cure; -- said of a disease or a wound.
[1913 Webster]

I will heal their backsliding. Hos. xiv. 4.
[1913 Webster]

3. To restore to original purity or integrity.
[1913 Webster]

Thus saith the Lord, I have healed these waters. 2 Kings ii. 21.
[1913 Webster]

4. To reconcile, as a breach or difference; to make whole; to free from guilt; as, to heal dissensions.
[1913 Webster]

Heal
Heal (hēl), v. i. To grow sound; to return to a sound state; as, the limb heals, or the wound heals; -- sometimes with up or over; as, it will heal up, or over.
[1913 Webster]

Those wounds heal ill that men do give themselves. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Heal
Heal, n. [AS. h&aemacr_;lu, h&aemacr_;l. See Heal, v. t.] Health. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Healable
Heal"a*ble (-&adot_;*b'l), a. Capable of being healed.
[1913 Webster]

Healall
Heal"all` (-&asuml_;l`), n. (Bot.) A common herb of the Mint family (Brunella vulgaris), destitute of active properties, but anciently thought to be a panacea.
[1913 Webster]

Heald
Heald (hēld), n. [CF. Heddle.] A heddle. Ure.
[1913 Webster]

Healer
Heal"er (hēl"&etilde_;r), n. One who, or that which, heals.
[1913 Webster]

Healful
Heal"ful (hēl"f&usdot_;l), a. Tending or serving to heal; healing. [Obs.] Ecclus. xv. 3.
[1913 Webster]

Healing
Heal"ing, a. Tending to cure; soothing; mollifying; as, the healing art; a healing salve; healing words.
[1913 Webster]

Here healing dews and balms abound. Keble.
[1913 Webster]

Healingly
Heal"ing*ly, adv. So as to heal or cure.
[1913 Webster]

Health
Health (h&ebreve_;lth), n. [OE. helthe, AS. h&aemacr_;lþ, fr. hāl hale, sound, whole. See Whole.] 1. The state of being hale, sound, or whole, in body, mind, or soul; especially, the state of being free from physical disease or pain.
[1913 Webster]

There is no health in us. Book of Common Prayer.
[1913 Webster]

Though health may be enjoyed without gratitude, it can not be sported with without loss, or regained by courage. Buckminster.
[1913 Webster]

2. A wish of health and happiness, as in pledging a person in a toast. “Come, love and health to all.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Bill of health. See under Bill. -- Health lift, a machine for exercise, so arranged that a person lifts an increasing weight, or moves a spring of increasing tension, in such a manner that most of the muscles of the body are brought into gradual action; -- also called lifting machine. -- Health officer, one charged with the enforcement of the sanitary laws of a port or other place. -- To drink a health. See under Drink.
[1913 Webster]

Healthful
Health"ful (-f&usdot_;l), a. 1. Full of health; free from illness or disease; well; whole; sound; healthy; as, a healthful body or mind; a healthful plant.
[1913 Webster]

2. Serving to promote health of body or mind; wholesome; salubrious; salutary; as, a healthful air, diet.
[1913 Webster]

The healthful Spirit of thy grace. Book of Common Prayer.
[1913 Webster]

3. Indicating, characterized by, or resulting from, health or soundness; as, a healthful condition.
[1913 Webster]

A mind . . . healthful and so well-proportioned. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

4. Well-disposed; favorable. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Gave healthful welcome to their shipwrecked guests. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Healthfully
Health"ful*ly, adv. In health; wholesomely.
[1913 Webster]

Healthfulness
Health"ful*ness, n. The state of being healthful.
[1913 Webster]

Healthily
Health"i*ly (-&ibreve_;*l&ybreve_;), adv. In a healthy manner.
[1913 Webster]

Healthiness
Health"i*ness, n. The state of being healthy or healthful; freedom from disease.
[1913 Webster]

Healthless
Health"less, a. 1. Without health, whether of body or mind; infirm. “A healthless or old age.” Jer. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

2. Not conducive to health; unwholesome. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Healthlessness
Health"less*ness, n. The state of being healthless.
[1913 Webster]

Healthsome
Health"some (-sŭm), a. Wholesome; salubrious. [R.]Healthsome air.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Healthward
Health"ward (-w&etilde_;rd), a. & adv. In the direction of health; as, a healthward tendency.
[1913 Webster]

Healthy
Health"y (-&ybreve_;), a. [Compar. Healthier (-&ibreve_;*&etilde_;r); superl. Healthiest.] 1. Being in a state of health; enjoying health; hale; sound; free from disease; as, a healthy child; a healthy plant.
[1913 Webster]

His mind was now in a firm and healthy state. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

2. Evincing health; as, a healthy pulse; a healthy complexion.
[1913 Webster]

3. Conducive to health; wholesome; salubrious; salutary; as, a healthy exercise; a healthy climate.

Syn. -- Vigorous; sound; hale; salubrious; healthful; wholesome; salutary.
[1913 Webster]

Heam
Heam (hēm), n. [Cf. AS. cildhamma womb, OD. hamme afterbirth, LG. hamen.] The afterbirth or secundines of a beast.
[1913 Webster]

Heap
Heap (hēp), n. [OE. heep, heap, heap, multitude, AS. heáp; akin to OS. hōp, D. hoop, OHG. houf, hūfo, G. haufe, haufen, Sw. hop, Dan. hob, Icel. hōpr troop, flock, Russ. kupa heap, crowd, Lith. kaupas. Cf. Hope, in Forlorn hope.] 1. A crowd; a throng; a multitude or great number of persons. [Now Low or Humorous]
[1913 Webster]

The wisdom of a heap of learned men. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

A heap of vassals and slaves. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

He had heaps of friends. W. Black.
[1913 Webster]

2. A great number or large quantity of things not placed in a pile; as, a heap of trouble. [Now Low or Humorous]
[1913 Webster]

A vast heap, both of places of scripture and quotations. Bp. Burnet.
[1913 Webster]

I have noticed a heap of things in my life. R. L. Stevenson.
[1913 Webster]

3. A pile or mass; a collection of things laid in a body, or thrown together so as to form an elevation; as, a heap of earth or stones.
[1913 Webster]

Huge heaps of slain around the body rise. Dryden.


[1913 Webster]

Heap
Heap, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Heaped (hēpt); p. pr. & vb. n. Heaping.] [AS. heápian.] 1. To collect in great quantity; to amass; to lay up; to accumulate; -- usually with up; as, to heap up treasures.
[1913 Webster]

Though he heap up silver as the dust. Job. xxvii. 16.
[1913 Webster]

2. To throw or lay in a heap; to make a heap of; to pile; as, to heap stones; -- often with up; as, to heap up earth; or with on; as, to heap on wood or coal.
[1913 Webster]

3. To form or round into a heap, as in measuring; to fill (a measure) more than even full.
[1913 Webster]

Heaper
Heap"er (hēp"&etilde_;r), n. One who heaps, piles, or amasses.
[1913 Webster]

heaps
heaps n. a large quantity. See heap, senses 2 and 3; as, he made heaps of money in the stock market.
Syn. -- tons, dozens, lots, piles, scores, stacks, loads, rafts, slews, wads, oodles, gobs, scads, lashings.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heapy
Heap"y (-&ybreve_;), a. Lying in heaps. Gay.
[1913 Webster]

Hear
Hear (hēr), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Heard (h&etilde_;rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Hearing.] [OE. heren, AS,. hiéran, h&ymacr_;ran, hēran; akin to OS. hōrian, OFries. hera, hora, D. hooren, OHG. hōren, G. hören, Icel. heyra, Sw. höra, Dan. hore, Goth. hausjan, and perh. to Gr. 'akoy`ein, E. acoustic. Cf. Hark, Hearken.] 1. To perceive by the ear; to apprehend or take cognizance of by the ear; as, to hear sounds; to hear a voice; to hear one call.
[1913 Webster]

Lay thine ear close to the ground, and list if thou canst hear the tread of travelers. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

He had been heard to utter an ominous growl. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

2. To give audience or attention to; to listen to; to heed; to accept the doctrines or advice of; to obey; to examine; to try in a judicial court; as, to hear a recitation; to hear a class; the case will be heard to-morrow.
[1913 Webster]

3. To attend, or be present at, as hearer or worshiper; as, to hear a concert; to hear Mass.
[1913 Webster]

4. To give attention to as a teacher or judge.
[1913 Webster]

Thy matters are good and right, but there is no man deputed of the king to hear thee. 2 Sam. xv. 3.
[1913 Webster]

I beseech your honor to hear me one single word. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

5. To accede to the demand or wishes of; to listen to and answer favorably; to favor.
[1913 Webster]

I love the Lord, because he hath heard my voice. Ps. cxvi. 1.
[1913 Webster]

They think that they shall be heard for their much speaking. Matt. vi. 7.
[1913 Webster]

Hear him. See Remark, under Hear, v. i. -- To hear a bird sing, to receive private communication. [Colloq.] Shak. -- To hear say, to hear one say; to learn by common report; to receive by rumor. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Hear
Hear, v. i. 1. To have the sense or faculty of perceiving sound. “The hearing ear.” Prov. xx. 12.
[1913 Webster]

2. To use the power of perceiving sound; to perceive or apprehend by the ear; to attend; to listen.
[1913 Webster]

So spake our mother Eve, and Adam heard,
Well pleased, but answered not.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. To be informed by oral communication; to be told; to receive information by report or by letter.
[1913 Webster]

I have heard, sir, of such a man. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

I must hear from thee every day in the hour. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

To hear ill, to be blamed. [Obs.]

Not only within his own camp, but also now at Rome, he heard ill for his temporizing and slow proceedings. Holland.

-- To hear well, to be praised. [Obs.]

[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Hear, or Hear him, is often used in the imperative, especially in the course of a speech in English assemblies, to call attention to the words of the speaker.
[1913 Webster]

Hear him, . . . a cry indicative, according to the tone, of admiration, acquiescence, indignation, or derision. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

hearable
hearable adj. perceptible by the ear. Opposite of inaudible. Also See: loud, perceptible.
Syn. -- audible.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Heard
Heard (h&etilde_;rd), imp. & p. p. of Hear.
[1913 Webster]

Hearer
Hear"er (hēr"&etilde_;r), n. One who hears; an auditor.
[1913 Webster]

Hearing
Hear"ing, n. 1. The act or power of perceiving sound; perception of sound; the faculty or sense by which sound is perceived; as, my hearing is good.
[1913 Webster]

I have heard of thee by the hearing of the ear. Job xlii. 5.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Hearing in a special sensation, produced by stimulation of the auditory nerve; the stimulus (waves of sound) acting not directly on the nerve, but through the medium of the endolymph on the delicate epithelium cells, constituting the peripheral terminations of the nerve. See Ear.
[1913 Webster]

2. Attention to what is delivered; opportunity to be heard; audience; as, I could not obtain a hearing.
[1913 Webster]

3. A listening to facts and evidence, for the sake of adjudication; a session of a court for considering proofs and determining issues.
[1913 Webster]

His last offenses to us
Shall have judicious hearing.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Another hearing before some other court. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Hearing, as applied to equity cases, means the same thing that the word trial does at law. Abbot.
[1913 Webster]

4. Extent within which sound may be heard; sound; earshot. “She's not within hearing.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

They laid him by the pleasant shore,
And in the hearing of the wave.
Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

hearing-impaired
hearing-impaired adj. having a hearing impairment making hearing difficult; having a defective but functioning sense of hearing.
Syn. -- hard-of-hearing.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Hearken
Heark"en (härk"'n), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Hearkened (-'nd); p. pr. & vb. n. Hearkening.] [OE. hercnen, hercnien, AS. hercnian, heorcnian, fr. hiéran, h&ymacr_;ran, to hear; akin to OD. harcken, horcken, LG. harken, horken, G. horchen. See Hear, and cf. Hark.] 1. To listen; to lend the ear; to attend to what is uttered; to give heed; to hear, in order to obey or comply.
[1913 Webster]

The Furies hearken, and their snakes uncurl. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Hearken, O Israel, unto the statutes and unto the judgments, which I teach you. Deut. iv. 1.
[1913 Webster]

2. To inquire; to seek information. [Obs.]Hearken after their offense.” Shak.

Syn. -- To attend; listen; hear; heed. See Attend, v. i.
[1913 Webster]

Hearken
Heark"en, v. t. 1. To hear by listening. [Archaic]
[1913 Webster]

[She] hearkened now and then
Some little whispering and soft groaning sound.
Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. To give heed to; to hear attentively. [Archaic]
[1913 Webster]

The King of Naples . . . hearkens my brother's suit. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

To hearken out, to search out. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

If you find none, you must hearken out a vein and buy. B. Johnson.
[1913 Webster]

Hearkener
Heark"en*er (-&etilde_;r), n. One who hearkens; a listener.
[1913 Webster]

Hearsal
Hear"sal (h&etilde_;r"s&aitalic_;l), n. Rehearsal. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Hearsay
Hear"say` (hēr"sā`), n. Report; rumor; fame; common talk; something heard from another.
[1913 Webster]

Much of the obloquy that has so long rested on the memory of our great national poet originated in frivolous hearsays of his life and conversation. Prof. Wilson.
[1913 Webster]

Hearsay evidence (Law), that species of testimony which consists in a narration by one person of matters told him by another. It is, with a few exceptions, inadmissible as testimony. Abbott.
[1913 Webster]

Hearse
Hearse (h&etilde_;rs), n. [Etymol. uncertain.] A hind in the second year of its age. [Eng.] Wright.
[1913 Webster]

Hearse
Hearse (h&etilde_;rs), n. [See Herse.] 1. A framework of wood or metal placed over the coffin or tomb of a deceased person, and covered with a pall; also, a temporary canopy bearing wax lights and set up in a church, under which the coffin was placed during the funeral ceremonies. [Obs.] Oxf. Gloss.
[1913 Webster]

2. A grave, coffin, tomb, or sepulchral monument. [Archaic] “Underneath this marble hearse.” B. Johnson.
[1913 Webster]

Beside the hearse a fruitful palm tree grows. Fairfax
[1913 Webster]

Who lies beneath this sculptured hearse. Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

3. A bier or handbarrow for conveying the dead to the grave. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Set down, set down your honorable load,
It honor may be shrouded in a hearse.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. A carriage or motor vehicle specially adapted or used for conveying the dead to the grave in a coffin.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Hearse
Hearse, v. t. To inclose in a hearse; to entomb. [Obs.] “Would she were hearsed at my foot.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hearsecloth
Hearse"cloth` (-kl&obreve_;th`; 115), n. A cloth for covering a coffin when on a bier; a pall. Bp. Sanderson.
[1913 Webster]

Hearselike
Hearse"like` (-līk`), a. Suitable to a funeral.
[1913 Webster]

If you listen to David's harp, you shall hear as many hearselike airs as carols. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Heart
Heart (härt), n. [OE. harte, herte, heorte, AS. heorte; akin to OS. herta, OFies. hirte, D. hart, OHG. herza, G. herz, Icel. hjarta, Sw. hjerta, Goth. haírtō, Lith. szirdis, Russ. serdtse, Ir. cridhe, L. cor, Gr. kardi`a, kh^r. √277. Cf. Accord, Discord, Cordial, 4th Core, Courage.] 1. (Anat.) A hollow, muscular organ, which, by contracting rhythmically, keeps up the circulation of the blood.
[1913 Webster]

Why does my blood thus muster to my heart! Shak.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; In adult mammals and birds, the heart is four-chambered, the right auricle and ventricle being completely separated from the left auricle and ventricle; and the blood flows from the systemic veins to the right auricle, thence to the right ventricle, from which it is forced to the lungs, then returned to the left auricle, thence passes to the left ventricle, from which it is driven into the systemic arteries. See Illust. under Aorta. In fishes there are but one auricle and one ventricle, the blood being pumped from the ventricle through the gills to the system, and thence returned to the auricle. In most amphibians and reptiles, the separation of the auricles is partial or complete, and in reptiles the ventricles also are separated more or less completely. The so-called lymph hearts, found in many amphibians, reptiles, and birds, are contractile sacs, which pump the lymph into the veins.
[1913 Webster]

2. The seat of the affections or sensibilities, collectively or separately, as love, hate, joy, grief, courage, and the like; rarely, the seat of the understanding or will; -- usually in a good sense, when no epithet is expressed; the better or lovelier part of our nature; the spring of all our actions and purposes; the seat of moral life and character; the moral affections and character itself; the individual disposition and character; as, a good, tender, loving, bad, hard, or selfish heart.
[1913 Webster]

Hearts are dust, hearts' loves remain. Emerson.
[1913 Webster]

3. The nearest the middle or center; the part most hidden and within; the inmost or most essential part of any body or system; the source of life and motion in any organization; the chief or vital portion; the center of activity, or of energetic or efficient action; as, the heart of a country, of a tree, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Exploits done in the heart of France. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Peace subsisting at the heart
Of endless agitation.
Wordsworth.
[1913 Webster]

4. Courage; courageous purpose; spirit.
[1913 Webster]

Eve, recovering heart, replied. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

The expelled nations take heart, and when they fly from one country invade another. Sir W. Temple.
[1913 Webster]

5. Vigorous and efficient activity; power of fertile production; condition of the soil, whether good or bad.
[1913 Webster]

That the spent earth may gather heart again. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

6. That which resembles a heart in shape; especially, a roundish or oval figure or object having an obtuse point at one end, and at the other a corresponding indentation, -- used as a symbol or representative of the heart.
[1913 Webster]

7. One of the suits of playing cards, distinguished by the figure or figures of a heart; as, hearts are trumps.
[1913 Webster]

8. Vital part; secret meaning; real intention.
[1913 Webster]

And then show you the heart of my message. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

9. A term of affectionate or kindly and familiar address. “I speak to thee, my heart.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Heart is used in many compounds, the most of which need no special explanation; as, heart-appalling, heart-breaking, heart-cheering, heart-chilled, heart-expanding, heart-free, heart-hardened, heart-heavy, heart-purifying, heart-searching, heart-sickening, heart-sinking, heart-sore, heart-stirring, heart-touching, heart-wearing, heart-whole, heart-wounding, heart-wringing, etc.
[1913 Webster]

After one's own heart, conforming with one's inmost approval and desire; as, a friend after my own heart.

The Lord hath sought him a man after his own heart. 1 Sam. xiii. 14.

-- At heart, in the inmost character or disposition; at bottom; really; as, he is at heart a good man. -- By heart, in the closest or most thorough manner; as, to know or learn by heart. “Composing songs, for fools to get by heart” (that is, to commit to memory, or to learn thoroughly). Pope. -- to learn by heart, to memorize. -- For my heart, for my life; if my life were at stake. [Obs.] “I could not get him for my heart to do it.” Shak. -- Heart bond (Masonry), a bond in which no header stone stretches across the wall, but two headers meet in the middle, and their joint is covered by another stone laid header fashion. Knight. -- Heart and hand, with enthusiastic coöperation. -- Heart hardness, hardness of heart; callousness of feeling; moral insensibility. Shak. -- Heart heaviness, depression of spirits. Shak. -- Heart point (Her.), the fess point. See Escutcheon. -- Heart rising, a rising of the heart, as in opposition. -- Heart shell (Zool.), any marine, bivalve shell of the genus Cardium and allied genera, having a heart-shaped shell; esp., the European Isocardia cor; -- called also heart cockle. -- Heart sickness, extreme depression of spirits. -- Heart and soul, with the utmost earnestness. -- Heart urchin (Zool.), any heartshaped, spatangoid sea urchin. See Spatangoid. -- Heart wheel, a form of cam, shaped like a heart. See Cam. -- In good heart, in good courage; in good hope. -- Out of heart, discouraged. -- Poor heart, an exclamation of pity. -- To break the heart of. (a) To bring to despair or hopeless grief; to cause to be utterly cast down by sorrow. (b) To bring almost to completion; to finish very nearly; -- said of anything undertaken; as, he has broken the heart of the task. -- To find in the heart, to be willing or disposed. “I could find in my heart to ask your pardon.” Sir P. Sidney. -- To have at heart, to desire (anything) earnestly. -- To have in the heart, to purpose; to design or intend to do. -- To have the heart in the mouth, to be much frightened. -- To lose heart, to become discouraged. -- To lose one's heart, to fall in love. -- To set the heart at rest, to put one's self at ease. -- To set the heart upon, to fix the desires on; to long for earnestly; to be very fond of. -- To take heart of grace, to take courage. -- To take to heart, to grieve over. -- To wear one's heart upon one's sleeve, to expose one's feelings or intentions; to be frank or impulsive. -- With all one's heart, With one's whole heart, very earnestly; fully; completely; devotedly.

[1913 Webster]

Heart
Heart (härt), v. t. To give heart to; to hearten; to encourage; to inspirit. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

My cause is hearted; thine hath no less reason. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Heart
Heart, v. i. To form a compact center or heart; as, a hearting cabbage.
[1913 Webster]

Heartache
Heart"ache` (-āk`), n. [Cf. AS. heortece.] Sorrow; anguish of mind; mental pang. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

heartbeat
heartbeat n. the audible and palpable rhythmic contraction and expansion of the arteries with each beat of the heart; as, he listened to her heartbeat with a stethoscope.
Syn. -- pulse, pulsation, beat.
[WordNet 1.5]

in a heartbeat immediately.
[PJC]

Heartbreak
Heart"break` (-brāk`), n. Crushing sorrow or grief; a yielding to such grief. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Heartbreaking
Heart"break`ing, a. Causing overpowering sorrow.
[1913 Webster]

Heartbroken
Heart"bro`ken (-brō`k'n), a. Overcome by crushing sorrow; deeply grieved.
[1913 Webster]

Heartburn
Heart"burn` (-bûrn`), n. (Med.) An uneasy, burning sensation in the stomach, often attended with an inclination to vomit. It is sometimes idiopathic, but is often a symptom of other complaints.
[1913 Webster]

Heartburned
Heart"burned` (-bûrnd`), a. Having heartburn. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Heartburning
Heart"burn`ing (-bûrn`&ibreve_;ng), a. Causing discontent.
[1913 Webster]

Heartburning
Heart"burn`ing, n. 1. (Med.) Same as Heartburn.
[1913 Webster]

2. Discontent; secret enmity. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

The transaction did not fail to leave heartburnings. Palfrey.
[1913 Webster]

Heartdear
Heart"dear` (-dēr`), a. Sincerely beloved. [R.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Heartdeep
Heart"deep` (-dēp`), a. Rooted in the heart. Herbert.
[1913 Webster]

Heart-eating
Heart"-eat`ing (-ēt`&ibreve_;ng), a. Preying on the heart.
[1913 Webster]

Hearted
Heart"ed, a. 1. Having a heart; having (such) a heart (regarded as the seat of the affections, disposition, or character).
[1913 Webster]

2. Shaped like a heart; cordate. [R.] Landor.
[1913 Webster]

3. Seated or laid up in the heart.
[1913 Webster]

I hate the Moor: my cause is hearted. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; This word is chiefly used in composition; as, hard-hearted, faint-hearted, kind-hearted, lion-hearted, stout-hearted, etc. Hence the nouns hard-heartedness, faint-heartedness, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Heartedness
Heart"ed*ness, n. Earnestness; sincerity; heartiness. [R.] Clarendon.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; See also the Note under Hearted. The analysis of the compounds gives hard-hearted + -ness, rather than hard + heartedness, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Hearten
Heart"en (härt"'n), v. t. [From Heart.] 1. To encourage; to animate; to incite or stimulate the courage of; to embolden.
[1913 Webster]

Hearten those that fight in your defense. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. To restore fertility or strength to, as to land.
[1913 Webster]

Heartener
Heart"en*er (-&etilde_;r), n. One who, or that which, heartens, animates, or stirs up. W. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Heartfelt
Heart"felt` (-f&ebreve_;lt`), a. Hearty; sincere.
[1913 Webster]

Heartgrief
Heart"grief` (-grēf`), n. Heartache; sorrow. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hearth
Hearth (härth), n. [OE. harthe, herth, herthe, AS. heorð; akin to D. haard, heerd, Sw. härd, G. herd; cf. Goth. haúri a coal, Icel. hyrr embers, and L. cremare to burn.] 1. The pavement or floor of brick, stone, or metal in a chimney, on which a fire is made; the floor of a fireplace; also, a corresponding part of a stove.
[1913 Webster]

There was a fire on the hearth burning before him. Jer. xxxvi. 22.
[1913 Webster]

Where fires thou find'st unraked and hearths unswept.
There pinch the maids as blue as bilberry.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. The house itself, as the abode of comfort to its inmates and of hospitality to strangers; fireside.
[1913 Webster]

Household talk and phrases of the hearth. Tennyson.

3. (Metal. & Manuf.) The floor of a furnace, on which the material to be heated lies, or the lowest part of a melting furnace, into which the melted material settles; as, an open-hearth smelting furnace.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Hearth ends (Metal.), fragments of lead ore ejected from the furnace by the blast. -- Hearth money, Hearth penny [AS. heorðpening], a tax formerly laid in England on hearths, each hearth (in all houses paying the church and poor rates) being taxed at two shillings; -- called also chimney money, etc.
[1913 Webster]

He had been importuned by the common people to relieve them from the . . . burden of the hearth money. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

hearthrug
hearthrug n. a rug spread out in front of a fireplace.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hearthstone
Hearth"stone` (-stōn`), n. Stone forming the hearth; hence, the fireside; home.
[1913 Webster]

Chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone. A. Lincoln.
[1913 Webster]

Heartily
Heart"i*ly (härt"&ibreve_;*l&ybreve_;), adv. [From Hearty.] 1. From the heart; with all the heart; with sincerity.
[1913 Webster]

I heartily forgive them. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. With zeal; actively; vigorously; willingly; cordially; as, he heartily assisted the prince.
[1913 Webster]

To eat heartily, to eat freely and with relish. Addison.

Syn. -- Sincerely; cordially; zealously; vigorously; actively; warmly; eagerly; ardently; earnestly.
[1913 Webster]

Heartiness
Heart"i*ness (härt"&ibreve_;*n&ebreve_;s), n. The quality of being hearty; as, the heartiness of a greeting.
[1913 Webster]

heartleaf
heartleaf n. (Bot.) 1. wild ginger (Asarum shuttleworthii) having persistent heart-shaped pungent leaves, growing from Western Virginia to Alabama.
Syn. -- Asarum shuttleworthii.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. (Bot.) An evergreen low-growing perennial (Asarum virginicum) having mottled green and silvery-gray heart-shaped pungent leaves, growing from Virginia to South Carolina.
Syn. -- Asarum virginicum.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heartless
Heart"less, a. 1. Without a heart.
[1913 Webster]

You have left me heartless; mine is in your bosom. J. Webster.
[1913 Webster]

2. Destitute of courage; spiritless; despondent.
[1913 Webster]

Heartless they fought, and quitted soon their ground. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Heartless and melancholy. W. Irwing.
[1913 Webster]

3. Destitute of feeling or affection; unsympathetic; cruel. “The heartless parasites.” Byron.

-- Heart"less*ly, adv. -- Heart"less*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Heartlet
Heart"let (-l&ebreve_;t), n. A little heart.
[1913 Webster]

Heartlings
Heart"lings (-l&ibreve_;ngz), interj. An exclamation used in addressing a familiar acquaintance. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Heartpea
Heart"pea` (-pē`), n. (Bot.) Same as Heartseed.
[1913 Webster]

Heartquake
Heart"quake` (-kwāk`), n. Trembling of the heart; trepidation; fear.
[1913 Webster]

In many an hour of danger and heartquake. Hawthorne.
[1913 Webster]

Heartrending
Heart"rend`ing (-r&ebreve_;nd`&ibreve_;ng), a. Causing intense grief; overpowering with anguish; very distressing.
[1913 Webster]

Heart-robbing
Heart"-rob`bing (-r&obreve_;b`b&ibreve_;ng), a. 1. Depriving of thought; ecstatic.Heart-robbing gladness.” Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. Stealing the heart or affections; winning.
[1913 Webster]

Heart's-ease
Heart's"-ease` (härts"ēz`), n. 1. Ease of heart; peace or tranquillity of mind or feeling. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) A species of violet (Viola tricolor), a common and long cultivated European herb from which most common garden pansies are derived; -- called also pansy. [wns=1]
Syn. -- wild pansy, Johnny-jump-up, heartsease, love-in-idleness, pink of my John, Viola tricolor.
[1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]

3. (Bot.) A violet of the Pacific coast of North America (Viola ocellata) having white petals tinged with yellow and deep violet. [wns=2]
Syn. -- two-eyed violet, heartsease, Viola ocellata.
[WordNet 1.5]

4. (Bot.) A common Old World viola (Viola arvensis) with creamy often violet-tinged flowers. [wns=3]
Syn. -- field pansy, heartsease, Viola arvensis.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heartseed
Heart"seed` (härt"sēd`), n. (Bot.) A climbing plant of the genus Cardiospermum, having round seeds which are marked with a spot like a heart. Loudon.
[1913 Webster]

heart-shaped
heartshaped
heart"shaped`, heart"-shaped` (härt"shāpt`), a. Having the shape of a heart; cordate; -- of a leaf shape.
[1913 Webster]

Heartsick
Heart"sick` (härt"s&ibreve_;k`), a. [AS. heortiseóc.] Sick at heart; extremely depressed in spirits; very despondent.
[1913 Webster]

Heartsome
Heart"some (härt"sŭm), a. Merry; cheerful; lively. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Heart-spoon
Heart"-spoon` (härt"sp&oomacr_;n`), n. A part of the breastbone. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

He feeleth through the herte-spon the pricke. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Heartstricken
Heart"strick`en (härt"str&ibreve_;k`'n), a. Shocked; dismayed.
[1913 Webster]

Heartstrike
Heart"strike` (härt"strīk`), v. t. To affect at heart; to shock. [R.] “They seek to heartstrike us.” B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

Heartstring
Heart"string` (härt"str&ibreve_;ng`), n. A nerve or tendon, supposed to brace and sustain the heart. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sobbing, as if a heartstring broke. Moore.
[1913 Webster]

Heartstruck
Heart"struck` (härt"strŭk`), a. 1. Driven to the heart; infixed in the mind. “His heartstruck injuries.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Shocked with pain, fear, or remorse; dismayed; heartstricken. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Heartswelling
Heart"swell`ing (härt"sw&ebreve_;l`&ibreve_;ng), a. Rankling in, or swelling, the heart.Heartswelling hate.” Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

heart-warming
heartwarming
heart"warm`ing, heart"-warm`ing adj. causing gladness and pleasure; -- used mostly of the actions of people, and sometimes of animals; as, Is there a sight more heart-warming than a family reunion?.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heart-whole
Heart"-whole` (härt"hōl`), a. [See Whole.] 1. Having the heart or affections free; not in love. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. With unbroken courage; undismayed.
[1913 Webster]

3. Of a single and sincere heart; with unconditional commitment or unstinting devotion; as, heart-whole friendship. [wns=1]
Syn. -- wholehearted.
[1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]

If he keeps heart-whole towards his Master. Bunyan.
[1913 Webster]

Heartwood
Heart"wood` (härt"w&oobreve_;d`), n. The hard, central part of the trunk of a tree, consisting of the old and matured wood, and usually differing in color from the outer layers. It is technically known as duramen, and distinguished from the softer sapwood or alburnum.
[1913 Webster]

Heart-wounded
Heart"-wound`ed (härt"w&oomacr_;nd`&ebreve_;d or -wound`&ebreve_;d), a. Wounded to the heart with love or grief. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Hearty
Heart"y (härt"&ybreve_;), a. [Compar. Heartier (härt"&ibreve_;*&etilde_;r); superl. Heartiest.] 1. Pertaining to, or proceeding from, the heart; warm; cordial; bold; zealous; sincere; willing; also, energetic; active; eager; as, a hearty welcome; hearty in supporting the government.
[1913 Webster]

Full of hearty tears
For our good father's loss.
Marston.
[1913 Webster]

2. Exhibiting strength; sound; healthy; firm; not weak; as, a hearty man; hearty timber.
[1913 Webster]

3. Promoting strength; nourishing; rich; abundant; as, hearty food; a hearty meal.

Syn. -- Sincere; real; unfeigned; undissembled; cordial; earnest; warm; zealous; ardent; eager; active; vigorous. -- Hearty, Cordial, Sincere. Hearty implies honesty and simplicity of feelings and manners; cordial refers to the warmth and liveliness with which the feelings are expressed; sincere implies that this expression corresponds to the real sentiments of the heart. A man should be hearty in his attachment to his friends, cordial in his reception of them to his house, and sincere in his offers to assist them.
[1913 Webster]

Hearty
Heart"y, n.; pl. Hearties (härt"&ibreve_;z). Comrade; boon companion; good fellow; -- a term of familiar address and fellowship among sailors. Dickens.
[1913 Webster]

