S.

S
S (&ebreve_;s), the nineteenth letter of the English alphabet, is a consonant, and is often called a sibilant, in allusion to its hissing sound. It has two principal sounds; one a mere hissing, as in sack, this; the other a vocal hissing (the same as that of z), as in is, wise. Besides these it sometimes has the sounds of sh and zh, as in sure, measure. It generally has its hissing sound at the beginning of words, but in the middle and at the end of words its sound is determined by usage. In a few words it is silent, as in isle, débris. With the letter h it forms the digraph sh. See Guide to pronunciation, §§ 255-261.
[1913 Webster]

Both the form and the name of the letter S are derived from the Latin, which got the letter through the Greek from the Phoenician. The ultimate origin is Egyptian. S is etymologically most nearly related to c, z, t, and r; as, in ice, OE. is; E. hence, OE. hennes; E. rase, raze; erase, razor; that, G. das; E. reason, F. raison, L. ratio; E. was, were; chair, chaise (see C, Z, T, and R.).
[1913 Webster]

-s
-s. 1. [OE. es, AS. as.] The suffix used to form the plural of most words; as in roads, elfs, sides, accounts.
[1913 Webster]

2. [OE. -s, for older -th, AS. .] The suffix used to form the third person singular indicative of English verbs; as in falls, tells, sends.
[1913 Webster]

3. An adverbial suffix; as in towards, needs, always, -- originally the genitive, possesive, ending. See -'s.
[1913 Webster]

-'s
-'s [OE. -es, AS. -es.] The suffix used to form the possessive singular of nouns; as, boy's; man's.
[1913 Webster]

's
's. A contraction for is or (colloquially) for has. “My heart's subdued.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Saadh
Sa"adh (sä"&adot_;d), n. See Sadh.
[1913 Webster]

Saan
Saan (sän), n. pl. (Ethnol.) Same as Bushmen.
[1913 Webster]

Sabadilla
Sab`a*dil"la (săb`&adot_;*d&ibreve_;l"l&adot_;), n. [Sp. cebadilla.] (Bot.) A Mexican liliaceous plant (Schoenocaulon officinale); also, its seeds, which contain the alkaloid veratrine. It was formerly used in medicine as an emetic and purgative.
[1913 Webster]

Sabaean
Sa*bae"an (?), a. & n. Same as Sabian.
[1913 Webster]

Sabaeanism
Sa*bae"an*ism (?), n. Same as Sabianism.
[1913 Webster]

Sabaism
Sabaeism
{ Sa"bae*ism (?), Sa"ba*ism (?), } n. See Sabianism.
[1913 Webster]

Sabal
Sa"bal (?), n. (Bot.) A genus of palm trees including the palmetto of the Southern United States.
[1913 Webster]

Sabaoth
Sab"a*oth (săb"&auptack_;*&obreve_;th or s&adot_;"bā*&obreve_;th; 277), n. pl. [Heb. tsebā'ōth, pl. of tsābā', an army or host, fr. tsābā', to go forth to war.] 1. Armies; hosts. [Used twice in the English Bible, in the phrase “The Lord of Sabaoth.”]
[1913 Webster]

2. Incorrectly, the Sabbath.
[1913 Webster]

Sabbat
Sab"bat (?), n. [See Sabbath.] In mediaeval demonology, the nocturnal assembly in which demons and sorcerers were thought to celebrate their orgies.
[1913 Webster]

Sabbatarian
Sab`ba*ta"ri*an (?), n. [L. Sabbatarius: cf. F. sabbataire. See Sabbath.] 1. One who regards and keeps the seventh day of the week as holy, agreeably to the letter of the fourth commandment in the Decalogue.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; There were Christians in the early church who held this opinion, and certain Christians, esp. the Seventh-day Baptists, hold it now.
[1913 Webster]

2. A strict observer of the Sabbath.
[1913 Webster]

Sabbatarian
Sab`ba*ta"ri*an, a. Of or pertaining to the Sabbath, or the tenets of Sabbatarians.
[1913 Webster]

Sabbatarianism
Sab`ba*ta"ri*an*ism (?), n. The tenets of Sabbatarians. Bp. Ward (1673).
[1913 Webster]

Sabbath
Sab"bath (?), n. [OE. sabat, sabbat, F. sabbat, L. sabbatum, Gr. sa`bbaton, fr. Heb. shabbāth, fr. shābath to rest from labor. Cf. Sabbat.] 1. A season or day of rest; one day in seven appointed for rest or worship, the observance of which was enjoined upon the Jews in the Decalogue, and has been continued by the Christian church with a transference of the day observed from the last to the first day of the week, which is called also Lord's Day.
[1913 Webster]

Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Ex. xx. 8.
[1913 Webster]

2. The seventh year, observed among the Israelites as one of rest and festival. Lev. xxv. 4.
[1913 Webster]

3. Fig.: A time of rest or repose; intermission of pain, effort, sorrow, or the like.
[1913 Webster]

Peaceful sleep out the sabbath of the tomb. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Sabbath breaker, one who violates the law of the Sabbath. -- Sabbath breaking, the violation of the law of the Sabbath. -- Sabbath-day's journey, a distance of about a mile, which, under Rabbinical law, the Jews were allowed to travel on the Sabbath.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Sabbath, Sunday. Sabbath is not strictly synonymous with Sunday. Sabbath denotes the institution; Sunday is the name of the first day of the week. The Sabbath of the Jews is on Saturday, and the Sabbath of most Christians on Sunday. In New England, the first day of the week has been called “the Sabbath,” to mark it as holy time; Sunday is the word more commonly used, at present, in all parts of the United States, as it is in England. “So if we will be the children of our heavenly Father, we must be careful to keep the Christian Sabbath day, which is the Sunday.” Homilies.
[1913 Webster]

Sabbathless
Sab"bath*less, a. Without Sabbath, or intermission of labor; hence, without respite or rest. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Sabbatical
Sabbatic
{ Sab*bat"ic (?), Sab*bat"ic*al (?), } a. [Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. sabbatique.] Of or pertaining to the Sabbath; resembling the Sabbath; enjoying or bringing an intermission of labor.
[1913 Webster]

Sabbatical year (Jewish Antiq.), every seventh year, in which the Israelites were commanded to suffer their fields and vineyards to rest, or lie without tillage.
[1913 Webster]

Sabbatism
Sab"ba*tism (?), n. [L. sabbatismus, Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; to keep the Sabbath: cf. F. sabbatisme. See Sabbath.] Intermission of labor, as upon the Sabbath; rest. Dr. H. More.
[1913 Webster]

Sabbaton
Sab"ba*ton (?), n. [Cf. Sp. zapaton, a large shoe, F. sabot a wooden shoe.] A round-toed, armed covering for the feet, worn during a part of the sixteenth century in both military and civil dress.
[1913 Webster]

Sabean
Sa*be"an (?), a. & n. Same as Sabian.
[1913 Webster]

Sabeism
Sa"be*ism (?), n. Same as Sabianism.
[1913 Webster]

Sabella
Sa*bel"la (?), n. [NL., fr. L. sabulum gravel.] (Zool.) A genus of tubicolous annelids having a circle of plumose gills around the head.
[1913 Webster]

Sabellian
Sa*bel"li*an (?), a. Pertaining to the doctrines or tenets of Sabellius. See Sabellian, n.
[1913 Webster]

Sabellian
Sa*bel"li*an (?), n. (Eccl. Hist.) A follower of Sabellius, a presbyter of Ptolemais in the third century, who maintained that there is but one person in the Godhead, and that the Son and Holy Spirit are only different powers, operations, or offices of the one God the Father.
[1913 Webster]

Sabellianism
Sa*bel"li*an*ism (?), n. (Eccl.) The doctrines or tenets of Sabellius. See Sabellian, n.
[1913 Webster]

Sabelloid
Sa*bel"loid (?), a. [Sabella + -oid.] (Zool.) Like, or related to, the genus Sabella. -- Sa*bel"loid, n.
[1913 Webster]

Sabre
Saber
{ Sa"ber, Sa"bre } (?), n. [F. sabre, G. säbel; of uncertain origin; cf. Hung. száblya, Pol. szabla, Russ. sabla, and L. Gr. zabo`s crooked, curved.] A sword with a broad and heavy blade, thick at the back, and usually more or less curved like a scimiter; a cavalry sword.
[1913 Webster]

Saber fish, or Sabre fish (Zool.), the cutlass fish.
[1913 Webster]

Sabre
Saber
{ Sa"ber, Sa"bre }, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sabered (?) or Sabred (&unr_;); p. pr. & vb. n. Sabering or Sabring (&unr_;).] [Cf. F. sabrer.] To strike, cut, or kill with a saber; to cut down, as with a saber.
[1913 Webster]

You send troops to saber and bayonet us into submission. Burke.
[1913 Webster]

Sabrebill
Saberbill
{ Sa"ber*bill`, Sa"bre*bill` }, n. (Zool.) The curlew.
[1913 Webster]

Sabian
Sa"bi*an (?), a. [L. Sabaeus.] [Written also Sabean, and Sabaean.] 1. Of or pertaining to Saba in Arabia, celebrated for producing aromatic plants.
[1913 Webster]

2. Relating to the religion of Saba, or to the worship of the heavenly bodies.
[1913 Webster]

Sabian
Sa"bi*an, n. An adherent of the Sabian religion; a worshiper of the heavenly bodies. [Written also Sabaean, and Sabean.]
[1913 Webster]

Sabianism
Sa"bi*an*ism (?), n. The doctrine of the Sabians; the Sabian religion; that species of idolatry which consists in worshiping the sun, moon, and stars; heliolatry. [Written also Sabaeanism.]
[1913 Webster]

Sabicu
Sab"i*cu (?), n. The very hard wood of a leguminous West Indian tree (Lysiloma Sabicu), valued for shipbuilding.
[1913 Webster]

Sabine
Sa"bine (?), a. [L. Sabinus.] Of or pertaining to the ancient Sabines, a people of Italy. -- n. One of the Sabine people.
[1913 Webster]

Sabine
Sab"ine (?), n. [F., fr. L. Sabina herba, fr. Sabini the Sabines. Cf. Savin.] (Bot.) See Savin.
[1913 Webster]

Sable
Sa"ble (?), n. [OF. sable, F. zibeline sable (in sense 4), LL. sabellum; cf. D. sabel, Dan. sabel, zobel, Sw. sabel, sobel, G. zobel; all fr. Russ. sóbole.] 1. (Zool.) A carnivorous animal of the Weasel family (Mustela zibellina) native of the northern latitudes of Europe, Asia, and America, -- noted for its fine, soft, and valuable fur.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The sable resembles the marten, but has a longer head and ears. Its fur consists of a soft under wool, with a dense coat of hair, overtopped by another still longer. It varies greatly in color and quality according to the locality and the season of the year. The darkest and most valuable furs are taken in autumn and winter in the colder parts of Siberia, Russia, and British North America.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The American sable, or marten, was formerly considered a distinct species (Mustela Americana), but it differs very little from the Asiatic sable, and is now considered only a geographical variety.
[1913 Webster]

2. The fur of the sable.
[1913 Webster]

3. A mourning garment; a funeral robe; -- generally in the plural.Sables wove by destiny.” Young.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Her.) The tincture black; -- represented by vertical and horizontal lines crossing each other.
[1913 Webster]

Sable
Sa"ble (?), a. Of the color of the sable's fur; dark; black; -- used chiefly in poetry.
[1913 Webster]

Night, sable goddess! from her ebon throne,
In rayless majesty, now stretches forth
Her leaden scepter o'er a slumbering world.
Young.
[1913 Webster]

Sable antelope (Zool.), a large South African antelope (Hippotragus niger). Both sexes have long, sharp horns. The adult male is black; the female is dark chestnut above, white beneath. -- Sable iron, a superior quality of Russia iron; -- so called because originally stamped with the figure of a sable. -- Sable mouse (Zool.), the lemming.
[1913 Webster]

Sable
Sa"ble, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sabled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sabling (?).] To render sable or dark; to drape darkly or in black.
[1913 Webster]

Sabled all in black the shady sky. G. Fletcher.
[1913 Webster]

Sabot
Sa`bot" (s&adot_;`bō"), n. [F.] 1. A kind of wooden shoe worn by the peasantry in France, Belgium, Sweden, and some other European countries.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Mil.) A thick, circular disk of wood, to which the cartridge bag and projectile are attached, in fixed ammunition for cannon; also, a piece of soft metal attached to a projectile to take the groove of the rifling.
[1913 Webster]

Sabotage
Sa`bo`tage" (?), n. [F.] 1. (a) Scamped work. (b) Malicious waste or destruction of an employer's property or injury to his interests by workmen during labor troubles.