Heartyhale
Heart"y*hale` (härt"hāl`), a. Good for the heart. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Heat
Heat (hēt), n. [OE. hete, hæte, AS. h&aemacr_;tu, h&aemacr_;to, fr. hāt hot; akin to OHG. heizi heat, Dan. hede, Sw. hetta. See Hot.] 1. A force in nature which is recognized in various effects, but especially in the phenomena of fusion and evaporation, and which, as manifested in fire, the sun's rays, mechanical action, chemical combination, etc., becomes directly known to us through the sense of feeling. In its nature heat is a mode of motion, being in general a form of molecular disturbance or vibration. It was formerly supposed to be a subtile, imponderable fluid, to which was given the name caloric.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; As affecting the human body, heat produces different sensations, which are called by different names, as heat or sensible heat, warmth, cold, etc., according to its degree or amount relatively to the normal temperature of the body.
[1913 Webster]

2. The sensation caused by the force or influence of heat when excessive, or above that which is normal to the human body; the bodily feeling experienced on exposure to fire, the sun's rays, etc.; the reverse of cold.
[1913 Webster]

3. High temperature, as distinguished from low temperature, or cold; as, the heat of summer and the cold of winter; heat of the skin or body in fever, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Else how had the world . . .
Avoided pinching cold and scorching heat!
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

4. Indication of high temperature; appearance, condition, or color of a body, as indicating its temperature; redness; high color; flush; degree of temperature to which something is heated, as indicated by appearance, condition, or otherwise.
[1913 Webster]

It has raised . . . heats in their faces. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

The heats smiths take of their iron are a blood-red heat, a white-flame heat, and a sparkling or welding heat. Moxon.
[1913 Webster]

5. A single complete operation of heating, as at a forge or in a furnace; as, to make a horseshoe in a certain number of heats.
[1913 Webster]

6. A violent action unintermitted; a single effort; a single course in a race that consists of two or more courses; as, he won two heats out of three.
[1913 Webster]

Many causes . . . for refreshment betwixt the heats. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

[He] struck off at one heat the matchless tale of “Tam o' Shanter.” J. C. Shairp.
[1913 Webster]

7. Utmost violence; rage; vehemence; as, the heat of battle or party. “The heat of their division.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

8. Agitation of mind; inflammation or excitement; exasperation. “The heat and hurry of his rage.” South.
[1913 Webster]

9. Animation, as in discourse; ardor; fervency; as, in the heat of argument.
[1913 Webster]

With all the strength and heat of eloquence. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

10. (Zool.) Sexual excitement in animals; readiness for sexual activity; estrus or rut.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

11. Fermentation.
[1913 Webster]

12. Strong psychological pressure, as in a police investigation; as, when they turned up the heat, he took it on the lam. [slang]
[PJC]

Animal heat, Blood heat, Capacity for heat, etc. See under Animal, Blood, etc. -- Atomic heat (Chem.), the product obtained by multiplying the atomic weight of any element by its specific heat. The atomic heat of all solid elements is nearly a constant, the mean value being 6.4. -- Dynamical theory of heat, that theory of heat which assumes it to be, not a peculiar kind of matter, but a peculiar motion of the ultimate particles of matter. Heat engine, any apparatus by which a heated substance, as a heated fluid, is made to perform work by giving motion to mechanism, as a hot-air engine, or a steam engine. -- Heat producers. (Physiol.) See under Food. -- Heat rays, a term formerly applied to the rays near the red end of the spectrum, whether within or beyond the visible spectrum. -- Heat weight (Mech.), the product of any quantity of heat by the mechanical equivalent of heat divided by the absolute temperature; -- called also thermodynamic function, and entropy. -- Mechanical equivalent of heat. See under Equivalent. -- Specific heat of a substance (at any temperature), the number of units of heat required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of the substance at that temperature one degree. -- Unit of heat, the quantity of heat required to raise, by one degree, the temperature of a unit mass of water, initially at a certain standard temperature. The temperature usually employed is that of 0° Centigrade, or 32° Fahrenheit.
[1913 Webster]

Heat
Heat (hēt), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Heated; p. pr. & vb. n. Heating.] [OE. heten, AS. h&aemacr_;tan, fr. hāt hot. See Hot.] 1. To make hot; to communicate heat to, or cause to grow warm; as, to heat an oven or furnace, an iron, or the like.
[1913 Webster]

Heat me these irons hot. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. To excite or make hot by action or emotion; to make feverish.
[1913 Webster]

Pray, walk softly; do not heat your blood. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. To excite ardor in; to rouse to action; to excite to excess; to inflame, as the passions.
[1913 Webster]

A noble emulation heats your breast. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Heat
Heat, v. i. 1. To grow warm or hot by the action of fire or friction, etc., or the communication of heat; as, the iron or the water heats slowly.
[1913 Webster]

2. To grow warm or hot by fermentation, or the development of heat by chemical action; as, green hay heats in a mow, and manure in the dunghill.
[1913 Webster]

Heat
Heat (h&ebreve_;t), imp. & p. p. of Heat. Heated; as, the iron though heat red-hot. [Obs. or Archaic] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

heated
heated adj. 1. characterized by great warmth and intensity of feeling; as, a heated argument. Opposite of dispassionate, passionless. [wns=1]
Syn. -- ardent, fervent, fervid, fiery, hot, impassioned, perfervid, torrid.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. supplied with a mechanism for heating; -- of structures or devices; as, a heated fishing cabin. Opposite of unheated. [wns=2]
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Heater
Heat"er (hēt"&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who, or that which, heats.
[1913 Webster]

2. Any contrivance or implement, as a furnace, stove, or other heated body or vessel, etc., used to impart heat to something, or to contain something to be heated.
[1913 Webster]

3. A pistol or other carryable firearm; as, gunmen with their heaters bulging in their pockets. [slang]
[PJC]

Feed heater. See under Feed.
[1913 Webster]

Heath
Heath (hēth), n. [OE. heth waste land, the plant heath, AS. h&aemacr_;ð; akin to D. & G. heide, Icel. heiðr waste land, Dan. hede, Sw. hed, Goth. haiþi field, L. bucetum a cow pasture; cf. W. coed a wood, Skr. kshētra field. √20.] 1. (Bot.) (a) A low shrub (Erica vulgaris or Calluna vulgaris), with minute evergreen leaves, and handsome clusters of pink flowers. It is used in Great Britain for brooms, thatch, beds for the poor, and for heating ovens. It is also called heather, and ling. (b) Also, any species of the genus Erica, of which several are European, and many more are South African, some of great beauty. See Illust. of Heather.
[1913 Webster]

2. A place overgrown with heath; any cheerless tract of country overgrown with shrubs or coarse herbage.
[1913 Webster]

Their stately growth, though bare,
Stands on the blasted heath.
Milton
[1913 Webster]

Heath cock (Zool.), the blackcock. See Heath grouse (below). -- Heath grass (Bot.), a kind of perennial grass, of the genus Triodia (Triodia decumbens), growing on dry heaths. -- Heath grouse, or Heath game (Zool.), a European grouse (Tetrao tetrix), which inhabits heaths; -- called also black game, black grouse, heath poult, heath fowl, moor fowl. The male is called heath cock, and blackcock; the female, heath hen, and gray hen. -- Heath hen. (Zool.) See Heath grouse (above). -- Heath pea (Bot.), a species of bitter vetch (Lathyrus macrorhizus), the tubers of which are eaten, and in Scotland are used to flavor whisky. -- Heath throstle (Zool.), a European thrush which frequents heaths; the ring ouzel.
[1913 Webster]

Heathclad
Heath"clad` (-klăd`), a. Clad or crowned with heath.
[1913 Webster]

Heathen
Hea"then (hē"&thlig_;'n; 277), n.; pl. Heathens (-&thlig_;'nz) or collectively Heathen. [OE. hethen, AS. h&aemacr_;ðen, prop. an adj. fr. h&aemacr_;ð heath, and orig., therefore, one who lives in the country or on the heaths and in the woods (cf. pagan, fr. pagus village); akin to OS. hēðin, adj., D. heiden a heathen, G. heide, OHG. heidan, Icel. heiðinn, adj., Sw. heden, Goth. haiþnō, n. fem. See Heath, and cf. Hoiden.] 1. An individual of the pagan or unbelieving nations, or those which worship idols and do not acknowledge the true God; a pagan; an idolater.
[1913 Webster]

2. An irreligious person.
[1913 Webster]

If it is no more than a moral discourse, he may preach it and they may hear it, and yet both continue unconverted heathens. V. Knox.
[1913 Webster]

The heathen, as the term is used in the Scriptures, all people except the Jews; now used of all people except Christians, Jews, and Muslims.
[1913 Webster]

Ask of me, and I shall give thee the heathen for thine inheritance. Ps. ii. 8.

Syn. -- Pagan; gentile. See Pagan.
[1913 Webster]

Heathen
Hea"then (hē"&thlig_;'n), a. 1. Gentile; pagan; as, a heathen author. “The heathen philosopher.” “All in gold, like heathen gods.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Barbarous; unenlightened; heathenish.
[1913 Webster]

3. Irreligious; scoffing.
[1913 Webster]

Heathendom
Hea"then*dom (-dŭm), n. [AS. h&aemacr_;ðendōm.] 1. That part of the world where heathenism prevails; the heathen nations, considered collectively.
[1913 Webster]

2. Heathenism. C. Kingsley.
[1913 Webster]

Heathenesse
Hea"then*esse (-&ebreve_;s), n. [AS. h&aemacr_;ðennes, i. e., heathenness.] Heathendom. [Obs.] Chaucer. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Heathenish
Hea"then*ish, a. [AS. h&aemacr_;ðenisc.] 1. Of or pertaining to the heathen; resembling or characteristic of heathens. “Worse than heathenish crimes.” Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Rude; uncivilized; savage; cruel. South.
[1913 Webster]

3. Irreligious; as, a heathenish way of living.
[1913 Webster]

Heathenishly
Hea"then*ish*ly, adv. In a heathenish manner.
[1913 Webster]

Heathenishness
Hea"then*ish*ness, n. The state or quality of being heathenish. “The . . . heathenishness and profaneness of most playbooks.” Prynne.
[1913 Webster]

Heathenism
Hea"then*ism (-&ibreve_;z'm), n. 1. The religious system or rites of a heathen nation; idolatry; paganism.
[1913 Webster]

2. The manners or morals usually prevalent in a heathen country; ignorance; rudeness; barbarism.
[1913 Webster]

Heathenize
Hea"then*ize (-īz), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Heathenized (-īzd); p. pr. & vb. n. Heathenizing (-ī`z&ibreve_;ng).] To render heathen or heathenish. Firmin.
[1913 Webster]

Heathenness
Hea"then*ness, n. [Cf. Heathenesse.] State of being heathen or like the heathen.
[1913 Webster]

Heathenry
Hea"then*ry (-r&ybreve_;), n. 1. The state, quality, or character of the heathen.
[1913 Webster]

Your heathenry and your laziness. C. Kingsley.
[1913 Webster]

2. Heathendom; heathen nations.
[1913 Webster]

Heather
Heath"er (h&ebreve_;&thlig_;"&etilde_;r; 277. This is the only pronunciation in Scotland), n. [See Heath.] Heath. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Gorse and grass
And heather, where his footsteps pass,
The brighter seem.
Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

Heather bell (Bot.), one of the pretty subglobose flowers of two European kinds of heather (Erica Tetralix, and Erica cinerea).
[1913 Webster]

Heathery
Heath"er*y (-&ybreve_;), a. Heathy; abounding in heather; of the nature of heath.
[1913 Webster]

heath fowl
heathfowl
heathfowl, heath fowl n. A large Northern European black grouse (Lyrurus tetrix formerly Tetrao tetrix) with a lyre-shaped tail; it is also called heath grouse, black game, black grouse, heath poult, heath fowl, and moor fowl. See heath grouse under heath, above.
Syn. -- European black grouse, Lyrurus tetrix.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heathy
Heath"y (hēth"&ybreve_;), a. Full of heath; abounding with heath; as, heathy land; heathy hills. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Heating
Heat"ing (hēt"&ibreve_;ng), a. That heats or imparts heat; promoting warmth or heat; exciting action; stimulating; as, heating medicines or applications.
[1913 Webster]

Heating surface (Steam Boilers), the aggregate surface exposed to fire or to the heated products of combustion, esp. of all the plates or sheets that are exposed to water on their opposite surfaces; -- called also fire surface.
[1913 Webster]

Heatingly
Heat"ing*ly, adv. In a heating manner; so as to make or become hot or heated.
[1913 Webster]

Heatless
Heat"less, a. Destitute of heat; cold. Beau. & Fl.
[1913 Webster]

heatstroke
heatstroke n. A physiological disturbance caused by exposure to excessive heat, resulting in rapid pulse, hot dry skin, and fever, leading to loss of consciousness.
[WordNet 1.5]

heaume
heaume n. 1. a large medieval helmet supported on the shoulders; called also helm.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Heave
Heave (hēv), v. t. [imp. Heaved (hēvd), or Hove (hōv); p. p. Heaved, Hove, formerly Hoven (hō"v'n); p. pr. & vb. n. Heaving.] [OE. heven, hebben, AS. hebban; akin to OS. hebbian, D. heffen, OHG. heffan, hevan, G. heben, Icel. hefja, Sw. häfva, Dan. hæve, Goth. hafjan, L. capere to take, seize; cf. Gr. kw`ph handle. Cf. Accept, Behoof, Capacious, Forceps, Haft, Receipt.] 1. To cause to move upward or onward by a lifting effort; to lift; to raise; to hoist; -- often with up; as, the wave heaved the boat on land.
[1913 Webster]

One heaved ahigh, to be hurled down below. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Heave, as now used, implies that the thing raised is heavy or hard to move; but formerly it was used in a less restricted sense.
[1913 Webster]

Here a little child I stand,
Heaving up my either hand.
Herrick.
[1913 Webster]

2. To throw; to cast; -- obsolete, provincial, or colloquial, except in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the lead; to heave the log.
[1913 Webster]

3. To force from, or into, any position; to cause to move; also, to throw off; -- mostly used in certain nautical phrases; as, to heave the ship ahead.
[1913 Webster]

4. To raise or force from the breast; to utter with effort; as, to heave a sigh.
[1913 Webster]

The wretched animal heaved forth such groans. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

5. To cause to swell or rise, as the breast or bosom.
[1913 Webster]

The glittering, finny swarms
That heave our friths, and crowd upon our shores.
Thomson.
[1913 Webster]

To heave a cable short (Naut.), to haul in cable till the ship is almost perpendicularly above the anchor. -- To heave a ship ahead (Naut.), to warp her ahead when not under sail, as by means of cables. -- To heave a ship down (Naut.), to throw or lay her down on one side; to careen her. -- To heave a ship to (Naut.), to bring the ship's head to the wind, and stop her motion. -- To heave about (Naut.), to put about suddenly. -- To heave in (Naut.), to shorten (cable). -- To heave in stays (Naut.), to put a vessel on the other tack. -- To heave out a sail (Naut.), to unfurl it. -- To heave taut (Naut.), to turn a capstan, etc., till the rope becomes strained. See Taut, and Tight. -- To heave the lead (Naut.), to take soundings with lead and line. -- To heave the log. (Naut.) See Log. -- To heave up anchor (Naut.), to raise it from the bottom of the sea or elsewhere.
[1913 Webster]

Heave
Heave (hēv), v. i. 1. To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound.
[1913 Webster]

And the huge columns heave into the sky. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Where heaves the turf in many a moldering heap. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

The heaving sods of Bunker Hill. E. Everett.
[1913 Webster]

2. To rise and fall with alternate motions, as the lungs in heavy breathing, as waves in a heavy sea, as ships on the billows, as the earth when broken up by frost, etc.; to swell; to dilate; to expand; to distend; hence, to labor; to struggle.
[1913 Webster]

Frequent for breath his panting bosom heaves. Prior.
[1913 Webster]

The heaving plain of ocean. Byron.
[1913 Webster]

3. To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult.
[1913 Webster]

The Church of England had struggled and heaved at a reformation ever since Wyclif's days. Atterbury.
[1913 Webster]

4. To make an effort to vomit; to retch; to vomit.
[1913 Webster]

To heave at. (a) To make an effort at. (b) To attack, to oppose. [Obs.] Fuller. -- To heave in sight (as a ship at sea), to come in sight; to appear. -- To heave up, to vomit. [Low]
[1913 Webster]

Heave
Heave, n. 1. An effort to raise something, as a weight, or one's self, or to move something heavy.
[1913 Webster]

After many strains and heaves
He got up to his saddle eaves.
Hudibras.
[1913 Webster]

2. An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

There's matter in these sighs, these profound heaves,
You must translate.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

None could guess whether the next heave of the earthquake would settle . . . or swallow them. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Geol.) A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode.
[1913 Webster]

Heaven
Heav"en (h&ebreve_;v"'n), n. [OE. heven, hefen, heofen, AS. heofon; akin to OS. hevan, LG. heben, heven, Icel. hifinn; of uncertain origin, cf. D. hemel, G. himmel, Icel. himmin, Goth. himins; perh. akin to, or influenced by, the root of E. heave, or from a root signifying to cover, cf. Goth. gahamōn to put on, clothe one's self, G. hemd shirt, and perh. E. chemise.] 1. The expanse of space surrounding the earth; esp., that which seems to be over the earth like a great arch or dome; the firmament; the sky; the place where the sun, moon, and stars appear; -- often used in the plural in this sense.
[1913 Webster]

I never saw the heavens so dim by day. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

When my eyes shall be turned to behold for the last time the sun in heaven. D. Webster.
[1913 Webster]

2. The dwelling place of the Deity; the abode of bliss; the place or state of the blessed after death.
[1913 Webster]

Unto the God of love, high heaven's King. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

It is a knell
That summons thee to heaven or to hell.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

New thoughts of God, new hopes of Heaven. Keble.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; In this general sense heaven and its corresponding words in other languages have as various definite interpretations as there are phases of religious belief.
[1913 Webster]

3. The sovereign of heaven; God; also, the assembly of the blessed, collectively; -- used variously in this sense, as in No. 2.; as, heaven helps those who help themselves.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Her prayers, whom Heaven delights to hear. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

The will
And high permission of all-ruling Heaven.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

4. Any place of supreme happiness or great comfort; perfect felicity; bliss; a sublime or exalted condition; as, a heaven of delight. “A heaven of beauty.” Shak. “The brightest heaven of invention.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

O bed! bed! delicious bed!
That heaven upon earth to the weary head!
Hood.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Heaven is very often used, esp. with participles, in forming compound words, most of which need no special explanation; as, heaven-appeasing, heaven-aspiring, heaven-begot, heaven-born, heaven-bred, heaven-conducted, heaven-descended, heaven-directed, heaven-exalted, heaven-given, heaven-guided, heaven-inflicted, heaven-inspired, heaven-instructed, heaven-kissing, heaven-loved, heaven-moving, heaven-protected, heaven-taught, heaven-warring, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

Heaven
Heav"en, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Heavened (h&ebreve_;v"'nd); p. pr. & vb. n. Heavening.] To place in happiness or bliss, as if in heaven; to beatify. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

We are happy as the bird whose nest
Is heavened in the hush of purple hills.
G. Massey.
[1913 Webster]

Heavenize
Heav"en*ize (h&ebreve_;v"'n*īz), v. t. To render like heaven or fit for heaven. [R.] Bp. Hall.
[1913 Webster]

heavenliness
heav"en*li*ness (h&ebreve_;v"'n*l&ibreve_;*n&ebreve_;s), n. [From Heavenly.] The state or quality of being heavenly. Sir J. Davies.
[1913 Webster]

Heavenly
Heav"en*ly (h&ebreve_;v"'n*l&ybreve_;), a. [AS. heofonic.] 1. Pertaining to, resembling, or inhabiting heaven; celestial; not earthly; as, heavenly regions; heavenly music.
[1913 Webster]

As is the heavenly, such are they also that are heavenly. 1 Cor. xv. 48.
[1913 Webster]

2. Appropriate to heaven in character or happiness; perfect; pure; supremely blessed; as, a heavenly race; the heavenly, throng.
[1913 Webster]

The love of heaven makes one heavenly. Sir P. Sidney.
[1913 Webster]

Heavenly
Heav"en*ly, adv. 1. In a manner resembling that of heaven. “She was heavenly true.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. By the influence or agency of heaven.
[1913 Webster]

Out heavenly guided soul shall climb. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Heavenly-minded
Heav"en*ly-mind`ed (h&ebreve_;v"'n*l&ibreve_;*mīnd`&ebreve_;d), a. Having the thoughts and affections placed on, or suitable for, heaven and heavenly objects; devout; godly; pious. Milner. -- Heav"en*ly-mind`ed*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Heavenward
Heav"en*ward (h&ebreve_;v"'n*w&etilde_;rd), a. & adv. Toward heaven.
[1913 Webster]

Heave offering
Heave" of`fer*ing (?). (Jewish Antiq.) An offering or oblation heaved up or elevated before the altar, as the shoulder of the peace offering. See Wave offering. Ex. xxix. 27.
[1913 Webster]

Heaver
Heav"er (hēv"&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who, or that which, heaves or lifts; a laborer employed on docks in handling freight; as, a coal heaver.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Naut.) A bar used as a lever. Totten.
[1913 Webster]

Heaves
Heaves (?), n. A disease of horses, characterized by difficult breathing, with heaving of the flank, wheezing, flatulency, and a peculiar cough; broken wind.
[1913 Webster]

Heavily
Heav"i*ly (?), adv. [From 2d Heavy.] 1. In a heavy manner; with great weight; as, to bear heavily on a thing; to be heavily loaded.
[1913 Webster]

Heavily interested in those schemes of emigration. The Century.
[1913 Webster]

2. As if burdened with a great weight; slowly and laboriously; with difficulty; hence, in a slow, difficult, or suffering manner; sorrowfully.
[1913 Webster]

And took off their chariot wheels, that they drave them heavily. Ex. xiv. 25.
[1913 Webster]

Why looks your grace so heavily to-day? Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. Greatly; intensely; as, heavily involved in a plot; heavily invested in real estate.
[PJC]

4. In large quantity; as, it rained heavily.
[PJC]

Heaviness
Heav"i*ness, n. The state or quality of being heavy in its various senses; weight; sadness; sluggishness; oppression; thickness.
[1913 Webster]

Heaving
Heav"ing (?), n. A lifting or rising; a swell; a panting or deep sighing. Addison. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Heavisome
Heav"i*some (?), a. Heavy; dull. [Prov.]
[1913 Webster]

Heavy
Heav"y (?), a. Having the heaves.
[1913 Webster]

Heavy
Heav"y (?), a. [Compar. Heavier (?); superl. Heaviest.] [OE. hevi, AS. hefig, fr. hebban to lift, heave; akin to OHG. hebig, hevig, Icel. höfigr, höfugr. See Heave.] 1. Heaved or lifted with labor; not light; weighty; ponderous; as, a heavy stone; hence, sometimes, large in extent, quantity, or effects; as, a heavy fall of rain or snow; a heavy failure; heavy business transactions, etc.; often implying strength; as, a heavy barrier; also, difficult to move; as, a heavy draught.
[1913 Webster]

2. Not easy to bear; burdensome; oppressive; hard to endure or accomplish; hence, grievous, afflictive; as, heavy yokes, expenses, undertakings, trials, news, etc.
[1913 Webster]

The hand of the Lord was heavy upon them of Ashdod. 1 Sam. v. 6.
[1913 Webster]

The king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sent hither to impart the heavy news. Wordsworth.
[1913 Webster]

Trust him not in matter of heavy consequence. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. Laden with that which is weighty; encumbered; burdened; bowed down, either with an actual burden, or with care, grief, pain, disappointment.
[1913 Webster]

The heavy [sorrowing] nobles all in council were. Chapman.
[1913 Webster]

A light wife doth make a heavy husband. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. Slow; sluggish; inactive; or lifeless, dull, inanimate, stupid; as, a heavy gait, looks, manners, style, and the like; a heavy writer or book.
[1913 Webster]

Whilst the heavy plowman snores. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Of a heavy, dull, degenerate mind. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Neither [is] his ear heavy, that it can not hear. Is. lix. 1.
[1913 Webster]

5. Strong; violent; forcible; as, a heavy sea, storm, cannonade, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

6. Loud; deep; -- said of sound; as, heavy thunder.
[1913 Webster]

But, hark! that heavy sound breaks in once more. Byron.
[1913 Webster]

7. Dark with clouds, or ready to rain; gloomy; -- said of the sky.
[1913 Webster]

8. Impeding motion; cloggy; clayey; -- said of earth; as, a heavy road, soil, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

9. Not raised or made light; as, heavy bread.
[1913 Webster]

10. Not agreeable to, or suitable for, the stomach; not easily digested; -- said of food.
[1913 Webster]

11. Having much body or strength; -- said of wines, or other liquors.
[1913 Webster]

12. With child; pregnant. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Heavy artillery. (Mil.) (a) Guns of great weight or large caliber, esp. siege, garrison, and seacoast guns. (b) Troops which serve heavy guns. -- Heavy cavalry. See under Cavalry. -- Heavy fire (Mil.), a continuous or destructive cannonading, or discharge of small arms. -- Heavy metal (Mil.), large guns carrying balls of a large size; also, large balls for such guns. -- Heavy metals. (Chem.) See under Metal. -- Heavy weight, in wrestling, boxing, etc., a term applied to the heaviest of the classes into which contestants are divided. Cf. Feather weight (c), under Feather.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Heavy is used in composition to form many words which need no special explanation; as, heavy-built, heavy-browed, heavy-gaited, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Heavy
Heav"y, adv. Heavily; -- sometimes used in composition; as, heavy-laden.
[1913 Webster]

Heavy
Heav"y, v. t. To make heavy. [Obs.] Wyclif.
[1913 Webster]

Heavy-armed
Heav"y-armed` (?), a. (Mil.) Wearing heavy or complete armor; carrying heavy arms.
[1913 Webster]

Heavy-haded
Heav"y-had"ed (?), a. Clumsy; awkward.
[1913 Webster]

heavy-handed
heavy-handed adj. 1. same as ham-fisted.
Syn. -- bumbling, bungling, butterfingered, ham-fisted, ham-handed, handless, left-handed.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. unjustly harsh or domineering; as, incensed at the government's heavy-handed economic policies.
Syn. -- harsh, roughshod.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heavy-headed
Heav"y-head"ed (?), a. Dull; stupid. “Gross heavy-headed fellows.” Beau. & Fl.
[1913 Webster]

heavy-hearted
heavyhearted
heavyhearted, heavy-hearted adj. feeling or affected by sorrow or unhappiness.
Syn. -- blue, sad.
[WordNet 1.5]

heavy-laden
heavy-laden adj. 1. burdened by cares.
Syn. -- care-laden.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. bearing a heavy load; as, the heavy-laden trucks wore deep ruts in the unpaved road.
Syn. -- burdened, laden, weighed down.
[WordNet 1.5]

heavyset
heavyset adj. 1. obese. usually men are portly and women are stout
Syn. -- portly, stout.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. heavy and compact in form or build or stature.
Syn. -- compact, stocky, thick, thickset.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heavy spar
Heav"y spar` (?). (Min.) Native barium sulphate or barite, -- so called because of its high specific gravity as compared with other non-metallic minerals.
[1913 Webster]

heavyweight
heavyweight adj. heaviest in a category; as, a heavyweight boxer.
[WordNet 1.5]

heavyweight
heavyweight n. 1. a wrestler who weighs more than 214 pounds.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. a boxer who weighs more than 195 pounds.
[WordNet 1.5]

3. a very large person.
Syn. -- giant, hulk.
[WordNet 1.5]

4. a person of exceptional importance and reputation.
Syn. -- colossus, behemoth, giant, titan.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hebdomad
Heb"do*mad (?), n. [L. hebdomas, -adis, Gr. "ebdoma`s the number seven days, fr. &unr_; seventh, &unr_; seven. See Seven.] A week; a period of seven days. [R.] Sir T. Browne.

Hebdomadary
Hebdomadal
{ Heb*dom"a*dal (?), Heb*dom"a*da*ry (?), } a. [L. hebdomadalis, LL. hebdomadarius: cf. F. hebdomadaire.] Consisting of seven days, or occurring at intervals of seven days; weekly.
[1913 Webster]

Hebdomadally
Heb*dom"a*dal*ly (?), adv. In periods of seven days; weekly. Lowell.
[1913 Webster]

Hebdomadary
Heb*dom"a*da*ry (?), n. [LL. hebdomadarius: cf. F. hebdomadier.] (R. C. Ch.) A member of a chapter or convent, whose week it is to officiate in the choir, and perform other services, which, on extraordinary occasions, are performed by the superiors.
[1913 Webster]

Hebdomatical
Heb`do*mat"ic*al (?), a. [L. hebdomaticus, Gr. &unr_;.] Weekly; hebdomadal. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hebe
He"be (?), n. [L., fr. Gr. "h`bh youth, "H`bh Hebe.]
[1913 Webster]

1. (Class. Myth.) The goddess of youth, daughter of Jupiter and Juno. She was believed to have the power of restoring youth and beauty to those who had lost them.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) An African ape; the hamadryas.
[1913 Webster]

Heben
Heb"en (?), n. Ebony. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Hebenon
Heb"e*non (?), n. See Henbane. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hebetate
Heb"e*tate (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hebetated (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Hebetating.] [L. hebetatus, p. p. of hebetare to dull. See Hebete.] To render obtuse; to dull; to blunt; to stupefy; as, to hebetate the intellectual faculties. Southey
[1913 Webster]

Hebetate
Heb"e*tate (?), a. 1. Obtuse; dull.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) Having a dull or blunt and soft point. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Hebetation
Heb`e*ta"tion (?), n. [L. hebetatio: cf. F. hébétation.] 1. The act of making blunt, dull, or stupid.
[1913 Webster]

2. The state of being blunted or dulled.
[1913 Webster]

Hebete
He*bete" (?), a. [L. hebes, hebetis, dull, stupid, fr. hebere to be dull.] Dull; stupid. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hebetude
Heb"e*tude (?), n. [L. hebetudo.] Dullness; stupidity. Harvey.
[1913 Webster]

Hebraic
He"bra"ic (?), a. [L. Hebraicus, Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. hebraïque. See Hebrew.] Of or pertaining to the Hebrews, or to the language of the Hebrews.
[1913 Webster]

Hebraically
He*bra"ic*al*ly (?), adv. After the manner of the Hebrews or of the Hebrew language.
[1913 Webster]

Hebraism
He"bra*ism (?), n. [Cf. F. hébraïsme.]
[1913 Webster]

1. A Hebrew idiom or custom; a peculiar expression or manner of speaking in the Hebrew language. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

2. The type of character of the Hebrews.
[1913 Webster]

The governing idea of Hebraism is strictness of conscience. M. Arnold.
[1913 Webster]

Hebraist
He"bra*ist, n. [Cf. F. hébraïste.] One versed in the Hebrew language and learning.
[1913 Webster]

Hebraistic
He`bra*is"tic (?), a. Pertaining to, or resembling, the Hebrew language or idiom.
[1913 Webster]

Hebraistically
He`bra*is"tic*al*ly (?), adv. In a Hebraistic sense or form.
[1913 Webster]

Which is Hebraistically used in the New Testament. Kitto.
[1913 Webster]

Hebraize
He"bra*ize (?), v. t. [Gr. &unr_; to speak Hebrew: cf. F. hébraïser.] To convert into the Hebrew idiom; to make Hebrew or Hebraistic. J. R. Smith.
[1913 Webster]

Hebraize
He"bra*ize, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Hebraized (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Hebraizing.] To speak Hebrew, or to conform to the Hebrew idiom, or to Hebrew customs.
[1913 Webster]

Hebrew
He"brew (?), n. [F. Hébreu, L. Hebraeus, Gr. &unr_;, fr. Heb. 'ibhrī.] 1. An appellative of Abraham or of one of his descendants, esp. in the line of Jacob; an Israelite; a Jew.
[1913 Webster]

There came one that had escaped and told Abram the Hebrew. Gen. xiv. 13.
[1913 Webster]

2. The language of the Hebrews; -- one of the Semitic family of languages.
[1913 Webster]

Hebrew
He"brew, a. Of or pertaining to the Hebrews; as, the Hebrew language or rites.
[1913 Webster]

Hebrew calendar
Hebrew calendar. same as Jewish calendar.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hebrewess
He"brew*ess, n. An Israelitish woman.
[1913 Webster]

Hebrician
He*bri"cian (?), n. A Hebraist. [R.]