2. any surreptitious destruction of property or obstruction of activity by persons not known to be hostile; -- in war, such actions carried out behind enemy lines by agents or local sympathisers of the hostile power.
[PJC]

Sabotiere
Sa`bo"tière (?), n. [F.] A kind of freezer for ices.
[1913 Webster]

Sabre
Sa"bre (?), n. & v. See Saber.
[1913 Webster]

Sabretasche
Sa"bre*tasche` (?), n. [F. sabretache, G. säbeltasche; säbel saber + tasche a pocket.] (Mil.) A leather case or pocket worn by cavalry at the left side, suspended from the sword belt. Campbell (Dict. Mil. Sci.).
[1913 Webster]

Sabrina work
Sa*bri"na work` (?). A variety of appliqué work for quilts, table covers, etc. Caulfeild & S. (Dict. of Needlework).
[1913 Webster]

Sabulose
Sab"u*lose (?), a. [L. sabulosus, from sabulum, sabulo, sand.] (Bot.) Growing in sandy places.
[1913 Webster]

Sabulosity
Sab`u*los"i*ty (?), n. The quality of being sabulous; sandiness; grittiness.
[1913 Webster]

Sabulous
Sab"u*lous (?), a. [L. sabulosus.] Sandy; gritty.
[1913 Webster]

Sac
Sac (s&asuml_;k), n. (Ethnol.) See Sacs.
[1913 Webster]

Sac
Sac, n. [See Sake, Soc.] (O.Eng. Law) The privilege formerly enjoyed by the lord of a manor, of holding courts, trying causes, and imposing fines. Cowell.
[1913 Webster]

Sac
Sac (săk), n. [F., fr. L. saccus a sack. See Sack a bag.] 1. See 2d Sack.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Biol.) A cavity, bag, or receptacle, usually containing fluid, and either closed, or opening into another cavity to the exterior; a sack.
[1913 Webster]

Sacalait
Sac"a*lait (?), n. (Zool.) A kind of fresh-water bass; the crappie. [Southern U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Sacar
Sa"car (?), n. See Saker.
[1913 Webster]

Saccade
Sac*cade" (?), n. [F.] (Man.) A sudden, violent check of a horse by drawing or twitching the reins on a sudden and with one pull.
[1913 Webster]

Saccate
Sac"cate (?), a. [NL. saccatus, fr. L. saccus a sack, bag.] 1. (Biol.) Having the form of a sack or pouch; furnished with a sack or pouch, as a petal.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Saccata, a suborder of ctenophores having two pouches into which the long tentacles can be retracted.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharate
Sac"cha*rate (?), n. (Chem.) (a) A salt of saccharic acid. (b) In a wider sense, a compound of saccharose, or any similar carbohydrate, with such bases as the oxides of calcium, barium, or lead; a sucrate.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharic
Sac*char"ic (?), a. (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or obtained from, saccharine substances; specifically, designating an acid obtained, as a white amorphous gummy mass, by the oxidation of mannite, glucose, sucrose, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Sacchariferous
Sac`cha*rif"er*ous (?), a. [L. saccharon sugar + -ferous.] Producing sugar; as, sacchariferous canes.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharify
Sac*char"i*fy (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saccharified (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Saccharifying (?).] [L. saccharon sugar + -fy: cf. F. saccharifier.] To convert into, or to impregnate with, sugar.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharilla
Sac`cha*ril"la (?), n. A kind of muslin.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharimeter
Sac`cha*rim"e*ter (?), n. [L. saccharon sugar + -meter: cf. F. saccharimètre.] An instrument for ascertaining the quantity of saccharine matter in any solution, as the juice of a plant, or brewers' and distillers' worts. [Written also saccharometer.]
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The common saccharimeter of the brewer is an hydrometer adapted by its scale to point out the proportion of saccharine matter in a solution of any specific gravity. The polarizing saccharimeter of the chemist is a complex optical apparatus, in which polarized light is transmitted through the saccharine solution, and the proportion of sugar indicated by the relative deviation of the plane of polarization.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharimetrical
Sac`cha*ri*met"ric*al (?), a. Of or pertaining to saccharimetry; obtained by saccharimetry.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharimetry
Sac`cha*rim"e*try (săk`k&adot_;*r&ibreve_;m"&euptack_;*tr&ybreve_;), n. The act, process or method of determining the amount and kind of sugar present in sirup, molasses, and the like, especially by the employment of polarizing apparatus.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharin
Sac"cha*rin (săk"k&adot_;*r&ibreve_;n), n. [F., from L. saccharon sugar.] (Chem.) A bitter white crystalline substance obtained from the saccharinates and regarded as the lactone of saccharinic acid; -- so called because formerly supposed to be isomeric with cane sugar (saccharose).
[1913 Webster]

Saccharinate
Sac"cha*ri*nate (?), n. (Chem.) (a) A salt of saccharinic acid. (b) A salt of saccharine.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharine
Sac"cha*rine (? or ?), a. [F. saccharin, fr. L. saccharon sugar, Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, &unr_;, Skr. çarkara. Cf. Sugar.] Of or pertaining to sugar; having the qualities of sugar; producing sugar; sweet; as, a saccharine taste; saccharine matter.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharine
Sac"cha*rine (? or ?), n. (Chem.) A trade name for benzoic sulphinide. [Written also saccharin.]
[1913 Webster]

Saccharinic
Sac"cha*rin"ic (?), a. (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, saccharin; specifically, designating a complex acid not known in the free state but well known in its salts, which are obtained by boiling dextrose and levulose (invert sugar) with milk of lime.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharize
Sac"cha*rize (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saccharized (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Saccharizing (?).] To convert into, or to impregnate with, sugar.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharoidal
Saccharoid
{ Sac"cha*roid (?), Sac`cha*roid"al (?), } a. [L. saccharon sugar + -oid: cf. F. saccharoïde.] Resembling sugar, as in taste, appearance, consistency, or composition; as, saccharoidal limestone.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharometer
Sac`cha*rom"e*ter (?), n. A saccharimeter.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharomyces
Sac`cha*ro*my"ces (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; sugar + &unr_;, &unr_;, a fungus.] (Biol.) A genus of budding fungi, the various species of which have the power, to a greater or less extent, or splitting up sugar into alcohol and carbonic acid. They are the active agents in producing fermentation of wine, beer, etc. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the yeast of sedimentary beer. Also called Torula.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharomycetes
Sac`cha*ro*my*ce"tes (?), n. pl. (Biol.) A family of fungi consisting of the one genus Saccharomyces.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharonate
Sac"cha*ro*nate (?), n. (Chem.) A salt of saccharonic acid.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharone
Sac"cha*rone (?), n. [Saccharin + lactone.] (Chem.) (a) A white crystalline substance, C6H8O6, obtained by the oxidation of saccharin, and regarded as the lactone of saccharonic acid. (b) An oily liquid, C6H10O2, obtained by the reduction of saccharin.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharonic
Sac`cha*ron"ic (?), a. (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, saccharone; specifically, designating an unstable acid which is obtained from saccharone (a) by hydration, and forms a well-known series of salts.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharose
Sac"cha*rose` (?), n. (Chem.) Cane sugar; sucrose; also, in general, any one of the group of which saccharose, or sucrose proper, is the type. See Sucrose.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharous
Sac"cha*rous (?), a. Saccharine.
[1913 Webster]

Saccharum
Sac"cha*rum (?), n. [NL. See Saccharine.] (Bot.) A genus of tall tropical grasses including the sugar cane.
[1913 Webster]

Saccholactate
Sac`cho*lac"tate (?), n. [See Saccholactic.] (Chem.) A salt of saccholactic acid; -- formerly called also saccholate. [Obs.] See Mucate.
[1913 Webster]

Saccholactic
Sac`cho*lac"tic (?), a. [L. saccharon sugar + lac, lactis, milk.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid now called mucic acid; saccholic. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Saccholic
Sac*chol"ic (?), a. Saccholactic. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sacchulmate
Sac*chul"mate (?), n. (Chem.) A salt of sacchulmic acid.
[1913 Webster]

Sacchulmic
Sac*chul"mic (?), a. [Saccharine + ulmic.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained as a dark amorphous substance by the long-continued boiling of sucrose with very dilute sulphuric acid. It resembles humic acid. [Written also sacculmic.]
[1913 Webster]

Sacchulmin
Sac*chul"min (?), n. (Chem.) An amorphous huminlike substance resembling sacchulmic acid, and produced together with it.
[1913 Webster]

Sacciferous
Sac*cif"er*ous (?), a. [L. saccus a sack + -ferous.] (Biol.) Bearing a sac.
[1913 Webster]

Sacciform
Sac"ci*form (?), a. [L. saccus a sack + -form.] (Biol.) Having the general form of a sac.
[1913 Webster]

Saccoglossa
Sac`co*glos"sa (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. L. saccus a sack + Gr. &unr_; a tongue.] (Zool.) Same as Pellibranchiata.
[1913 Webster]

Saccular
Sac"cu*lar (?), a. Like a sac; sacciform.
[1913 Webster]

Sacculated
Sac"cu*la`ted (?), a. Furnished with little sacs.
[1913 Webster]

Saccule
Sac"cule (?), n. [L. sacculus, dim. of saccus sack.] A little sac; specifically, the sacculus of the ear.
[1913 Webster]

Sacculo-cochlear
Sac`cu*lo-coch"le*ar (?), a. (Anat.) Pertaining to the sacculus and cochlea of the ear.
[1913 Webster]

Sacculo-utricular
Sac`cu*lo-u*tric"u*lar (?), a. (Anat.) Pertaining to the sacculus and utriculus of the ear.
[1913 Webster]

Sacculus
Sac"cu*lus (?), n.; pl. Sacculi (#). [L., little sack.] (Anat.) A little sac; esp., a part of the membranous labyrinth of the ear. See the Note under Ear.
[1913 Webster]

Saccus
Sac"cus (?), n.; pl. Sacci (#). [L., a sack.] (Biol.) A sac.
[1913 Webster]

Sacellum
Sa*cel"lum (?), n.; pl. Sacella (#). [L., dim. of sacrum a sacred place.] (a) (Rom. Antiq.) An unroofed space consecrated to a divinity. (b) (Eccl.) A small monumental chapel in a church. Shipley.
[1913 Webster]

Sacerdotal
Sac`er*do"tal (?), a. [L. sacerdotalis, fr. sacerdos, -otis, a priest, fr. sacer holy, sacred: cf. F. sacerdotal.] Of or pertaining to priests, or to the order of priests; relating to the priesthood; priesty; as, sacerdotal dignity; sacerdotal functions.
[1913 Webster]

The ascendency of the sacerdotal order was long the ascendency which naturally and properly belongs to intellectual superiority. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Sacerdotalism
Sac`er*do"tal*ism (?), n. The system, style, spirit, or character, of a priesthood, or sacerdotal order; devotion to the interests of the sacerdotal order.
[1913 Webster]

Sacerdotally
Sac`er*do"tal*ly, adv. In a sacerdotal manner.
[1913 Webster]

Sachel
Sach"el (săch"&ebreve_;l), n. A small bag. See Satchel.
[1913 Webster]

Sachem
Sa"chem (să"ch&eitalic_;m), n. A chief of a tribe of the American Indians; a sagamore. See Sagamore.
[1913 Webster]

Sachemdom
Sa"chem*dom (-dŭm), n. The government or jurisdiction of a sachem. Dr. T. Dwight.
[1913 Webster]

Sachemship
Sa"chem*ship, n. Office or condition of a sachem.
[1913 Webster]

Sachet
Sa`chet" (?), n. [F., dim. of sac. See Sac.] A scent bag, or perfume cushion, to be laid among handkerchiefs, garments, etc., to perfume them.
[1913 Webster]

Saciety
Sa*ci"e*ty (?), n. Satiety. [Obs.] Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Sack
Sack (săk), n. [OE. seck, F. sec dry (cf. Sp. seco, It. secco), from L. siccus dry, harsh; perhaps akin to Gr. 'ischno`s, Skr. sikata sand, Ir. sesc dry, W. hysp. Cf. Desiccate.] A name formerly given to various dry Spanish wines. “Sherris sack.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sack posset, a posset made of sack, and some other ingredients.
[1913 Webster]

Sack
Sack, n. [OE. sak, sek, AS. sacc, saecc, L. saccus, Gr. sa`kkos from Heb. sak; cf. F. sac, from the Latin. Cf. Sac, Satchel, Sack to plunder.] 1. A bag for holding and carrying goods of any kind; a receptacle made of some kind of pliable material, as cloth, leather, and the like; a large pouch.
[1913 Webster]

2. A measure of varying capacity, according to local usage and the substance. The American sack of salt is 215 pounds; the sack of wheat, two bushels. McElrath.
[1913 Webster]

3. [Perhaps a different word.] Originally, a loosely hanging garment for women, worn like a cloak about the shoulders, and serving as a decorative appendage to the gown; now, an outer garment with sleeves, worn by women; as, a dressing sack. [Written also sacque.]
[1913 Webster]

4. A sack coat; a kind of coat worn by men, and extending from top to bottom without a cross seam.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Biol.) See 2d Sac, 2.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Sack bearer (Zool.). See Basket worm, under Basket. -- Sack tree (Bot.), an East Indian tree (Antiaris saccidora) which is cut into lengths, and made into sacks by turning the bark inside out, and leaving a slice of the wood for a bottom. -- To give the sack to or get the sack, to discharge, or be discharged, from employment; to jilt, or be jilted. [Slang] -- To hit the sack, to go to bed. [Slang]
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Sack
Sack, v. t. 1. To put in a sack; to bag; as, to sack corn.
[1913 Webster]

Bolsters sacked in cloth, blue and crimson. L. Wallace.
[1913 Webster]

2. To bear or carry in a sack upon the back or the shoulders. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Sack
Sack, n. [F. sac plunder, pillage, originally, a pack, packet, booty packed up, fr. L. saccus. See Sack a bag.] The pillage or plunder, as of a town or city; the storm and plunder of a town; devastation; ravage.
[1913 Webster]

The town was stormed, and delivered up to sack, -- by which phrase is to be understood the perpetration of all those outrages which the ruthless code of war allowed, in that age, on the persons and property of the defenseless inhabitants, without regard to sex or age. Prescott.
[1913 Webster]

Sack
Sack, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sacked (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sacking.] [See Sack pillage.] To plunder or pillage, as a town or city; to devastate; to ravage.
[1913 Webster]

The Romans lay under the apprehensions of seeing their city sacked by a barbarous enemy. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

Sackage
Sack"age (?; 48), n. The act of taking by storm and pillaging; sack. [R.] H. Roscoe.
[1913 Webster]

Sackbut
Sack"but (?), n. [F. saquebute, OF. saqueboute a sackbut, earlier, a sort of hook attached to the end of a lance used by foot soldiers to unhorse cavalrymen; prop. meaning, pull and push; fr. saquier, sachier, to pull, draw (perhaps originally, to put into a bag or take out from a bag; see Sack a bag) + bouter to push (see Butt to thrust). The name was given to the musical instrument from its being lengthened and shortened.] (Mus.) A brass wind instrument, like a bass trumpet, so contrived that it can be lengthened or shortened according to the tone required; -- said to be the same as the trombone. [Written also sagbut.] Moore (Encyc. of Music).
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The sackbut of the Scriptures is supposed to have been a stringed instrument.
[1913 Webster]

Sackcloth
Sack"cloth` (?; 115), n. Linen or cotton cloth such as sacks are made of; coarse cloth; anciently, a cloth or garment worn in mourning, distress, mortification, or penitence.
[1913 Webster]

Gird you with sackcloth, and mourn before Abner. 2 Sam. iii. 31.
[1913 Webster]

Thus with sackcloth I invest my woe. Sandys.
[1913 Webster]

Sackclothed
Sack"clothed` (?), a. Clothed in sackcloth.
[1913 Webster]

Sacker
Sack"er (?), n. One who sacks; one who takes part in the storm and pillage of a town.
[1913 Webster]

Sackful
Sack"ful (?), n.; pl. Sackfuls (&unr_;). As much as a sack will hold.
[1913 Webster]

Sackful
Sack"ful, a. Bent on plunder. [Obs.] Chapman.
[1913 Webster]

Sacking
Sack"ing, n. [AS. saeccing, from saecc sack, bag.] Stout, coarse cloth of which sacks, bags, etc., are made.
[1913 Webster]

Sackless
Sack"less, a. [AS. sacleás; sacu contention + leás loose, free from.] Quiet; peaceable; harmless; innocent. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Sack-winged
Sack"-winged` (?), a. (Zool.) Having a peculiar pouch developed near the front edge of the wing; -- said of certain bats of the genus Saccopteryx.
[1913 Webster]

Sacque
Sacque (?), n. [Formed after the analogy of the French. See 2d Sack.] Same as 2d Sack, 3.
[1913 Webster]

Sacral
Sa"cral (?), a. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sacrum; in the region of the sacrum.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrament
Sac"ra*ment (?), n. [L. sacramentum an oath, a sacred thing, a mystery, a sacrament, fr. sacrare to declare as sacred, sacer sacred: cf. F. sacrement. See Sacred.] 1. The oath of allegiance taken by Roman soldiers; hence, a sacred ceremony used to impress an obligation; a solemn oath-taking; an oath. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

I'll take the sacrament on't. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. The pledge or token of an oath or solemn covenant; a sacred thing; a mystery. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

God sometimes sent a light of fire, and pillar of a cloud . . . and the sacrament of a rainbow, to guide his people through their portion of sorrows. Jer. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Theol.) One of the solemn religious ordinances enjoined by Christ, the head of the Christian church, to be observed by his followers; hence, specifically, the eucharist; the Lord's Supper.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Sacrament, Eucharist. -- Protestants apply the term sacrament to baptism and the Lord's Supper, especially the latter. The R. Cath. and Greek churches have five other sacraments, viz., confirmation, penance, holy orders, matrimony, and extreme unction. As sacrament denotes an oath or vow, the word has been applied by way of emphasis to the Lord's Supper, where the most sacred vows are renewed by the Christian in commemorating the death of his Redeemer. Eucharist denotes the giving of thanks; and this term also has been applied to the same ordinance, as expressing the grateful remembrance of Christ's sufferings and death. “Some receive the sacrament as a means to procure great graces and blessings; others as an eucharist and an office of thanksgiving for what they have received.” Jer. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrament
Sac"ra*ment (?), v. t. To bind by an oath. [Obs.] Laud.
[1913 Webster]

Sacramental
Sac`ra*men"tal (?), a. [L. sacramentalis: cf. F. sacramental, sacramentel.] 1. Of or pertaining to a sacrament or the sacraments; of the nature of a sacrament; sacredly or solemnly binding; as, sacramental rites or elements.
[1913 Webster]

2. Bound by a sacrament.
[1913 Webster]

The sacramental host of God's elect. Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

Sacramental
Sac`ra*men"tal, n. That which relates to a sacrament. Bp. Morton.
[1913 Webster]

Sacramentalism
Sac`ra*men"tal*ism (?), n. The doctrine and use of sacraments; attachment of excessive importance to sacraments.
[1913 Webster]

Sacramentalist
Sac`ra*men"tal*ist, n. One who holds the doctrine of the real objective presence of Christ's body and blood in the holy eucharist. Shipley.
[1913 Webster]

Sacramentally
Sac`ra*men"tal*ly, adv. In a sacramental manner.
[1913 Webster]

Sacramentarian
Sac`ra*men*ta"ri*an (?), n. [LL. sacramentarius: cf. F. sacramentaire.] 1. (Eccl.) A name given in the sixteenth century to those German reformers who rejected both the Roman and the Lutheran doctrine of the holy eucharist.
[1913 Webster]

2. One who holds extreme opinions regarding the efficacy of sacraments.
[1913 Webster]

Sacramentarian
Sac`ra*men*ta"ri*an, a. 1. Of or pertaining a sacrament, or to the sacramentals; sacramental.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of or pertaining to the Sacramentarians.
[1913 Webster]

Sacramentary
Sac`ra*men"ta*ry (?), a. 1. Of or pertaining to a sacrament or the sacraments; sacramental.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of or pertaining to the Sacramentarians.
[1913 Webster]

Sacramentary
Sac`ra*men"ta*ry, n.; pl. -ries (#). [LL. sacramentarium: cf. F. sacramentaire.] 1. An ancient book of the Roman Catholic Church, written by Pope Gelasius, and revised, corrected, and abridged by St. Gregory, in which were contained the rites for Mass, the sacraments, the dedication of churches, and other ceremonies. There are several ancient books of the same kind in France and Germany.
[1913 Webster]

2. Same as Sacramentarian, n., 1.
[1913 Webster]

Papists, Anabaptists, and Sacramentaries. Jer. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

Sacramentize
Sac"ra*ment*ize (?), v. i. To administer the sacraments. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Both to preach and sacramentize. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrarium
Sa*cra"ri*um (?), n.; pl. -ria (#). [L., fr. sacer sacred.] 1. A sort of family chapel in the houses of the Romans, devoted to a special divinity.
[1913 Webster]

2. The adytum of a temple. Gwilt.
[1913 Webster]

3. In a Christian church, the sanctuary.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrate
Sa"crate (?), v. t. [L. sacratus, p. p. of sacrare. See Sacred.] To consecrate. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sacration
Sa*cra"tion (?), n. Consecration. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sacre
Sa"cre (?), n. See Saker.
[1913 Webster]

Sacre
Sa"cre, v. t. [F. sacrer. See Sacred.] To consecrate; to make sacred. [Obs.] Holland.
[1913 Webster]

Sacred
Sa"cred (?), a. [Originally p. p. of OE. sacren to consecrate, F. sacrer, fr. L. sacrare, fr. sacer sacred, holy, cursed. Cf. Consecrate, Execrate, Saint, Sexton.] 1. Set apart by solemn religious ceremony; especially, in a good sense, made holy; set apart to religious use; consecrated; not profane or common; as, a sacred place; a sacred day; sacred service.
[1913 Webster]

2. Relating to religion, or to the services of religion; not secular; religious; as, sacred history.
[1913 Webster]

Smit with the love of sacred song. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. Designated or exalted by a divine sanction; possessing the highest title to obedience, honor, reverence, or veneration; entitled to extreme reverence; venerable.
[1913 Webster]

Such neighbor nearness to our sacred [royal] blood
Should nothing privilege him.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Poet and saint to thee alone were given,
The two most sacred names of earth and heaven.
Cowley.
[1913 Webster]

4. Hence, not to be profaned or violated; inviolable.
[1913 Webster]

Secrets of marriage still are sacred held. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

5. Consecrated; dedicated; devoted; -- with to.
[1913 Webster]

A temple, sacred to the queen of love. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

6. Solemnly devoted, in a bad sense, as to evil, vengeance, curse, or the like; accursed; baleful. [Archaic]
[1913 Webster]

But, to destruction sacred and devote. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Society of the Sacred Heart (R.C. Ch.), a religious order of women, founded in France in 1800, and approved in 1826. It was introduced into America in 1817. The members of the order devote themselves to the higher branches of female education. -- Sacred baboon. (Zool.) See Hamadryas. -- Sacred bean (Bot.), a seed of the Oriental lotus (Nelumbo speciosa or Nelumbium speciosum), a plant resembling a water lily; also, the plant itself. See Lotus. -- Sacred beetle (Zool.) See Scarab. -- Sacred canon. See Canon, n., 3. -- Sacred fish (Zool.), any one of numerous species of fresh-water African fishes of the family Mormyridae. Several large species inhabit the Nile and were considered sacred by the ancient Egyptians; especially Mormyrus oxyrhynchus. -- Sacred ibis. See Ibis. -- Sacred monkey. (Zool.) (a) Any Asiatic monkey of the genus Semnopithecus, regarded as sacred by the Hindoos; especially, the entellus. See Entellus. (b) The sacred baboon. See Hamadryas. (c) The bhunder, or rhesus monkey. -- Sacred place (Civil Law), the place where a deceased person is buried.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Holy; divine; hallowed; consecrated; dedicated; devoted; religious; venerable; reverend.
[1913 Webster]