Hebridian
Hebridean
{ He*brid"e*an (?), He*brid"i*an (?), } a. Of or pertaining to the islands called Hebrides, west of Scotland. -- n. A native or inhabitant of the Hebrides.
[1913 Webster]

Hecatomb
Hec"a*tomb (?), n. [L. hecatombe, Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; hundred + &unr_; ox: cf. F. hécatombe.] (Antiq.) A sacrifice of a hundred oxen or cattle at the same time; hence, the sacrifice or slaughter of any large number of victims.
[1913 Webster]

Slaughtered hecatombs around them bleed. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

More than a human hecatomb. Byron.
[1913 Webster]

Hecatompedon
Hec`a*tom"pe*don (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; hundred feet long, &unr_; &unr_; the Parthenon; &unr_; hundred + &unr_; foot.] (Arch.) A name given to the old Parthenon at Athens, because measuring 100 Greek feet, probably in the width across the stylobate.
[1913 Webster]

Hecdecane
Hec"de*cane (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; six + &unr_; ten.] (Chem.) A white, semisolid, spermaceti-like hydrocarbon, C16H34, of the paraffin series, found dissolved as an important ingredient of kerosene, and so called because each molecule has sixteen atoms of carbon; -- called also hexadecane.
[1913 Webster]

Heck
Heck (?), n. [See Hatch a half door.] [Written also hack.] 1. The bolt or latch of a door. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

2. A rack for cattle to feed at. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

3. A door, especially one partly of latticework; -- called also heck door. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

4. A latticework contrivance for catching fish.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Weaving) An apparatus for separating the threads of warps into sets, as they are wound upon the reel from the bobbins, in a warping machine.
[1913 Webster]

6. A bend or winding of a stream. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Half heck, the lower half of a door. -- Heck board, the loose board at the bottom or back of a cart. -- Heck box or Heck frame, that which carries the heck in warping.
[1913 Webster]

Heck
Heck (?), n. hell; -- a euphemism. Used commonly in the phrase “What the heck”. [Colloq.]
[PJC]

Heckerism
Heck"er*ism (?), n. (R. C. Ch.) (a) The teaching of Isaac Thomas Hecker (1819-88), which interprets Catholicism as promoting human aspirations after liberty and truth, and as the religion best suited to the character and institutions of the American people. (b) Improperly, certain views or principles erroneously ascribed to Father Hecker in a French translation of Elliott's Life of Hecker. They were condemned as “Americanism” by the Pope, in a letter to Cardinal Gibbons, January 22, 1899.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Heckimal
Heck"i*mal (?), n. (Zool.) The European blue titmouse (Parus cœruleus). [Written also heckimel, hackeymal, hackmall, hagmall, and hickmall.]
[1913 Webster]

Heckle
Hec"kle (?), n. & v. t. Same as Hackle.
[1913 Webster]

Heckle
Hec"kle, v. t. 1. To interrogate, or ply with questions, esp. with severity or antagonism, as a candidate for the ministry.

Robert bore heckling, however, with great patience and adroitness. Mrs. Humphry Ward.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

2. To shout questions or jibes at (a public speaker), so as to disconcert him or render his talk ineffective.
[PJC]

heckling
heckling n. [vb. n. from heckle{2}.] Shouting in order to interrupt a speech with which the shouter disagrees.
Syn. -- barracking.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hectare
Hec"tare` (?), n. [F., fr. Gr. &unr_; hundred + F. are an are.] A measure of area, or superficies, containing a hundred ares, or 10,000 square meters, and equivalent to 2.471 acres.
[1913 Webster]

Hectic
Hec"tic (?), a. [F. hectique, Gr. &unr_; habitual, consumptive, fr. &unr_; habit, a habit of body or mind, fr. &unr_; to have; akin to Skr. sah to overpower, endure; cf. AS. sige, sigor, victory, G. sieg, Goth. sigis. Cf. Scheme.] 1. Habitual; constitutional; pertaining especially to slow waste of animal tissue, as in consumption; as, a hectic type in disease; a hectic flush.
[1913 Webster]

2. In a hectic condition; having hectic fever; consumptive; as, a hectic patient.
[1913 Webster]

Hectic fever (Med.), a fever of irritation and debility, occurring usually at a advanced stage of exhausting disease, as a in pulmonary consumption.
[1913 Webster]

Hectic
Hec"tic, n. 1. (Med.) Hectic fever.
[1913 Webster]

2. A hectic flush.
[1913 Webster]

It is no living hue, but a strange hectic. Byron.
[1913 Webster]

Hectocotylized
Hec`to*cot"y*lized (?), a. (Zool.) Changed into a hectocotylus; having a hectocotylis.
[1913 Webster]

Hectocotylus
Hec`to*cot"y*lus (?), n.; pl. Hectocotyli (#). [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; a hundred + &unr_; a hollow vessel.] (Zool.) One of the arms of the male of most kinds of cephalopods, which is specially modified in various ways to effect the fertilization of the eggs. In a special sense, the greatly modified arm of Argonauta and allied genera, which, after receiving the spermatophores, becomes detached from the male, and attaches itself to the female for reproductive purposes.
[1913 Webster]

hectogram
hec"to*gram (h&ebreve_;k"t&ouptack_;*grăm), n. [F. hectogramme, fr. Gr. 'ekato`n hundred + F. gramme a gram.] A measure of mass or weight, containing a hundred grams, or about 3.527 ounces avoirdupois. See 3rd gram.
[1913 Webster]

Hectogramme
Hec"to*gramme (?), n. [F.] The same as Hectogram.
[1913 Webster]

Hectograph
Hec"to*graph (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; hundred + -graph.] A contrivance for multiple copying, by means of a surface of gelatin softened with glycerin. [Written also hectograph.]

Hectolitre
Hectoliter
{ Hec"to*li`ter, Hec"to*li`tre } (?), n. [F. hectolitre, fr. Gr. &unr_; hundred + F. litre a liter.] A measure of liquids, containing a hundred liters; equal to a tenth of a cubic meter, nearly 261/2 gallons of wine measure, or 22.0097 imperial gallons. As a dry measure, it contains ten decaliters, or about 25/6 Winchester bushels.

Hectometre
Hectometer
{ Hec"to*me`ter, Hec"to*me`tre } (?), n. [F. &unr_; hectomètre, fr. Gr. &unr_; hundred + F. mètre a meter.] A measure of length, equal to a hundred meters. It is equivalent to 328.09 feet.
[1913 Webster]

Hector
Hec"tor (?), n. [From the Trojan warrior Hector, the son of Priam.] A bully; a blustering, turbulent, insolent, fellow; one who vexes or provokes.
[1913 Webster]

Hector
Hec"tor, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hectored (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Hectoring.] To treat with insolence; to threaten; to bully; hence, to torment by words; to tease; to taunt; to worry or irritate by bullying. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Hector
Hec"tor, v. i. To play the bully; to bluster; to be turbulent or insolent. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Hectorism
Hec"to*rism (?), n. The disposition or the practice of a hector; a bullying. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Hectorly
Hec"tor*ly, a. Resembling a hector; blustering; insolent; taunting.Hectorly, ruffianlike swaggering or huffing.” Barrow.
[1913 Webster]

Hectostere
Hec"to*stere (?), n. [F. hectostère; Gr. &unr_; hundred + F. stère.] A measure of solidity, containing one hundred cubic meters, and equivalent to 3531.66 English or 3531.05 United States cubic feet.
[1913 Webster]

Heddle
Hed"dle (?), n.; pl. Heddles (#). [Cf. Heald.] (Weaving) One of the sets of parallel doubled threads which, with mounting, compose the harness employed to guide the warp threads to the lathe or batten in a loom.
[1913 Webster]

Heddle
Hed"dle, v. t. To draw (the warp thread) through the heddle-eyes, in weaving.
[1913 Webster]

Heddle-eye
Hed"dle-eye` (?), n. (Weaving) The eye or loop formed in each heddle to receive a warp thread.
[1913 Webster]

Heddling
Hed"dling (?), vb. n. The act of drawing the warp threads through the heddle-eyes of a weaver's harness; the harness itself. Knight.
[1913 Webster]

Hederaceous
Hed`er*a"ceous (?), a. [L. hederaceus, fr. hedera ivy.] Of, pertaining to, or resembling, ivy.
[1913 Webster]

Hederal
Hed"er*al (?), a. Of or pertaining to ivy.
[1913 Webster]

Hederic
He*der"ic (?), a. Pertaining to, or derived from, the ivy (Hedera); as, hederic acid, an acid of the acetylene series.
[1913 Webster]

Hederiferous
Hed`er*if"er*ous (?), a. [L. hedera ivy + -ferous.] Producing ivy; ivy-bearing.
[1913 Webster]

Hederose
Hed"er*ose` (?), a. [L. hederosus, fr. hedera ivy.] Pertaining to, or of, ivy; full of ivy.
[1913 Webster]

Hedge
Hedge (?), n. [OE. hegge, AS. hecg; akin to haga an inclosure, E. haw, AS. hege hedge, E. haybote, D. hegge, OHG. hegga, G. hecke. √12. See Haw a hedge.] A thicket of bushes, usually thorn bushes; especially, such a thicket planted as a fence between any two portions of land; and also any sort of shrubbery, as evergreens, planted in a line or as a fence; particularly, such a thicket planted round a field to fence it, or in rows to separate the parts of a garden.
[1913 Webster]

The roughest berry on the rudest hedge. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Through the verdant maze
Of sweetbrier hedges I pursue my walk.
Thomson.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Hedge, when used adjectively or in composition, often means rustic, outlandish, illiterate, poor, or mean; as, hedge priest; hedgeborn, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Hedge bells, Hedge bindweed (Bot.), a climbing plant related to the morning-glory (Convolvulus sepium). -- Hedge bill, a long-handled billhook. -- Hedge garlic (Bot.), a plant of the genus Alliaria. See Garlic mustard, under Garlic. -- Hedge hyssop (Bot.), a bitter herb of the genus Gratiola, the leaves of which are emetic and purgative. -- Hedge marriage, a secret or clandestine marriage, especially one performed by a hedge priest. [Eng.] -- Hedge mustard (Bot.), a plant of the genus Sisymbrium, belonging to the Mustard family. -- Hedge nettle (Bot.), an herb, or under shrub, of the genus Stachys, belonging to the Mint family. It has a nettlelike appearance, though quite harmless. -- Hedge note. (a) The note of a hedge bird. (b) Low, contemptible writing. [Obs.] Dryden. -- Hedge priest, a poor, illiterate priest. Shak. -- Hedge school, an open-air school in the shelter of a hedge, in Ireland; a school for rustics. -- Hedge sparrow (Zool.), a European warbler (Accentor modularis) which frequents hedges. Its color is reddish brown, and ash; the wing coverts are tipped with white. Called also chanter, hedge warbler, dunnock, and doney. -- Hedge writer, an insignificant writer, or a writer of low, scurrilous stuff. [Obs.] Swift. -- To breast up a hedge. See under Breast. -- To hang in the hedge, to be at a standstill. “While the business of money hangs in the hedge.” Pepys.
[1913 Webster]

Hedge
Hedge (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hedged (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Hedging.] 1. To inclose or separate with a hedge; to fence with a thickly set line or thicket of shrubs or small trees; as, to hedge a field or garden.
[1913 Webster]

2. To obstruct, as a road, with a barrier; to hinder from progress or success; -- sometimes with up and out.
[1913 Webster]

I will hedge up thy way with thorns. Hos. ii. 6.
[1913 Webster]

Lollius Urbius . . . drew another wall . . . to hedge out incursions from the north. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. To surround for defense; to guard; to protect; to hem (in). “England, hedged in with the main.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. To surround so as to prevent escape.
[1913 Webster]

That is a law to hedge in the cuckoo. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

5. To protect oneself against excessive loss in an activity by taking a countervailing action; as, to hedge an investment denominated in a foreign currency by buying or selling futures in that currency; to hedge a donation to one political party by also donating to the opposed political party.
[PJC]

To hedge a bet, to bet upon both sides; that is, after having bet on one side, to bet also on the other, thus guarding against loss. See hedge{5}.
[1913 Webster]

Hedge
Hedge, v. i. 1. To shelter one's self from danger, risk, duty, responsibility, etc., as if by hiding in or behind a hedge; to skulk; to slink; to shirk obligations.
[1913 Webster]

I myself sometimes, leaving the fear of God on the left hand and hiding mine honor in my necessity, am fain to shuffle, to hedge and to lurch. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Betting) To reduce the risk of a wager by making a bet against the side or chance one has bet on.
[1913 Webster]

3. To use reservations and qualifications in one's speech so as to avoid committing one's self to anything definite.
[1913 Webster]

The Heroic Stanzas read much more like an elaborate attempt to hedge between the parties than . . . to gain favor from the Roundheads. Saintsbury.
[1913 Webster]

Hedgeborn
Hedge"born` (?), a. Born under a hedge; of low birth. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hedgebote
Hedge"bote` (?), n. (Eng. Law) Same as Haybote.
[1913 Webster]

hedged
hedged adj. [p. p. from hedge, v. i. {3}.] qualified; limited or restricted; as, a hedged promise.
Syn. -- weasel-worded.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hedge fund
Hedge" fund` (?), n. (Finance) a mutual fund or partnership of investors who pool large sums of money to speculate in securities, increasing the risk of such activity by using borrowed money to leverage the investments, or by selling short.
[PJC]

Hedgehog
Hedge"hog` (?), n. 1. (Zool.) A small European insectivore (Erinaceus Europaeus), and other allied species of Asia and Africa, having the hair on the upper part of its body mixed with prickles or spines. It is able to roll itself into a ball so as to present the spines outwardly in every direction. It is nocturnal in its habits, feeding chiefly upon insects.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) The Canadian porcupine.[U.S]
[1913 Webster]

3. (Bot.) A species of Medicago (Medicago intertexta), the pods of which are armed with short spines; -- popularly so called. Loudon.
[1913 Webster]

4. A form of dredging machine. Knight.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Elec.) A variety of transformer with open magnetic circuit, the ends of the iron wire core being turned outward and presenting a bristling appearance, whence the name.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

6. (Mil.) a defensive obstacle having pointed barbs extending outward, such as one composed of crossed logs with barbed wire wound around them, or a tangle of steel beams embedded in concrete used to impede or damage landing craft on a beach; also, a position well-fortified with such defensive obstacles.
[PJC]

Hedgehog caterpillar (Zool.), the hairy larvae of several species of bombycid moths, as of the Isabella moth. It curls up like a hedgehog when disturbed. See Woolly bear, and Isabella moth. -- Hedgehog fish (Zool.), any spinose plectognath fish, esp. of the genus Diodon; the porcupine fish. -- Hedgehog grass (Bot.), a grass with spiny involucres, growing on sandy shores; burgrass (Cenchrus tribuloides). -- Hedgehog rat (Zool.), one of several West Indian rodents, allied to the porcupines, but with ratlike tails, and few quills, or only stiff bristles. The hedgehog rats belong to Capromys, Plagiodon, and allied genera. -- Hedgehog shell (Zool.), any spinose, marine, univalve shell of the genus Murex. -- Hedgehog thistle (Bot.), a plant of the Cactus family, globular in form, and covered with spines (Echinocactus). -- Sea hedgehog. See Diodon.
[1913 Webster]

Hedgeless
Hedge"less, a. Having no hedge.
[1913 Webster]

Hedgepig
Hedge"pig` (?), n. A young hedgehog. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hedger
Hedg"er (?), n. One who makes or mends hedges; also, one who hedges, as, in betting.
[1913 Webster]

Hedgerow
Hedge"row` (?), n. A row of shrubs, or trees, planted for inclosure or separation of fields.
[1913 Webster]

By hedgerow elms and hillocks green. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hedging bill
Hedg"ing bill` (?). A hedge bill. See under Hedge.
[1913 Webster]

hediondilla
hediondilla n. A desert shrub (Larrea tridentata) of the Southwestern U.S. and Northern Mexico having persistent resinous aromatic foliage and small yellow flowers.
Syn. -- creosote bush, coville, Larrea tridentata.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hedonic
He*don"ic (?), a. [Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; pleasure, &unr_; sweet, pleasant.] 1. Pertaining to pleasure.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of or relating to Hedonism or the Hedonic sect.
[1913 Webster]

Hedonic sect a sect that placed the highest good in the gratification of the senses, -- called also Cyrenaic sect, (which see), and School of Aristippus.
[1913 Webster]

Hedonics
He*don"ics (?), n. (Philos.) That branch of moral philosophy which treats of the relation of duty to pleasure; the science of practical, positive enjoyment or pleasure. J. Grote.
[1913 Webster]

Hedonism
Hed"on*ism (?), n. 1. The doctrine of the Hedonic sect; the pursuit of pleasure as a matter of ethical principle. [wns=1]
[1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]

2. The ethical theory which finds the explanation and authority of duty in its tendency to give pleasure.
[1913 Webster]

Hedonist
Hed"on*ist (?), n. One who believes in hedonism.
[1913 Webster]

Hedonistic
Hed`o*nis"tic (?), a. Same as Hedonic, 2.
[1913 Webster]

Hedysarum
Hedysarum n. A genus of herbs of Northern temperate regions.
Syn. -- genus Hedysarum.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heed
Heed (hēd), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Heeded; p. pr. & vb. n. Heeding.] [OE. heden, AS. hēdan; akin to OS. hōdian, D. hoeden, Fries. hoda, OHG. huoten, G. hüten, Dan. hytte. √13. Cf. Hood.] To mind; to regard with care; to take notice of; to attend to; to observe.
[1913 Webster]

With pleasure Argus the musician heeds. Dryden.

Syn. -- To notice; regard; mind. See Attend, v. t.
[1913 Webster]

Heed
Heed, v. i. To mind; to consider.
[1913 Webster]

Heed
Heed, n. 1. Attention; notice; observation; regard; -- often with give or take.
[1913 Webster]

With wanton heed and giddy cunning. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Amasa took no heed to the sword that was in Joab's hand. 2 Sam. xx. 10.
[1913 Webster]

Birds give more heed and mark words more than beasts. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

2. Careful consideration; obedient regard.
[1913 Webster]

Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things which we have heard. Heb. ii. 1.
[1913 Webster]

3. A look or expression of heading. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

He did it with a serious mind; a heed
Was in his countenance.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Heedful
Heed"ful (?), a. Full of heed; regarding with care; cautious; circumspect; attentive; vigilant. Shak.

-- Heed"ful*ly, adv. -- Heed"ful*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Heedless
Heed"less, a. Without heed or care; inattentive; careless; thoughtless; unobservant.
[1913 Webster]

O, negligent and heedless discipline! Shak.
[1913 Webster]

The heedless lover does not know
Whose eyes they are that wound him so.
Waller.

-- Heed"less*ly, adv. -- Heed"less*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Heedy
Heed"y (?), a. Heedful. [Obs.]Heedy shepherds.” Spenser. -- Heed"i*ly (#), adv. [Obs.] -- Heed"i*ness, n. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

hee-haw
hee-haw v. i. to bray in the manner of a donkey.
Syn. -- bray.
[WordNet 1.5]

hee-haw
hee-haw n. a loud laugh that sounds like a horse neighing.
Syn. -- horselaugh, ha-ha, haw-haw.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heel
Heel (hēl), v. i. [OE. helden to lean, incline, AS. heldan, hyldan; akin to Icel. halla, Dan. helde, Sw. hälla to tilt, pour, and perh. to E. hill.] (Naut.) To lean or tip to one side, as a ship; as, the ship heels aport; the boat heeled over when the squall struck it.
[1913 Webster]

Heeling error (Naut.), a deviation of the compass caused by the heeling of an iron vessel to one side or the other.
[1913 Webster]

Heel
Heel, n. [OE. hele, heele, AS. hēla, perh. for hōhila, fr. AS. hōh heel (cf. Hough); but cf. D. hiel, OFries. heila, hēla, Icel. hæll, Dan. hæl, Sw. häl, and L. calx. √12. Cf. Inculcate.] 1. The hinder part of the foot; sometimes, the whole foot; -- in man or quadrupeds.
[1913 Webster]

He [the stag] calls to mind his strength and then his speed,
His winged heels and then his armed head.
Denham.
[1913 Webster]

2. The hinder part of any covering for the foot, as of a shoe, sock, etc.; specif., a solid part projecting downward from the hinder part of the sole of a boot or shoe.
[1913 Webster]

3. The latter or remaining part of anything; the closing or concluding part. “The heel of a hunt.” A. Trollope. “The heel of the white loaf.” Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

4. Anything regarded as like a human heel in shape; a protuberance; a knob.
[1913 Webster]

5. The part of a thing corresponding in position to the human heel; the lower part, or part on which a thing rests; especially: (a) (Naut.) The after end of a ship's keel. (b) (Naut.) The lower end of a mast, a boom, the bowsprit, the sternpost, etc. (c) (Mil.) In a small arm, the corner of the but which is upwards in the firing position. (d) (Mil.) The uppermost part of the blade of a sword, next to the hilt. (e) The part of any tool next the tang or handle; as, the heel of a scythe.
[1913 Webster]

6. (Man.) Management by the heel, especially the spurred heel; as, the horse understands the heel well.
[1913 Webster]

7. (Arch.) (a) The lower end of a timber in a frame, as a post or rafter. In the United States, specif., the obtuse angle of the lower end of a rafter set sloping. (b) A cyma reversa; -- so called by workmen. Gwilt.
[1913 Webster]

8. (Golf) The part of the face of the club head nearest the shaft.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

9. In a carding machine, the part of a flat nearest the cylinder.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Heel chain (Naut.), a chain passing from the bowsprit cap around the heel of the jib boom. -- Heel plate, the butt plate of a gun. -- Heel of a rafter. (Arch.) See Heel, n., 7. -- Heel ring, a ring for fastening a scythe blade to the snath. -- Neck and heels, the whole body. (Colloq.) -- To be at the heels of, to pursue closely; to follow hard; as, hungry want is at my heels. Otway. -- To be down at the heel, to be slovenly or in a poor plight. -- To be out at the heels, to have on stockings that are worn out; hence, to be shabby, or in a poor plight. Shak. -- To cool the heels. See under Cool. -- To go heels over head, to turn over so as to bring the heels uppermost; hence, to move in a inconsiderate, or rash, manner. -- To have the heels of, to outrun. -- To lay by the heels, to fetter; to shackle; to imprison. Shak. Addison. -- To show the heels, to flee; to run from. -- To take to the heels, to flee; to betake to flight. -- To throw up another's heels, to trip him. Bunyan. -- To tread upon one's heels, to follow closely. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Heel
Heel, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Heeled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Heeling.] 1. To perform by the use of the heels, as in dancing, running, and the like. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

I cannot sing,
Nor heel the high lavolt.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. To add a heel to; as, to heel a shoe.
[1913 Webster]

3. To arm with a gaff, as a cock for fighting.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Golf) To hit (the ball) with the heel of the club.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

5. (Football) To make (a fair catch) standing with one foot advanced, the heel on the ground and the toe up.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Heelball
Heel"ball` (?), n. A composition of wax and lampblack, used by shoemakers for polishing, and by antiquaries in copying inscriptions.
[1913 Webster]

Heeler
Heel"er (?), n. 1. A cock that strikes well with his heels or spurs.
[1913 Webster]

2. A dependent and subservient hanger-on of a political patron. [Political Cant, U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

The army of hungry heelers who do their bidding. The Century.
[1913 Webster]

Heelless
Heel"less, a. Without a heel.
[1913 Webster]

Heelpath
Heel"path` (?), n. [So called with a play upon the words tow and toe.] The bank of a canal opposite, and corresponding to, that of the towpath; berm. [U. S.]

The Cowles found convenient spiles sunk in the heelpath. The Century.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Heelpiece
Heel"piece` (?), n. 1. A piece of armor to protect the heels. Chesterfield.
[1913 Webster]

2. A piece of leather fixed on the heel of a shoe.
[1913 Webster]

3. The end. “The heelpiece of his book.” Lloyd.
[1913 Webster]

Heelpost
Heel"post` (?), n. 1. (Naut.) The post supporting the outer end of a propeller shaft.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Carp.) The post to which a gate or door is hinged.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Engineering) The quoin post of a lock gate.
[1913 Webster]

Heelspur
Heel"spur` (?), n. (Zool.) A slender bony or cartilaginous process developed from the heel bone of bats. It helps to support the wing membranes. See Illust. of Cheiropter.
[1913 Webster]

Heeltap
Heel"tap` (?), n. 1. One of the segments of leather in the heel of a shoe.
[1913 Webster]

2. A small portion of liquor left in a glass after drinking. “Bumpers around and no heeltaps.” Sheridan.
[1913 Webster]

Heeltap
Heel"tap`, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Heeltapped (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Heeltapping.] To add a piece of leather to the heel of (a shoe, boot, etc.)
[1913 Webster]

Heeltool
Heel"tool` (?), n. A tool used by turners in metal, having a bend forming a heel near the cutting end.
[1913 Webster]

Heemraad
Heem"raad` (?), n.; pl. -raaden (#). [Sometimes, incorrectly, Heemraat or even Heemrad.] [D. heem village + raad council, councilor.] In Holland, and, until the 19th century, also in Cape Colony, a council to assist a local magistrate in the government of rural districts; hence, also, a member of such a council.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Heep
Heep (?), n. The hip of the dog-rose. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Heer
Heer (?), n.[Etymol. uncertain.] A yarn measure of six hundred yards or 1/24 of a spindle. See Spindle.
[1913 Webster]

Heer
Heer, n. [See Hair.] Hair. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Heft
Heft (?), n. Same as Haft, n. [Obs.] Waller.
[1913 Webster]

Heft
Heft, n. [From Heave: cf. hefe weight. Cf. Haft.] 1. The act or effort of heaving; violent strain or exertion. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

He craks his gorge, his sides,
With violent hefts.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Weight; ponderousness. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

A man of his age and heft. T. Hughes.
[1913 Webster]

3. The greater part or bulk of anything; as, the heft of the crop was spoiled. [Colloq. U. S.] J. Pickering.
[1913 Webster]

Heft
Heft (?), n.; G. pl. Hefte (#). [G.] A number of sheets of paper fastened together, as for a notebook; also, a part of a serial publication.

The size of “hefts” will depend on the material requiring attention, and the annual volume is to cost about 15 marks. The Nation.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Heft
Heft, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hefted (Heft, obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. Hefting.] 1. To heave up; to raise aloft.
[1913 Webster]

Inflamed with wrath, his raging blade he heft. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. To prove or try the weight of by raising. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Hefty
Heft"y, a. 1. Moderately heavy. [Colloq. U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

2. Strong; muscular; -- of people.
[PJC]

3. Substantial; large; as, a hefty increase in annual profits.
[PJC]

hegari
hegari n. Sudanese sorghums having white seeds; one variety is grown in Southwestern U.S.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hegel
Hegel prop. n. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, a German writer (1770-1831).
[WordNet 1.5]

Hegelian
He*ge"li*an (?; 106), prop. a. Pertaining to Hegelianism. -- n. A follower of Hegel.

Hegelism
Hegelianism
{ He*ge"li*an*ism (?), He"gel*ism (?), } prop. n. The system of logic and philosophy set forth by Hegel, a German writer (1770-1831).

Hegemonical
Hegemonic
{ Heg`e*mon"ic (?), Heg`e*mon"ic*al (?), } a. [Gr. &unr_;. See Hegemony.] Leading; controlling; ruling; predominant. “Princelike and hegemonical.” Fotherby.
[1913 Webster]

Hegemony
He*gem`o*ny (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; guide, leader, fr. &unr_; to go before.] Leadership; preponderant influence or authority; -- usually applied to the relation of a government or state to its neighbors or confederates. Lieber.
[1913 Webster]

Hegge
Heg"ge (?), n. A hedge. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hegira
He*gi"ra (?; 277), n. [Written also hejira.] [Ar. hijrah flight.] The flight of Mohammed from Mecca, September 13, a. d. 622 (subsequently established as the first year of the Moslem era); hence, any flight or exodus regarded as like that of Mohammed.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The starting point of the Era was made to begin, not from the date of the flight, but from the first day of the Arabic year, which corresponds to July 16, a. d. 622.
[1913 Webster]

he-huckleberry
he-huckleberry n. A deciduous much-branched shrub (Lyonia ligustrina) with dense downy panicles of small bell-shaped white flowers.
Syn. -- maleberry, male berry, privet andromeda, Lyonia ligustrina.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heifer
Heif"er (?), n. [OE. hayfare, AS. heáhfore, heáfore; the second part of this word seems akin to AS. fearr bull, ox; akin to OHG. farro, G. farre, D. vaars, heifer, G. färse, and perh. to Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, calf, heifer.] (Zool.) A young cow.
[1913 Webster]

Heigh-ho
Heigh"-ho (hī"-hō), interj. An exclamation of surprise, joy, dejection, uneasiness, weariness, etc. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Height
Height (hīt), n. [Written also hight.] [OE. heighte, heght, heighthe, AS. heáhðu, hēhðu fr. heah high; akin to D. hoogte, Sw. höjd, Dan. höide, Icel. hæð, Goth. hauhiþa. See High.] 1. The condition of being high; elevated position.
[1913 Webster]

Behold the height of the stars, how high they are! Job xxii. 12.
[1913 Webster]

2. The distance to which anything rises above its foot, above that on which in stands, above the earth, or above the level of the sea; altitude; the measure upward from a surface, as the floor or the ground, of an animal, especially of a man; stature. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

[Goliath's] height was six cubits and a span. 1 Sam. xvii. 4.
[1913 Webster]

3. Degree of latitude either north or south. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Guinea lieth to the north sea, in the same height as Peru to the south. Abp. Abbot.
[1913 Webster]

4. That which is elevated; an eminence; a hill or mountain; as, Alpine heights. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

5. Elevation in excellence of any kind, as in power, learning, arts; also, an advanced degree of social rank; preëminence or distinction in society; prominence.
[1913 Webster]

Measure your mind's height by the shade it casts. R. Browning.
[1913 Webster]

All would in his power hold, all make his subjects. Chapman.
[1913 Webster]

6. Progress toward eminence; grade; degree.
[1913 Webster]

Social duties are carried to greater heights, and enforced with stronger motives by the principles of our religion. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

7. Utmost degree in extent; extreme limit of energy or condition; as, the height of a fever, of passion, of madness, of folly; the height of a tempest.
[1913 Webster]

My grief was at the height before thou camest. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

On height, aloud. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster] [He] spake these same words, all on hight. Chaucer.

[1913 Webster]

Heighten
Height"en (hīt"'n), v. t. [Written also highten.] [imp. & p. p. Heightened (#); p. pr. & vb. n. Heightening.] 1. To make high; to raise higher; to elevate.
[1913 Webster]

2. To carry forward; to advance; to increase; to augment; to aggravate; to intensify; to render more conspicuous; -- used of things, good or bad; as, to heighten beauty; to heighten a flavor or a tint. “To heighten our confusion.” Addison.
[1913 Webster]

An aspect of mystery which was easily heightened to the miraculous. Hawthorne.
[1913 Webster]

Heightener
Height"en*er (?), n. [Written also hightener.] One who, or that which, heightens.
[1913 Webster]

heights
heights n. a high place; the high part of a district; as, he doesn't like heights.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Heimdal
Heimdal n. god of dawn and light; guardian of Asgard.
Syn. -- Heimdall, Heimdallr.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heimdall
Heimdall n. Same as Heimdal.
Syn. -- Heimdal, Heimdallr.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heimdallr
Heimdallr n. Same as Heimdal.
Syn. -- Heimdall, Heimdal.
[WordNet 1.5]

heinie
hei"nie (hī"nē), n. The buttocks; -- a word used with children. [slang]
Syn. -- ass, butt, buttocks, rear end, derriere, rump, behind.
[PJC]

Heinous
Hei"nous (hā"nŭs), a. [OF. haïnos hateful, F. haineux, fr. OF. haïne hate, F. haine, fr. haïr to hate; of German origin. See Hate.] Hateful; hatefully bad; flagrant; odious; atrocious; giving great offense; -- applied to deeds or to character.
[1913 Webster]

It were most heinous and accursed sacrilege. Hooker.
[1913 Webster]

How heinous had the fact been, how deserving
Contempt!
Milton.

Syn. -- Monstrous; flagrant; flagitious; atrocious.

-- Hei"nous*ly, adv. -- Hei"nous*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

heinousness
heinousness n. the quality of being shockingly cruel and inhumane.
Syn. -- atrocity, atrociousness, barbarity, barbarousness.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heir
Heir (âr), n. [OE. heir, eir, hair, OF. heir, eir, F. hoir, L. heres; of uncertain origin. Cf. Hereditary, Heritage.] 1. One who inherits, or is entitled to succeed to the possession of, any property after the death of its owner; one on whom the law bestows the title or property of another at the death of the latter.
[1913 Webster]

I am my father's heir and only son. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. One who receives any endowment from an ancestor or relation; as, the heir of one's reputation or virtues.
[1913 Webster]

And I his heir in misery alone. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Heir apparent. (Law.) See under Apparent. -- Heir at law, one who, after his ancector's death, has a right to inherit all his intestate estate. Wharton (Law Dict.). -- Heir presumptive, one who, if the ancestor should die immediately, would be his heir, but whose right to the inheritance may be defeated by the birth of a nearer relative, or by some other contingency.
[1913 Webster]

Heir
Heir (?), v. t. To inherit; to succeed to. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

One only daughter heired the royal state. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Heirdom
Heir"dom (?), n. The state of an heir; succession by inheritance. Burke.
[1913 Webster]

Heiress
Heir"ess, n. A female heir.
[1913 Webster]

Heirless
Heir"less a. Destitute of an heir. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Heirloom
Heir"loom` (?), n. [Heir + loom, in its earlier sense of implement, tool. See Loom the frame.] Any furniture, movable, or personal chattel, which by law or special custom descends to the heir along with the inheritance; any piece of personal property that has been in a family for several generations.
[1913 Webster]

Woe to him whose daring hand profanes
The honored heirlooms of his ancestors.
Moir.
[1913 Webster]

Heirship
Heir"ship (?), n. The state, character, or privileges of an heir; right of inheriting.
[1913 Webster]

Heirship movables, certain kinds of movables which the heir is entitled to take, besides the heritable estate. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Hejira
He*ji"ra (?), n. See Hegira.