-- Sa"cred*ly (#), adv. -- Sa"cred*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrifical
Sacrific
{ Sacrif"ic (?), Sa*crif"ic*al (?), } a. [L. sacrificus, sacrificalis. See Sacrifice.] Employed in sacrifice. [R.] Johnson.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrificable
Sa*crif"ic*a*ble (?), a. Capable of being offered in sacrifice. [R.] Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrificant
Sa*crif"ic*ant (?), n. [L. sacrificans, p. pr. See Sacrifice.] One who offers a sacrifice. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Sacrificator
Sac"ri*fi*ca`tor (?), n. [L.] A sacrificer; one who offers a sacrifice. [R.] Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrificatory
Sa*crif"ic*a*to*ry (?), n. [Cf. F. sacrificatoire.] Offering sacrifice. [R.] Sherwood.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrifice
Sac"ri*fice (?; 277), n. [OE. sacrifise, sacrifice, F. sacrifice, fr. L. sacrificium; sacer sacred + facere to make. See Sacred, and Fact.] 1. The offering of anything to God, or to a god; consecratory rite.
[1913 Webster]

Great pomp, and sacrifice, and praises loud,
To Dagon.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Anything consecrated and offered to God, or to a divinity; an immolated victim, or an offering of any kind, laid upon an altar, or otherwise presented in the way of religious thanksgiving, atonement, or conciliation.
[1913 Webster]

Moloch, horrid king, besmeared with blood
Of human sacrifice.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

My life, if thou preserv'st my life,
Thy sacrifice shall be.
Addison.
[1913 Webster]

3. Destruction or surrender of anything for the sake of something else; devotion of some desirable object in behalf of a higher object, or to a claim deemed more pressing; hence, also, the thing so devoted or given up; as, the sacrifice of interest to pleasure, or of pleasure to interest.
[1913 Webster]

4. A sale at a price less than the cost or the actual value. [Tradesmen's Cant]
[1913 Webster]

Burnt sacrifice. See Burnt offering, under Burnt. -- Sacrifice hit (Baseball), in batting, a hit of such a kind that the batter loses his chance of tallying, but enables one or more who are on bases to get home or gain a base.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrifice
Sac"ri*fice (?; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sacrificed (&unr_;); p. pr. & vb. n. Sacrificing (&unr_;).] [From Sacrifice, n.: cf. F. sacrifier, L. sacrificare; sacer sacred, holy + -ficare (only in comp.) to make. See -fy.] 1. To make an offering of; to consecrate or present to a divinity by way of expiation or propitiation, or as a token acknowledgment or thanksgiving; to immolate on the altar of God, in order to atone for sin, to procure favor, or to express thankfulness; as, to sacrifice an ox or a sheep.
[1913 Webster]

Oft sacrificing bullock, lamb, or kid. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, to destroy, surrender, or suffer to be lost, for the sake of obtaining something; to give up in favor of a higher or more imperative object or duty; to devote, with loss or suffering.
[1913 Webster]

Condemned to sacrifice his childish years
To babbling ignorance, and to empty fears.
Prior.
[1913 Webster]

The Baronet had sacrificed a large sum . . . for the sake of . . . making this boy his heir. G. Eliot.
[1913 Webster]

3. To destroy; to kill. Johnson.
[1913 Webster]

4. To sell at a price less than the cost or the actual value. [Tradesmen's Cant]
[1913 Webster]

Sacrifice
Sac"ri*fice, v. i. To make offerings to God, or to a deity, of things consumed on the altar; to offer sacrifice.
[1913 Webster]

O teacher, some great mischief hath befallen
To that meek man, who well had sacrificed.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrificer
Sac"ri*fi`cer (?), n. One who sacrifices.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrificial
Sac`ri*fi"cial (?), a. Of or pertaining to sacrifice or sacrifices; consisting in sacrifice; performing sacrifice.Sacrificial rites.” Jer. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrilege
Sac"ri*lege (?), n. [F. sacrilège, L. sacrilegium, from sacrilegus that steals, properly, gathers or picks up, sacred things; sacer sacred + legere to gather, pick up. See Sacred, and Legend.] The sin or crime of violating or profaning sacred things; the alienating to laymen, or to common purposes, what has been appropriated or consecrated to religious persons or uses.
[1913 Webster]

And the hid treasures in her sacred tomb
With sacrilege to dig.
Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Families raised upon the ruins of churches, and enriched with the spoils of sacrilege. South.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrilegious
Sac`ri*le"gious (?), a. [From sacrilege: cf. L. sacrilegus.] Violating sacred things; polluted with sacrilege; involving sacrilege; profane; impious.
[1913 Webster]

Above the reach of sacrilegious hands. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

-- Sac`ri*le"gious*ly, adv. -- Sac`ri*le"gious*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrilegist
Sac"ri*le`gist (?), n. One guilty of sacrilege.
[1913 Webster]

Sacring
Sac"ring (?), a. & n. from Sacre.
[1913 Webster]

Sacring bell. See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrist
Sa"crist (?), n. [LL. sacrista. See Sacristan.] A sacristan; also, a person retained in a cathedral to copy out music for the choir, and take care of the books.
[1913 Webster]

Sacristan
Sac"ris*tan (?), n. [F. sacristain, LL. sacrista, fr. L. sacer. See Sacred, and cf. Sexton.] An officer of the church who has the care of the utensils or movables, and of the church in general; a sexton.
[1913 Webster]

Sacristy
Sac"ris*ty (?), n.; pl. Sacristies (#). [F. sacristie, LL. sacristia, fr. L. sacer. See Sacred.] An apartment in a church where the sacred utensils, vestments, etc., are kept; a vestry.
[1913 Webster]

Sacro-
Sa"cro- (&unr_;). (Anat.) A combining form denoting connection with, or relation to, the sacrum, as in sacro-coccygeal, sacro-iliac, sacrosciatic.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrosanct
Sac"ro*sanct (?), a. [L. sucrosanctus.] Sacred; inviolable. [R.] Dr. H. More.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrosciatic
Sa`cro*sci*at"ic (?), a. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to both the sacrum and the hip; as, the sacrosciatic foramina formed by the sacrosciatic ligaments which connect the sacrum and the hip bone.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrovertebral
Sa`cro*ver"te*bral (?), a. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sacrum and that part of the vertebral column immediately anterior to it; as, the sacrovertebral angle.
[1913 Webster]

Sacrum
Sa"crum (?), n.; pl. sacra (&unr_;). [NL., fr. L. sacer sacred, os sacrum the lowest bone of the spine.] (Anat.) That part of the vertebral column which is directly connected with, or forms a part of, the pelvis.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; It may consist of a single vertebra or of several more or less consolidated. In man it forms the dorsal, or posterior, wall of the pelvis, and consists of five united vertebrae, which diminish in size very rapidly to the posterior extremity, which bears the coccyx.
[1913 Webster]

Sacs
Sacs (s&asuml_;ks), n. pl.; sing. Sac (&unr_;). (Ethnol.) A tribe of Indians, which, together with the Foxes, formerly occupied the region about Green Bay, Wisconsin. [Written also Sauks.]
[1913 Webster]

Sad
Sad (săd), a. [Compar. Sadder (săd"d&etilde_;r); superl. Saddest.] [OE. sad sated, tired, satisfied, firm, steadfast, AS. saed satisfied, sated; akin to D. zat, OS. sad, G. satt, OHG. sat, Icel. saðr, saddr, Goth. saþs, Lith. sotus, L. sat, satis, enough, satur sated, Gr. 'a`menai to satiate, 'a`dnh enough. Cf. Assets, Sate, Satiate, Satisfy, Satire.] 1. Sated; satisfied; weary; tired. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Yet of that art they can not waxen sad,
For unto them it is a bitter sweet.
Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. Heavy; weighty; ponderous; close; hard. [Obs., except in a few phrases; as, sad bread.]
[1913 Webster]

His hand, more sad than lump of lead. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Chalky lands are naturally cold and sad. Mortimer.
[1913 Webster]

3. Dull; grave; dark; somber; -- said of colors.Sad-colored clothes.” Walton.
[1913 Webster]

Woad, or wade, is used by the dyers to lay the foundation of all sad colors. Mortimer.
[1913 Webster]

4. Serious; grave; sober; steadfast; not light or frivolous. [Obs.] “Ripe and sad courage.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Lady Catharine, a sad and religious woman. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Which treaty was wisely handled by sad and discrete counsel of both parties. Ld. Berners.
[1913 Webster]

5. Affected with grief or unhappiness; cast down with affliction; downcast; gloomy; mournful.
[1913 Webster]

First were we sad, fearing you would not come;
Now sadder, that you come so unprovided.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

The angelic guards ascended, mute and sad. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

6. Afflictive; calamitous; causing sorrow; as, a sad accident; a sad misfortune.
[1913 Webster]

7. Hence, bad; naughty; troublesome; wicked. [Colloq.]Sad tipsy fellows, both of them.” I. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Sad is sometimes used in the formation of self-explaining compounds; as, sad-colored, sad-eyed, sad-hearted, sad-looking, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

Sad bread, heavy bread. [Scot. & Local, U.S.] Bartlett.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Sorrowful; mournful; gloomy; dejected; depressed; cheerless; downcast; sedate; serious; grave; grievous; afflictive; calamitous.
[1913 Webster]

Sad
Sad, v. t. To make sorrowful; to sadden. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

How it sadded the minister's spirits! H. Peters.
[1913 Webster]

SAD
SAD (?), n. Seasonal affective disorder. [Acron.]
[PJC]

Sadda
Sad"da (?), n. [Per. sad-dar the hundred gates or ways; sad a hundred + dar door, way.] A work in the Persian tongue, being a summary of the Zend-Avesta, or sacred books.
[1913 Webster]

Sadden
Sad"den (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saddened (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Saddening.] To make sad. Specifically: (a) To render heavy or cohesive. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Marl is binding, and saddening of land is the great prejudice it doth to clay lands. Mortimer.
[1913 Webster]

(b) To make dull- or sad-colored, as cloth. (c) To make grave or serious; to make melancholy or sorrowful.
[1913 Webster]

Her gloomy presence saddens all the scene. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Sadden
Sad"den, v. i. To become, or be made, sad. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Sadder
Sad"der (?), n. Same as Sadda.
[1913 Webster]

Saddle
Sad"dle (?), n. [OE. sadel, AS. sadol; akin to D. zadel, G. sattel, OHG. satal, satul, Icel. söðull, Dan. & Sw. sadel; cf. Russ. siedlo; all perh. ultimately from the root of E. sit.] 1. A seat for a rider, -- usually made of leather, padded to span comfortably a horse's back, furnished with stirrups for the rider's feet to rest in, and fastened in place with a girth; also, a seat for the rider on a bicycle or tricycle.
[1913 Webster]

2. A padded part of a harness which is worn on a horse's back, being fastened in place with a girth. It serves various purposes, as to keep the breeching in place, carry guides for the reins, etc.
[1913 Webster]

3. A piece of meat containing a part of the backbone of an animal with the ribs on each side; as, a saddle of mutton, of venison, etc.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Naut.) A block of wood, usually fastened to some spar, and shaped to receive the end of another spar.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Mach.) A part, as a flange, which is hollowed out to fit upon a convex surface and serve as a means of attachment or support.
[1913 Webster]

6. (Zool.) The clitellus of an earthworm.
[1913 Webster]

7. (Arch.) The threshold of a door, when a separate piece from the floor or landing; -- so called because it spans and covers the joint between two floors.
[1913 Webster]

8. (Phys. Geog.) A ridge connected two higher elevations; a low point in the crest line of a ridge; a col.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

9. (Mining) A formation of gold-bearing quartz occurring along the crest of an anticlinal fold, esp. in Australia.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Saddle bar (Arch.), one the small iron bars to which the lead panels of a glazed window are secured. Oxf. Gloss. -- Saddle gall (Far.), a sore or gall upon a horse's back, made by the saddle. -- Saddle girth, a band passing round the body of a horse to hold the saddle in its place. -- saddle horse, a horse suitable or trained for riding with a saddle. -- Saddle joint, in sheet-metal roofing, a joint formed by bending up the edge of a sheet and folding it downward over the turned-up edge of the next sheet. -- Saddle roof, (Arch.), a roof having two gables and one ridge; -- said of such a roof when used in places where a different form is more common; as, a tower surmounted by a saddle roof. Called also saddleback roof. -- Saddle shell (Zool.), any thin plicated bivalve shell of the genera Placuna and Anomia; -- so called from its shape. Called also saddle oyster.
[1913 Webster]

Saddle
Sad"dle (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saddled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Saddling (?).] [AS. sadelian.] 1. To put a saddle upon; to equip (a beast) for riding.saddle my horse.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Abraham rose up early, . . . and saddled his ass. Gen. xxii. 3.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence: To fix as a charge or burden upon; to load; to encumber; as, to saddle a town with the expense of bridges and highways.
[1913 Webster]

Saddleback
Sad"dle*back` (?), a. Same as Saddle-backed.
[1913 Webster]

Saddleback roof. (Arch.) See Saddle roof, under Saddle.
[1913 Webster]

Saddleback
Sad"dle*back`, n. 1. Anything saddle-backed; esp., a hill or ridge having a concave outline at the top.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) (a) The harp seal. (b) The great blackbacked gull (Larus marinus). (c) The larva of a bombycid moth (Empretia stimulea) which has a large, bright green, saddle-shaped patch of color on the back.
[1913 Webster]

Saddle-backed
Sad"dle-backed` (?), a. 1. Having the outline of the upper part concave like the seat of a saddle.
[1913 Webster]

2. Having a low back and high neck, as a horse.
[1913 Webster]

Saddlebags
Sad"dle*bags (?), n. pl. Bags, usually of leather, united by straps or a band, formerly much used by horseback riders to carry small articles, one bag hanging on each side.
[1913 Webster]

Saddlebow
Sad"dle*bow` (?), n. [AS. sadelboga.] The bow or arch in the front part of a saddle, or the pieces which form the front.
[1913 Webster]

Saddlecloth
Sad"dle*cloth` (?; 115), n. A cloth under a saddle, and extending out behind; a housing.
[1913 Webster]

Saddled
Sad"dled (?), a. (Zool.) Having a broad patch of color across the back, like a saddle; saddle-backed.
[1913 Webster]

Saddler
Sad"dler (?), n. One who makes saddles.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) A harp seal.
[1913 Webster]

Saddlery
Sad"dler*y (?), n. 1. The materials for making saddles and harnesses; the articles usually offered for sale in a saddler's shop.
[1913 Webster]

2. The trade or employment of a saddler.
[1913 Webster]

Saddle-shaped
Sad"dle-shaped` (?), a. Shaped like a saddle. Specifically: (a) (Bot.) Bent down at the sides so as to give the upper part a rounded form. Henslow.
[1913 Webster]

(b) (Geol.) Bent on each side of a mountain or ridge, without being broken at top; -- said of strata.
[1913 Webster]

Saddletree
Sad"dle*tree` (?), n. The frame of a saddle.
[1913 Webster]

For saddletree scarce reached had he,
His journey to begin.
Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

Sadducaic
Sad`du*ca"ic (?; 135), a. Pertaining to, or like, the Sadducees; as, Sadducaic reasonings.
[1913 Webster]

Sadducee
Sad"du*cee (?), n. [L. Sadducaei, p., Gr. &unr_;, Heb. Tsaddūkīm; -- so called from Tsādōk, the founder of the sect.] One of a sect among the ancient Jews, who denied the resurrection, a future state, and the existence of angels. -- Sad`du*ce"an (#), a.
[1913 Webster]

Sadducism
Sadduceeism
{ Sad"du*cee`ism (?), Sad"du*cism (?), } n. The tenets of the Sadducees.
[1913 Webster]

Sadducize
Sad"du*cize (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Sadducized (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sadducizing (?).] To adopt the principles of the Sadducees. Atterbury.
[1913 Webster]

Sadh
Sadh (?), n. [Skr. sādhu perfect, pure.] A member of a monotheistic sect of Hindoos. Sadhs resemble the Quakers in many respects. Balfour (Cyc. of India).
[1913 Webster]

Sadiron
Sad"i`ron (?), n. [Probably sad heavy + iron.] An iron for smoothing clothes; a flatiron.
[1913 Webster]

Sadly
Sad"ly, adv. 1. Wearily; heavily; firmly. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

In go the spears full sadly in arest. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. Seriously; soberly; gravely. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

To tell thee sadly, shepherd, without blame
Or our neglect, we lost her as we came.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. Grievously; deeply; sorrowfully; miserably. “He sadly suffers in their grief.” Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Sadness
Sad"ness, n. 1. Heaviness; firmness. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

2. Seriousness; gravity; discretion. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Her sadness and her benignity. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

3. Quality of being sad, or unhappy; gloominess; sorrowfulness; dejection.
[1913 Webster]

Dim sadness did not spare
That time celestial visages.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Sorrow; heaviness; dejection. See Grief.
[1913 Webster]

Sadr
Sadr (?), n. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Ziziphus (Ziziphus lotus); -- so called by the Arabs of Barbary, who use its berries for food. See Lotus (b).
[1913 Webster]

Saengerbund
Saeng"er*bund` (?), n.; G. pl. Saengerbünde (#). [G. sängerbund.] (Music) A singers' union; an association of singers or singing clubs, esp. German.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Saengerfest
Saeng"er*fest (?), n. [G. sängerfest.] A festival of singers; a German singing festival.
[1913 Webster]

Safe
Safe (?), a. [Compar. Safer (?); superl. Safest.] [OE. sauf, F. sauf, fr. L. salvus, akin to salus health, welfare, safety. Cf. Salute, Salvation, Sage a plant, Save, Salvo an exception.] 1. Free from harm, injury, or risk; untouched or unthreatened by danger or injury; unharmed; unhurt; secure; whole; as, safe from disease; safe from storms; safe from foes. “And ye dwelled safe.” 1 Sam. xii. 11.
[1913 Webster]

They escaped all safe to land. Acts xxvii. 44.
[1913 Webster]

Established in a safe, unenvied throne. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Conferring safety; securing from harm; not exposing to danger; confining securely; to be relied upon; not dangerous; as, a safe harbor; a safe bridge, etc. “The man of safe discretion.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

The King of heaven hath doomed
This place our dungeon, not our safe retreat.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. Incapable of doing harm; no longer dangerous; in secure care or custody; as, the prisoner is safe.
[1913 Webster]

But Banquo's safe?
Ay, my good lord, safe in a ditch he bides.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Safe hit (Baseball), a hit which enables the batter to get to first base even if no error is made by the other side.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Secure; unendangered; sure.
[1913 Webster]

Safe
Safe (?), n. A place for keeping things in safety. Specifically: (a) A strong and fireproof receptacle (as a movable chest of steel, etc., or a closet or vault of brickwork) for containing money, valuable papers, or the like. (b) A ventilated or refrigerated chest or closet for securing provisions from noxious animals or insects.
[1913 Webster]

Safe
Safe, v. t. To render safe; to make right. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Safe-conduct
Safe"-con"duct (?), n. [Safe + conduct: cf. F. sauf-conduit.] That which gives a safe passage; either (a) a convoy or guard to protect a person in an enemy's country or a foreign country, or (b) a writing, pass, or warrant of security, given to a person to enable him to travel with safety. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Safe-conduct
Safe`-con*duct" (?), v. t. To conduct safely; to give safe-conduct to. [Poetic]
[1913 Webster]

He him by all the bonds of love besought
To safe-conduct his love.
Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Safeguard
Safe"guard` (?), n. [Safe = guard: cf. F. sauvegarde.] 1. One who, or that which, defends or protects; defense; protection. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Thy sword, the safeguard of thy brother's throne. Granville.
[1913 Webster]

2. A convoy or guard to protect a traveler or property.
[1913 Webster]

3. A pass; a passport; a safe-conduct. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Safeguard
Safe"guard`, v. t. To guard; to protect. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Safe-keeping
Safe"-keep"ing (?), n. [Safe + keep.] The act of keeping or preserving in safety from injury or from escape; care; custody.
[1913 Webster]

Safely
Safe"ly, adv. In a safe manner; danger, injury, loss, or evil consequences.
[1913 Webster]

Safeness
Safe"ness, n. The quality or state of being safe; freedom from hazard, danger, harm, or loss; safety; security; as the safeness of an experiment, of a journey, or of a possession.
[1913 Webster]

Safe-pledge
Safe"-pledge" (?), n. (Law) A surety for the appearance of a person at a given time. Bracton.
[1913 Webster]

Safety
Safe"ty (?), n. [Cf. F. sauveté.] 1. The condition or state of being safe; freedom from danger or hazard; exemption from hurt, injury, or loss.
[1913 Webster]

Up led by thee,
Into the heaven I have presumed,
An earthly guest . . . With like safety guided down,
Return me to my native element.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Freedom from whatever exposes one to danger or from liability to cause danger or harm; safeness; hence, the quality of making safe or secure, or of giving confidence, justifying trust, insuring against harm or loss, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Would there were any safety in thy sex,
That I might put a thousand sorrows off,
And credit thy repentance!
Beau. & Fl.
[1913 Webster]

3. Preservation from escape; close custody.
[1913 Webster]

Imprison him, . . .
Deliver him to safety; and return.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Amer. Football) the act or result of a ball-carrier on the offensive team being tackled behind his own goal line, or the downing of a ball behind the offensive team's own goal line when it had been carried or propelled behind that goal line by a player on the offensive tream; such a play causes a score of two points to be awarded to the defensive team; -- it is distinguished from touchback, when the ball is downed behind the goal after being propelled there or last touched by a player of the defending team. See Touchdown. Same as Safety touchdown, below.
[Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

5. Short for Safety bicycle. [archaic]
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

6. a switch on a firearm that locks the trigger and prevents the firearm from being discharged unintentionally; -- also called safety catch, safety lock, or lock. [archaic]
[PJC]

Safety bicycle
Safety bicycle. A bicycle with equal or nearly equal wheels, usually about 28 inches diameter, driven by pedals connected to the rear (driving) wheel by a multiplying gear. Since the 1930's this has been the most common type of bicycle, now simply called bicycle. The older high-wheelers are often referred to as bone-rattlers.
[Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

Safety chain
Safety chain. (a) (Railroads) A normally slack chain for preventing excessive movement between a truck and a car body in sluing. (b) An auxiliary watch chain, secured to the clothes, usually out of sight, to prevent stealing of the watch. (c) A chain of sheet metal links with an elongated hole through each broad end, made up by doubling the first link on itself, slipping the next link through and doubling, and so on.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Safety arch (Arch.), a discharging arch. See under Discharge, v. t. -- Safety belt, a belt made of some buoyant material, or which is capable of being inflated, so as to enable a person to float in water; a life preserver. -- Safety buoy, a buoy to enable a person to float in water; a safety belt. -- Safety cage (Mach.), a cage for an elevator or mine lift, having appliances to prevent it from dropping if the lifting rope should break. -- Safety lamp. (Mining) See under Lamp. -- Safety match, a match which can be ignited only on a surface specially prepared for the purpose. -- Safety pin, a pin made in the form of a clasp, with a guard covering its point so that it will not prick the wearer. -- Safety plug. See Fusible plug, under Fusible. -- Safety switch. See Switch. -- Safety touchdown (Football), the act or result of a player's touching to the ground behind his own goal line a ball which received its last impulse from a man on his own side; -- distinguished from touchback. See Touchdown. Same as safety -- Safety tube (Chem.), a tube to prevent explosion, or to control delivery of gases by an automatic valvular connection with the outer air; especially, a bent funnel tube with bulbs for adding those reagents which produce unpleasant fumes or violent effervescence. -- Safety valve, a valve which is held shut by a spring or weight and opens automatically to permit the escape of steam, or confined gas, water, etc., from a boiler, or other vessel, when the pressure becomes too great for safety; also, sometimes, a similar valve opening inward to admit air to a vessel in which the pressure is less than that of the atmosphere, to prevent collapse.
[1913 Webster]

Safflow
Saf"flow (?), n. (Bot.) The safflower. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Safflower
Saf"flow`er (?), n. [F. safleur, saflor, for safran, influenced by fleur flower. See Saffron, and Flower.] 1. (Bot.) An annual composite plant (Carthamus tinctorius), the flowers of which are used as a dyestuff and in making rouge; bastard, or false, saffron.
[1913 Webster]

2. The dried flowers of the Carthamus tinctorius.
[1913 Webster]

3. A dyestuff from these flowers. See Safranin (b).
[1913 Webster]

Oil of safflower, a purgative oil expressed from the seeds of the safflower.
[1913 Webster]

Saffron
Saf"fron (?; 277), n. [OE. saffran, F. safran; cf. It. zafferano, Sp. azafran, Pg. açafrão; all fr. Ar. & Per. za' farān.] 1. (Bot.) A bulbous iridaceous plant (Crocus sativus) having blue flowers with large yellow stigmas. See Crocus.
[1913 Webster]