Hektometer
Hektoliter
Hektogram
Hektare
Hek"tare`, Hek"to*gram, Hek"to*li`ter, and Hek"to*me`ter, n. Same as Hectare, Hectogram, Hectoliter, and Hectometer.
[1913 Webster]

Hektograph
Hek"to*graph (?), n. See Hectograph.
[1913 Webster]

Helamys
Hel*a*mys (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; fawn + &unr_; mouse.] (Zool.) See Jumping hare, under Hare.
[1913 Webster]

Helcoplasty
Hel"co*plas`ty (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; a wound + -plasty.] (Med.) The act or process of repairing lesions made by ulcers, especially by a plastic operation.
[1913 Webster]

Held
Held (?), imp. & p. p. of Hold.
[1913 Webster]

Hele
Hele (?), n. [See Heal, n.] Health; welfare. [Obs.] “In joy and perfyt hele.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hele
Hele, v. t. [AS. helan, akin to D. helen, OHG. helan, G. hehlen, L. celare. √17. See Hell, and cf. Conceal.] To hide; to cover; to roof. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hide and hele things. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Helena
Hel"e*na (?), n. [L.: cf. Sp. helena.] See St. Elmo's fire, under Saint.
[1913 Webster]

Helenin
Hel"e*nin (?), n. (Chem.) A neutral organic substance found in the root of the elecampane (Inula helenium), and extracted as a white crystalline or oily material, with a slightly bitter taste.
[1913 Webster]

Heleodytes
Heleodytes prop. n. A genus comprising the cactus wrens; one of several alternative classifications.
Syn. -- Campylorhynchus, genus Campylorhynchus, genus Heleodytes.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heliac
He"li*ac (?), a. Heliacal.
[1913 Webster]

Heliacal
He*li"a*cal (?), a. [Gr. &unr_; belonging to the sun, fr. &unr_; the sun: cf. F. héliaque.] (Astron.) Emerging from the light of the sun, or passing into it; rising or setting at the same, or nearly the same, time as the sun. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The heliacal rising of a star is when, after being in conjunction with the sun, and invisible, it emerges from the light so as to be visible in the morning before sunrising. On the contrary, the heliacal setting of a star is when the sun approaches conjunction so near as to render the star invisible.
[1913 Webster]

Heliacally
He*li"a*cal*ly, adv. In a heliacal manner. De Quincey.
[1913 Webster]

Helianthin
He`li*an"thin (?), n. [Prob. fr. L. helianthes, or NL. helianthus, sunflower, in allusion to its color.] (Chem.) An artificial, orange dyestuff, analogous to tropaolin, and like it used as an indicator in alkalimetry; -- called also methyl orange.
[1913 Webster]

Helianthoid
He`li*an"thoid (?), a. (Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Helianthoidea.
[1913 Webster]

Helianthoidea
He`li*an"thoi"de*a (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. L. helianthes sunflower + -oid.] (Zool.) An order of Anthozoa; the Actinaria.
[1913 Webster]

helianthus
helianthus n. any plant of the genus Helianthus having large flower heads with dark disk florets and showy yellow rays.
Syn. -- sunflower.
[WordNet 1.5]

Helical
Hel"i*cal (?), a. [From Helix.] Of or pertaining to, or in the form of, a helix; spiral; as, a helical staircase; a helical spring. -- Hel"i*cal*ly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

Helichrysum
Hel`i*chry"sum (&unr_;), n. [L., the marigold, fr. Gr. &unr_; a kind of plant.] (Bot.) A genus of composite plants, with shining, commonly white or yellow, or sometimes reddish, radiated involucres, which are often called “everlasting flowers.”
[1913 Webster]

Heliciform
He*lic"i*form (?), a. [Helix + -form.] Having the form of a helix; spiral.
[1913 Webster]

Helicin
Hel"i*cin (?), n. (Chem.) A glucoside obtained as a white crystalline substance by partial oxidation of salicin, from a willow (Salix Helix of Linnaeus.)
[1913 Webster]

Helicine
Hel"i*cine (?), a. (Anat.) Curled; spiral; helicoid; -- applied esp. to certain arteries of the penis.
[1913 Webster]

Helicograph
Hel"i*co*graph` (?), n. [Helix + -graph.] An instrument for drawing spiral lines on a plane.
[1913 Webster]

Helicoid
Hel"i*coid (?), a. [Gr. &unr_;; &unr_;, &unr_;, spiral + &unr_; shape: cf. F. hélicoïde. See Helix.]
[1913 Webster]

1. Spiral; curved, like the spire of a univalve shell.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) Shaped like a snail shell; pertaining to the Helicidae, or Snail family.
[1913 Webster]

Helicoid parabola (Math.), the parabolic spiral.
[1913 Webster]

Helicoid
Hel"i*coid, n. (Geom.) A warped surface which may be generated by a straight line moving in such a manner that every point of the line shall have a uniform motion in the direction of another fixed straight line, and at the same time a uniform angular motion about it.
[1913 Webster]

Helicoidal
Hel`i*coid"al (?), a. Same as Helicoid. -- Hel`i*coid"al*ly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

Helicon
Hel"i*con (h&ebreve_;l"&ibreve_;*k&obreve_;n), prop. n. [L., fr. Gr. "Elikw`n.] A mountain in Bœotia, in Greece, supposed by the Greeks to be the residence of Apollo and the Muses.
[1913 Webster]

From Helicon's harmonious springs
A thousand rills their mazy progress take.
Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Heliconia
Hel`i*co"ni*a (?), n. [NL. See Helicon.] (Zool.) One of numerous species of Heliconius, a genus of tropical American butterflies. The wings are usually black, marked with green, crimson, and white.
[1913 Webster]

Heliconian
Hel`i*co"ni*an (?), a. [L. Heliconius.] 1. Of or pertaining to Helicon.Heliconian honey.” Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) Like or pertaining to the butterflies of the genus Heliconius.
[1913 Webster]

Helicopter
Hel"i*cop`ter (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. "e`lix, "e`likos, a spiral + ptero`n a wing.] a heavier-than-air aircraft whose lift is provided by the aerodynamic forces on rotating blades rather than on fixed wings. Contrasted with fixed-wing aircraft.
[PJC]

Helicopter
Hel"i*cop`ter (?), v. i. to travel in a helicopter.
[PJC]

Helicopter
Hel"i*cop`ter (?), v. t. to transport in a helicopter.
[PJC]

Helicotrema
Hel`i*co"tre"ma (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. "e`lix, "e`likos, a helix + &unr_; a hole.] (Anat.) The opening by which the two scalae communicate at the top of the cochlea of the ear.
[1913 Webster]

Helio-
He"li*o- (hē"l&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;-). A combining form from Gr. "h`lios the sun.

Heliocentrical
Heliocentric
{ He`li*o*cen"tric (hē`l&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*s&ebreve_;n"tr&ibreve_;k), He`li*o*cen"tric"al (hē`l&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*s&ebreve_;n"tr&ibreve_;*k&aitalic_;l), } a. [Helio- + centric, centrical: cf. F. héliocentrique.] (Astron.) pertaining to the sun's center, or appearing to be seen from it; having, or relating to, the sun as a center; -- opposed to geocentrical.
[1913 Webster]

Heliocentric parallax. See under Parallax. -- Heliocentric place, latitude, longitude, etc. (of a heavenly body), the direction, latitude, longitude, etc., of the body as viewed from the sun.
[1913 Webster]

Heliochrome
He"li*o*chrome (hē"l&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*krōm), n. [Helio- + Gr. chrw^ma color.] A photograph in colors. R. Hunt.
[1913 Webster]

Heliochromic
He`li*o*chro"mic (hē`l&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*krō"m&ibreve_;k or hē`l&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*kr&obreve_;m"&ibreve_;k), a. Pertaining to, or produced by, heliochromy.
[1913 Webster]

Heliochromy
He"li*o*chro`my (hē"l&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*krō`m&ybreve_; or hē`l&ibreve_;*&obreve_;k"r&ouptack_;`m&ybreve_;), n. The art of producing photographs in color.
[1913 Webster]

Heliogram
He"li*o*gram (hē"l&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*gr&adot_;m), n. [Helio- + -gram.] A message transmitted by a heliograph.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Heliograph
He"li*o*graph (hē"l&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*gr&adot_;f), n. [Helio- + -graph.]
[1913 Webster]

1. A picture taken by heliography; a photograph.
[1913 Webster]

2. An instrument for taking photographs of the sun.
[1913 Webster]

3. An apparatus for telegraphing by means of the sun's rays. See Heliotrope, 3.
[1913 Webster]

Heliograph
He"li*o*graph (hē"l&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*gr&adot_;f), v. t. 1. To telegraph, or signal, with a heliograph.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

2. To photograph by sunlight.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Heliographic
He`li*o*graph"ic (hē`l&ibreve_;*&ouptack_;*grăf"&ibreve_;k), a. (Astron.) 1. Of or pertaining to a description of the sun.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

&hand_; Heliographic longitudes and latitudes of spots on the sun's surface are analogous to geographic longitudes and latitudes of places on the earth.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

2. Of or pertaining to heliography or a heliograph; made by heliography.
[1913 Webster]

Heliographic chart. See under Chart.
[1913 Webster]

Heliography
He`li*og"ra*phy, n. 1. [Helio- + -graphy.] The description of the sun.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

2. The system, art, or practice of telegraphing, or signaling, with the heliograph.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

3. An early photographic process invented by Nicéphore Niepce, and still used in photo-engraving. It consists essentially in exposing under a design or in a camera a polished metal plate coated with a preparation of asphalt, and subsequently treating the plate with a suitable solvent. The light renders insoluble those parts of the film which is strikes, and so a permanent image is formed, which can be etched upon the plate by the use of acid.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

4. Photography. [Archaic.] R. Hunt.
[1913 Webster]

Heliogravure
He`li*o*grav"ure (?), n. [F. héliogravure.] 1. The process of photographic engraving.
[1913 Webster]

2. A plate or picture made by the process of heliogravure.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Heliolater
He`li*ol"a*ter (?), n. [Helio- + Gr. &unr_; servant, worshiper.] A worshiper of the sun.
[1913 Webster]

Heliolatry
He`li*ol"a*try (?), n. [Helio- + Gr. &unr_; service, worship.] Sun worship. See Sabianism.
[1913 Webster]

Heliolite
He"li*o*lite (?), n. [Helio- + -lite.] (Paleon.) A fossil coral of the genus Heliolites, having twelve-rayed cells. It is found in the Silurian rocks.
[1913 Webster]

Heliometer
He`li*om"e*ter (?), n. [Helio- + -meter: cf. F. héliomètre.] (Astron.) An instrument devised originally for measuring the diameter of the sun; now employed for delicate measurements of the distance and relative direction of two stars too far apart to be easily measured in the field of view of an ordinary telescope.

Heliometrical
Heliometric
{ He`li*o*met"ric (?), He`li*o*met"ric*al (?), } a. Of or pertaining to the heliometer, or to heliometry.
[1913 Webster]

Heliometry
He`li*om"e*try (?), n. The apart or practice of measuring the diameters of heavenly bodies, their relative distances, etc. See Heliometer.
[1913 Webster]

Heliopora
He`li*op"o*ra (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; the sun + &unr_; a passage, pore.] (Zool.) An East Indian stony coral now known to belong to the Alcyonaria; -- called also blue coral.
[1913 Webster]

Helioscope
He"li*o*scope (?), n. [Helio- + -scope: cf. F. hélioscope.] (Astron.) A telescope or instrument for viewing the sun without injury to the eyes, as through colored glasses, or with mirrors which reflect but a small portion of light. -- He`li*o*scop`ic (#), a.
[1913 Webster]

Heliostat
He"li*o*stat (?), n. [Helio- + Gr. &unr_; placed, standing, fr. &unr_; to place, stand: cf. F. héliostate.] An instrument consisting of a mirror moved by clockwork, by which a sunbeam is made apparently stationary, by being steadily directed to one spot during the whole of its diurnal period; also, a geodetic heliotrope.
[1913 Webster]

Heliotrope
He"li*o*trope (?), n. [F. héliotrope, L. heliotropium, Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; the sun + &unr_; to turn, &unr_; turn. See Heliacal, Trope.] 1. (Anc. Astron.) An instrument or machine for showing when the sun arrived at the tropics and equinoctial line.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Heliotropium; -- called also turnsole and girasole. Heliotropium Peruvianum is the commonly cultivated species with fragrant flowers.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Geodesy & Signal Service) An instrument for making signals to an observer at a distance, by means of the sun's rays thrown from a mirror.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Min.) See Bloodstone (a).
[1913 Webster]

Heliotrope purple, a grayish purple color.
[1913 Webster]

Heliotroper
He"li*o*tro`per (?), n. The person at a geodetic station who has charge of the heliotrope.
[1913 Webster]

Heliotropic
He`li*o*trop"ic (?), a. (Bot.) Manifesting heliotropism; turning toward the sun.
[1913 Webster]

Heliotropism
He`li*ot"ro*pism (?), n. [Helio- + Gr. &unr_; to turn.] (Bot.) The phenomenon of turning toward the light, seen in many leaves and flowers.
[1913 Webster]

Heliotype
He"li*o*type (?), n. [Helio- + -type.] A picture obtained by the process of heliotypy.
[1913 Webster]

Heliotypic
He`li*o*typ"ic (?), a. Relating to, or obtained by, heliotypy.
[1913 Webster]

Heliotypy
He"li*o*ty`py (?), n. A method of transferring pictures from photographic negatives to hardened gelatin plates from which impressions are produced on paper as by lithography.
[1913 Webster]

Heliozoa
He`li*o*zo"a (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; the sun + zw^,on an animal.] (Zool.) An order of fresh-water rhizopods having a more or less globular form, with slender radiating pseudopodia; the sun animalcule.

heliport
heliport n. an airport for helicopters.
[WordNet 1.5]

Helipterum
Helipterum n. genus of South African and Australian herbs or shrubs grown as everlastings; the various Helipterum species are currently in process of being assigned to other genera, especially Pteropogon and Hyalosperma.
Syn. -- genus Helipterum.
[WordNet 1.5]

Helispherical
Helispheric
Hel`i*spher"ic (?), Hel`i*spher"ic*al (&unr_;), a. [Helix + spheric, spherical.] Spiral.
[1913 Webster]

Helispherical line (Math.). the rhomb line in navigation. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Helium
He"li*um (hē"l&ibreve_;*ŭm), n. [NL., fr. Gr. "h`lios the sun.] (Chem.) An inert, monoatomic, gaseous element occurring in the atmosphere of the sun and stars, and in small quantities in the earth's atmosphere, in several minerals and in certain mineral waters. It is obtained from natural gas in industrial quantities. Symbol, He; atomic number 2; at. wt., 4.0026 (C=12.011). Helium was first detected spectroscopically in the sun by Lockyer in 1868; it was first prepared by Ramsay in 1895. Helium has a density of 1.98 compared with hydrogen, and is more difficult to liquefy than the latter. Chemically, it is an inert noble gas, belonging to the argon group, and cannot be made to form compounds. The helium nucleus is the charged particle which constitutes alpha rays, and helium is therefore formed as a decomposition product of certain radioactive substances such as radium. The normal helium nucleus has two protons and two neutrons, but an isotope with only one neutron is also observed in atmospheric helium at an abundance of 0.013 %. Liquid helium has a boiling point of -268.9° C at atmospheric pressure, and is used for maintaining very low temperatures, both in laboratory experimentation and in commercial applications to maintain superconductivity in low-temperature superconducting devices. Gaseous helium at normal temperatures is used for buoyancy in blimps, dirigibles, and high-altitude balloons, and also for amusement in party balloons.
[Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

Helix
He"lix (?), n.; pl. L. Helices (#), E. Helixes (#). [L. helix, Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, fr. &unr_; to turn round; cf. L. volvere, and E. volute, voluble.] 1. (Geom.) A nonplane curve whose tangents are all equally inclined to a given plane. The common helix is the curve formed by the thread of the ordinary screw. It is distinguished from the spiral, all the convolutions of which are in the plane.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Arch.) A caulicule or little volute under the abacus of the Corinthian capital.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Anat.) The incurved margin or rim of the external ear. See Illust. of Ear.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Zool.) A genus of land snails, including a large number of species.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The genus originally included nearly all shells, but is now greatly restricted. See Snail, Pulmonifera.
[1913 Webster]

Hell
Hell (?), n. [AS. hell; akin to D. hel, OHG. hella, G. hölle, Icel. hal, Sw. helfvete, Dan. helvede, Goth. halja, and to AS. helan to conceal. &unr_;&unr_;&unr_;. Cf. Hele, v. t., Conceal, Cell, Helmet, Hole, Occult.]
[1913 Webster]

1. The place of the dead, or of souls after death; the grave; -- called in Hebrew sheol, and by the Greeks hades.
[1913 Webster]

He descended into hell. Book of Common Prayer.
[1913 Webster]

Thou wilt not leave my soul in hell. Ps. xvi. 10.
[1913 Webster]

2. The place or state of punishment for the wicked after death; the abode of evil spirits. Hence, any mental torment; anguish. “Within him hell.” Milton.
[1913 Webster]

It is a knell
That summons thee to heaven or to hell.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. A place where outcast persons or things are gathered; as: (a) A dungeon or prison; also, in certain running games, a place to which those who are caught are carried for detention. (b) A gambling house. “A convenient little gambling hell for those who had grown reckless.” W. Black. (c) A place into which a tailor throws his shreds, or a printer his broken type. Hudibras.
[1913 Webster]

Gates of hell. (Script.) See Gate, n., 4.
[1913 Webster]

Hell
Hell, v. t. To overwhelm. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Hellanodic
Hel`la*nod"ic (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;; &unr_;, &unr_;, a Greek + &unr_; right, judgment.] (Gr. Antiq.) A judge or umpire in games or combats.
[1913 Webster]

Hellbender
Hell"bend`er (?), n. (Zool.) A large North American aquatic salamander (Protonopsis horrida or Menopoma Alleghaniensis). It is very voracious and very tenacious of life. Also called alligator, and water dog.
[1913 Webster]

hell-bent
hell-bent adj. recklessly determined; as, hell-bent on winning.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hellborn
Hell"born` (?), a. Born in or of hell. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hellbred
Hell"bred` (?), a. Produced in hell. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Hellbrewed
Hell"brewed` (?), a. Prepared in hell. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hellbroth
Hell"broth` (?), n. A composition for infernal purposes; a magical preparation. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hell-cat
Hell"-cat ` (?), n. A witch; a hag. Middleton.
[1913 Webster]

Hell-diver
Hell"-div`er (?), n. (Zool.) The dabchick.
[1913 Webster]

Helldoomed
Hell"doomed` (?), a. Doomed to hell. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hellebore
Hel"le*bore (?), n. [L. helleborus, elleborus, Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;; cf. F. hellébore, ellébore.]
[1913 Webster]

1. (Bot.) A genus of perennial herbs (Helleborus) of the Crowfoot family, mostly having powerfully cathartic and even poisonous qualities. Helleborus niger is the European black hellebore, or Christmas rose, blossoming in winter or earliest spring. Helleborus officinalis was the officinal hellebore of the ancients.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) Any plant of several species of the poisonous liliaceous genus Veratrum, especially Veratrum album and Veratrum viride, both called white hellebore.
[1913 Webster]

Helleborein
Hel`le*bo"re*in (?), n. (Chem.) A poisonous glucoside accompanying helleborin in several species of hellebore, and extracted as a white crystalline substance with a bittersweet taste. It has a strong action on the heart, resembling digitalin.
[1913 Webster]

Helleborin
Hel*leb"o*rin (? or ?), n. (Chem.) A poisonous glucoside found in several species of hellebore, and extracted as a white crystalline substance with a sharp tingling taste. It possesses the essential virtues of the plant; -- called also elleborin.
[1913 Webster]

Helleborism
Hel"le*bo*rism (?), n. The practice or theory of using hellebore as a medicine.
[1913 Webster]

Hellene
Hel"lene (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;.] A native of either ancient or modern Greece; a Greek. Brewer.
[1913 Webster]

Hellenian
Hel*le"ni*an (?), a. Of or pertaining to the Hellenes, or Greeks.
[1913 Webster]

Hellenic
Hel*len"ic (?; 277), a. [Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, fr. &unr_; the Greeks.] Of or pertaining to the Hellenes, or inhabitants of Greece; Greek; Grecian. “The Hellenic forces.” Jowett (Thucyd. ).
[1913 Webster]

Hellenic
Hel*len"ic, n. The dialect, formed with slight variations from the Attic, which prevailed among Greek writers after the time of Alexander.
[1913 Webster]

Hellenism
Hel"len*ism (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. Hellénisme.] 1. A phrase or form of speech in accordance with genius and construction or idioms of the Greek language; a Grecism. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

2. The type of character of the ancient Greeks, who aimed at culture, grace, and amenity, as the chief elements in human well-being and perfection.
[1913 Webster]

Hellenist
Hel"len*ist (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. Helléniste.] 1. One who affiliates with Greeks, or imitates Greek manners; esp., a person of Jewish extraction who used the Greek language as his mother tongue, as did the Jews of Asia Minor, Greece, Syria, and Egypt; distinguished from the Hebraists, or native Jews (Acts vi. 1).
[1913 Webster]

2. One skilled in the Greek language and literature; as, the critical Hellenist.

Hellenistical
Hellenistic
{ Hel`le*nis"tic (?), Hel`le*nis"tic*al (?), } a. [Cf. F. Hellénistique.] Pertaining to the Hellenists.
[1913 Webster]

Hellenistic language, Hellenistic dialect, or Hellenistic idiom, the Greek spoken or used by the Jews who lived in countries where the Greek language prevailed; the Jewish-Greek dialect or idiom of the Septuagint.
[1913 Webster]

Hellenistically
Hel`le*nis"tic*al*ly, adv. According to the Hellenistic manner or dialect. J. Gregory.
[1913 Webster]

Hellenize
Hel"len*ize (?), v. i. [Gr. &unr_;.] To use the Greek language; to play the Greek; to Grecize.
[1913 Webster]

Hellenize
Hel"len*ize (?), v. t. [Gr. &unr_;.] To give a Greek form or character to; to Grecize; as, to Hellenize a word.
[1913 Webster]

Hellenotype
Hel*len"o*type (?), n. See Ivorytype.
[1913 Webster]

Hellespont
Hel"les*pont (?), n. [L. Hellespontus, Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; the mythological Helle, daughter of Athamas + &unr_; sea.] A narrow strait between Europe and Asia, now called the Daradanelles. It connects the Aegean Sea and the sea of Marmora.
[1913 Webster]

Hellespontine
Hel`les*pon"tine (?), a. Of or pertaining to the Hellespont. Mitford.

Hellgramite
Hellgamite
{ Hell"ga*mite (?), Hell"gra*mite (?), } n. (Zool.) The aquatic larva of a large American winged insect (Corydalus cornutus), much used a fish bait by anglers; the dobson. It belongs to the Neuroptera.
[1913 Webster]

Hellhag
Hell"hag` (?), n. A hag of or fit for hell. Bp. Richardson.
[1913 Webster]

Hell-haunted
Hell"-haunt`ed (&unr_;), a. Haunted by devils; hellish. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Hellhound
Hell"hound` (?), n. [AS. hellehund.] A dog of hell; an agent of hell.
[1913 Webster]

A hellhound, that doth hunt us all to death. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hellier
Hel"li*er (?), n. [See Hele, v. t.] One who heles or covers; hence, a tiler, slater, or thatcher. [Obs.] [Written also heler.] Usher.
[1913 Webster]

Hellish
Hell"ish (?), a. Of or pertaining to hell; like hell; infernal; malignant; wicked; detestable; diabolical.Hellish hate.” Milton. -- Hell"ish*ly, adv. -- Hell"ish*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Hellkite
Hell"kite` (?), n. A kite of infernal breed. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hello
Hel*lo" (?), interj. & n. An exclamation used as a greeting, to call attention, as an exclamation of surprise, or to encourage one. This variant of Halloo and Holloo has become the dominant form. In the United States, it is the most common greeting used in answering a telephone.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Hellward
Hell"ward (?), adv. Toward hell. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Helly
Hell"y, a. [AS. hellīc.] Hellish. Anderson (1573).
[1913 Webster]

Helm
Helm (?), n. See Haulm, straw.
[1913 Webster]

Helm
Helm (?), n. [OE. helme, AS. helma rudder; akin to D. & G. helm, Icel. hjālm, and perh. to E. helve.]
[1913 Webster]

1. (Naut.) The apparatus by which a ship is steered, comprising rudder, tiller, wheel, etc.; -- commonly used of the tiller or wheel alone.
[1913 Webster]

2. The place or office of direction or administration. “The helm of the Commonwealth.” Melmoth.
[1913 Webster]

3. One at the place of direction or control; a steersman; hence, a guide; a director.
[1913 Webster]

The helms o' the State, who care for you like fathers. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. [Cf. Helve.] A helve. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Helm amidships, when the tiller, rudder, and keel are in the same plane. -- Helm aport, when the tiller is borne over to the port side of the ship. -- Helm astarboard, when the tiller is borne to the starboard side. -- Helm alee, Helm aweather, when the tiller is borne over to the lee or to the weather side. -- Helm hard alee, Helm hard aport, Helm hard astarboard, etc., when the tiller is borne over to the extreme limit. -- Helm port, the round hole in a vessel's counter through which the rudderstock passes. -- Helm down, helm alee. -- Helm up, helm aweather. -- To ease the helm, to let the tiller come more amidships, so as to lessen the strain on the rudder. -- To feel the helm, to obey it. -- To right the helm, to put it amidships. -- To shift the helm, to bear the tiller over to the corresponding position on the opposite side of the vessel. Ham. Nav. Encyc.
[1913 Webster]

Helm
Helm, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Helmed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Helming.] To steer; to guide; to direct. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

The business he hath helmed. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

A wild wave . . . overbears the bark,
And him that helms it.
Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Helm
Helm, n. [AS. See Helmet.] 1. A helmet. [Poetic]
[1913 Webster]

2. A heavy cloud lying on the brow of a mountain. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

Helm
Helm, v. t. To cover or furnish with a helm or helmet. [Perh. used only as a past part. or part. adj.]
[1913 Webster]

She that helmed was in starke stours. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Helmage
Helm"age (?), n. Guidance; direction. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Helmed
Helm"ed (?), a. Covered with a helmet.
[1913 Webster]

The helmed cherubim
Are seen in glittering ranks.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Helmet
Hel"met (?), n. [OF. helmet, a dim of helme, F. heaume; of Teutonic origin; cf. G. helm, akin to AS. & OS. helm, D. helm, helmet, Icel. hjālmr, Sw. hjelm, Dan. hielm, Goth. hilms; and prob. from the root of AS. helan to hide, to hele; cf. also Lith. szalmas, Russ. shleme, Skr. çarman protection. √17. Cf. Hele, Hell, Helm a helmet.] 1. (Armor) A defensive covering for the head. See Casque, Headpiece, Morion, Sallet, and Illust. of Beaver.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Her.) The representation of a helmet over shields or coats of arms, denoting gradations of rank by modifications of form.
[1913 Webster]

3. A helmet-shaped hat, made of cork, felt, metal, or other suitable material, worn as part of the uniform of soldiers, firemen, etc., also worn in hot countries as a protection from the heat of the sun.
[1913 Webster]

4. That which resembles a helmet in form, position, etc.; as: (a) (Chem.) The upper part of a retort. Boyle. (b) (Bot.) The hood-formed upper sepal or petal of some flowers, as of the monkshood or the snapdragon. (c) (Zool.) A naked shield or protuberance on the top or fore part of the head of a bird.
[1913 Webster]

Helmet beetle (Zool.), a leaf-eating beetle of the family Chrysomelidae, having a short, broad, and flattened body. Many species are known. -- Helmet shell (Zool.), one of many species of tropical marine univalve shells belonging to Cassis and allied genera. Many of them are large and handsome; several are used for cutting as cameos, and hence are called cameo shells. See King conch. -- Helmet shrike (Zool.), an African wood shrike of the genus Prionodon, having a large crest.
[1913 Webster]

Helmeted
Hel`met*ed (?), a. Wearing a helmet; furnished with or having a helmet or helmet-shaped part; galeate.
[1913 Webster]

Helmet-shaped
Hel"met-shaped` (&unr_;), a. Shaped like a helmet; galeate. See Illust. of Galeate.
[1913 Webster]

Helminth
Hel"minth (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, a worm.] (Zool.) An intestinal worm, or wormlike intestinal parasite; one of the Helminthes.
[1913 Webster]

Helminthagogue
Hel*min"tha*gogue (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; a worm + &unr_; to drive.] (Med.) A vermifuge.
[1913 Webster]

Helminthes
Hel*min"thes (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, a worm.] (Zool.) One of the grand divisions or branches of the animal kingdom. It is a large group including a vast number of species, most of which are parasitic. Called also Enthelminthes, Enthelmintha.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The following classes are included, with others of less importance: Cestoidea (tapeworms), Trematodea (flukes, etc.), Turbellaria (planarians), Acanthocephala (thornheads), Nematoidea (roundworms, trichina, gordius), Nemertina (nemerteans). See Plathelminthes, and Nemathelminthes.
[1913 Webster]

Helminthiasis
Hel`min*thi"a*sis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; to suffer from worms, fr. &unr_;, &unr_;, a worm.] (Med.) A disease in which worms are present in some part of the body.
[1913 Webster]

Helminthic
Hel*min"thic (?), a. [Cf. F. helminthique.] Of or relating to worms, or Helminthes; expelling worms. -- n. A vermifuge; an anthelmintic.
[1913 Webster]

Helminthite
Hel*min"thite (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, a worm.] (Geol.) One of the sinuous tracks on the surfaces of many stones, and popularly considered as worm trails.
[1913 Webster]

Helminthoid
Hel*min"thoid (?), a. [Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, a worm + -oid.] Wormlike; vermiform.

Helminthological
Helminthologic
{ Hel*min`tho*log"ic (?), Hel*min`tho*log"ic*al, } a. [Cf. F. helminthologique.] Of or pertaining to helminthology.
[1913 Webster]

Helminthologist
Hel`min*thol"o*gist (?), n. [Cf. F. helminthologiste.] One versed in helminthology.
[1913 Webster]

Helminthology
Hel`min*thol"o*gy (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, a worm + -logy: cf. F. helminthologie.] The natural history, or study, of worms, esp. parasitic worms.
[1913 Webster]

Helmless
Helm"less (?), a. 1. Destitute of a helmet.
[1913 Webster]

2. Without a helm or rudder. Carlyle.
[1913 Webster]

Helmsman
Helms"man (?), n.; pl. Helmsmen (&unr_;). The man at the helm; a steersman.
[1913 Webster]

Helmwind
Helm"wind` (?), n. A wind attending or presaged by the cloud called helm. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Helodermatidae
Helodermatidae prop. n. A natural family of lizards, including the only known venomous lizards.
Syn. -- family Helodermatidae.
[WordNet 1.5]

Helot
He"lot (?; 277), n. [L. Helotes, Hilotae, pl., fr. Gr. E'e`lws and E'elw`ths a bondman or serf of the Spartans; so named from 'Elos, a town of Laconia, whose inhabitants were enslaved; or perh. akin to e`lei^n to take, conquer, used as 2d aor. of &unr_;.] A slave in ancient Sparta; a Spartan serf; hence, a slave or serf.
[1913 Webster]

Those unfortunates, the Helots of mankind, more or less numerous in every community. I. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

Helotism
He"lot*ism (?), n. The condition of the Helots or slaves in Sparta; slavery.
[1913 Webster]

Helotium
Helotium n. The type genus of the Helotiaceae.
Syn. -- genus Helotium.
[WordNet 1.5]

Helotry
He"lot*ry (?), n. The Helots, collectively; slaves; bondsmen. “The Helotry of Mammon.” Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Help
Help (h&ebreve_;lp), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Helped (h&ebreve_;lpt) (Obs. imp. Holp (hōlp), p. p. Holpen (hōl"p'n)); p. pr. & vb. n. Helping.] [AS. helpan; akin to OS. helpan, D. helpen, G. helfen, OHG. helfan, Icel. hjālpa, Sw. hjelpa, Dan. hielpe, Goth. hilpan; cf. Lith. szelpti, and Skr. klp to be fitting.] 1. To furnish with strength or means for the successful performance of any action or the attainment of any object; to aid; to assist; as, to help a man in his work; to help one to remember; -- the following infinitive is commonly used without to; as, “Help me scale yon balcony.” Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

2. To furnish with the means of deliverance from trouble; as, to help one in distress; to help one out of prison. “God help, poor souls, how idly do they talk!” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. To furnish with relief, as in pain or disease; to be of avail against; -- sometimes with of before a word designating the pain or disease, and sometimes having such a word for the direct object. “To help him of his blindness.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

The true calamus helps coughs. Gerarde.
[1913 Webster]

4. To change for the better; to remedy.
[1913 Webster]

Cease to lament for what thou canst not help. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

5. To prevent; to hinder; as, the evil approaches, and who can help it? Swift.
[1913 Webster]

6. To forbear; to avoid.
[1913 Webster]

I can not help remarking the resemblance betwixt him and our author. Pope.