2. The aromatic, pungent, dried stigmas, usually with part of the stile, of the Crocus sativus. Saffron is used in cookery, and in coloring confectionery, liquors, varnishes, etc., and was formerly much used in medicine.
[1913 Webster]

3. An orange or deep yellow color, like that of the stigmas of the Crocus sativus.
[1913 Webster]

Bastard saffron, Dyer's saffron. (Bot.) See Safflower. -- Meadow saffron (Bot.), a bulbous plant (Colchichum autumnale) of Europe, resembling saffron. -- Saffron wood (Bot.), the yellowish wood of a South African tree (Elaeodendron croceum); also, the tree itself. -- Saffron yellow, a shade of yellow like that obtained from the stigmas of the true saffron (Crocus sativus).
[1913 Webster]

Saffron
Saf"fron (?; 277), a. Having the color of the stigmas of saffron flowers; deep orange-yellow; as, a saffron face; a saffron streamer.
[1913 Webster]

Saffron
Saf"fron, v. t. To give color and flavor to, as by means of saffron; to spice. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

And in Latyn I speak a wordes few,
To saffron with my predication.
Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Saffrony
Saf"fron*y (?), a. Having a color somewhat like saffron; yellowish. Lord (1630).
[1913 Webster]

Safranin
Saf"ra*nin (?), n. (Chem.) (a) An orange-red dyestuff extracted from the saffron. [R.] (b) A red dyestuff extracted from the safflower, and formerly used in dyeing wool, silk, and cotton pink and scarlet; -- called also Spanish red, China lake, and carthamin. (c) An orange-red dyestuff prepared from certain nitro compounds of creosol, and used as a substitute for the safflower dye.
[1913 Webster]

Safranine
Saf"ra*nine (? or ?), n. [So called because used as a substitute for safranin.] (Chem.) An orange-red nitrogenous dyestuff produced artificially by oxidizing certain aniline derivatives, and used in dyeing silk and wool; also, any one of the series of which safranine proper is the type.
[1913 Webster]

Sag
Sag (săg), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Sagged (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sagging (?).] [Akin to Sw. sacka to settle, sink down, LG. sacken, D. zakken. Cf. Sink, v. i.] 1. To sink, in the middle, by its weight or under applied pressure, below a horizontal line or plane; as, a line or cable supported by its ends sags, though tightly drawn; the floor of a room sags; hence, to lean, give way, or settle from a vertical position; as, a building may sag one way or another; a door sags on its hinges.
[1913 Webster]

2. Fig.: To lose firmness or elasticity; to sink; to droop; to flag; to bend; to yield, as the mind or spirits, under the pressure of care, trouble, doubt, or the like; to be unsettled or unbalanced. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

The mind I sway by, and the heart I bear,
Shall never sag with doubt nor shake with fear.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. To loiter in walking; to idle along; to drag or droop heavily.
[1913 Webster]

To sag to leeward (Naut.), to make much leeway by reason of the wind, sea, or current; to drift to leeward; -- said of a vessel. Totten.
[1913 Webster]

Sag
Sag, v. t. To cause to bend or give way; to load.
[1913 Webster]

Sag
Sag, n. State of sinking or bending; sagging.
[1913 Webster]

Saga
Sa"ga (sā"g&adot_;), n.; pl. Sagas (-g&adot_;z). [Icel., akin to E. saw a saying. See Say, and cf. Saw.] A Scandinavian legend, or heroic or mythic tradition, among the Norsemen and kindred people; a northern European popular historical or religious tale of olden time.
[1913 Webster]

And then the blue-eyed Norseman told
A saga of the days of old.
Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

Sagacious
Sa*ga"cious (?), a. [L. sagax, sagacis, akin to sagire to perceive quickly or keenly, and probably to E. seek. See Seek, and cf. Presage.] 1. Of quick sense perceptions; keen-scented; skilled in following a trail.
[1913 Webster]

Sagacious of his quarry from so far. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, of quick intellectual perceptions; of keen penetration and judgment; discerning and judicious; knowing; far-sighted; shrewd; sage; wise; as, a sagacious man; a sagacious remark.
[1913 Webster]

Instinct . . . makes them, many times, sagacious above our apprehension. Dr. H. More.
[1913 Webster]

Only sagacious heads light on these observations, and reduce them into general propositions. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- See Shrewd.
[1913 Webster]

-- Sa*ga"cious*ly, adv. -- Sa*ga"cious*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Sagacity
Sa*gac"i*ty (?), n. [L. sagacitas. See Sagacious.] The quality of being sagacious; quickness or acuteness of sense perceptions; keenness of discernment or penetration with soundness of judgment; shrewdness.
[1913 Webster]

Some [brutes] show that nice sagacity of smell. Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

Natural sagacity improved by generous education. V. Knox.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Penetration; shrewdness; judiciousness. -- Sagacity, Penetration. Penetration enables us to enter into the depths of an abstruse subject, to detect motives, plans, etc. Sagacity adds to penetration a keen, practical judgment, which enables one to guard against the designs of others, and to turn everything to the best possible advantage.
[1913 Webster]

Sagamore
Sag"a*more (?), n. 1. [Cf. Sachem.] The head of a tribe among the American Indians; a chief; -- generally used as synonymous with sachem, but some writters distinguished between them, making the sachem a chief of the first rank, and a sagamore one of the second rank. “Be it sagamore, sachem, or powwow.” Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

2. A juice used in medicine. [Obs.] Johnson.
[1913 Webster]

Sagapen
Sag"a*pen (?), n. Sagapenum.
[1913 Webster]

Sagapenum
Sag`a*pe"num (?), n. [L. sagapenon, sacopenium, Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. sagapin, gomme sagapin, sagapénum, Ar. sikbīnaj, Per. sakbīnah, sikbīnah.] (Med.) A fetid gum resin obtained from a species of Ferula. It has been used in hysteria, etc., but is now seldom met with. See also asafetida. U. S. Disp.
[1913 Webster]

Sagathy
Sag"a*thy (?), n. [F. sagatis: cf. Sp. sagatí, saetí.] A mixed woven fabric of silk and cotton, or silk and wool; sayette; also, a light woolen fabric.
[1913 Webster]

Sage
Sage (?), n. [OE. sauge, F. sauge, L. salvia, from salvus saved, in allusion to its reputed healing virtues. See Safe.] (Bot.) (a) A suffruticose labiate plant (Salvia officinalis) with grayish green foliage, much used in flavoring meats, etc. The name is often extended to the whole genus, of which many species are cultivated for ornament, as the scarlet sage, and Mexican red and blue sage. (b) The sagebrush.
[1913 Webster]

Meadow sage (Bot.), a blue-flowered species of Salvia (Salvia pratensis) growing in meadows in Europe. -- Sage cheese, cheese flavored with sage, and colored green by the juice of leaves of spinach and other plants which are added to the milk. -- Sage cock (Zool.), the male of the sage grouse; in a more general sense, the specific name of the sage grouse. -- Sage green, of a dull grayish green color, like the leaves of garden sage. -- Sage grouse (Zool.), a very large American grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), native of the dry sagebrush plains of Western North America. Called also cock of the plains. The male is called sage cock, and the female sage hen. -- Sage hare, or Sage rabbit (Zool.), a species of hare (Lepus Nuttalli syn. Lepus artemisia) which inhabits the arid regions of Western North America and lives among sagebrush. By recent writers it is considered to be merely a variety of the common cottontail, or wood rabbit. -- Sage hen (Zool.), the female of the sage grouse. -- Sage sparrow (Zool.), a small sparrow (Amphispiza Belli, var. Nevadensis) which inhabits the dry plains of the Rocky Mountain region, living among sagebrush. -- Sage thrasher (Zool.), a singing bird (Oroscoptes montanus) which inhabits the sagebrush plains of Western North America. -- Sage willow (Bot.), a species of willow (Salix tristis) forming a low bush with nearly sessile grayish green leaves.
[1913 Webster]

Sage
Sage (?), a. [Compar. Sager (?); superl. Sagest.] [F., fr. L. sapius (only in nesapius unwise, foolish), fr. sapere to be wise; perhaps akin to E. sap. Cf. Savor, Sapient, Insipid.] 1. Having nice discernment and powers of judging; prudent; grave; sagacious.
[1913 Webster]

All you sage counselors, hence! Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Proceeding from wisdom; well judged; shrewd; well adapted to the purpose.
[1913 Webster]

Commanders, who, cloaking their fear under show of sage advice, counseled the general to retreat. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. Grave; serious; solemn. [R.] “[Great bards] in sage and solemn tunes have sung.” Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Wise; sagacious; sapient; grave; prudent; judicious.
[1913 Webster]

Sage
Sage, n. A wise man; a man of gravity and wisdom; especially, a man venerable for years, and of sound judgment and prudence; a grave philosopher.
[1913 Webster]

At his birth a star,
Unseen before in heaven, proclaims him come,
And guides the Eastern sages.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Sagebrush
Sage"brush` (?), n. A low irregular shrub (Artemisia tridentata), of the order Compositae, covering vast tracts of the dry alkaline regions of the American plains; -- called also sagebush, and wild sage.
[1913 Webster]

Sagebrush State
Sagebrush State. Nevada; -- a nickname.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sagely
Sage"ly, adv. In a sage manner; wisely.
[1913 Webster]

Sagene
Sa*gene" (?), n. [Russ. sajene.] A Russian measure of length equal to about seven English feet.
[1913 Webster]

Sageness
Sage"ness (?), n. The quality or state of being sage; wisdom; sagacity; prudence; gravity. Ascham.
[1913 Webster]

Sagenite
Sag"e*nite (?), n. [F. sagénite, fr. L. sagena a large net. See Seine.] (Min.) Acicular rutile occurring in reticulated forms imbedded in quartz.
[1913 Webster]

Sagenitic
Sag`e*nit"ic (?), a. (Min.) Resembling sagenite; -- applied to quartz when containing acicular crystals of other minerals, most commonly rutile, also tourmaline, actinolite, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

Sagger
Sag"ger (?), n. [See Seggar.] 1. A pot or case of fire clay, in which fine stoneware is inclosed while baking in the kiln; a seggar.
[1913 Webster]

2. The clay of which such pots or cases are made.
[1913 Webster]

Sagging
Sag"ging (?), n. A bending or sinking between the ends of a thing, in consequence of its own, or an imposed, weight; an arching downward in the middle, as of a ship after straining. Cf. Hogging.
[1913 Webster]

Saginate
Sag"i*nate (?), v. t. [L. saginatus, p. p. of saginare to fat, fr. sagina stuffing.] To make fat; to pamper. [R.] “Many a saginated boar.” Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

Sagination
Sag`i*na"tion (?), n. [L. saginatio.] The act of fattening or pampering. [R.] Topsell.
[1913 Webster]

Sagitta
Sa*git"ta (?), n. [L., an arrow.] 1. (Astron.) A small constellation north of Aquila; the Arrow.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Arch.) The keystone of an arch. [R.] Gwilt.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Geom.) The distance from a point in a curve to the chord; also, the versed sine of an arc; -- so called from its resemblance to an arrow resting on the bow and string. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

4. (Anat.) The larger of the two otoliths, or ear bones, found in most fishes.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Zool.) A genus of transparent, free-swimming marine worms having lateral and caudal fins, and capable of swimming rapidly. It is the type of the class Chaetognatha.
[1913 Webster]

Sagittal
Sag"it*tal (?), a. [L. sagitta an arrow: cf. F. sagittal.] 1. Of or pertaining to an arrow; resembling an arrow; furnished with an arrowlike appendage.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Anat.) (a) Of or pertaining to the sagittal suture; in the region of the sagittal suture; rabdoidal; as, the sagittal furrow, or groove, on the inner surface of the roof of the skull. (b) In the mesial plane; mesial; as, a sagittal section of an animal.
[1913 Webster]

Sagittal suture (Anat.), the suture between the two parietal bones in the top of the skull; -- called also rabdoidal suture, and interparietal suture.
[1913 Webster]

Sagittarius
Sag`it*ta"ri*us (?), n. [L., literally, an archer, fr. sagittarius belonging to an arrow, fr. sagitta an arrow.] (Astron.) (a) The ninth of the twelve signs of the zodiac, which the sun enters about November 22, marked thus [&sagittarius_;] in almanacs; the Archer. (b) A zodiacal constellation, represented on maps and globes as a centaur shooting an arrow.
[1913 Webster]