[1913 Webster]

7. To wait upon, as the guests at table, by carving and passing food.
[1913 Webster]

To help forward, to assist in advancing. -- To help off, to help to go or pass away, as time; to assist in removing. Locke. -- To help on, to forward; to promote by aid. -- To help out, to aid, as in delivering from a difficulty, or to aid in completing a design or task.
[1913 Webster] The god of learning and of light
Would want a god himself to help him out.
Swift. -- To help over, to enable to surmount; as, to help one over an obstacle. -- To help to, to supply with; to furnish with; as, to help one to soup. -- To help up, to help (one) to get up; to assist in rising, as after a fall, and the like. “A man is well holp up that trusts to you.” Shak.

Syn. -- To aid; assist; succor; relieve; serve; support; sustain; befriend. -- To Help, Aid, Assist. These words all agree in the idea of affording relief or support to a person under difficulties. Help turns attention especially to the source of relief. If I fall into a pit, I call for help; and he who helps me out does it by an act of his own. Aid turns attention to the other side, and supposes coöperation on the part of him who is relieved; as, he aided me in getting out of the pit; I got out by the aid of a ladder which he brought. Assist has a primary reference to relief afforded by a person who “stands by” in order to relieve. It denotes both help and aid. Thus, we say of a person who is weak, I assisted him upstairs, or, he mounted the stairs by my assistance. When help is used as a noun, it points less distinctively and exclusively to the source of relief, or, in other words, agrees more closely with aid. Thus we say, I got out of a pit by the help of my friend.
[1913 Webster]

Help
Help (?), v. i. To lend aid or assistance; to contribute strength or means; to avail or be of use; to assist.
[1913 Webster]

A generous present helps to persuade, as well as an agreeable person. Garth.
[1913 Webster]

To help out, to lend aid; to bring a supply.
[1913 Webster]

Help
Help, n. [AS. help; akin to D. hulp, G. hülfe, hilfe, Icel. hjālp, Sw. hjelp, Dan. hielp. See Help, v. t.]
[1913 Webster]

1. Strength or means furnished toward promoting an object, or deliverance from difficulty or distress; aid; ^; also, the person or thing furnishing the aid; as, he gave me a help of fifty dollars.
[1913 Webster]

Give us help from trouble, for vain is the help of man. Ps. lx. 11.
[1913 Webster]

God is . . . a very present help in trouble. Ps. xlvi. 1.
[1913 Webster]

Virtue is a friend and a help to nature. South.
[1913 Webster]

2. Remedy; relief; as, there is no help for it.
[1913 Webster]

3. A helper; one hired to help another; also, thew hole force of hired helpers in any business.
[1913 Webster]

4. Specifically, a domestic servant, man or woman. [Local, U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

Helper
Help"er (?), n. One who, or that which, helps, aids, assists, or relieves; as, a lay helper in a parish.
[1913 Webster]

Thou art the helper of the fatherless. Ps. x. 14.
[1913 Webster]

Compassion . . . oftentimes a helper of evils. Dr. H. More.
[1913 Webster]

Helpful
Help"ful (?), a. Furnishing help; giving aid; assistant; useful; salutary.
[1913 Webster]

Heavens make our presence and our practices
Pleasant and helpful to him!
Shak.

-- Help"ful*ly, adv. -- Help"ful*ness, n. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

helping
helping n. 1. a quantity of food served as part of a meal.
Syn. -- portion, serving.
[WordNet 1.5]

2. the activity of contributing to the fulfillment of a need or furtherance of an effort or purpose.
Syn. -- aid, assistance, help.
[WordNet 1.5]

Helpless
Help"less, a. 1. Destitute of help or strength; unable to help or defend one's self; needing help; feeble; weak; as, a helpless infant.
[1913 Webster]

How shall I then your helpless fame defend? Pope.
[1913 Webster]

2. Beyond help; irremediable.
[1913 Webster]

Some helpless disagreement or dislike, either of mind or body. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. Bringing no help; unaiding. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Yet since the gods have been
Helpless foreseers of my plagues.
Chapman.
[1913 Webster]

4. Unsupplied; destitute; -- with of. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Helpless of all that human wants require. Dryden.

-- Help"less*ly, adv. -- Help"less*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Helpmate
Help"mate` (?), n. [A corruption of the “help meet for him” of Genesis ii. 18.Fitzedward Hall.] A helper; a companion; specifically, a wife.
[1913 Webster]

In Minorca the ass and the hog are common helpmates, and are yoked together in order to turn up the land. Pennant.
[1913 Webster]

A waiting woman was generally considered as the most suitable helpmate for a parson. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Helpmeet
Help"meet` (?), n. [See Helpmate.] A wife; a helpmate.
[1913 Webster]

The Lord God created Adam, . . . and afterwards, on his finding the want of a helpmeet, caused him to sleep, and took one of his ribs and thence made woman. J. H. Newman.
[1913 Webster]

Helter-skelter
Hel"ter-skel"ter (?), adv. [An onomat&unr_;poetic word. Cf. G. holter-polter, D. holder de bolder.] In hurry and confusion; without definite purpose; irregularly. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Helter-skelter have I rode to thee. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

A wistaria vine running helter-skelter across the roof. J. C. Harris.
[1913 Webster]

Helve
Helve (?), n. [OE. helve, helfe, AS. hielf, helf, hylf, cf. OHG. halb; and also E. halter, helm of a rudder.] 1. The handle of an ax, hatchet, or adze.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Iron Working) (a) The lever at the end of which is the hammer head, in a forge hammer. (b) A forge hammer which is lifted by a cam acting on the helve between the fulcrum and the head.
[1913 Webster]

Helve
Helve, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Helved (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Helving.] To furnish with a helve, as an ax.
[1913 Webster]

Helvetian
Hel*ve"tian (?), a. Same as Helvetic. -- n. A Swiss; a Switzer.
[1913 Webster]

Helvetic
Hel*ve"tic (?), a. [L. Helveticus, fr. Helvetii the Helvetii.] Of or pertaining to the Helvetii, the ancient inhabitant of the Alps, now Switzerland, or to the modern states and inhabitant of the Alpine regions; as, the Helvetic confederacy; Helvetic states.

Helvite
Helvine
{ Hel"vine (?), Hel"vite (?), } n. [L. helvus of a light bay color.] (Min.) A mineral of a yellowish color, consisting chiefly of silica, glucina, manganese, and iron, with a little sulphur.
[1913 Webster]

Helxine
Helxine n. (Bot.) A genus of plants consisting of one species; a dwarf creeping mat-forming evergreen herb.
Syn. -- genus Helxine, Soleirolia, genus Soleirolia.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hem
Hem (h&ebreve_;m), pron. [OE., fr. AS. him, heom, dative pl. of. he. See He, They.] Them [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hem
Hem, interj. An onomatopoetic word used as an expression of hesitation, doubt, etc. It is often a sort of voluntary half cough, loud or subdued, and would perhaps be better expressed by hm.
[1913 Webster]

Cough or cry hem, if anybody come. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hem
Hem, n. An utterance or sound of the voice, hem or hm, often indicative of hesitation or doubt, sometimes used to call attention. “His morning hems.” Spectator.
[1913 Webster]

Hem
Hem, v. i. [√15. See Hem, interj.] To make the sound expressed by the word hem; hence, to hesitate in speaking.Hem, and stroke thy beard.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hem
Hem, n. [AS. hem, border, margin; cf. Fries. hämel, Prov. G. hammel hem of mire or dirt.] 1. The edge or border of a garment or cloth, doubled over and sewed, to strengthen it and prevent raveling.
[1913 Webster]

2. Border; edge; margin.Hem of the sea.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. A border made on sheet-metal ware by doubling over the edge of the sheet, to stiffen it and remove the sharp edge.
[1913 Webster]

Hem
Hem, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hemmed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Hemming.] 1. To form a hem or border to; to fold and sew down the edge of. Wordsworth.
[1913 Webster]

2. To border; to edge
[1913 Webster]

All the skirt about
Was hemmed with golden fringe.
Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

To hem about, To hem around, or To hem in, to inclose and confine; to surround; to environ. “With valiant squadrons round about to hem.” Fairfax.Hemmed in to be a spoil to tyranny.” Daniel. -- To hem out, to shut out. “You can not hem me out of London.” J. Webster.
[1913 Webster]

Hema-
Hem"a- (?). Same as Haema-.
[1913 Webster]

Hemachate
Hem"a*chate (?), n. [L. haemachates; Gr. a"i^ma blood + 'acha`ths agate.] (Min.) A species of agate, sprinkled with spots of red jasper.
[1913 Webster]

Hemachrome
Hem"a*chrome (?), n. Same as Haemachrome.
[1913 Webster]

Hemacite
Hem"a*cite (?), n. [Gr. a"i^ma blood.] A composition made from blood, mixed with mineral or vegetable substances, used for making buttons, door knobs, etc.

Hemadromometer
Hemadrometer
{ Hem`a*drom"e*ter (?), Hem`a*dro*mom"e*ter (?), } n. [Hema- + Gr. &unr_; course + -meter.] (Physiol.) An instrument for measuring the velocity with which the blood moves in the arteries.

Hemadromometry
Hemadrometry
{ Hem`a*drom`e*try (?), Hem`a*dro*mom"e*try (?), } n. (Physiol.) The act of measuring the velocity with which the blood circulates in the arteries; haemotachometry.
[1913 Webster]

Hemadynamics
He`ma*dy*nam"ics (?), n. [Hema- + dynamics.] (Physiol.) The principles of dynamics in their application to the blood; that part of science which treats of the motion of the blood.
[1913 Webster]

Hemadynamometer
He`ma*dy"na*mom"e*ter (?), n. [Hema- + dynamometr.] (Physiol.) An instrument by which the pressure of the blood in the arteries, or veins, is measured by the height to which it will raise a column of mercury; -- called also a haemomanometer.
[1913 Webster]

Hemal
He"mal (?), a. [Gr. a"i^ma blood.] Relating to the blood or blood vessels; pertaining to, situated in the region of, or on the side with, the heart and great blood vessels; -- opposed to neural.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; As applied to vertebrates, hemal is the same as ventral, the heart and great blood vessels being on the ventral, and the central nervous system on the dorsal, side of the vertebral column.
[1913 Webster]

Hemal arch (Anat.), the ventral arch in a segment of the spinal skeleton, formed by vertebral processes or ribs.
[1913 Webster]

Hemaphaein
Hem`a*phae"in (?), n. Same as Haemaphaein.
[1913 Webster]

Hemapophysis
Hem`a*poph"y*sis (?), n.; pl. Hemapophyses . [NL. See Haema-, and Apophysis.] (Anat.) The second element in each half of a hemal arch, corresponding to the sternal part of a rib. Owen. -- Hem`a*po*phys"i*al (#), a.

Hemastatical
Hemastatic
{ Hem`a*stat"ic (?), Hem`a*stat"ic*al (?), } a. & n. Same as Hemostatic.
[1913 Webster]

Hemastatics
Hem`a*stat"ics (?), n. (Physiol.) Laws relating to the equilibrium of the blood in the blood vessels.
[1913 Webster]

Hematachometer
Hem`a*ta*chom"e*ter (?), n. Same as Haematachometer.
[1913 Webster]

Hematein
Hem`a*te"in (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, blood.] (Chem.) A reddish brown or violet crystalline substance, C16H12O6, got from hematoxylin by partial oxidation, and regarded as analogous to the phthaleins.
[1913 Webster]

Hematemesis
Hem`a*tem"e*sis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. a"i^ma, a"i`matos, blood + &unr_; a vomiting, fr. &unr_; to vomit.] (Med.) A vomiting of blood.
[1913 Webster]

Hematherm
Hem"a*therm (?), n. [Gr. a"i^ma blood + &unr_; warm.] (Zool.) A warm-blooded animal. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Hemathermal
Hem`a*ther"mal (?), a. (Zool.) Warm-blooded; hematothermal. [R]
[1913 Webster]

Hematic
He*mat"ic (?), a. Same as Haematic.
[1913 Webster]

Hematic
He*mat"ic, n. (Med.) A medicine designed to improve the condition of the blood.
[1913 Webster]

Hematin
Hem"a*tin (?), n. [Gr. a"i^ma, a"i`matos, blood.] 1. Hematoxylin.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Physiol. Chem.) A bluish black, amorphous substance containing iron and obtained from blood. It exists the red blood corpuscles united with globulin, and the form of hemoglobin or oxyhemoglobin gives to the blood its red color.
[1913 Webster]

Hematinic
He`ma*tin"ic (?), n. [From Hematin.] (Med.) Any substance, such as an iron salt or organic compound containing iron, which when ingested tends to increase the hemoglobin contents of the blood.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hematinometer
Hem`a*ti*nom"e*ter (?), n. [Hematin + -meter.] (Physiol. Chem.) A form of hemoglobinometer.
[1913 Webster]

Hematinometric
Hem`a*tin`o*met"ric (?), a. (Physiol.) Relating to the measurement of the amount of hematin or hemoglobin contained in blood, or other fluids.
[1913 Webster]

Hematinon
He*mat"i*non (?), n. [Gr. a"i^ma, a"i`matos, blood.] A red consisting of silica, borax, and soda, fused with oxide of copper and iron, and used in enamels, mosaics, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Hematite
Hem"a*tite (?), n. [L. haematites, Gr. &unr_; bloodlike, fr. a"i^ma, a"i`matos, blood.] (Min.) An important ore of iron, the sesquioxide, so called because of the red color of the powder. It occurs in splendent rhombohedral crystals, and in massive and earthy forms; -- the last called red ocher. Called also specular iron, oligist iron, rhombohedral iron ore, and bloodstone. See Brown hematite, under Brown.
[1913 Webster]

Hematitic
Hem`a*tit"ic (?), a. Of or pertaining to hematite, or resembling it.
[1913 Webster]

Hemato
Hem"a*to (?). See Haema-.
[1913 Webster]

Hematocele
He*mat"o*cele (?), n. [Hemato- + Gr. &unr_; tumor: cf. F. hématocèle.] (Med.) A tumor filled with blood.
[1913 Webster]

Hematocrya
Hem`a*toc"ry*a (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. a"i^ma, a"i`matos, blood + kry`os cold.] (Zool.) The cold-blooded vertebrates, that is, all but the mammals and birds; -- the antithesis to Hematotherma.
[1913 Webster]

Hematocrystallin
Hem`a*to*crys"tal*lin (?), n. [Hemato + crystalline.] (Physiol.) See Hemoglobin.
[1913 Webster]

Hematoid
Hem"a*toid (?), a. [Hemato- + -oid.] (Physiol.) Resembling blood.
[1913 Webster]

Hematoidin
Hem`a*toid"in (?), n. (Physiol. Chem.) A crystalline or amorphous pigment, free from iron, formed from hematin in old blood stains, and in old hemorrhages in the body. It resembles bilirubin. When present in the corpora lutea it is called haemolutein.
[1913 Webster]

Hematology
Hem`a*tol"o*gy (?), n. [Hemato- + -logy.] The science which treats of the blood.
[1913 Webster]

hematolysis
hematolysis n. The lysis of erythrocytes in the blood with the release of hemoglobin.
Syn. -- hemolysis, haemolysis, haematolysis.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hematoma
Hem`a*to"ma (hē`m&adot_;*tō"m&adot_; or h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*tō"m&adot_;), n. [NL. See Hema-, and -oma.] (Med.) A localised leakage of blood from the blood vessels into nearby tissues, usually confined within a tissue or organ; especially, a local swelling produced by an effusion of blood beneath the skin, which may clot and discolor the affected area.
[1913 Webster]

Hematophilia
Hem`a*to*phil"i*a (hē`m&adot_;*t&ouptack_;*f&ibreve_;l"&ibreve_;*&adot_;), n. [NL., fr. Gr. a"i^ma, a"i`matos, blood + filei^n to love.] (Med.) Same as hemophilia; -- an obsolete term. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Hematosin
Hem`a*to"sin (?), n. (Physiol. Chem.) The hematin of blood. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Hematosis
Hem`a*to"sis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. a"ima`twsis.] (Physiol.) (a) Sanguification; the conversion of chyle into blood. (b) The arterialization of the blood in the lungs; the formation of blood in general; haematogenesis.
[1913 Webster]

Hematotherma
Hem`a*to*ther"ma (?), n. pl. [NL., from Gr. a"i^ma, a"i`matos, blood + thermo`s warm.] (Zool.) The warm-blooded vertebrates, comprising the mammals and birds; -- the antithesis to hematocrya.
[1913 Webster]

Hematothermal
Hem"a*to*ther"mal (?), a. Warm-blooded.
[1913 Webster]

Hematoxylin
Hem`a*tox"y*lin (?), n. Haematoxylin.
[1913 Webster]

Hematuria
Hem`a*tu"ri*a (?), n. [NL. See Hema-, and Urine.] (Med.) Passage of urine mingled with blood; blood in the urine.
[1913 Webster]

Hemautography
Hem`au*tog"ra*phy (?), n. (Physiol.) The obtaining of a curve similar to a pulse curve or sphygmogram by allowing the blood from a divided artery to strike against a piece of paper.

Hemelytrum
Hemelytron
{ ‖Hem*el"y*tron (? or ?), ‖Hem*el"y*trum (-trŭm cf. Elytron, 277), }, n.; pl. Hemelytra (&unr_;). [NL. See Hemi, and Elytron.] (Zool.) One of the partially thickened anterior wings of certain insects, as of many Hemiptera, the earwigs, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Hemeralopia
Hem`e*ra*lo"pi*a (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_;, the opposite of &unr_;; &unr_; day + &unr_; of &unr_;. See Nyctalopia.] (Med.) A disease of the eyes, in consequence of which a person can see clearly or without pain only by daylight or a strong artificial light; day sight.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Some writers (as Quain) use the word in the opposite sense, i. e., day blindness. See Nyctalopia.
[1913 Webster]

Hemerobian
Hem`er*o"bi*an (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; day + &unr_; life.] (Zool.) A neuropterous insect of the genus Hemerobius, and allied genera.
[1913 Webster]

Hemerobid
He*mer"o*bid (?), a. (Zool.) Of relating to the hemerobians.
[1913 Webster]

Hemerobiidae
Hemerobiidae prop. n. A natural family of insects including the brown lacewings.
Syn. -- family Hemerobiidae.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hemerocallidaceae
Hemerocallidaceae n. one of many subfamilies into which some classification systems subdivide the Lily family Liliaceae, but not widely accepted; it includes the genus Hemerocallis.
Syn. -- family Hemerocallidaceae.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hemerocallis
Hem`e*ro*cal"lis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; day + ka`llos beauty.] (Bot.) A genus of plants, some species of which are cultivated for their beautiful flowers; day lily.
[1913 Webster]

Hemi-
Hem"i- (?). [Gr. "hmi-. See Semi-.] A prefix signifying half.
[1913 Webster]

Hemialbumin
Hem`i*al*bu"min (?), n. [Hemi- + albumin.] (Physiol. Chem.) Same as Hemialbumose.
[1913 Webster]

Hemialbumose
Hem`i*al"bu"mose` (?), n. [Hemi- + albumose.] (Physiol. Chem.) An albuminous substance formed in gastric digestion, and by the action of boiling dilute acids on albumin. It is readily convertible into hemipeptone. Called also hemialbumin.
[1913 Webster]

Hemianaesthesia
Hem`i*an`aes*the"si*a (?), n. [Hemi- + anaesthesia.] (Med.) Anaesthesia upon one side of the body.
[1913 Webster]

Hemibranchi
Hem`i*bran"chi (?), n. pl. [NL. See Hemi-, and Branchia.] (Zool.) An order of fishes having an incomplete or reduced branchial apparatus. It includes the sticklebacks, the flutemouths, and Fistularia.
[1913 Webster]

Hemicardia
Hem`i*car"di*a (?), n. [NL. See Hemi-, and Cardia.] (Anat.) A lateral half of the heart, either the right or left. B. G. Wilder.
[1913 Webster]

Hemicarp
Hem`i*carp (?), n. [Hemi- + Gr. &unr_; fruit.] (Bot.) One portion of a fruit that spontaneously divides into halves.
[1913 Webster]

Hemicerebrum
Hem`i*cer"e*brum (?), n. [Hemi- + cerebrum.] (Anat.) A lateral half of the cerebrum. Wilder.
[1913 Webster]

Hemicollin
Hem`i*col"lin (?), n. [Hemi- + collin.] (Physiol. Chem.) See Semiglutin.
[1913 Webster]

Hemicrania
Hem`i*cra"ni*a (?), n. [L.: cf. F. hémicrânie. See Cranium, and Megrim.] (Med.) A pain that affects only one side of the head.
[1913 Webster]

Hemicrany
Hem"i*cra`ny (?), n. (Med.) Hemicranis.
[1913 Webster]

Hemicycle
Hem"i*cy`cle (?), n. [L. hemicyclus, Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; + ky`klos.] 1. A half circle; a semicircle.
[1913 Webster]

2. A semicircular place, as a semicircular arena, or room, or part of a room.
[1913 Webster]

The collections will be displayed in the hemicycle of the central pavilion. London Academy.
[1913 Webster]

Hemidactyl
Hem`i*dac"tyl (?), n. [See Hemi-, and Dactyl.] (Zool.) Any species of Old World geckoes of the genus Hemidactylus. The hemidactyls have dilated toes, with two rows of plates beneath.
[1913 Webster]

Hemi-demi-semiquaver
Hem`i-dem`i-sem"i*quaver (?), n. [Hemi- + demi-semiquaver.] (Mus.) A short note, equal to one fourth of a semiquaver, or the sixty-fourth part of a whole note.
[1913 Webster]

Hemiditone
Hem`i*di"tone (?), n. [Hemi- + ditone.] (Gr. Mus.) The lesser third. Busby.
[1913 Webster]

Hemigamous
He*mig"a*mous (?), a. [Hemi- + Gr. &unr_; marriage.] (Bot.) Having one of the two florets in the same spikelet neuter, and the other unisexual, whether male or female; -- said of grasses.
[1913 Webster]

Hemiglyph
Hem"i*glyph (?), n. [Hemi- + Gr. &unr_; a carving.] (Arch.) The half channel or groove in the edge of the triglyph in the Doric order.
[1913 Webster]

Hemihedral
Hem`i*he"dral (?), a. [Hemi- + Gr. &unr_; seat, base, fr. &unr_; to sit.] (Crystallog.) Having half of the similar parts of a crystals, instead of all; consisting of half the planes which full symmetry would require, as when a cube has planes only on half of its eight solid angles, or one plane out of a pair on each of its edges; or as in the case of a tetrahedron, which is hemihedral to an octahedron, it being contained under four of the planes of an octahedron. -- Hem`i*he"dral*ly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

Hemihedrism
Hem`i*he"drism (?), n. (Crystallog.) The property of crystallizing hemihedrally.
[1913 Webster]

Hemihedron
Hem`i*he"dron (?), n. (Crystallog.) A solid hemihedrally derived. The tetrahedron is a hemihedron.
[1913 Webster]

Hemiholohedral
Hem`i*hol`o*he"dral (?), a. [Hemi- + holohedral.] (Crystallog.) Presenting hemihedral forms, in which half the sectants have the full number of planes.
[1913 Webster]

Hemimellitic
Hem`i*mel*lit"ic (?), a. [Hemi- + mellitic.] (Chem.) Having half as many (three) carboxyl radicals as mellitic acid; -- said of an organic acid.
[1913 Webster]

Hemimetabola
Hem`i*me*tab"o*la (?), n. pl. [NL. See Hemi-, and Metabola.] (Zool.) Those insects which have an incomplete metamorphosis.
[1913 Webster]

Hemimetabolic
Hem`i*met`a*bol"ic (?), a. (Zool.) Having an incomplete metamorphosis, the larvae differing from the adults chiefly in laking wings, as in the grasshoppers and cockroaches.
[1913 Webster]

Hemimorphic
Hem`i*mor"phic (?), a. [Hemi- + Gr. morfh` form.] (Crystallog.) Having the two ends modified with unlike planes; -- said of a crystal.
[1913 Webster]

Hemin
He"min (?), n. [Gr. a"i^ma blood.] (Physiol. Chem.) A substance, in the form of reddish brown, microscopic, prismatic crystals, formed from dried blood by the action of strong acetic acid and common salt; -- called also Teichmann's crystals. Chemically, it is a hydrochloride of hematin.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The obtaining of these small crystals, from old blood clots or suspected blood stains, constitutes one of the best evidences of the presence of blood.
[1913 Webster]

Hemina
He*mi"na (?), n.; pl. Heminae (#). [L., fr. Gr. &unr_;.] 1. (Rom. Antiq.) A measure of half a sextary. Arbuthnot.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Med.) A measure equal to about ten fluid ounces.
[1913 Webster]

Hemionus
He*mi"o*nus (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; a half ass, a mule.] (Zool.) A wild ass found in Tibet; the kiang. Darwin.

Hemiopsia
Hemiopia
{ ‖Hem`i*o"pi*a (?), Hem`i*op"si*a (?), } n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; half + Gr. &unr_; sight.] (Med.) A defect of vision in consequence of which a person sees but half of an object looked at.
[1913 Webster]

Hemiorthotype
Hem`i*or"tho*type (?), a. [Hemi- + Gr. &unr_; straight + -type.] Same as Monoclinic.
[1913 Webster]

Hemipeptone
Hem`i*pep"tone (?), n. [Hemi- + peptone.] (Physiol. Chem.) A product of the gastric and pancreatic digestion of albuminous matter.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Unlike antipeptone it is convertible into leucin and tyrosin, by the continued action of pancreatic juice. See Peptone. It is also formed from hemialbumose and albumin by the action of boiling dilute sulphuric acid.
[1913 Webster]

Hemiplegia
Hem`i*ple"gi*a (?), n.[NL., fr. Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; half + &unr_; a stroke; cf. F. hémiplagie.] (Med.) A palsy that affects one side only of the body. -- Hem`i"pleg"ic (#), a.
[1913 Webster]

Hemiplegy
Hem"i*ple`gy (?), n. (Med.) Hemiplegia.
[1913 Webster]

Hemipode
Hem"i*pode (?), n. [Hemi- + Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, foot.] (Zool.) Any bird of the genus Turnix. Various species inhabit Asia, Africa, and Australia.
[1913 Webster]

Hemiprotein
Hem`i*pro"te*in (?), n. [Hemi- + protein.] (Physiol. Chem.) An insoluble, proteid substance, described by Schützenberger, formed when albumin is heated for some time with dilute sulphuric acid. It is apparently identical with antialbumid and dyspeptone.
[1913 Webster]

Hemipter
He*mip"ter (?), n. [Cf. F. hémiptères, pl.] (Zool.) One of the Hemiptera.
[1913 Webster]

Hemiptera
He*mip"te*ra (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; half + &unr_; wing, fr. &unr_; to fly.] (Zool.) An order of hexapod insects having a jointed proboscis, including four sharp stylets (mandibles and maxillae), for piercing. In many of the species (Heteroptera) the front wings are partially coriaceous, and different from the others.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; They are divided into the Heteroptera, including the squash bug, soldier bug, bedbug, etc.; the Homoptera, including the cicadas, cuckoo spits, plant lice, scale insects, etc.; the Thysanoptera, including the thrips, and, according to most recent writers, the Pediculina or true lice.

Hemipterous
Hemipteral
{ He*mip"ter*al (?), He*mip"ter*ous (?), } a. (Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Hemiptera.
[1913 Webster]

Hemipteran
He*mip"ter*an (?), n. (Zool.) One of the Hemiptera; an hemipter.
[1913 Webster]

Hemiramphidae
Hemiramphidae prop. n. A natural family of fish including the halfbeaks, marine and freshwater fishes closely related to the flying fishes but not able to glide.
Syn. -- family Hemiramphidae.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hemisect
Hem`i*sect" (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hemisected; p. pr. & vb. n. Hemisecting.] [Hemi- + L. secare to cut.] (Anat.) To divide along the mesial plane.
[1913 Webster]

Hemisection
Hem`i*sec"tion (?), n. (Anat.) A division along the mesial plane; also, one of the parts so divided.
[1913 Webster]

Hemisphere
Hem"i*sphere (?), n. [L. hemisphaerium, Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; half = &unr_; sphere: cf. F. hémisphère. See Hemi-, and Sphere.] 1. A half sphere; one half of a sphere or globe, when divided by a plane passing through its center.
[1913 Webster]

2. Half of the terrestrial globe, or a projection of the same in a map or picture.
[1913 Webster]

3. The people who inhabit a hemisphere.
[1913 Webster]

He died . . . mourned by a hemisphere. J. P. Peters.
[1913 Webster]

Cerebral hemispheres. (Anat.) See Brain. -- Magdeburg hemispheres (Physics), two hemispherical cups forming, when placed together, a cavity from which the air can be withdrawn by an air pump; -- used to illustrate the pressure of the air. So called because invented by Otto von Guericke at Magdeburg.

Hemispherical
Hemispheric
{ Hem`i*spher"ic (?), Hem`i*spher"ic*al (?), } a. [Cf. F. hémisphérique.] Containing, or pertaining to, a hemisphere; as, a hemispheric figure or form; a hemispherical body.
[1913 Webster]

Hemispheroid
Hem`i*sphe"roid (?), n. [Hemi- + spheroid.] A half of a spheroid.
[1913 Webster]

Hemispheroidal
Hem`i*sphe*roid"al (?), a. Resembling, or approximating to, a hemisphere in form.
[1913 Webster]

Hemispherule
Hem`i*spher"ule (?), n. A half spherule.
[1913 Webster]

Hemistich
Hem"i*stich (?; 277), n. [L. hemistichium, Gr. "hmisti`chion; "hmi- half + sti`chos row, line, verse: cf. F. hémistiche.] Half a poetic verse or line, or a verse or line not completed.
[1913 Webster]

Hemistichal
He*mis"ti*chal (?), a. Pertaining to, or written in, hemistichs; also, by, or according to, hemistichs; as, a hemistichal division of a verse.
[1913 Webster]

Hemisystole
Hem`i*sys"to*le (?), n. (Physiol.) Contraction of only one ventricle of the heart.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Hemisystole is noticed in rare cases of insufficiency of the mitral valve, in which both ventricles at times contract simultaneously, as in a normal heart, this condition alternating with contraction of the right ventricle alone; hence, intermittent hemisystole.
[1913 Webster]

Hemitone
Hem"i*tone (?), n. [L. hemitonium, Gr. &unr_;.] See Semitone.