Sagittary
Sag"it*ta"ry (?), n. [See Sagittarius.] 1. (Myth.) A centaur; a fabulous being, half man, half horse, armed with a bow and quiver. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. The Arsenal in Venice; -- so called from having a figure of an archer over the door. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sagittary
Sag"it*ta*ry, a. [L. sagittarius.] Pertaining to, or resembling, an arrow. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Sagittate
Sag"it*tate (?), a. [NL. sagittatus, fr. L. sagitta an arrow.] Shaped like an arrowhead; triangular, with the two basal angles prolonged downward.
[1913 Webster]

Sagittated
Sag"it*ta`ted (?), a. Sagittal; sagittate.
[1913 Webster]

Sagittocyst
Sag"it*to*cyst (?), n. [See Sagitta, and Cyst.] (Zool.) A defensive cell containing a minute rodlike structure which may be expelled. Such cells are found in certain Turbellaria.
[1913 Webster]

Sago
Sa"go (sā"g&ouptack_;), n. [Malay. sāgu.] A dry granulated starch imported from the East Indies, much used for making puddings and as an article of diet for the sick; also, as starch, for stiffening textile fabrics. It is prepared from the stems of several East Indian and Malayan palm trees, but chiefly from the Metroxylon Sagu; also from several cycadaceous plants (Cycas revoluta, Zamia integrifolia, etc.).
[1913 Webster]

Portland sago, a kind of sago prepared from the corms of the cuckoopint (Arum maculatum). -- Sago palm. (Bot.) (a) A palm tree which yields sago. (b) A species of Cycas (Cycas revoluta). -- Sago spleen (Med.), a morbid condition of the spleen, produced by amyloid degeneration of the organ, in which a cross section shows scattered gray translucent bodies looking like grains of sago.
[1913 Webster]

Sagoin
Sa*goin" (?), n. [F. sagouin(formed from the native South American name).] (Zool.) A marmoset; -- called also sagouin.
[1913 Webster]

Sagum
Sa"gum (?), n.; pl. Saga (#). [L. sagum, sagus; cf. Gr. &unr_;. Cf. Say a kind of serge.] (Rom. Antiq.) The military cloak of the Roman soldiers.
[1913 Webster]

Sagus
Sa"gus (?), n. [NL. See Sago.] (Bot.) A genus of palms from which sago is obtained.
[1913 Webster]

Sagy
Sa"gy (?), a. Full of sage; seasoned with sage.
[1913 Webster]

Saheb
Sahib
Sa"hib (?), ‖Sa"heb (&unr_;), n. [Ar. çāhib master, lord, fem. çāhibah.] A respectful title or appellation given to Europeans of rank. [India]
[1913 Webster]

Sahibah
Sa"hi*bah (?), n. [See Sahib.] A lady; mistress. [India]
[1913 Webster]

Sahidic
Sa*hid"ic (?), a. Same as Thebaic.
[1913 Webster]

Sahlite
Sah"lite (?), n. (Min.) See Salite.
[1913 Webster]

Sahui
Sa*hui" (?), n. (Zool.) A marmoset.
[1913 Webster]

Sai
Sa"i (?), n. [Cf. Pg. sahi.] (Zool.) See Capuchin, 3 (a).
[1913 Webster]

Saibling
Sai"bling (?), n. [Dial. G.] (Zool.) A European mountain trout (Salvelinus alpinus); -- called also Bavarian charr.
[1913 Webster]

Saic
Sa"ic (?), n. [F. saïque, Turk. shaïka.] (Naut.) A kind of ketch very common in the Levant, which has neither topgallant sail nor mizzen topsail.
[1913 Webster]

Said
Said (?), imp. & p. p. of Say.
[1913 Webster]

Said
Said, a. Before-mentioned; already spoken of or specified; aforesaid; -- used chiefly in legal style.
[1913 Webster]

Saiga
Sai"ga (?), n. [Russ. saika.] (Zool.) An antelope (Saiga Tartarica) native of the plains of Siberia and Eastern Russia. The male has erect annulated horns, and tufts of long hair beneath the eyes and ears.
[1913 Webster]

Saikyr
Sai"kyr (?), n. (Mil.) Same as Saker. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sail
Sail (?), n. [OE. seil, AS. segel, segl; akin to D. zeil, OHG. segal, G. & Sw. segel, Icel. segl, Dan. seil. √ 153.] 1. An extent of canvas or other fabric by means of which the wind is made serviceable as a power for propelling vessels through the water.
[1913 Webster]

Behoves him now both sail and oar. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Anything resembling a sail, or regarded as a sail.
[1913 Webster]

3. A wing; a van. [Poetic]
[1913 Webster]

Like an eagle soaring
To weather his broad sails.
Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

4. The extended surface of the arm of a windmill.
[1913 Webster]

5. A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; In this sense, the plural has usually the same form as the singular; as, twenty sail were in sight.
[1913 Webster]

6. A passage by a sailing vessel; a journey or excursion upon the water.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Sails are of two general kinds, fore-and-aft sails, and square sails. Square sails are always bent to yards, with their foot lying across the line of the vessel. Fore-and-aft sails are set upon stays or gaffs with their foot in line with the keel. A fore-and-aft sail is triangular, or quadrilateral with the after leech longer than the fore leech. Square sails are quadrilateral, but not necessarily square. See Phrases under Fore, a., and Square, a.; also, Bark, Brig, Schooner, Ship, Stay.
[1913 Webster]

Sail burton (Naut.), a purchase for hoisting sails aloft for bending. -- Sail fluke (Zool.), the whiff. -- Sail hook, a small hook used in making sails, to hold the seams square. -- Sail loft, a loft or room where sails are cut out and made. -- Sail room (Naut.), a room in a vessel where sails are stowed when not in use. -- Sail yard (Naut.), the yard or spar on which a sail is extended. -- Shoulder-of-mutton sail (Naut.), a triangular sail of peculiar form. It is chiefly used to set on a boat's mast. -- To crowd sail. (Naut.) See under Crowd. -- To loose sails (Naut.), to unfurl or spread sails. -- To make sail (Naut.), to extend an additional quantity of sail. -- To set a sail (Naut.), to extend or spread a sail to the wind. -- To set sail (Naut.), to unfurl or spread the sails; hence, to begin a voyage. -- To shorten sail (Naut.), to reduce the extent of sail, or take in a part. -- To strike sail (Naut.), to lower the sails suddenly, as in saluting, or in sudden gusts of wind; hence, to acknowledge inferiority; to abate pretension. -- Under sail, having the sails spread.
[1913 Webster]

Sail
Sail (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Sailed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sailing.] [AS. segelian, seglian. See Sail, n.] 1. To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by the action of steam or other power.
[1913 Webster]

2. To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a water fowl.
[1913 Webster]

3. To be conveyed in a vessel on water; to pass by water; as, they sailed from London to Canton.
[1913 Webster]

4. To set sail; to begin a voyage.
[1913 Webster]

5. To move smoothly through the air; to glide through the air without apparent exertion, as a bird.
[1913 Webster]

As is a winged messenger of heaven, . . .
When he bestrides the lazy pacing clouds,
And sails upon the bosom of the air.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sail
Sail, v. t. 1. To pass or move upon, as in a ship, by means of sails; hence, to move or journey upon (the water) by means of steam or other force.
[1913 Webster]

A thousand ships were manned to sail the sea. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. To fly through; to glide or move smoothly through.
[1913 Webster]

Sublime she sails
The aerial space, and mounts the wingèd gales.
Pope.
[1913 Webster]

3. To direct or manage the motion of, as a vessel; as, to sail one's own ship. Totten.
[1913 Webster]

Sailable
Sail"a*ble (?), a. Capable of being sailed over; navigable; as, a sailable river.
[1913 Webster]

Sailboat
Sail"boat`, n. A boat propelled by a sail or sails.
[1913 Webster]

Sailcloth
Sail"cloth` (?), n. Duck or canvas used in making sails.
[1913 Webster]

Sailer
Sail"er (?), n. 1. A sailor. [R.] Sir P. Sidney.
[1913 Webster]

2. A ship or other vessel; -- with qualifying words descriptive of speed or manner of sailing; as, a heavy sailer; a fast sailer.
[1913 Webster]

Sailfish
Sail"fish (?), n. (Zool.) (a) The banner fish, or spikefish (Histiophorus.) (b) The basking, or liver, shark. (c) The quillback.
[1913 Webster]

Sailing
Sail"ing (?), n. 1. The act of one who, or that which, sails; the motion of a vessel on water, impelled by wind or steam; the act of starting on a voyage.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Naut.) The art of managing a vessel; seamanship; navigation; as, globular sailing; oblique sailing.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; For the several methods of sailing, see under Circular, Globular, Oblique, Parallel, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Sailing master (U. S. Navy), formerly, a warrant officer, ranking next below a lieutenant, whose duties were to navigate the vessel; and under the direction of the executive officer, to attend to the stowage of the hold, to the cables, rigging, etc. The grade was merged in that of master in 1862.
[1913 Webster]

Sailless
Sail"less (?), a. Destitute of sails. Pollok.
[1913 Webster]

Sailmaker
Sail"mak`er (?), n. One whose occupation is to make or repair sails. -- Sail"mak`ing, n.
[1913 Webster]

Sailor
Sail"or (?), n. One who follows the business of navigating ships or other vessels; one who understands the practical management of ships; one of the crew of a vessel; a mariner; a common seaman.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Mariner; seaman; seafarer.
[1913 Webster]

Sailor's choice. (Zool.) (a) An excellent marine food fish (Diplodus rhomboides, syn. Lagodon rhomboides) of the Southern United States; -- called also porgy, squirrel fish, yellowtail, and salt-water bream. (b) A species of grunt (Orthopristis chrysopterus syn. Pomadasys chrysopterus), an excellent food fish common on the southern coasts of the United States; -- called also hogfish, and pigfish.
[1913 Webster]

Saily
Sail"y (?), a. Like a sail. [R.] Drayton.
[1913 Webster]

Saim
Saim (?), n. [OF. sain, LL. saginum, fr. L. sagina a fattening.] Lard; grease. [Scot. & Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Saimir
Sai*mir" (?), n. (Zool.) The squirrel monkey.
[1913 Webster]

Sain
Sain (?), obs. p. p. of Say, for sayen. Said. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sain
Sain, v. t. [Cf. Saint, Sane.] To sanctify; to bless so as to protect from evil influence. [R.] Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Sainfoin
Sain"foin (?; 277), n. [F., fr. sain wholesome (L. sanus; see Sane.) + foin hay (L. faenum); or perh. fr. saint sacred (L. sanctus; see Saint) + foin hay.] (Bot.) (a) A leguminous plant (Onobrychis sativa) cultivated for fodder. [Written also saintfoin.] (b) A kind of tick trefoil (Desmodium Canadense). [Canada]
[1913 Webster]

Saint
Saint (sānt), n. [F., fr. L. sanctus sacred, properly p. p. of sancire to render sacred by a religious act, to appoint as sacred; akin to sacer sacred. Cf. Sacred, Sanctity, Sanctum, Sanctus.] 1. A person sanctified; a holy or godly person; one eminent for piety and virtue; any true Christian, as being redeemed and consecrated to God.
[1913 Webster]

Them that are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints. 1 Cor. i. 2.
[1913 Webster]

2. One of the blessed in heaven.
[1913 Webster]

Then shall thy saints, unmixed, and from the impure
Far separate, circling thy holy mount,
Unfeigned hallelujahs to thee sing.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Eccl.) One canonized by the church. [Abbrev. St.]
[1913 Webster]