Hemitropous
Hemitropal
{ He*mit"ro*pal (?), He*mit"ro*pous (?), } a. [See Hemitrope.] 1. Turned half round; half inverted.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) Having the raphe terminating about half way between the chalaza and the orifice; amphitropous; -- said of an ovule. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Hemitrope
Hem"i*trope (?), a. [Hemi- + Gr. &unr_; to turn: cf. F. hémitrope.] Half turned round; half inverted; (Crystallog.) having a twinned structure.
[1913 Webster]

Hemitrope
Hem"i*trope, n. That which is hemitropal in construction; (Crystallog.) a twin crystal having a hemitropal structure.
[1913 Webster]

Hemitropy
He*mit"ro*py (?), n. (Crystallog.) Twin composition in crystals.
[1913 Webster]

Hemlock
Hem"lock (?), n. [OE. hemeluc, humloc, AS. hemlic, hymlic.] 1. (Bot.) The name of several poisonous umbelliferous herbs having finely cut leaves and small white flowers, as the Cicuta maculata, Cicuta bulbifera, and Cicuta virosa, and the Conium maculatum. See Conium.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The potion of hemlock administered to Socrates is by some thought to have been a decoction of Cicuta virosa, or water hemlock, by others, of Conium maculatum.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) An evergreen tree common in North America (Abies Canadensis or Tsuga Canadensis); hemlock spruce.
[1913 Webster]

The murmuring pines and the hemlocks. Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

3. The wood or timber of the hemlock tree.
[1913 Webster]

Ground hemlock, or Dwarf hemlock. See under Ground.
[1913 Webster]

Hemmel
Hem"mel (?), n. [Scot. hemmel, hammel, Prov. E. hemble hovel, stable, shed, perh. allied to D. hemel heaven, canopy, G. himmel; cf. E. heaven. √14.] A shed or hovel for cattle. [Prov. Eng.] Wright.
[1913 Webster]

Hemmer
Hem"mer (?), n. One who, or that which, hems with a needle. Specifically: (a) An attachment to a sewing machine, for turning under the edge of a piece of fabric, preparatory to stitching it down. (b) A tool for turning over the edge of sheet metal to make a hem.
[1913 Webster]

hemming-stitch
hemming-stitch n. a stitch used in sewing hems on skirts and dresses.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hemo-
Hem"o- (?). Same as Haema-, Haemo-.
[1913 Webster]

Hemoglobin
Hem"o*glo"bin (?), n. [Hemo- + globe.] (Physiol.) The normal coloring matter of the red blood corpuscles of vertebrate animals. It is composed of hematin and globulin, and is also called haematoglobulin. In arterial blood, it is always combined with oxygen, and is then called oxyhemoglobin. It crystallizes under different forms from different animals, and when crystallized, is called haematocrystallin. See Blood crystal, under Blood.
[1913 Webster]

Hemoglobinometer
Hem`o*glo"bin*om"e*ter (?), n. (Physiol. Chem.) Same as Haemochromometer.
[1913 Webster]

hemolysis
hemolysis n. The lysis of erythrocytes with the release of hemoglobin; the breaking apart of red blood cells in the blood.
Syn. -- haemolysis, hematolysis, haematolysis.
[WordNet 1.5]

hemolytic
hemolytic adj. of or pertaining to hemolysis; causing hemolysis.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hemophilia
Hem`o*phil"i*a (hē`m&adot_;*f&ibreve_;l"&ibreve_;*&adot_; or h&ebreve_;m`&adot_;*f&ibreve_;l"&ibreve_;*&adot_;), n. [NL., fr. Gr. a"i^ma, blood + filei^n to love.] (Med.) A condition characterized by a tendency to profuse and uncontrollable hemorrhage from the slightest wounds; it is caused by an absence or abnormality of a clotting factor in the blood, and is a recessive genetic disease linked to the X-chromosome, and therefore usually occurs only in males; there are several specific forms. It may be treated by administering purified clotting factor. It was formerly termed Hematophilia.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

hemophiliac
hem`o*phil"i*ac (hē`m&adot_;*f&ibreve_;l"&ibreve_;*ăk), n. A person afflicted with hemophilia; called also hemophile.
[PJC]

hemophiliac
hem`o*phil"i*ac (hē`m&adot_;*f&ibreve_;l"&ibreve_;*ăk), a. of, pertaining to, characteristic of, or afflicted with hemophilia; hemophilic.
[PJC]

hemophilic
hem`o*phil"ic adj. 1. of, pertaining to, characteristic of, or afflicted with hemophilia; hemophiliac.
Syn. -- haemophilic, hemophiliac.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

2. (Microbiology) Growing best in a medium containing blood, or in blood; -- of bacteria.
[PJC]

Hemoptysis
He*mop"ty*sis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. a"i^ma blood + &unr_; to spit: cf. F. hémoptysie.] (Med.) The expectoration of blood, due usually to hemorrhage from the mucous membrane of the lungs.
[1913 Webster]

Hemorrhage
Hem"or*rhage (?), n. [L. haemorrhagia, Gr. a"imorragi`a; a"i^ma blood + "rhgny`nai to break, burst: cf. F. hémorragie, hémorrhagie.] (Med.) Any discharge of blood from the blood vessels.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The blood circulates in a system of closed tubes, the rupture of which gives rise to hemorrhage.
[1913 Webster]

Hemorrhagic
Hem`or*rhag"ic (?), a. [Gr. a"imorragiko`s: cf. F. hémorrhagique.] Pertaining or tending to a flux of blood; consisting in, or accompanied by, hemorrhage.
[1913 Webster]

Hemorrhoidal
Hem`or*rhoid"al (?), a. [Cf. F. hémorroïdal, hémorrhoïdal.] 1. Of or pertaining to, or of the nature of, hemorrhoids.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the rectum; rectal; as, the hemorrhoidal arteries, veins, and nerves.
[1913 Webster]

Hemorrhoids
Hem"or*rhoids (?), n. pl. [L. haemorrhoidae, pl., Gr. &unr_;, sing., &unr_; (sc. &unr_;), pl., veins liable to discharge blood, hemorrhoids, fr. &unr_; flowing with blood; a"i^ma blood + &unr_; to flow: cf. F. hémorroïdes, hémorrhoïdes. See Rheum.] (Med.) Livid and painful swellings formed by the dilation of the blood vessels around the margin of, or within, the anus, from which blood or mucus is occasionally discharged; piles; emerods. [The sing. hemorrhoid is rarely used.]
[1913 Webster]

hemosiderin
hemosiderin n. (Med.) a granular yellowish-brown substance composed of protein and ferric oxide, resulting from the breakdown of hemoglobin; it has a higher iron content than ferritin, and its presence in body tissues or phagocytes can be a symptom of disturbed iron metabolism.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

hemosiderosis
hemosiderosis n. (Med.) The accumulation of abnormal amounts of hemosiderin in the tisssues. Several causes have been recognized. Stedman.
[PJC]

hemostat
hemostat n. a surgical instrument that stops bleeding by clamping the blood vessel.
Syn. -- haemostat.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hemostatic
Hem`o*stat"ic (?), a. [Hemo- + Gr. statiko`s causing to stand, fr. &unr_; to stand.] 1. (Med.) Of or relating to stagnation of the blood.
[1913 Webster]

2. Serving to arrest hemorrhage; styptic.
[1913 Webster]

Hemostatic
Hem`o*stat"ic, n. A medicine or application to arrest hemorrhage.
[1913 Webster]

Hemothorax
Hem`o*tho"rax (?), n. [NL. See Hemo-, and Thorax.] (Med.) An effusion of blood into the cavity of the pleura.
[1913 Webster]

Hemp
Hemp (h&ebreve_;mp), n. [OE. hemp, AS. henep, hænep; akin to D. hennep, OHG. hanaf, G. hanf, Icel. hampr, Dan. hamp, Sw. hampa, L. cannabis, cannabum, Gr. ka`nnabis, ka`nnabos; cf. Russ. konoplia, Skr. ça&nsdot_;a; all prob. borrowed from some other language at an early time. Cf. Cannabine, Canvas.] 1. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Cannabis (Cannabis sativa), the fibrous skin or bark of which is used for making cloth and cordage. The name is also applied to various other plants yielding fiber.
[1913 Webster]

2. The fiber of the skin or rind of the plant, prepared for spinning. The name has also been extended to various fibers resembling the true hemp.
[1913 Webster]

African hemp, Bowstring hemp. See under African, and Bowstring. -- Bastard hemp, the Asiatic herb Datisca cannabina. -- Canada hemp, a species of dogbane (Apocynum cannabinum), the fiber of which was used by the Indians. -- Hemp agrimony, a coarse, composite herb of Europe (Eupatorium cannabinum), much like the American boneset. -- Hemp nettle, a plant of the genus Galeopsis (Galeopsis Tetrahit), belonging to the Mint family. -- Indian hemp. See under Indian, a. -- Manila hemp, the fiber of Musa textilis. -- Sisal hemp, the fiber of Agave sisalana, of Mexico and Yucatan. -- Sunn hemp, a fiber obtained from a leguminous plant (Crotalaria juncea). -- Water hemp, an annual American weed (Acnida cannabina), related to the amaranth.
[1913 Webster]

Hempen
Hemp"en (-'n), a. 1. Made of hemp; as, a hempen cord.
[1913 Webster]

2. Like hemp. “Beat into a hempen state.” Cook.
[1913 Webster]

Hempy
Hemp"y (?), a. Like hemp. [R.] Howell.

Hemselven
Hemselve
Hemself
Hem*self" (?), Hem*selve" (&unr_;), Hem*selv"en (&unr_;), pron. pl. [See Hem, pron.] Themselves; -- used reflexively. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hemstitch
Hem"stitch (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hemstitched (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Hemstitching.] [Hem + stitch.] To ornament at the head of a broad hem by drawing out a few parallel threads, and fastening the cross threads in successive small clusters; as, to hemstitch a handkerchief.
[1913 Webster]

Hemstitched
Hem"stitched (?), a. Having a broad hem separated from the body of the article by a line of open work; as, a hemistitched handkerchief.
[1913 Webster]

Hemuse
He"muse (?), n. (Zool.) The roebuck in its third year. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Hen
Hen (?), n. [AS. henn, hen, hæn; akin to D. hen, OHG. henna, G. henne, Icel. h&unr_;na, Dan. höna; the fem. corresponding to AS. hana cock, D. haan, OHG. hano, G. hahn, Icel. hani, Dan. & Sw. hane. Prob. akin to L. canere to sing, and orig. meaning, a singer. Cf. Chanticleer.] (Zool.) The female of the domestic fowl; also, the female of grouse, pheasants, or any kind of birds; as, the heath hen; the gray hen.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Used adjectively or in combination to indicate the female; as, hen canary, hen eagle, hen turkey, peahen.
[1913 Webster]

Hen clam. (Zool.) (a) A clam of the Mactra, and allied genera; the sea clam or surf clam. See Surf clam. (b) A California clam of the genus Pachydesma. -- Hen driver. See Hen harrier (below). -- Hen harrier (Zool.), a hawk (Circus cyaneus), found in Europe and America; -- called also dove hawk, henharm, henharrow, hen driver, and usually, in America, marsh hawk. See Marsh hawk. -- Hen hawk (Zool.), one of several species of large hawks which capture hens; esp., the American red-tailed hawk (Buteo borealis), the red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus), and the goshawk.
[1913 Webster]

Henbane
Hen"bane` (?), n. [Hen + bane.] (Bot.) A plant of the genus Hyoscyamus (Hyoscyamus niger). All parts of the plant are poisonous, and the leaves are used for the same purposes as belladonna. It is poisonous to domestic fowls; whence the name. Called also, stinking nightshade, from the fetid odor of the plant. See Hyoscyamus.
[1913 Webster]

Henbit
Hen"bit` (?), n. (Bot.) A weed of the genus Lamium (Lamium amplexicaule) with deeply crenate leaves.
[1913 Webster]

Hence
Hence (h&ebreve_;ns), adv. [OE. hennes, hens (the s is prop. a genitive ending; cf. -wards), also hen, henne, hennen, heonnen, heonene, AS. heonan, heonon, heona, hine; akin to OHG. hinnān, G. hinnen, OHG. hina, G. hin; all from the root of E. he. See He.] 1. From this place; away. “Or that we hence wend.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Arise, let us go hence. John xiv. 31.
[1913 Webster]

I will send thee far hence unto the Gentiles. Acts xxii. 21.
[1913 Webster]

2. From this time; in the future; as, a week hence. “Half an hour hence.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. From this reason; therefore; -- as an inference or deduction.
[1913 Webster]

Hence, perhaps, it is, that Solomon calls the fear of the Lord the beginning of wisdom. Tillotson.
[1913 Webster]

4. From this source or origin.
[1913 Webster]

All other faces borrowed hence
Their light and grace.
Suckling.
[1913 Webster]

Whence come wars and fightings among you? Come they not hence, even of your lusts? James. iv. 1.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Hence is used, elliptically and imperatively, for go hence; depart hence; away; be gone. “Hence with your little ones.” Shak. -- From hence, though a pleonasm, is fully authorized by the usage of good writers.
[1913 Webster]

An ancient author prophesied from hence. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Expelled from hence into a world
Of woe and sorrow.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hence
Hence (?), v. t. To send away. [Obs.] Sir P. Sidney.
[1913 Webster]

Henceforth
Hence`forth" (?), adv. From this time forward; henceforward.
[1913 Webster]

I never from thy side henceforth to stray. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Henceforward
Hence`for"ward (?), adv. From this time forward; from now into the indefinite future; henceforth.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Henchboy
Hench"boy` (h&ebreve_;nch"boi`), n. A page; a servant. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Henchman
Hench"man (h&ebreve_;nch"m&aitalic_;n), n.; pl. -men (-m&eitalic_;n). [OE. hencheman, henxman; prob. fr. OE. & AS. hengest horse + E. man, and meaning, a groom. AS. hengest is akin to D. & G. hengst stallion, OHG. hengist horse, gelding.] An attendant; a servant; a follower. Now chiefly used as a political cant term.
[1913 Webster]

Hencoop
Hen"coop` (?), n. A coop or cage for hens.
[1913 Webster]

Hende
Hende (?), a. [OE., near, handy, kind, fr. AS. gehende near, fr. hand hand. See Handy.] 1. Skillful; dexterous; clever. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. Friendly; civil; gentle; kind. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hendecagon
Hen*dec"a*gon (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; eleven + &unr_; angle: cf. F. hendécagone.] (Geom.) A plane figure of eleven sides and eleven angles. [Written also endecagon.]
[1913 Webster]

Hendecane
Hen"de*cane (?), n. [Gr. "e`ndeka eleven.] (Chem.) A hydrocarbon, C11H24, of the paraffin series; -- so called because it has eleven atoms of carbon in each molecule. Called also endecane, undecane.
[1913 Webster]

Hendecasyllabic
Hen*dec`a*syl*lab"ic (?), a. Pertaining to a line of eleven syllables.
[1913 Webster]

Hendecasyllable
Hen*dec"a*syl`la*ble (?), n. [L. hendecasyllabus, Gr. &unr_; eleven-syllabled; &unr_; eleven + &unr_; syllable: cf. F. hendécasyllabe.] A metrical line of eleven syllables. J. Warton.
[1913 Webster]

Hendecatoic
Hen*dec`a*to"ic (?), a. [See Hendecane.] (Chem.) Undecylic; pertaining to, or derived from, hendecane; as, hendecatoic acid.
[1913 Webster]

Hendiadys
Hen*di"a*dys (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; &unr_; &unr_; one by two.] (Gram.) A figure in which the idea is expressed by two nouns connected by and, instead of by a noun and limiting adjective; as, we drink from cups and gold, for golden cups.
[1913 Webster]

Hendy
Hen"dy (?), a. [Obs.] See Hende.
[1913 Webster]

Henen
Hen"en (?), adv. Hence. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Henfish
Hen"fish` (?), n. (Zool.) (a) A marine fish; the sea bream. (b) A young bib. See Bib, n., 2.
[1913 Webster]

Heng
Heng (?), obs. imp. of Hang. Hung. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hen-hearted
Hen"-heart`ed (?), a. Cowardly; timid; chicken-hearted. Udall.
[1913 Webster]

Henhouse
Hen"house` (?), n.; pl. Henhouses. A house or shelter for fowls.
[1913 Webster]

Henhussy
Hen"hus`sy (?), n. A cotquean; a man who intermeddles with women's concerns.
[1913 Webster]

Heniquen
He*ni"quen (?), n. See Jeniquen.
[1913 Webster]

Henna
Hen"na (?), n. [Ar. hinnā alcanna (Lawsonia inermis syn. Lawsonia alba). Cf. Alcanna, Alkanet, Orchanet.]
[1913 Webster]

1. (Bot.) A thorny tree or shrub of the genus Lawsonia (Lawsonia alba). The fragrant white blossoms are used by the Buddhists in religious ceremonies. The powdered leaves furnish a red coloring matter used in the East to stain the nails and fingers, the manes of horses, etc.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Com.) The leaves of the henna plant, or a preparation or dyestuff made from them.
[1913 Webster]

Hennery
Hen"ner*y (?), n. An inclosed place for keeping hens. [U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

Hennes
Hen"nes (?), adv. Hence. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hennotannic
Hen`no*tan"nic (?), a. [Henna + tannic.] (Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, a brown resinous substance resembling tannin, and extracted from the henna plant; as, hennotannic acid.

Henogenesis
Henoge ny
{ He*nog"e* ny (?), Hen`o*gen"e*sis (?), } n. [Gr. e"i^s, masc., "e`n, neut., one + root of gi`gnesqai to be born.] (Biol.) Same as Ontogeny.
[1913 Webster]

Henotheism
Hen"o*the*ism (?), n. [Gr. e"i`s, "eno`s, one + E. theism.] Primitive religion in which each of several divinities is regarded as independent, and is worshiped without reference to the rest. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Henotic
He*not"ic (?), a. [Gr. "enwtiko`s, fr. "enou^n to unite, fr. e"i^s one.] Harmonizing; irenic. Gladstone.
[1913 Webster]

hen-peck
henpeck
hen"peck`, hen"-peck` (h&ebreve_;n"p&ebreve_;k`), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Henpecked (h&ebreve_;n"p&ebreve_;kt`); p. pr. & vb. n. Henpecking.] To bother persistently with trivial complaints; to subject to petty authority; -- said of a woman who thus treats her male companion, especially of wives who thus dominate their husbands. Commonly used in the past participle (often adjectively); as, henpecked for years, he finally left her.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

hen-of-the-woods
hen-of-the-woods n. A large grayish-brown edible fungus (Polyporus frondosus) forming a mass of overlapping caps at the base of trees that somewhat resembles a hen.
Syn. -- hen of the woods, Polyporus frondosus.
[WordNet 1.5]

Henrietta cloth
Hen`ri*et"ta cloth` (?). A fine wide wooled fabric much used for women's dresses.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Henroost
Hen"roost` (?), n. A place where hens roost.
[1913 Webster]

Henry
Hen"ry (?), n.; pl. Henrys. [From Joseph Henry, an American physicist.] The unit of electric induction; the induction in a circuit when the electro-motive force induced in this circuit is one volt, while the inducing current varies at the rate of one ampère a second.
[1913 Webster]

Hen's-foot
Hen's-foot` (&unr_;), n. (Bot.) An umbelliferous plant (Caucalis daucoides).
[1913 Webster]

Hent
Hent (h&ebreve_;nt), v. t. [imp. Hente; p. p. Hent.] [OE. hente, henten, fr. AS. hentan, gehentan, to pursue, take, seize; cf. Icel. henda, Goth. hinpan (in compos.), and E. hunt.] To seize; to lay hold on; to catch; to get. [Obs.] Piers Plowman. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

This cursed Jew him hente and held him fast. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

But all that he might of his friendes hente
On bookes and on learning he it spente.
Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Henware
Hen"ware` (?), n. (Bot.) A coarse, blackish seaweed. See Badderlocks.
[1913 Webster]

Henxman
Henx"man (?), n. Henchman. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

henyard
henyard n. an enclosed yard for keeping poultry.
Syn. -- chicken yard, chicken run, fowl run.
[WordNet 1.5]

hep
hep (h&ebreve_;p), n. See Hip, the fruit of the dog-rose.
[1913 Webster]

hep
hep (h&ebreve_;p), a. Same as Hip, a., but older and now less frequently used.
[PJC]

hep
hep (h&ebreve_;p), interj. A call used by drill instructors to count cadence during marching; used identically to hut and hup.
[PJC]

hepcat
hep"cat` (h&ebreve_;p"kăt`), n. 1. One who performs jazz music. [slang]
[PJC]

2. A person who is hep or hip; same as hipster; -- an older term becoming dated and less used. [slang]
[PJC]

Hepar
He"par (?), n. [L. hepar, hepatis, the liver, Gr. &unr_;.] 1. (Old Chem.) Liver of sulphur; a substance of a liver-brown color, sometimes used in medicine. It is formed by fusing sulphur with carbonates of the alkalies (esp. potassium), and consists essentially of alkaline sulphides. Called also hepar sulphuris (&unr_;).
[1913 Webster]

2. Any substance resembling hepar proper, in appearance; specifically, in homeopathy, calcium sulphide, called also hepar sulphuris calcareum (&unr_;).
[1913 Webster]

Hepar antimonii (&unr_;) (Old Chem.), a substance, of a liver-brown color, obtained by fusing together antimony sulphide with alkaline sulphides, and consisting of sulphantimonites of the alkalies; -- called also liver of antimony.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatic
He*pat"ic (?), a. [L. hepaticus, Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; the liver; akin to L. jecur, Skr. yak&unr_;t: cf. F. hépatique.] 1. Of or pertaining to the liver; as, hepatic artery; hepatic diseases.
[1913 Webster]

2. Resembling the liver in color or in form; as, hepatic cinnabar.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Bot.) Pertaining to, or resembling, the plants called Hepaticae, or scale mosses and liverworts.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatic duct (Anat.), any biliary duct; esp., the duct, or one of the ducts, which carries the bile from the liver to the cystic and common bile ducts. See Illust., under Digestive. -- Hepatic gas (Old Chem.), sulphureted hydrogen gas. -- Hepatic mercurial ore, or Hepatic cinnabar. See under Cinnabar.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatica
He*pat"i*ca (?), n.; pl. Hepaticae (#). [NL. See Hepatic. So called in allusion to the shape of the lobed leaves or fronds.]
[1913 Webster]

1. (Bot.) A genus of pretty spring flowers closely related to Anemone; squirrel cup.
[1913 Webster]

2. (bot.) Any plant, usually procumbent and mosslike, of the cryptogamous class Hepaticae; -- called also scale moss and liverwort. See Hepaticae, in the Supplement.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatical
He*pat"ic*al, a. Hepatic. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Hepatite
Hep"a*tite (?; 277), n. [L. hepatitis an unknown precious stone, Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_;, &unr_;, the liver: cf. F. hépatite.] (Min.) A variety of barite emitting a fetid odor when rubbed or heated.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatitis
Hep`a*ti"tis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, liver + -itis.] (Med.) Inflammation of the liver.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatization
Hep`a*ti*za"tion (?), n. 1. (Chem.) Impregnating with sulphureted hydrogen gas. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

2. [Cf. F. hépatisation.] (Med.) Conversion into a substance resembling the liver; a state of the lungs when gorged with effused matter, so that they are no longer pervious to the air.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatize
Hep"a*tize (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hepatized (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Hepatizing (?).] [Gr. &unr_; to be like the liver, to be liver-colored, fr. &unr_;, &unr_;, the liver: cf. E. hepatite, and (for sense 2) F. hépatiser.] 1. To impregnate with sulphureted hydrogen gas, formerly called hepatic gas.
[1913 Webster]

On the right . . . were two wells of hepatized water. Barrow.
[1913 Webster]

2. To gorge with effused matter, as the lungs.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatocele
He*pat"o*cele (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, the liver + &unr_; tumor.] (Med.) Hernia of the liver.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatocystic
Hep`a*to*cys"tic (?), a. [Hepatic + cystic.] (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the liver and gall bladder; as, the hepatocystic ducts.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatogastric
Hep`a*to*gas"tric (?), a. [Hepatic + gastric.] (Anat.) See Gastrohepatic.

Hepatogenous
Hepatogenic
{ Hep`a*to*gen"ic (?), Hep`a*tog"e*nous (?), } a. [Gr. "h^par, "h`patos, the liver + root of gi`gnesqai to be born] (Med.) Arising from the liver; due to a condition of the liver; as, hepatogenic jaundice.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatology
Hep`a*tol"o*gy (?), n. [Gr. "h^par, "h`patos, the liver + -logy.] The science which treats of the liver; a treatise on the liver.
[1913 Webster]

Hepato-pancreas
Hep"a*to-pan"cre*as (?), n. [Gr. "h^par, "h`patos, the liver + E. pancreas.] (Zool.) A digestive gland in Crustacea, Mollusca, etc., usually called the liver, but different from the liver of vertebrates.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatorenal
Hep`a*to*re"nal (?), a. [Hepatic + renal.] (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the liver and kidneys; as, the hepatorenal ligament.
[1913 Webster]

Hepatoscopy
Hep`a*tos"co*py (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;; fr. "h^par, "h`patos, the liver + &unr_; to view: cf. F. hépatoscopie.] Divination by inspecting the liver of animals.
[1913 Webster]

Heppen
Hep"pen (?), a. [Cf. AS. gehæp fit, Icel. heppinn lucky, E. happy.] Neat; fit; comfortable. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hepper
Hep"per (?), n. [Etymol. uncertain.] (Zool.) A young salmon; a parr.
[1913 Webster]

Heppelwhite
Hep"pel*white (?), a. (Furniture) Designating a light and elegant style developed in England under George III., chiefly by Messrs. A. Heppelwhite & Co.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hepta
Hep"ta (?). [See Seven.] A combining form from Gr. "epta`, seven.
[1913 Webster]

Heptachord
Hep"ta*chord (?), n. [Gr. "epta`chordos seven-stringed; "epta` seven + chordh` chord: cf. F. heptacorde. See Seven, and Chord.] 1. (Anc. Mus.) (a) A system of seven sounds. (b) A lyre with seven chords.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Anc. Poet.) A composition sung to the sound of seven chords or tones. Moore (Encyc. of Music).
[1913 Webster]

Heptad
Hep"tad (?), n. [L. heptas the number seven. Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, fr. "epta` seven.] (Chem.) An atom which has a valence of seven, and which can be theoretically combined with, substituted for, or replaced by, seven monad atoms or radicals; as, iodine is a heptad in iodic acid. Also used as an adjective.
[1913 Webster]

Heptade
Hep"tade (?), n. [Cf. F. heptade. See Heptad.] The sum or number of seven.
[1913 Webster]

Heptaglot
Hep"ta*glot (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;; "epta` seven + 3, &unr_;, tongue, language.] A book in seven languages.
[1913 Webster]

Heptagon
Hep"ta*gon (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; sevencornered; "epta` seven + &unr_; angle: cf. F. heptagone.] (Geom.) A plane figure consisting of seven sides and having seven angles.
[1913 Webster]

Heptagonal
Hep*tag"o*nal (?), a. [Cf. F. heptagonal.] Having seven angles or sides.
[1913 Webster]

Heptagonal numbers (Arith.), the numbers of the series 1, 7, 18, 34, 55, etc., being figurate numbers formed by adding successively the terms of the arithmetical series 1, 6, 11, 16, 21, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Heptagynia
Hep`ta*gyn"i*a (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. "epta` seven + &unr_; woman, female: cf. F. heptagunie.] (Bot.) A Linnaean order of plants having seven pistils.

Heptagynous
Heptagynian
{ Hep`ta*gyn"i*an (?), Hep*tag"y*nous (?), } a. [Cf. F. heptagyne.] (Bot.) Having seven pistils.
[1913 Webster]

Heptahedron
Hep`ta*he"dron (?), n. [Hepta- + Gr. &unr_; seat, base, fr. &unr_; to sit: cf. F. heptaèdre.] (Geom.) A solid figure with seven sides.
[1913 Webster]

Heptamerous
Hep*tam"er*ous (?), a. [Hepta- + Gr. &unr_; part.] (Bot.) Consisting of seven parts, or having the parts in sets of sevens. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Heptandria
Hep*tan"dri*a (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. "epta` seven + &unr_;, &unr_;, man, male: cf. F. heptandrie.] (Bot.) A Linnaean class of plants having seven stamens.

Heptandrous
Heptandrian
{ Hep*tan"dri*an (?), Hep*tan"drous (?), } a. [Cf. F. heptandre.] (Bot.) Having seven stamens.
[1913 Webster]

Heptane
Hep"tane (?), n. [Gr. "epta` seven.] (Chem.) Any one of several isometric hydrocarbons, C7H16, of the paraffin series (nine are possible, four are known); -- so called because the molecule has seven carbon atoms. Specifically, a colorless liquid, found as a constituent of petroleum, in the tar oil of cannel coal, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Heptangular
Hep*tan"gu*lar (?), a. [Hepta- + angular: cf. F. heptangulaire. Cf. Septangular.] Having seven angles.
[1913 Webster]

Heptaphyllous
Hep*taph"yl*lous (?), a. [Hepta- + Gr. &unr_; leaf: cf. F. heptaphylle.] (Bot.) Having seven leaves.
[1913 Webster]

Heptarch
Hep"tarch (?), n. Same as Heptarchist.
[1913 Webster]

Heptarchic
Hep*tar"chic (?), a. [Cf. F. heptarchique.] Of or pertaining to a heptarchy; constituting or consisting of a heptarchy. T. Warton.
[1913 Webster]

Heptarchist
Hep"tarch*ist (?), n. A ruler of one division of a heptarchy. [Written also heptarch.]
[1913 Webster]

Heptarchy
Hep"tarch*y (?), n. [Hepta- + -archy: cf. F. heptarchie.] A government by seven persons; also, a country under seven rulers.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The word is most commonly applied to England, when it was divided into seven kingdoms; as, the Saxon heptachy, which consisted of Kent, the South Saxons (Sussex), West Saxons (Wessex), East Saxons (Essex), the East Angles, Mercia, and Northumberland.
[1913 Webster]

Heptaspermous
Hep`ta*sper"mous (?), a. [Hepta- + Gr. &unr_; a seed.] (Bot.) Having seven seeds.
[1913 Webster]

Heptastich
Hep"ta*stich (?), n. [Hepta- + Gr. sti`chos line, verse.] (Pros.) A composition consisting of seven lines or verses.
[1913 Webster]

Heptateuch
Hep"ta*teuch (?), n. [L. heptateuchos, Gr. "epta` seven + &unr_; tool, book; &unr_; to prepare, make, work: cf. F. heptateuque.] The first seven books of the Testament.
[1913 Webster]

Heptavalent
Hep*tav"a*lent (?), a. [Hepta- + L. valens, p. pr. See Valence.] (Chem.) Having seven units of attractive force or affinity; -- said of heptad elements or radicals.
[1913 Webster]

Heptene
Hep"tene (?), n. [Gr. "epta` seven.] (Chem.) Same as Heptylene.
[1913 Webster]

Heptine
Hep"tine (?), n. [Heptane + -ine.] (Chem.) Any one of a series of unsaturated metameric hydrocarbons, C7H12, of the acetylene series.
[1913 Webster]

Heptoic
Hep*to"ic (?), a. (Chem.) Pertaining to, or derived from, heptane; as, heptoic acid.
[1913 Webster]

Heptone
Hep"tone (?), n. [Gr. "epta` seven.] (Chem.) A liquid hydrocarbon, C7H10, of the valylene series.
[1913 Webster]

Hep tree
Hep" tree` (?). [See Hep.] The wild dog-rose.
[1913 Webster]

Heptyl
Hep"tyl (?), n. [Hepta- + -yl.] (Chem.) A compound radical, C7H15, regarded as the essential radical of heptane and a related series of compounds.
[1913 Webster]

Heptylene
Hep"tyl*ene (?), n. (Chem.) A colorless liquid hydrocarbon, C7H14, of the ethylene series; also, any one of its isomers. Called also heptene.
[1913 Webster]

Heptylic
Hep*tyl"ic (?), a. (Chem.) Pertaining to, or derived from, heptyl or heptane; as, heptylic alcohol. Cf. Œnanthylic.
[1913 Webster]

Her
Her (?), pron. & a. [OE. hire, here, hir, hure, gen. and dat. sing., AS. hire, gen. and dat. sing. of héo she. from the same root as E. he. See He.] The form of the objective and the possessive case of the personal pronoun she; as, I saw her with her purse out.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The possessive her takes the form hers when the noun with which in agrees is not given, but implied. “And what his fortune wanted, hers could mend.” Dryden.

Here
Her
Her, Here (&unr_;), pron. pl. [OE. here, hire, AS. heora, hyra, gen. pl. of . See He.] Of them; their. [Obs.] Piers Plowman.
[1913 Webster]

On here bare knees adown they fall. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Heracleonite
He*rac"le*on*ite (?), n. (Eccl. Hist.) A follower of Heracleon of Alexandria, a Judaizing Gnostic, in the early history of the Christian church.
[1913 Webster]

Herakline
He*rak"line (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; Hercules.] A picrate compound, used as an explosive in blasting.
[1913 Webster]

Herald
Her"ald (?), n. [OE. herald, heraud, OF. heralt, heraut, herault, F. héraut, LL. heraldus, haraldus, fr. (assumed) OHG. heriwalto, hariwaldo, a (civil) officer who serves the army; hari, heri, army + waltan to manage, govern, G. walten; akin to E. wield. See Harry, Wield.] 1. (Antiq.) An officer whose business was to denounce or proclaim war, to challenge to battle, to proclaim peace, and to bear messages from the commander of an army. He was invested with a sacred and inviolable character.
[1913 Webster]

2. In the Middle Ages, the officer charged with the above duties, and also with the care of genealogies, of the rights and privileges of noble families, and especially of armorial bearings. In modern times, some vestiges of this office remain, especially in England. See Heralds' College (below), and King-at-Arms.
[1913 Webster]

3. A proclaimer; one who, or that which, publishes or announces; as, the herald of another's fame. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. A forerunner; a a precursor; a harbinger.
[1913 Webster]

It was the lark, the herald of the morn. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

5. Any messenger. “My herald is returned.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Heralds' College, in England, an ancient corporation, dependent upon the crown, instituted or perhaps recognized by Richard III. in 1483, consisting of the three Kings-at-Arms and the Chester, Lancaster, Richmond, Somerset, Windsor, and York Heralds, together with the Earl Marshal. This retains from the Middle Ages the charge of the armorial bearings of persons privileged to bear them, as well as of genealogies and kindred subjects; -- called also College of Arms.
[1913 Webster]

Herald
Her"ald (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Heralded; p. pr. & vb. n. Heralding.] [Cf. OF. herauder, heraulder.] To introduce, or give tidings of, as by a herald; to proclaim; to announce; to foretell; to usher in. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

heralded
heralded adj. widely publicized; as, the royal couple's much heralded world tour.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heraldic
He*ral"dic (?), a. [Cf. F. héraldique.] Of or pertaining to heralds or heraldry; as, heraldic blazoning; heraldic language. T. Warton.
[1913 Webster]

Heraldically
He*ral"dic*al*ly (?), adv. In an heraldic manner; according to the rules of heraldry.
[1913 Webster]

heraldist
heraldist adj. of or pertaining to heraldry.
Syn. -- heraldic.
[WordNet 1.5]

Heraldry
Her"ald*ry (?), n. 1. The art or office of a herald; the art, practice, or science of recording genealogies, and blazoning arms or ensigns armorial; also, of marshaling cavalcades, processions, and public ceremonies.
[1913 Webster]

2. A coat of arms or some other heraldic device or collection of heraldic symbols.
[PJC]

Heraldship
Her"ald*ship, n. The office of a herald. Selden.
[1913 Webster]

Herapathite
Her"a*path*ite (?), n. [Named after Dr. Herapath, the discoverer.] (Chem.) The sulphate of iodoquinine, a substance crystallizing in thin plates remarkable for their effects in polarizing light.
[1913 Webster]

Heraud
Her"aud (?), n. A herald. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Herb
Herb (&etilde_;rb or h&etilde_;rb; 277), n. [OE. herbe, erbe, OF. herbe, erbe, F. herbe, L. herba; perh. akin to Gr. forbh` food, pasture, fe`rbein to feed.] 1. A plant whose stem does not become woody and permanent, but dies, at least down to the ground, after flowering.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Annual herbs live but one season; biennial herbs flower the second season, and then die; perennial herbs produce new stems year after year.
[1913 Webster]

2. Grass; herbage.
[1913 Webster]

And flocks
Grazing the tender herb.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Herb bennet. (Bot.) See Bennet. -- Herb Christopher (Bot.), an herb (Actaea spicata), whose root is used in nervous diseases; the baneberry. The name is occasionally given to other plants, as the royal fern, the wood betony, etc. -- Herb Gerard (Bot.), the goutweed; -- so called in honor of St. Gerard, who used to be invoked against the gout. Dr. Prior. -- Herb grace, or Herb of grace. (Bot.) See Rue. -- Herb Margaret (Bot.), the daisy. See Marguerite. -- Herb Paris (Bot.), an Old World plant related to the trillium (Paris quadrifolia), commonly reputed poisonous. -- Herb Robert (Bot.), a species of Geranium (Geranium Robertianum.)
[1913 Webster]

Herbaceous
Her*ba"ceous (?), a. [L. herbaceus grassy. See Herb.] Of or pertaining to herbs; having the nature, texture, or characteristics, of an herb; as, herbaceous plants; an herbaceous stem.
[1913 Webster]

Herbage
Herb"age (?; 48), n. [F. See Herb.]
[1913 Webster]

1. Herbs collectively; green food beasts; grass; pasture. “Thin herbage in the plaims.” Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Law.) The liberty or right of pasture in the forest or in the grounds of another man. Blount.
[1913 Webster]

Herbaged
Herb"aged (?), a. Covered with grass. Thomson.
[1913 Webster]

Herbal
Herb"al (?), a. Of or pertaining to herbs. Quarles.
[1913 Webster]

Herbal
Herb"al (?), n. 1. A book containing the names and descriptions of plants. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

2. A collection of specimens of plants, dried and preserved; a hortus siccus; an herbarium. Steele.
[1913 Webster]

Herbalism
Herb"al*ism (?), n. The knowledge of herbs.
[1913 Webster]

Herbalist
Herb"al*ist, n. One skilled in the knowledge of plants; a collector of, or dealer in, herbs, especially medicinal herbs.
[1913 Webster]

Herbar
Herb"ar (?), n. An herb. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Herbarian
Her*ba"ri*an (?), n. A herbalist.
[1913 Webster]

Herbarist
Herb"a*rist (?), n. A herbalist. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Herbarium
Her*ba"ri*um (?), n.; pl. E. Herbariums (#), L. Herbaria (#). [LL., fr. L. herba. See Herb, and cf. Arbor, Herbary.] 1. A collection of dried specimens of plants, systematically arranged. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

2. A book or case for preserving dried plants.
[1913 Webster]

Herbarize
Herb"a*rize (?), v. t. See Herborize.
[1913 Webster]

Herbary
Herb"a*ry (?), n. [See Herbarium.] A garden of herbs; a cottage garden. T. Warton.
[1913 Webster]

Herber
Herb"er (?), n. [OF. herbier, LL. herbarium. See Herbarium.] A garden; a pleasure garden. [Obs.] “Into an herber green.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Herbergage
Her"berg*age (?), n. [See Harborage.] Harborage; lodging; shelter; harbor. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Herbergeour
Her"ber*geour (?), n. [See Harbinger.] A harbinger. [Obs.] Chaucer.

Herberwe
Herbergh
Her"bergh (?), Her"ber*we (&unr_;), n. [See Harbor.] A harbor. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Herbescent
Her*bes"cent (?), a. [L. herbescens, p. pr. of herbescere.] Growing into herbs.
[1913 Webster]

Herbid
Herb"id (?), a. [L. herbidus.] Covered with herbs. [Obs.] Bailey.
[1913 Webster]

Herbiferous
Her*bif"er*ous (?), a. [Herb + -ferous: cf. F. herbifére.] Bearing herbs or vegetation.
[1913 Webster]

Herbist
Herb"ist (?), n. A herbalist.
[1913 Webster]

Herbivora
Her*biv"o*ra (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. L. herba herb + vorare to devour.] (Zool.) An extensive division of Mammalia. It formerly included the Proboscidea, Hyracoidea, Perissodactyla, and Artiodactyla, but by later writers it is generally restricted to the two latter groups (Ungulata). They feed almost exclusively upon vegetation.
[1913 Webster]

Herbivore
Her"bi*vore (?), n. [Cf. F. herbivore.] (Zool.) One of the Herbivora. P. H. Gosse.
[1913 Webster]

Herbivorous
Her*biv"o*rous (?), a. (Zool.) Eating plants; of or pertaining to the Herbivora.
[1913 Webster]

Herbless
Herb"less (?), a. Destitute of herbs or of vegetation. J. Warton.
[1913 Webster]

Herblet
Herb"let (?), n. A small herb. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Herborist
Her"bo*rist (?), n. [F. herboriste.] A herbalist. Ray.
[1913 Webster]

Herborization
Her`bo*ri*za"tion (?), n. [F. herborisation.] 1. The act of herborizing.
[1913 Webster]

2. The figure of plants in minerals or fossils.
[1913 Webster]

Herborize
Her"bo*rize (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Herborized (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Herborizing (?).] [F. herboriser, for herbariser, fr. L. herbarium. See Hebrarium.] To search for plants, or new species of plants, with a view to classifying them.
[1913 Webster]

He herborized as he traveled. W. Tooke.
[1913 Webster]

Herborize
Her"bo*rize, v. t. To form the figures of plants in; -- said in reference to minerals. See Arborized.
[1913 Webster]

Herborized stones contain fine mosses. Fourcroy (Trans.)
[1913 Webster]

Herborough
Her"bor*ough (?), n. [See Harborough, and Harbor.] A harbor. [Obs.] B. Jonson.

Herbous
Herbose
{ Her*bose" (?), Herb"ous (?), } a. [L. herbosus: cf. F. herbeux.] Abounding with herbs. “Fields poetically called herbose.” Byrom.
[1913 Webster]

Herb-woman
Herb"-wom`an (?), n.; pl. Herb-women (&unr_;). A woman that sells herbs.
[1913 Webster]

Herby
Herb"y (?), a. Having the nature of, pertaining to, or covered with, herbs or herbage.Herby valleys.” Chapman.
[1913 Webster]

Hercogamous
Her*cog"a*mous (?), a. [Gr. &unr_; a fence + &unr_; marriage.] (Bot.) Not capable of self-fertilization; -- said of hermaphrodite flowers in which some structural obstacle forbids autogamy.
[1913 Webster]

Herculean
Her*cu"le*an (?), a. [L. herculeus, fr. Hercules: cf. F. herculéen. See Hercules.]
[1913 Webster]

1. Requiring the strength of Hercules; hence, very great, difficult, or dangerous; as, an Herculean task.
[1913 Webster]

2. Having extraordinary strength or size; as, Herculean limbs.Herculean Samson.” Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hercules
Her"cu*les (?), n. 1. (Gr. Myth.) A hero, fabled to have been the son of Jupiter and Alcmena, and celebrated for great strength, esp. for the accomplishment of his twelve great tasks or “labors.”
[1913 Webster]

2. (Astron.) A constellation in the northern hemisphere, near Lyra.
[1913 Webster]

Hercules' beetle (Zool.), any species of Dynastes, an American genus of very large lamellicorn beetles, esp. Dynastes hercules of South America, which grows to a length of six inches. -- Hercules powder, an explosive containing nitroglycerin; -- used for blasting.
[1913 Webster]

Hercules-club
Hercules'-club
Hercules'-club
Hercules'-club, Hercules'-club, Hercules-club prop. n. 1. (Bot.) A densely spiny ornamental tree (Zanthoxylum clava-herculis) of the rue family, growing in southeast U. S. and West Indies. [wns=1] It belongs to the same genus as one of the trees (Zanthoxylum Americanum) called prickly ash.
Syn. -- Hercules'-clubs, Hercules-club, Zanthoxylum clava-herculis.
[1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]

2. A small, prickly, deciduous clump-forming tree or shrub (Aralia spinosa) of eastern U.S.; also called Angelica tree and prickly ash. [wns=2]
Syn. -- American angelica tree, devil's walking stick, Aralia spinosa.
[1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]

3. A variety of the common gourd (Lagenaria vulgaris). Its fruit sometimes exceeds five feet in length.
[1913 Webster]

Hercynian
Her*cyn"i*an (?), a. [L. Hercynia silva, Hercynius saltus, the Hercynian forest; cf. Gr. &unr_; &unr_;.] Of or pertaining to an extensive forest in Germany, of which there are still portions in Swabia and the Hartz mountains.
[1913 Webster]

Herd
Herd (h&etilde_;rd), a. Haired. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Herd
Herd (h&etilde_;rd), n. [OE. herd, heord, AS. heord; akin to OHG. herta, G. herde, Icel. hjörð, Sw. hjord, Dan. hiord, Goth. haírda; cf. Skr. çardha troop, host.]
[1913 Webster]

1. A number of beasts assembled together; as, a herd of horses, oxen, cattle, camels, elephants, deer, or swine; a particular stock or family of cattle.
[1913 Webster]

The lowing herd wind slowly o'er the lea. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Herd is distinguished from flock, as being chiefly applied to the larger animals. A number of cattle, when driven to market, is called a drove.
[1913 Webster]

2. A crowd of low people; a rabble.
[1913 Webster]

But far more numerous was the herd of such
Who think too little and who talk too much.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

You can never interest the common herd in the abstract question. Coleridge.
[1913 Webster]

Herd's grass (Bot.), one of several species of grass, highly esteemed for hay. See under Grass.
[1913 Webster]

Herd
Herd, n. [OE. hirde, herde, heorde, AS. hirde, hyrde, heorde; akin to G. hirt, hirte, OHG. hirti, Icel. hir&unr_;ir, Sw. herde, Dan. hyrde, Goth. haírdeis. See 2d Herd.] One who herds or assembles domestic animals; a herdsman; -- much used in composition; as, a shepherd; a goatherd, and the like. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Herd
Herd, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Herded; p. pr. & vb. n. Herding.] [See 2d Herd.] 1. To unite or associate in a herd; to feed or run together, or in company; as, sheep herd on many hills.
[1913 Webster]

2. To associate; to ally one's self with, or place one's self among, a group or company.
[1913 Webster]

I'll herd among his friends, and seem
One of the number.
Addison.
[1913 Webster]

3. To act as a herdsman or a shepherd. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Herd
Herd, v. t. To form or put into a herd.
[1913 Webster]

Herdbook
Herd"book` (?), n. A book containing the list and pedigrees of one or more herds of choice breeds of cattle; -- also called herd record, or herd register.
[1913 Webster]

Herder
Herd"er (?), n. A herdsman. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Herderite
Her"der*ite (?), n. [Named after Baron von Herder, who discovered it.] (Min.) A rare fluophosphate of glucina, in small white crystals.
[1913 Webster]

Herdess
Herd"ess (?), n. A shepherdess; a female herder. Sir P. Sidney. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Herdgroom
Herd"groom` (?), n. A herdsman. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Herdic
Her"dic (?), n. [Named from Peter Herdic, the inventor.] A kind of low-hung cab.

Herdsman
Herdman
{ Herd"man (?), Herds"man (?), } n.; pl. -men (&unr_;). The owner or keeper of a herd or of herds; one employed in tending a herd of cattle.
[1913 Webster]

Herdswoman
Herds"wom`an (?), n.; pl. -women (&unr_;). A woman who tends a herd. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Here
Here (?), n. Hair. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Here
Here (h&etilde_;r), pron. 1. See Her, their. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. Her; hers. See Her. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Here
Here (hēr), adv. [OE. her, AS. hēr; akin to OS. hēr, D. hier, OHG. hiar, G. hier, Icel. & Goth. hēr, Dan. her, Sw. här; fr. root of E. he. See He.] 1. In this place; in the place where the speaker is; -- opposed to there.
[1913 Webster]

He is not here, for he is risen. Matt. xxviii. 6.
[1913 Webster]

2. In the present life or state.
[1913 Webster]

Happy here, and more happy hereafter. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

3. To or into this place; hither. [Colloq.] See Thither.
[1913 Webster]

Here comes Virgil. B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

Thou led'st me here. Byron.
[1913 Webster]

4. At this point of time, or of an argument; now.
[1913 Webster]

The prisoner here made violent efforts to rise. Warren.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Here, in the last sense, is sometimes used before a verb without subject; as, Here goes, for Now (something or somebody) goes; -- especially occurring thus in drinking healths. “Here's [a health] to thee, Dick.” Cowley.
[1913 Webster]

Here and there, in one place and another; in a dispersed manner; irregularly. “Footsteps here and there.” Longfellow. -- It is neither, here nor there, it is neither in this place nor in that, neither in one place nor in another; hence, it is to no purpose, irrelevant, nonsense. Shak.

Hereabouts
Herea-bout
{ Here"a-bout` (?), Here"a*bouts` (?), } adv. 1. About this place; in this vicinity.
[1913 Webster]

2. Concerning this. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Hereafter
Here*aft"er (?), adv. [AS. hēræfter.] In time to come; in some future time or state.
[1913 Webster]

Hereafter he from war shall come. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Hereafter
Here*aft"er, n. A future existence or state.
[1913 Webster]

'Tis Heaven itself that points out an hereafter. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

Hereafterward
Here*aft"er*ward (?), adv. Hereafter. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Thou shalt hereafterward . . . come. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Here-at
Here-at" (?), adv. At, or by reason of, this; as, he was offended hereat. Hooker.
[1913 Webster]

Hereby
Here*by" (?), adv. 1. By means of this.
[1913 Webster]

And hereby we do know that we know him. 1 John ii. 3.
[1913 Webster]

2. Close by; very near. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hereditability
He*red`i*ta*bil"i*ty (?), n. State of being hereditable. Brydges.
[1913 Webster]

Hereditable
He*red"i*ta*ble (?), a. [LL. hereditabilis, fr. hereditare to inherit, fr. L. hereditas heirship inheritance, heres heir: cf. OF. hereditable. See Heir, and cf. Heritable.] 1. Capable of being inherited. See Inheritable. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

2. Qualified to inherit; capable of inheriting.
[1913 Webster]

Hereditably
He*red"i*ta*bly, adv. By inheritance. W. Tooke.
[1913 Webster]

Hereditament
Her`e*dit"a*ment (?), n. [LL. hereditamentum. See Hereditable.] (Law) Any species of property that may be inherited; lands, tenements, anything corporeal or incorporeal, real, personal, or mixed, that may descend to an heir. Blackstone.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; A corporeal hereditament is visible and tangible; an incorporeal hereditament is not in itself visible or tangible, being an hereditary right, interest, or obligation, as duty to pay rent, or a right of way.
[1913 Webster]

Hereditarily
He*red"i*ta*ri*ly (?), adv. By inheritance; in an hereditary manner. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Hereditary
He*red"i*ta*ry (?), a. [L. hereditarius, fr. hereditas heirship, inheritance, fr. heres heir: cf. F. héréditaire. See Heir.] 1. Descended, or capable of descending, from an ancestor to an heir at law; received or passing by inheritance, or that must pass by inheritance; as, an hereditary estate or crown.
[1913 Webster]

2. Transmitted, or capable of being transmitted, as a constitutional quality or condition from a parent to a child; as, hereditary pride, bravery, disease.

Syn. -- Ancestral; patrimonial; inheritable.
[1913 Webster]

Heredity
He*red"i*ty (?), n. [L. hereditas heirship.] (Biol.) Hereditary transmission of the physical and psychical qualities of parents to their offspring; the biological law by which living beings tend to repeat their characteristics in their descendants. See Pangenesis.
[1913 Webster]

Hereford
Her"e*ford (?), n. One of a breed of cattle originating in Herefordshire, England. The Herefords are good working animals, and their beef-producing quality is excellent.
[1913 Webster]

Herehence
Here"hence` (?), adv. From hence. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Herein
Here*in" (?), adv. [AS. h&unr_;rinne.] In this.
[1913 Webster]

Herein is my Father glorified, that ye bear much fruit. John xv. 8.
[1913 Webster]

Hereinafter
Here`in*aft"er (?), adv. In the following part of this (writing, document, speech, and the like).
[1913 Webster]

Hereinbefore
Here`in*be*fore", adv. In the preceding part of this (writing, document, book, etc.).
[1913 Webster]

Hereinto
Here`in*to" (?; 277), adv. Into this. Hooker.

Heremite
Heremit
{ Her"e*mit (?), Her"e*mite (?), } n. [See Hermit.] A hermit. [Obs.] Bp. Hall.
[1913 Webster]

Heremitical
Her`e*mit"ic*al (?), a. Of or pertaining to a hermit; solitary; secluded from society. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Heren
Her"en (?), a. Made of hair. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hereof
Here*of" (?), adv. Of this; concerning this; from this; hence.
[1913 Webster]

Hereof comes it that Prince Harry is valiant. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hereon
Here*on" (?), adv. On or upon this; hereupon.
[1913 Webster]

Hereout
Here*out" (?), adv. Out of this. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Heresiarch
Her"e*si*arch (?; 277), n. [L. haeresiarcha, Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; heresy + &unr_; leader, &unr_; to lead: cf. F. hérésiarque.] A leader in heresy; the chief of a sect of heretics. Bp. Stillingfleet.
[1913 Webster]

Heresiarchy
Her"e*si*arch`y (?), n. A chief or great heresy. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

The book itself [the Alcoran] consists of heresiarchies against our blessed Savior. Sir T. Herbert.
[1913 Webster]

Heresiographer
Her`e*si*og"ra*pher (?), n. [See Heresiography.] One who writes on heresies.
[1913 Webster]

Heresiography
Her`e*si*og"ra*phy (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; heresy + -graphy: cf. F. hérésiographie.] A treatise on heresy.
[1913 Webster]

Heresy
Her"e*sy (?), n.; pl. Heresies (#). [OE. heresie, eresie, OF. heresie, iresie, F. hérésie, L. haeresis, Gr. &unr_; a taking, a taking for one's self, choosing, a choice, a sect, a heresy, fr. &unr_; to take, choose.]
[1913 Webster]

1. An opinion held in opposition to the established or commonly received doctrine, and tending to promote a division or party, as in politics, literature, philosophy, etc.; -- usually, but not necessarily, said in reproach.
[1913 Webster]

New opinions
Divers and dangerous, which are heresies,
And, not reformed, may prove pernicious.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

After the study of philosophy began in Greece, and the philosophers, disagreeing amongst themselves, had started many questions . . . because every man took what opinion he pleased, each several opinion was called a heresy; which signified no more than a private opinion, without reference to truth or falsehood. Hobbes.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Theol.) Religious opinion opposed to the authorized doctrinal standards of any particular church, especially when tending to promote schism or separation; lack of orthodox or sound belief; rejection of, or erroneous belief in regard to, some fundamental religious doctrine or truth; heterodoxy.
[1913 Webster]

Doubts 'mongst divines, and difference of texts,
From whence arise diversity of sects,
And hateful heresies by God abhor'd.
Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Deluded people! that do not consider that the greatest heresy in the world is a wicked life. Tillotson.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Law) An offense against Christianity, consisting in a denial of some essential doctrine, which denial is publicly avowed, and obstinately maintained.
[1913 Webster]

A second offense is that of heresy, which consists not in a total denial of Christianity, but of some its essential doctrines, publicly and obstinately avowed. Blackstone.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; “When I call dueling, and similar aberrations of honor, a moral heresy, I refer to the force of the Greek &unr_;, as signifying a principle or opinion taken up by the will for the will's sake, as a proof or pledge to itself of its own power of self-determination, independent of all other motives.” Coleridge.
[1913 Webster]

Heretic
Her"e*tic (?), n. [L. haereticus, Gr. &unr_; able to choose, heretical, fr. &unr_; to take, choose: cf. F. hérétique. See Heresy.] 1. One who holds to a heresy; one who believes some doctrine contrary to the established faith or prevailing religion.
[1913 Webster]

A man that is an heretic, after the first and second admonition, reject. Titus iii. 10.
[1913 Webster]

2. (R. C. Ch.) One who having made a profession of Christian belief, deliberately and pertinaciously refuses to believe one or more of the articles of faith “determined by the authority of the universal church.” Addis & Arnold.

Syn. -- Heretic, Schismatic, Sectarian. A heretic is one whose errors are doctrinal, and usually of a malignant character, tending to subvert the true faith. A schismatic is one who creates a schism, or division in the church, on points of faith, discipline, practice, etc., usually for the sake of personal aggrandizement. A sectarian is one who originates or is an ardent adherent and advocate of a sect, or distinct organization, which separates from the main body of believers.
[1913 Webster]

Heretical
He*ret"i*cal (?), a. Containing heresy; of the nature of, or characterized by, heresy.
[1913 Webster]

Heretically
He*ret"i*cal*ly, adv. In an heretical manner.
[1913 Webster]

Hereticate
He*ret"i*cate (?), v. t. [LL. haereticatus, p. p. of haereticare.] To decide to be heresy or a heretic; to denounce as a heretic or heretical. Bp. Hall.
[1913 Webster]

And let no one be minded, on the score of my neoterism, to hereticate me. Fitzed. Hall.
[1913 Webster]

Heretification
He*ret`i*fi*ca"tion (?), n. The act of hereticating or pronouncing heretical. London Times.
[1913 Webster]

Hereto
Here*to" (?), adv. To this; hereunto. Hooker.

Heretog
Heretoch
{ Her"e*toch (?), Her"e*tog (?), } n. [AS. heretoga, heretoha; here army + teón to draw, lead; akin to OS. heritogo, OHG. herizogo, G. herzog duke.] (AS. Antiq.) The leader or commander of an army; also, a marshal. Blackstone.
[1913 Webster]

Heretofore
Here`to*fore" (?), adv. Up to this time; hitherto; before; in time past. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hereunto
Here`un*to" (?), adv. Unto this; up to this time; hereto.
[1913 Webster]

Hereupon
Here`up*on" (?), adv. On this; hereon.
[1913 Webster]

Herewith
Here*with" (?), adv. With this.
[1913 Webster]

Herie
Her"ie (?), v. t. [See Hery.] To praise; to worship. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Heriot
Her"i*ot (?), n. [AS. heregeatu military equipment, heriot; here army + geatwe, pl., arms, equipments.] (Eng. Law) Formerly, a payment or tribute of arms or military accouterments, or the best beast, or chattel, due to the lord on the death of a tenant; in modern use, a customary tribute of goods or chattels to the lord of the fee, paid on the decease of a tenant. Blackstone. Bouvier.
[1913 Webster]

Heriot custom, a heriot depending on usage. -- Heriot service (Law), a heriot due by reservation in a grant or lease of lands. Spelman. Blackstone.
[1913 Webster]

Heriotable
Her"i*ot*a*ble (?), a. Subject to the payment of a heriot. Burn.
[1913 Webster]

Herisson
Her"is*son (?), n. [F. hérisson, prop., hedgehog.] (fort.) A beam or bar armed with iron spikes, and turning on a pivot; -- used to block up a passage.
[1913 Webster]

Heritability
Her`it*a*bil"i*ty (?), n. The state of being heritable.
[1913 Webster]

Heritable
Her"it*a*ble (?), a. [OF. héritable. See Heritage, Hereditable.] 1. Capable of being inherited or of passing by inheritance; inheritable.
[1913 Webster]

2. Capable of inheriting or receiving by inheritance.
[1913 Webster]

This son shall be legitimate and heritable. Sir M. Hale.
[1913 Webster]

Heritable rights (Scots Law), rights of the heir; rights to land or whatever may be intimately connected with land; realty. Jacob (Law Dict.).
[1913 Webster]

Heritage
Her"it*age (?), a. [OE. heritage, eritage, OF. heritage, eritage, F. héritage, fr. hériter to inherit, LL. heriditare. See Hereditable.] 1. That which is inherited, or passes from heir to heir; inheritance.
[1913 Webster]

Part of my heritage,
Which my dead father did bequeath to me.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Script.) A possession; the Israelites, as God's chosen people; also, a flock under pastoral charge. Joel iii. 2. 1 Peter v. 3.
[1913 Webster]

Heritance
Her"it*ance (?), n. [OF. heritance.] Heritage; inheritance. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Robbing their children of the heritance
Their fathers handed down
Southey.
[1913 Webster]

Heritor
Her"it*or (?), n. [Cf. LL. her&unr_;ator, fr. L. heres an heir.] A proprietor or landholder in a parish. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Herl
Herl (?), n. (Zool.) Same as Harl, 2.

Hirling
Herling
Her"ling, Hir"ling (&unr_;), n. [Etymol. uncertain.] (Zool.) The young of the sea trout. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Herma
Her"ma (?), n.; pl. Hermae (#). [L.] See Hermes, 2.
[1913 Webster]

Hermaphrodeity
Her*maph`ro*de"i*ty (?), n. Hermaphrodism. B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

Hermaphrodism
Her*maph"ro*dism (?), n. [Cf. F. hermaphrodisme.] (Biol.) See Hermaphroditism.
[1913 Webster]

Hermaphrodite
Her*maph"ro*dite (?), n. [L. hermaphroditus, Gr. &unr_;, so called from the mythical story that Hermaphroditus, son of Hermes and Aphrodite, when bathing, became joined in one body with Salmacis, the nymph of a fountain in Caria: cf. F. hermaphrodite.] (Biol.) An individual which has the attributes of both male and female, or which unites in itself the two sexes; an animal or plant having the parts of generation of both sexes, as when a flower contains both the stamens and pistil within the same calyx, or on the same receptacle. In some cases reproduction may take place without the union of the distinct individuals. In the animal kingdom true hermaphrodites are found only among the invertebrates. See Illust. in Appendix, under Helminths.
[1913 Webster]

Hermaphrodite
Her*maph"ro*dite, a. Including, or being of, both sexes; as, an hermaphrodite animal or flower.
[1913 Webster]

Hermaphrodite brig. (Naut.) See under Brig. Totten.

Hermaphroditical
Hermaphroditic
{ Her*maph`ro*dit"ic (?), Her*maph`ro*dit"ic*al (?), } a. 1. (Biol.) Partaking of the characteristics of both sexes; having male and female reproductive organs in the same plant or animal; characterized by hermaphroditism. Opposite of dioecious. [wns=1]-- Her*maph`ro*dit"ic*al*ly, adv.
Syn. -- monoecious, monecious, hermaphrodite.
[1913 Webster + WordNet 1.5]

2. Specifically: (Botany) having pistils and stamens in the same flower. Opposite of diclinous. [wns=2]
Syn. -- monoclinous.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hermaphroditism
Her*maph"ro*dit*ism (?), n. (Biol.) The union of the two sexes in the same individual, or the combination of some of their characteristics or organs in one individual.

Hermeneutical
Hermeneutic
{ Her`me*neu"tic (?), Her`me*neu"tic*al (?), } a. [Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; to interpret: cf. F. herméneutique.] Unfolding the signification; of or pertaining to interpretation; exegetical; explanatory; as, hermeneutic theology, or the art of expounding the Scriptures; a hermeneutic phrase.
[1913 Webster]

Hermeneutically
Her`me*neu"tic*al*ly, adv. According to the principles of interpretation; as, a verse of Scripture was examined hermeneutically.
[1913 Webster]

Hermeneutics
Her`me*neu"tics (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; (sc. &unr_;).] The science of interpretation and explanation; exegesis; esp., that branch of theology which defines the laws whereby the meaning of the Scriptures is to be ascertained. Schaff-Herzog Encyc.
[1913 Webster]

Hermes
Her"mes (?), n. [L., fr. Gr. &unr_;.] 1. (Myth.) See Mercury.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Hermes Trismegistus [Gr. 'Ermh^s trisme`gistos, lit., Hermes thrice greatest] was a late name of Hermes, especially as identified with the Egyptian god Thoth. He was the fabled inventor of astrology and alchemy.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Archaeology) Originally, a boundary stone dedicated to Hermes as the god of boundaries, and therefore bearing in some cases a head, or head and shoulders, placed upon a quadrangular pillar whose height is that of the body belonging to the head, sometimes having feet or other parts of the body sculptured upon it. These figures, though often representing Hermes, were used for other divinities, and even, in later times, for portraits of human beings. Called also herma. See Terminal statue, under Terminal.

Hermetical
Hermetic
{ Her*met"ic (?), Her*met"ic*al (?), } a. [F. hermétique. See Note under Hermes, 1.] 1. Of, pertaining to, or taught by, Hermes Trismegistus; as, hermetic philosophy. Hence: Alchemical; chemic. “Delusions of the hermetic art.” Burke.
[1913 Webster]

The alchemists, as the people were called who tried to make gold, considered themselves followers of Hermes, and often called themselves Hermetic philosophers. A. B. Buckley.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of or pertaining to the system which explains the causes of diseases and the operations of medicine on the principles of the hermetic philosophy, and which made much use, as a remedy, of an alkali and an acid; as, hermetic medicine.
[1913 Webster]

3. Made perfectly close or air-tight by fusion, so that no gas or spirit can enter or escape; as, an hermetic seal. See Note under Hermetically.
[1913 Webster]

Hermetic art, alchemy. -- Hermetic books. (a) Books of the Egyptians, which treat of astrology. (b) Books which treat of universal principles, of the nature and orders of celestial beings, of medicine, and other topics.
[1913 Webster]

Hermetically
Her*met"ic*al*ly, adv. 1. In an hermetical manner; chemically. Boyle.
[1913 Webster]

2. By fusion, so as to form an air-tight closure.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; A vessel or tube is hermetically sealed when it is closed completely against the passage of air or other fluid by fusing the extremity; -- sometimes less properly applied to any air-tight closure.
[1913 Webster]

Hermit
Her"mit (?), n. [OE. ermite, eremite, heremit, heremite, F. hermite, ermite, L. eremita, Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; lonely, solitary. Cf. Eremite.] 1. A person who retires from society and lives in solitude; a recluse; an anchoret; especially, one who so lives from religious motives.
[1913 Webster]

He had been Duke of Savoy, and after a very glorious reign, took on him the habit of a hermit, and retired into this solitary spot. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

2. A beadsman; one bound to pray for another. [Obs.] “We rest your hermits.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Cookery) A spiced molasses cookie, often containing chopped raisins and nuts.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hermit crab (Zool.), a marine decapod crustacean of the family Paguridae. The species are numerous, and belong to many genera. Called also soldier crab. The hermit crabs usually occupy the dead shells of various univalve mollusks. See Illust. of Commensal. -- Hermit thrush (Zool.), an American thrush (Turdus Pallasii), with retiring habits, but having a sweet song. -- Hermit warbler (Zool.), a California wood warbler (Dendroica occidentalis), having the head yellow, the throat black, and the back gray, with black streaks.
[1913 Webster]

Hermitage
Her"mit*age (?; 48), n. [OE. hermitage, ermitage, F. hermitage, ermitage. See Hermit.] 1. The habitation of a hermit; a secluded residence.
[1913 Webster]

Some forlorn and naked hermitage,
Remote from all the pleasures of the world.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. [F. Vin de l'Hermitage.] A celebrated French wine, both white and red, of the Department of Drôme.
[1913 Webster]

Hermitary
Her"mit*a*ry (?), n. [Cf. LL. hermitorium, eremitorium.] A cell annexed to an abbey, for the use of a hermit. Howell.
[1913 Webster]

Hermitess
Her"mit*ess, n. A female hermit. Coleridge.
[1913 Webster]

Hermitical
Her*mit"i*cal (?), a. Pertaining to, or suited for, a hermit. Coventry.
[1913 Webster]

Hermodactyl
Her`mo*dac"tyl (?), n. [NL. hermodactylus, lit., Hermes' finger; fr. Gr. &unr_; Hermes + &unr_; finger.] (med.) A heart-shaped bulbous root, about the size of a finger, brought from Turkey, formerly used as a cathartic.
[1913 Webster]

Hermogenian
Her`mo*ge"ni*an (?), n. (Eccl. Hist.) A disciple of Hermogenes, an heretical teacher who lived in Africa near the close of the second century. He held matter to be the fountain of all evil, and that souls and spirits are formed of corrupt matter.
[1913 Webster]

Hern
Hern (?), n. (Zool.) A heron; esp., the common European heron. “A stately hern.” Trench.
[1913 Webster]

Hernani
Her*na"ni (?), n. A thin silk or woolen goods, for women's dresses, woven in various styles and colors.
[1913 Webster]

Herne
Herne (?), n. [AS. hyrne.] A corner. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Lurking in hernes and in lanes blind. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hernia
Her"ni*a (?), n.; pl. E. Hernias (#), L. Herniae (#). [L.] (Med.) A protrusion, consisting of an organ or part which has escaped from its natural cavity, and projects through some natural or accidental opening in the walls of the latter; as, hernia of the brain, of the lung, or of the bowels. Hernia of the abdominal viscera in most common. Called also rupture.
[1913 Webster]

Strangulated hernia, a hernia so tightly compressed in some part of the channel through which it has been protruded as to arrest its circulation, and produce swelling of the protruded part. It may occur in recent or chronic hernia, but is more common in the latter.
[1913 Webster]

Hernial
Her"ni*al (?), a. Of, or connected with, hernia.
[1913 Webster]

Herniotomy
Her`ni*ot"o*my (?), n. [Hernia + Gr. &unr_; to cut.] (Med.) A surgical procedure for the cure or relief of hernia; celotomy.
[1913 Webster]

Hernshaw
Hern"shaw (?), n. Heronshaw. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Hero
He"ro (hē"r&ouptack_;), n.; pl. Heroes (hē"rōz). [F. héros, L. heros, Gr. "h`rws.] 1. (Myth.) An illustrious man, supposed to be exalted, after death, to a place among the gods; a demigod, as Hercules.
[1913 Webster]

2. A man of distinguished valor or enterprise in danger, or fortitude in suffering; a prominent or central personage in any remarkable action or event; hence, a great or illustrious person.
[1913 Webster]

Each man is a hero and oracle to somebody. Emerson.
[1913 Webster]

3. The principal personage in a poem, story, and the like, or the person who has the principal share in the transactions related; as Achilles in the Iliad, Ulysses in the Odyssey, and Aeneas in the Aeneid.
[1913 Webster]

The shining quality of an epic hero. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Hero worship, extravagant admiration for great men, likened to the ancient worship of heroes.
[1913 Webster]

Hero worship exists, has existed, and will forever exist, universally among mankind. Carlyle.
[1913 Webster]

Herodian
He*ro"di*an (h&euptack_;*rō"d&ibreve_;*&aitalic_;n), prop. n. (Jewish Hist.) One of a party among the Jews, composed of partisans of Herod of Galilee. They joined with the Pharisees against Christ.
[1913 Webster]

Herodiones
He*ro`di*o"nes (h&euptack_;*rō`d&ibreve_;*ō"nēz), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. 'erwdio`s a heron.] (Zool.) A division of wading birds, including the herons, storks, and allied forms. Called also Herodii. -- He*ro`di*o"nine (#), a.
[1913 Webster]

Heroess
He"ro*ess (hē"r&obreve_;*&ebreve_;s), n. A heroine. [Obs.] Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Heroic
He*ro"ic (?), a. [F. héroïque, L. heroïcus, Gr. "hrwi:ko`s.] 1. Of or pertaining to, or like, a hero; of the nature of heroes; distinguished by the existence of heroes; as, the heroic age; an heroic people; heroic valor.
[1913 Webster]

2. Worthy of a hero; bold; daring; brave; illustrious; as, heroic action; heroic enterprises.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Sculpture & Painting) Larger than life size, but smaller than colossal; -- said of the representation of a human figure.
[1913 Webster]

Heroic Age, the age when the heroes, or those called the children of the gods, are supposed to have lived. -- Heroic poetry, that which celebrates the deeds of a hero; epic poetry. -- Heroic treatment or Heroic remedies (Med.), treatment or remedies of a severe character, suited to a desperate case. -- Heroic verse (Pros.), the verse of heroic or epic poetry, being in English, German, and Italian the iambic of ten syllables; in French the iambic of twelve syllables; and in classic poetry the hexameter.

Syn. -- Brave; intrepid; courageous; daring; valiant; bold; gallant; fearless; enterprising; noble; magnanimous; illustrious.
[1913 Webster]

Heroical
He*ro"ic*al (?), a. Heroic. [R.] Spectator. -- He*ro"ic*al*ly, adv. -- He*ro"ic*al*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Heroicness
He*ro"ic*ness (?), n. Heroism. [R.] W. Montagu.

Heroicomical
Heroicomic
{ He`ro*i*com"ic (?), He`ro*i*com"ic*al (?), } a. [Cf. F. héroïcomigue. See Heroic, and Comic.] Combining the heroic and the ludicrous; denoting high burlesque; as, a heroicomic poem.
[1913 Webster]

heroin
her"o*in (h&etilde_;r"&ouptack_;*&ibreve_;n), n. (Chem.) a morphine derivative, diacetyl morphine, used to relieve severe pain and as a sedative. It is highly addictive, and its use is strictly controlled in the U.S. by federal law. It is a popular strong narcotic drug of abuse, in part because it is more soluble than morphine. It is sometimes included as one of the components of Brompton's mixture, used to control pain in terminallly ill patients.
Syn. -- diacetyl morphine, H, horse, junk, scag, shit, smack.
[WordNet 1.5 +PJC]

Heroine
Her"o*ine (?), n. [F. héroïne, L. heroina, Gr. &unr_;, fem. of &unr_;. See Hero.] 1. A woman of an heroic spirit.
[1913 Webster]

The heroine assumed the woman's place. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. The principal female person who figures in a remarkable action, or as the subject of a poem or story.
[1913 Webster]

Heroism
Her"o*ism (?; 277), n. [F. héroïsme.] The qualities characteristic of a hero, as courage, bravery, fortitude, unselfishness, etc.; the display of such qualities.
[1913 Webster]

Heroism is the self-devotion of genius manifesting itself in action. Hare.

Syn. -- Heroism, Courage, Fortitude, Bravery, Valor, Intrepidity, Gallantry. Courage is generic, denoting fearlessness or defiance of danger; fortitude is passive courage, the habit of bearing up nobly under trials, danger, and sufferings; bravery is courage displayed in daring acts; valor is courage in battle or other conflicts with living opponents; intrepidity is firm courage, which shrinks not amid the most appalling dangers; gallantry is adventurous courage, dashing into the thickest of the fight. Heroism may call into exercise all these modifications of courage. It is a contempt of danger, not from ignorance or inconsiderate levity, but from a noble devotion to some great cause, and a just confidence of being able to meet danger in the spirit of such a cause. Cf. Courage.
[1913 Webster]

Heron
Her"on (?), n. [OE. heiroun, heroun, heron, hern, OF. hairon, F. héron, OHG. heigir; cf. Icel. hegri, Dan. heire, Sw. häger, and also G. häher jay, jackdaw, OHG. hehara, higere, woodpecker, magpie, D. reiger heron, G. reiher, AS. hrāgra. Cf. Aigret, Egret.] (Zool.) Any wading bird of the genus Ardea and allied genera, of the family Ardeidae. The herons have a long, sharp bill, and long legs and toes, with the claw of the middle toe toothed. The common European heron (Ardea cinerea) is remarkable for its directly ascending flight, and was formerly hunted with the larger falcons.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; There are several common American species; as, the great blue heron (Ardea herodias); the little blue (Ardea cœrulea); the green (Ardea virescens); the snowy (Ardea candidissima); the night heron or qua-bird (Nycticorax nycticorax). The plumed herons are called egrets.
[1913 Webster]

Heron's bill (Bot.), a plant of the genus Erodium; -- so called from the fancied resemblance of the fruit to the head and beak of the heron.
[1913 Webster]

Heroner
Her"on*er (?), n. A hawk used in hunting the heron.Heroner and falcon.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Heronry
Her"on*ry (?), n. A place where herons breed.
[1913 Webster]

Heronsew
Her"on*sew (?), n. A heronshaw. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Heronshaw
Her"on*shaw (?), n. [OF. heroncel, dim. of héron. See Heron.] (Zool.) A heron. [Written variously hernshaw, harnsey, etc.]
[1913 Webster]

Heroologist
He`ro*öl"o*gist (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; + &unr_; discourse.] One who treats of heroes. [R.] T. Warton.
[1913 Webster]

Heroship
He"ro*ship (?), n. The character or personality of a hero. “Three years of heroship.” Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

Herpes
Her"pes (?), n. [L., fr. Gr. "e`rphs, fr. "e`rpein to creep.] (Med.) An eruption of the skin, taking various names, according to its form, or the part affected, caused by a herpesvirus infection; especially, an eruption of vesicles in small distinct clusters, accompanied with itching or tingling, including shingles, ringworm, and the like; -- so called from its tendency to creep or spread from one part of the skin to another.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Herpes simplex
Her"pes simp`lex (?), n. (Med.) either of two forms of herpesvirus infection, distinguished as being caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), which causes mostly sores and eruptions around the mouth (cold sores and fever blisters) and at other points above the waist, and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), causing genital herpes. HSV-1 is also known in some cases to cause genital herpes infections.
[PJC]

Herpestes
Herpestes n. A genus of carnivores including the mongooses.
Syn. -- genus Herpestes.
[WordNet 1.5]

Herpesvirus
Her"pes*vir`us (?), n. (Med.) any of several dozen DNA-containing virus of the family Herpetoviridae, including among them such human-disease-causing agents as Herpes simplex virus causing oral and genital herpes, varicella-zoster virus (Herpes zoster virus) causing shingles and chickenpox (varicella), Epstein-Barr virus (EB virus) causing infectious mononucleosis, and Cytomegalovirus.
[PJC]

Herpes zoster
Her"pes zos`ter (?), n. (Med.) same as shingles; -- a form of herpes caused by the varicella-zoster virus.
[PJC]

Herpes zoster virus
Her"pes zos`ter vir*us (?), n. (Med.) same as varicella-zoster virus.
[PJC]

Herpetic
Her*pet"ic (?), a. [Cf. F. herpétique.] Pertaining to, or resembling, the herpes; partaking of the nature of herpes; as, herpetic eruptions.
[1913 Webster]

Herpetism
Her"pe*tism (?), n. [See Herpes.] (Med.) See Dartrous diathesis, under Dartrous.

Herpetological
Herpetologic
{ Her*pet`o*log"ic (?), Her*pet`o*log"ic*al (?), } a. Pertaining to herpetology.
[1913 Webster]

Herpetologist
Her`pe*tol"o*gist (?), n. One versed in herpetology, or the natural history of reptiles.
[1913 Webster]

Herpetology
Her`pe*tol"o*gy (?), n. [Written also, but less properly, erpetology.] [Gr. &unr_; a creeping thing, reptile (fr. &unr_; to creep) + -logy: cf. F. herpétologie.] The natural history of reptiles; that branch of Zoology which relates to reptiles, including their structure, classification, and habits.
[1913 Webster]

Herpetotomist
Her`pe*tot"o*mist (?), n. One who dissects, or studies the anatomy of, reptiles.
[1913 Webster]

Herpetotomy
Her`pe*tot"o*my (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; a reptile + &unr_; to cut.] The anatomy or dissection of reptiles.
[1913 Webster]

Herr
Herr (?), n. A title of respect given to gentlemen in Germany, equivalent to the English Mister.
[1913 Webster]

Herrenvolk
Her"ren*volk (h&ebreve_;r"r&eitalic_;n*fōlk`), n. [German.] a race that considers itself superior to all others and fitted to rule the others; -- referred to especially in NAZI racial theories.
Syn. -- master race.
[WordNet 1.5]

Herrenhaus
Her"ren*haus` (h&ebreve_;r"r&eitalic_;n*hous`), n. [G., House of Lords.] See Legislature, Austria, Prussia.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Herring
Her"ring (h&ebreve_;r"r&ibreve_;ng), n. [OE. hering, AS. hæring; akin to D. haring, G. häring, hering, OHG. haring, hering, and prob. to AS. here army, and so called because they commonly move in large numbers. Cf. Harry.] (Zool.) One of various species of fishes of the genus Clupea, and allied genera, esp. the common round or English herring (Clupea harengus) of the North Atlantic. Herrings move in vast schools, coming in spring to the shores of Europe and America, where they are salted and smoked in great quantities.
[1913 Webster]

Herring gull (Zool.), a large gull which feeds in part upon herrings; esp., Larus argentatus in America, and Larus cachinnans in England. See Gull. -- Herring hog (Zool.), the common porpoise. -- King of the herrings. (Zool.) (a) The chimaera (Chimaera monstrosa) which follows the schools of herring. Called also rabbit fish in the U. K. See Chimaera. (b) The opah.
[1913 Webster]

Herringbone
Her"ring*bone` (h&ebreve_;r"r&ibreve_;ng*bōn`), a. Pertaining to, or like, the spine of a herring; especially, characterized by an arrangement of work in rows of parallel lines, which in the alternate rows slope in different directions.
[1913 Webster]

Herringbone stitch, a kind of cross-stitch in needlework, chiefly used in flannel. Simmonds.
[1913 Webster]

Herrnhuter
Herrn"hut*er (h&etilde_;rn"hŭ*&etilde_;r; G. h&ebreve_;rn"h&oomacr_;*&etilde_;r), n. (Eccl. Hist.) One of the Moravians; -- so called from the settlement of Herrnhut (the Lord's watch) made, about 1722, by the Moravians at the invitation of Nicholas Lewis, count of Zinzendorf, upon his estate in the circle of Bautzen.
[1913 Webster]

Hers
Hers (h&etilde_;rz), pron. See the Note under Her, pron.
[1913 Webster]

Hersal
Her"sal (?), n. Rehearsal. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Herschel
Her"schel (?), n. (Astron.) See Uranus.
[1913 Webster]

Herschelian
Her*sche"li*an (?), a. Of or relating to Sir William Herschel; as, the Herschelian telescope.
[1913 Webster]

Herse
Herse (h&etilde_;rs), n. [F. herse harrow, portcullis, OF. herce, LL. hercia, L. hirpex, gen. hirpicis, and irpex, gen. irpicis, harrow. The LL. hercia signifies also a kind of candlestick in the form of a harrow, having branches filled with lights, and placed at the head of graves or cenotaphs; whence herse came to be used for the grave, coffin, or chest containing the dead. Cf. Hearse.] 1. (Fort.) A kind of gate or portcullis, having iron bars, like a harrow, studded with iron spikes. It is hung above gateways so that it may be quickly lowered, to impede the advance of an enemy. Farrow.
[1913 Webster]

2. See Hearse, a carriage for the dead.
[1913 Webster]

3. A funeral ceremonial. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Herse
Herse, v. t. Same as Hearse, v. t. Chapman.
[1913 Webster]

Herself
Her*self" (?), pron. 1. An emphasized form of the third person feminine pronoun; -- used as a subject with she; as, she herself will bear the blame; also used alone in the predicate, either in the nominative or objective case; as, it is herself; she blames herself.
[1913 Webster]

2. Her own proper, true, or real character; hence, her right, or sane, mind; as, the woman was deranged, but she is now herself again; she has come to herself.
[1913 Webster]

By herself, alone; apart; unaccompanied.
[1913 Webster]

Hersillon
Her"sil*lon (?), n. [F., fr. herse a harrow. See Herse, n.] (Fort.) A beam with projecting spikes, used to make a breach impassable.
[1913 Webster]

Hert
Hert (?), n. A hart. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Herte
Her"te (?), n. A heart. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hertely
Her"te*ly, a. & adv. Hearty; heartily. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Hery
Her"y (?), v. t. [AS. herian.] To worship; to glorify; to praise. [Obs.] Chaucer. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Hertz
Hertz (?), n. [from the German physicist Heinrich Hertz.] a unit of frequency equal to one cycle per second; it is abbreviated Hz. It is commonly used to specify the frequency of radio waves, and also the clock frequencies in digital computers. For these applications, kilohertz and megahertz are the most commonly used units, derived from hertz.
[PJC]

Hertzian
Hertz"i*an (?), a. Of or pert. to the German physicist Heinrich Hertz.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hertzian telegraphy, telegraphy by means of the Hertzian waves; wireless telegraphy. -- H. waves, electric waves; -- so called because Hertz was the first to investigate them systematically. His apparatus consisted essentially in an oscillator for producing the waves, and a resonator for detecting them. The waves were found to have the same velocity as light, and to undergo reflection, refraction, and polarization.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Herzog
Her"zog (?), n. [G., akin to AS. heretoga, lit., army leader. See Harry, and Duke.] A member of the highest rank of nobility in Germany and Austria, corresponding to the British duke.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hesitancy
Hes"i*tan*cy (?), n. [L. haesitantia a stammering.] 1. The act of hesitating, or pausing to consider; slowness in deciding; vacillation; also, the manner of one who hesitates.
[1913 Webster]

2. A stammering; a faltering in speech.
[1913 Webster]

Hesitant
Hes"i*tant (?), a. [L. haesitans, p. pr. of haesitare: cf. F. hésitant. See Hesitate.] 1. Not prompt in deciding or acting; hesitating.
[1913 Webster]

2. Unready in speech. Baxter.
[1913 Webster]

Hesitantly
Hes"i*tant*ly, adv. With hesitancy or doubt.
[1913 Webster]

Hesitate
Hes"i*tate (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Hesitated (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Hesitating.] [L. haesitatus, p. p. of haesitare, intens. fr. haerere to hesitate, stick fast; to hang or hold fast. Cf. Aghast, Gaze, Adhere.]
[1913 Webster]

1. To stop or pause respecting decision or action; to be in suspense or uncertainty as to a determination; as, he hesitated whether to accept the offer or not; men often hesitate in forming a judgment. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

2. To stammer; to falter in speaking.

Syn. -- To doubt; waver; scruple; deliberate; demur; falter; stammer.
[1913 Webster]

Hesitate
Hes"i*tate, v. t. To utter with hesitation or to intimate by a reluctant manner. [Poetic & R.]
[1913 Webster]

Just hint a fault, and hesitate dislike. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

hesitater
hesitater n. one who hesitates.
Syn. -- waverer, vacillator, hesitator.
[WordNet 1.5]

hesitating
hesitating adj. holding back because of doubt or lack of confidence.
Syn. -- hesitant, indecisive.
[WordNet 1.5]

Hesitatingly
Hes"i*ta`ting*ly, adv. With hesitation or doubt.
[1913 Webster]

Hesitation
Hes`i*ta"tion (?), n. [L. haesitatio: cf. F. hésitation.] 1. The act of hesitating; suspension of opinion or action; doubt; vacillation.
[1913 Webster]

2. A faltering in speech; stammering. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Hesitative
Hes"i*ta*tive (?), a. Showing, or characterized by, hesitation.
[1913 Webster]

[He said] in his mild, hesitative way. R. D. Blackmore.
[1913 Webster]

Hesitatory
Hes"i*ta*to*ry (?), a. Hesitating. R. North.
[1913 Webster]

Hesp
Hesp (?), n. [Cf. Icel. hespa a hasp, a wisp or skein. See Hasp.] A measure of two hanks of linen thread. [Scot.] [Written also hasp.] Knight.
[1913 Webster]

Hesper
Hes"per (?), n. [See Hesperian.] The evening; Hesperus.
[1913 Webster]

Hesperetin
Hes*per"e*tin (?), n. (Chem.) A white, crystalline substance having a sweetish taste, obtained by the decomposition of hesperidin, and regarded as a complex derivative of caffeic acid.
[1913 Webster]

Hesperian
Hes*pe"ri*an (?), a. [L. hesperius, fr. hesperus the evening star, Gr. &unr_; evening, &unr_; &unr_; the evening star. Cf. Vesper.] Western; being in the west; occidental. [Poetic] Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hesperian
Hes*pe"ri*an, n. A native or an inhabitant of a western country. [Poetic] J. Barlow.
[1913 Webster]

Hesperian
Hes*pe"ri*an, a. (Zool.) Of or pertaining to a family of butterflies called Hesperidae, or skippers. -- n. Any one of the numerous species of Hesperidae; a skipper.
[1913 Webster]

Hesperid
Hes"per*id (?), a. & n. (Zool.) Same as 3d Hesperian.
[1913 Webster]

Hesperidene
Hes*per"i*dene (?), n. [See Hesperidium.] (Chem.) An isomeric variety of terpene from orange oil.
[1913 Webster]

Hesperides
Hes*per"i*des (?), n. pl. [L., fr. Gr. &unr_;.]
[1913 Webster]

1. (Class. Myth.) The daughters of Hesperus, or Night (brother of Atlas), and fabled possessors of a garden producing golden apples, in Africa, at the western extremity of the known world. To slay the guarding dragon and get some of these apples was one of the labors of Hercules. Called also Atlantides.
[1913 Webster]

2. The garden producing the golden apples.
[1913 Webster]

It not love a Hercules,
Still climbing trees in the Hesperides?
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hesperidin
Hes*per"i*din (?), n. [See Hesperidium.] (Chem.) A glucoside found in ripe and unripe fruit (as the orange), and extracted as a white crystalline substance.
[1913 Webster]

Hesperidium
Hes`pe*rid"i*um (?), n. [NL. So called in allusion to the golden apples of the Hesperides. See Hesperides.] (Bot.) A large berry with a thick rind, as a lemon or an orange.
[1913 Webster]

Hesperornis
Hes`pe*ror"nis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; western + &unr_;, &unr_;, a bird.] (Paleon.) A genus of large, extinct, wingless birds from the Cretaceous deposits of Kansas, belonging to the Odontornithes. They had teeth, and were essentially carnivorous swimming ostriches. Several species are known. See Illust. in Append.
[1913 Webster]

Hesperus
Hes"pe*rus (?), n. [L. See Hesper.] 1. Venus when she is the evening star; Hesper.
[1913 Webster]

2. Evening. [Poetic]
[1913 Webster]

The Sun was sunk, and after him the Star
Of Hesperus.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Hessian
Hes"sian (?), a. Of or relating to Hesse, in Germany, or to the Hessians.
[1913 Webster]

Hessian boots, or Hessians, boot of a kind worn in England, in the early part of the nineteenth century, tasseled in front. Thackeray. -- Hessian cloth, or Hessians, a coarse hempen cloth for sacking. -- Hessian crucible. See under Crucible. -- Hessian fly (Zool.), a small dipterous fly or midge (Cecidomyia destructor). Its larvae live between the base of the lower leaves and the stalk of wheat, and are very destructive to young wheat; -- so called from the erroneous idea that it was brought into America by the Hessian troops, during the Revolution.
[1913 Webster]

Hessian
Hes"sian, n. 1. A native or inhabitant of Hesse.
[1913 Webster]

2. A mercenary or venal person. [U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; This use is a relic of the patriot hatred of the Hessian mercenaries who served with the British troops in the Revolutionary War.
[1913 Webster]

3. pl. See Hessian boots and cloth, under Hessian, a.
[1913 Webster]

Hessite
Hess"ite (?), n. [After H. Hess.] (Min.) A lead-gray sectile mineral. It is a telluride of silver.
[1913 Webster]

Hest
Hest (h&ebreve_;st), n. [AS. h&aemacr_;s, fr. hātan to call, bid. See Hight, and cf. Behest.] Command; precept; injunction. [Archaic] See Behest. “At thy hest.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Let him that yields obey the victor's hest. Fairfax.
[1913 Webster]

Yet I thy hest will all perform, at full. Tennyson.

Hesternal
Hestern
{ Hes"tern (?), Hes*ter"nal (?), } a. [L. hesternus; akin to heri yesterday.] Pertaining to yesterday. [Obs.] See Yester, a. Ld. Lytton.
[1913 Webster]

Hesychast
Hes"y*chast (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; hermit, fr. &unr_; to be still or quiet, fr. &unr_; still, calm.] One of a mystical sect of the Greek Church in the fourteenth century; a quietist. Brande & C.

Hetaira
Hetaera
{ ‖He*tae"ra (?), ‖He*tai"ra (?) }, n.; pl. -rae (#). [NL. See Hetairism.] (Gr. Antiq.) A female paramour; a mistress, concubine, or harlot. -- He*tae"ric, He*tai"ric (#), a.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Hetarism
Hetairism
{ He*tair"ism (?), Het"a*rism (?), } n. [Gr. &unr_; a companion, a concubine, fem. of &unr_; a comrade.] A supposed primitive state of society, in which all the women of a tribe were held in common. H. Spencer. -- Het`a*ris"tic (#), a.
[1913 Webster]

Hetchel
Hetch"el (?), v. t. Same as Hatchel.
[1913 Webster]

Hete
Hete (?), v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Hete, later Het.] Variant of Hote. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

But one avow to greate God I hete. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Heteracanth
Het"er*a*canth (?), a. [Hetero- + Gr. &unr_; a spine.] (Zool.) Having the spines of the dorsal fin unsymmetrical, or thickened alternately on the right and left sides.
[1913 Webster]

Heterarchy
Het"er*arch`y (?), n. [Hetero- + -archy.] The government of an alien. [Obs.] Bp. Hall.
[1913 Webster]

Heterauxesis
Het`e*raux*e"sis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; the other + &unr_; growth.] (Bot.) Unequal growth of a cell, or of a part of a plant.
[1913 Webster]

Hetero-
Het"er*o- (?). [Gr. "e`teros other.] A combining form signifying other, other than usual, different; as, heteroclite, heterodox, heterogamous.
[1913 Webster]

Heterocarpism
Het`er*o*car"pism (?), n. [Hetero- + Gr. &unr_; fruit.] (Bot.) The power of producing two kinds of reproductive bodies, as in the hog peanut Amphicarpaea bracteata (photo by Daniel Reed (daniel@2bnthewild.com) from http://www.2bnthewild.com), in which besides the usual pods produced from flowers above ground, there are others underground. In the hog peanut the above-ground flowers are all creamy white or tinged with purple, as in the photo.
[1913 Webster + PJC]

Heterocarpous
Het`er*o*car"pous (?), a. (Bot.) Characterized by heterocarpism.
[1913 Webster]

Heterocephalous
Het`er*o*ceph"a*lous (?), a. [Hetero- + Gr.&unr_; head.] (Bot.) Bearing two kinds of heads or capitula; -- said of certain composite plants.
[1913 Webster]

Heterocera
Het`e*roc"e*ra (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; other + &unr_; horn.] (Zool.) A division of Lepidoptera, including the moths, and hawk moths, which have the antennæ variable in form.
[1913 Webster]

Heterocercal
Het`er*o*cer"cal (?), a. [Hetero- + Gr. &unr_; tail.] (Anat.) Having the vertebral column evidently continued into the upper lobe of the tail, which is usually longer than the lower one, as in sharks.
[1913 Webster]

Heterocercy
Het"er*o*cer`cy (?), n. [Hetero- + Gr. &unr_; a tail.] (Anat.) Unequal development of the tail lobes of fishes; the possession of a heterocercal tail.
[1913 Webster]

Heterochromous
Het`er*o*chro"mous (?; 277), a. [Hetero- + Gr. &unr_; color.] (Bot.) Having the central florets of a flower head of a different color from those of the circumference.

Heterochrony
Heterochronism
{ Het`er*och"ro*nism (?), Het`er*och"ro*ny (?), } n. [Gr. &unr_; of different times; &unr_; other + &unr_; time.] (Biol.) In evolution, a deviation from the typical sequence in the formation of organs or parts.
[1913 Webster]

Heteroclite
Het"er*o*clite, a. [L. heteroclitus, Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; other + &unr_; to lean, incline, inflect: cf. F. hétéroclite.] Deviating from ordinary forms or rules; irregular; anomalous; abnormal.
[1913 Webster]

Heteroclite
Het"er*o*clite, n. 1. (Gram.) A word which is irregular or anomalous either in declension or conjugation, or which deviates from ordinary forms of inflection in words of a like kind; especially, a noun which is irregular in declension.
[1913 Webster]

2. Any thing or person deviating from the common rule, or from common forms. Howell.

Heteroclitical
Heteroclitic
{ Het`er*o*clit"ic (?), Het`er*o*clit"ic*al (?), } a. [See Heteroclite.] Deviating from ordinary forms or rules; irregular; anomalous; abnormal.
[1913 Webster]

Heteroclitous
Het`er*oc"li*tous (?), a. Heteroclitic. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Heterocyst
Het"er*o*cyst (?), n. [Hetero- + cyst.] (Bot.) A cell larger than the others, and of different appearance, occurring in certain algæ related to nostoc.
[1913 Webster]

Heterodactyl
Het`er*o*dac"tyl (?), a. (Zool.) Heterodactylous. -- n. One of the Heterodactylæ.
[1913 Webster]

Heterodactylae
Het`e*ro*dac"ty*læ (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; other + &unr_; a finger.] (Zool.) A group of birds including the trogons.
[1913 Webster]

Heterodactylous
Het`er*o*dac"tyl*ous (?), a. [Hetero- + Gr. &unr_; a toe.] (Zool.) Having the first and second toes turned backward, as in the trogons.
[1913 Webster]

Heterodont
Het"er*o*dont (?), a. [Hetero- + Gr. &unr_;, &unr_; a tooth.] (Anat.) Having the teeth differentiated into incisors, canines, and molars, as in man; -- opposed to homodont.
[1913 Webster]

Heterodont
Het"er*o*dont, n. (Zool.) Any animal with heterodont dentition.
[1913 Webster]

Heterodox
Het"er*o*dox (?), a. [Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; other + &unr_; opinion; cf. F. hétérodoxe.] 1. Contrary to, or differing from, some acknowledged standard, as the Bible, the creed of a church, the decree of a council, and the like; not orthodox; heretical; -- said of opinions, doctrines, books, etc., esp. upon theological subjects.
[1913 Webster]

Raw and indigested, heterodox, preaching. Strype.
[1913 Webster]

2. Holding heterodox opinions, or doctrines not orthodox; heretical; -- said of persons. Macaulay.

-- Het"er*o*dox`ly, adv. -- Het"er*o*dox`ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Heterodox
Het"er*o*dox, n. An opinion opposed to some accepted standard. [Obs.] Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Heterodoxal
Het"er*o*dox`al (?), a. Not orthodox. Howell.
[1913 Webster]

Heterodoxy
Het"er*o*dox`y (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. hétérodoxie.] An opinion or doctrine, or a system of doctrines, contrary to some established standard of faith, as the Scriptures, the creed or standards of a church, etc.; heresy. Bp. Bull.
[1913 Webster]

Heterodromous
Het`er*od"ro*mous (?), a. [Hetero- + Gr. &unr_; to run.] 1. (Bot.) Having spirals of changing direction. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Mech.) Moving in opposite directions; -- said of a lever, pulley, etc., in which the resistance and the actuating force are on opposite sides of the fulcrum or axis.
[1913 Webster]

Heteroecious
Het`er*œ"cious (?), a. [Hetero- + Gr. &unr_; house.] (Bot.) Passing through the different stages in its life history on an alternation of hosts, as the common wheat-rust fungus (Puccinia graminis), and certain other parasitic fungi; -- contrasted with autœcious. -- Het`er*œ"cism (#), n.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Heterogamous
Het`er*og"a*mous (?), a. [Hetero- + Gr. ga`mos marriage: cf. F. hétérogame.] (Bot. & Biol.) (a) The condition of having two or more kinds of flowers which differ in regard to stamens and pistils, as in the aster. (b) Characterized by heterogamy.
[1913 Webster]

Heterogamy
Het`er*og"a*my (?), n. [See Heterogamous.]
[1913 Webster]

1. (Bot.) The process of fertilization in plants by an indirect or circuitous method; -- opposed to orthogamy.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Biol.) That form of alternate generation in which two kinds of sexual generation, or a sexual and a parthenogenetic generation, alternate; -- in distinction from metagenesis, where sexual and asexual generations alternate. Claus & Sedgwick.
[1913 Webster]

Heterogangliate
Het`er*o*gan"gli*ate (?), a. [Hetero- + gangliate.] (Physiol.) Having the ganglia of the nervous system unsymmetrically arranged; -- said of certain invertebrate animals.
[1913 Webster]

Heterogene
Het"er*o*gene (?), a. Heterogenous. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Heterogeneal
Het`er*o*ge"ne*al (?), a. Heterogeneous.
[1913 Webster]

Heterogeneity
Het`er*o*ge*ne"i*ty (?), n. <