Saint Andrew's cross. (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust. 4, under Cross. (b) (Bot.) A low North American shrub (Ascyrum Crux-Andreae, the petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's cross. Gray. -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust. 6, under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly so called because it was supposed to have been cured by the intercession of Saint Anthony. -- Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the groundnut (Bunium flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it, and St. Anthony was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's turnip (Bot.), the bulbous crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Barnaby's thistle (Bot.), a kind of knapweed (Centaurea solstitialis) flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Bernard (Zool.), a breed of large, handsome dogs celebrated for strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at the Hospice of St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe and America. There are two races, the smooth-haired and the rough-haired. See Illust. under Dog. -- Saint Catharine's flower (Bot.), the plant love-in-a-mist. See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's heath (Bot.), a heatherlike plant (Daboecia polifolia), named from an Irish saint. -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint Elmo's fire, a luminous, flamelike appearance, sometimes seen in dark, tempestuous nights, at some prominent point on a ship, particularly at the masthead and the yardarms. It has also been observed on land, and is due to the discharge of electricity from elevated or pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a Corposant; a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or a double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a field argent, the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign, a red cross on a white field with a union jack in the upper corner next the mast. It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint George's flag, a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the union jack; used as the sign of the presence and command of an admiral. [Eng.] Brande & C. -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine variety of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St. Gobain in France, where it was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed of a tree of the Philippines (Strychnos Ignatia), of properties similar to the nux vomica. -- Saint James's shell (Zool.), a pecten (Vola Jacobaeus) worn by pilgrims to the Holy Land. See Illust. under Scallop. -- Saint James's-wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio Jacobaea). -- Saint John's bread. (Bot.) See Carob. -- Saint John's-wort (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger, the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September at Doncaster, England; -- instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. -- Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant (Sauvagesia erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine. -- Saint Martin's summer, a season of mild, damp weather frequently prevailing during late autumn in England and the Mediterranean countries; -- so called from St. Martin's Festival, occurring on November 11. It corresponds to the Indian summer in America. Shak. Whittier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust. 4, under Cross. -- Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the death (about 466) of St. Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of Ireland. -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zool.) See John Dory, under John. -- Saint Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum Ascyron, Hypericum quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath (Bot.), a shrubby kind of Spiraea (Spiraea hypericifolia), having long slender branches covered with clusters of small white blossoms in spring. -- Saint's bell. See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint Vitus's dance (Med.), chorea; -- so called from the supposed cures wrought on intercession to this saint.
[1913 Webster]

Saint
Saint (sānt), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sainted; p. pr. & vb. n. Sainting.] To make a saint of; to enroll among the saints by an offical act, as of the pope; to canonize; to give the title or reputation of a saint to (some one).
[1913 Webster]

A large hospital, erected by a shoemaker who has been beatified, though never sainted. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

To saint it, to act as a saint, or with a show of piety.
[1913 Webster] Whether the charmer sinner it or saint it. Pope.

[1913 Webster]

Saint
Saint, v. i. To act or live as a saint. [R.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Saintdom
Saint"dom (-dŭm), n. The state or character of a saint. [R.] Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Sainted
Saint"ed, a. 1. Consecrated; sacred; holy; pious. “A most sainted king.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Amongst the enthroned gods on sainted seats. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Entered into heaven; -- a euphemism for dead.
[1913 Webster]

Saintess
Saint"ess, n. A female saint. [R.] Bp. Fisher.
[1913 Webster]

Sainthood
Saint"hood (?), n. 1. The state of being a saint; the condition of a saint. Walpole.
[1913 Webster]

2. The order, or united body, of saints; saints, considered collectively.
[1913 Webster]

It was supposed he felt no call to any expedition that might endanger the reign of the military sainthood. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Saintish
Saint"ish, a. Somewhat saintlike; -- used ironically.
[1913 Webster]

Saintism
Saint"ism (?), n. The character or quality of saints; also, hypocritical pretense of holiness. Wood.
[1913 Webster]

Saintlike
Saint"like` (?), a. Resembling a saint; suiting a saint; becoming a saint; saintly.
[1913 Webster]

Glossed over only with a saintlike show. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Saintliness
Saint"li*ness (?), n. Quality of being saintly.
[1913 Webster]

Saintly
Saint"ly, a. [Compar. Saintlier (?); superl. Saintliest.] Like a saint; becoming a holy person.
[1913 Webster]

So dear to Heaven is saintly chastity. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

St. Nicholas
Saint Nicholas
Saint Nicholas, St. Nicholas (?), n. A Dutch saint, who was reputed to bring gifts to children on Christmas even, giving rise to the modern legend of Santa Claus.
[PJC]

A Visit from St. Nicholas The original name for a poem by Clement Clarke Moore, popularly called titled The Night Before Christmans. It is a popular poem with the theme of St. Nicholas (Santa Claus) coming to bring gifts to children on Christmans eve. See Night Before Christmas in the vocabulary.
[PJC]

Saintologist
Saint*ol"o*gist (?), n. [Saint + -logy + -ist.] (Theol.) One who writes the lives of saints. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Saintship
Saint"ship, n. The character or qualities of a saint.
[1913 Webster]

Saint-Simonian
Saint`-Si*mo"ni*an (?), n. A follower of the Count de St. Simon, who died in 1825, and who maintained that the principle of property held in common, and the just division of the fruits of common labor among the members of society, are the true remedy for the social evils which exist. Brande & C.
[1913 Webster]

Saint-Simonianism
Saint`-Si*mo"ni*an*ism (?), n. The principles, doctrines, or practice of the Saint-Simonians; -- called also Saint- Simonism.
[1913 Webster]

Saint-Simonism
Saint-Si"mon*ism (?), n. A system of socialism in which the state owns all the property and the laborer is entitled to share according to the quality and amount of his work, founded by Saint Simon (1760-1825); -- called also Saint- Simonianism.
[Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

Saith
Saith (?), 3d pers. sing. pres. of Say. [Archaic]
[1913 Webster]

Saithe
Saithe (?), n. [Gael. saoidheam.] (Zool.) The pollock, or coalfish; -- called also sillock. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Saiva
Sai"va (? or ?), n. [Skr. çaiva devoted to Siva.] One of an important religious sect in India which regards Siva with peculiar veneration.
[1913 Webster]

Saivism
Sai"vism (?), n. The worship of Siva.
[1913 Webster]

Sajene
Sa*jene" (?), n. Same as Sagene.
[1913 Webster]

Sajou
Sa"jou (?; F. &unr_;), n. (Zool.) Same as Sapajou.
[1913 Webster]

Sake
Sake (sāk), n. [OE. sake cause, also, lawsuit, fault, AS. sacu strife, a cause or suit at law; akin to D. zaak cause, thing, affair, G. sache thing, cause in law, OHG. sahha, Icel. sök, Sw. sak, Dan. sag, Goth. sakjō strife, AS. sacan to contend, strive, Goth. sakam, Icel. saka to contend, strive, blame, OHG. sahhan, MHG. sachen, to contend, strive, defend one's right, accuse, charge in a lawsuit, and also to E. seek. Cf. Seek.] Final cause; end; purpose of obtaining; cause; motive; reason; interest; concern; account; regard or respect; -- used chiefly in such phrases as, for the sake of, for his sake, for man's sake, for mercy's sake, and the like; as, to commit crime for the sake of gain; to go abroad for the sake of one's health.
[1913 Webster]

Moved with wrath and shame and ladies' sake. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

I will not again curse the ground any more for man's sake. Gen. viii. 21.
[1913 Webster]

Will he draw out,
For anger's sake, finite to infinite?
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Knowledge is for the sake of man, and not man for the sake of knowledge. Sir W. Hamilton.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The -s of the possessive case preceding sake is sometimes omitted for euphony; as, for goodness sake. “For conscience sake.” 1 Cor. x. 28. The plural sakes is often used with a possessive plural. “For both our sakes.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sake
Sa"ke (sä"k&euptack_;), n. a traditional alcoholic drink of Japan. It is made from rice. [Also spelled saki.]
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Saker
Sa"ker (sā"k&etilde_;r), n. [F. sacre (cf. It. sagro, Sp. & Pg. sacre), either fr. L. sacer sacred, holy, as a translation of Gr. "ie`rax falcon, from "iero`s holy, or more probably from Ar. çaqr hawk.] [Written also sacar, sacre.] 1. (Zool.) (a) A falcon (Falco sacer) native of Southern Europe and Asia, closely resembling the lanner.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The female is called chargh, and the male charghela, or sakeret.
[1913 Webster]

(b) The peregrine falcon. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

2. (Mil.) A small piece of artillery. Wilhelm.
[1913 Webster]

On the bastions were planted culverins and sakers. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

The culverins and sakers showing their deadly muzzles over the rampart. Hawthorne.
[1913 Webster]

Sakeret
Sa"ker*et (sā"k&etilde_;r*&ebreve_;t), n. [F. sacret. See Saker.] (Zool.) The male of the saker (a).
[1913 Webster]

Saki
Sa"ki (sā"k&ibreve_;), n. [Cf. F. & Pg. saki; probably from the native name.] (Zool.) Any one of several species of South American monkeys of the genus Pithecia. They have large ears, and a long hairy tail which is not prehensile.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The black saki (Pithecia satanas), the white-headed (Pithecia leucocephala), and the red-backed, or hand-drinking, saki (Pithecia chiropotes), are among the best-known.
[1913 Webster]

Saki
Sa"ki (sä"k&euptack_;), n. The alcoholic drink of Japan. It is made from rice; it is usually spelled sake.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Sakiyeh
Sakieh
{ Sak"i*eh (?), Sak"i*yeh (?), } n.} [Ar. sāqīah canal, trench.] A kind of water wheel used in Egypt for raising water, from wells or pits, in buckets attached to its periphery or to an endless rope.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sakti
Sak"ti (?), n. [Skr.] (Hind. Myth.) The divine energy, personified as the wife of a deity (Brahma, Vishnu, Siva, etc.); the female principle.
[1913 Webster]

Sal
Sal (s&asuml_;l), n. [Hind. sāl, Skr. çāla.] (Bot.) An East Indian timber tree (Shorea robusta), much used for building purposes. It is of a light brown color, close-grained, heavy, and durable. [Written also saul.]
[1913 Webster]

Sal
Sal (săl), n. [L. See Salt.] (Chem. & Pharm.) Salt.
[1913 Webster]

Sal absinthii [NL.] (Old Chem.), an impure potassium carbonate obtained from the ashes of wormwood (Artemisia Absinthium). -- Sal acetosellae [NL.] (Old Chem.), salt of sorrel. -- Sal alembroth. (Old Chem.) See Alembroth. -- Sal ammoniac (Chem.), ammonium chloride, NH4Cl, a white crystalline volatile substance having a sharp salty taste, obtained from gas works, from nitrogenous matter, etc. It is largely employed as a source of ammonia, as a reagent, and as an expectorant in bronchitis. So called because originally made from the soot from camel's dung at the temple of Jupiter Ammon in Africa. Called also muriate of ammonia. -- Sal catharticus [NL.] (Old Med. Chem.), Epsom salts. -- Sal culinarius [L.] (Old Chem.), common salt, or sodium chloride. -- Sal Cyrenaicus. [NL.] (Old Chem.) See Sal ammoniac above. -- Sal de duobus, Sal duplicatum [NL.] (Old Chem.), potassium sulphate; -- so called because erroneously supposed to be composed of two salts, one acid and one alkaline. -- Sal diureticus [NL.] (Old Med. Chem.), potassium acetate. -- Sal enixum [NL.] (Old Chem.), acid potassium sulphate. -- Sal gemmae [NL.] (Old Min.), common salt occuring native. -- Sal Jovis [NL.] (Old Chem.), salt tin, or stannic chloride; -- the alchemical name of tin being Jove. -- Sal Martis [NL.] (Old Chem.), green vitriol, or ferrous sulphate; -- the alchemical name of iron being Mars. -- Sal microcosmicum [NL.] (Old Chem.) See Microcosmic salt, under Microcosmic. -- Sal plumbi [NL.] (Old Chem.), sugar of lead. -- Sal prunella. (Old Chem.) See Prunella salt, under 1st Prunella. -- Sal Saturni [NL.] (Old Chem.), sugar of lead, or lead acetate; -- the alchemical name of lead being Saturn. -- Sal sedativus [NL.] (Old Chem.), sedative salt, or boric acid. -- Sal Seignette [F. seignette, sel de seignette] (Chem.), Rochelle salt. -- Sal soda (Chem.), sodium carbonate. See under Sodium. -- Sal vitrioli [NL.] (Old Chem.), white vitriol; zinc sulphate. -- Sal volatile. [NL.] (a) (Chem.) See Sal ammoniac, above. (b) Spirits of ammonia.
[1913 Webster]

Salaam
Sa*laam" (s&adot_;*läm"), n. Same as Salam.
[1913 Webster]

Finally, Josiah might have made his salaam to the exciseman just as he was folding up that letter. Prof. Wilson.
[1913 Webster]

Salaam
Sa*laam", v. i. To make or perform a salam.
[1913 Webster]

I have salaamed and kowtowed to him. H. James.
[1913 Webster]

Salability
Sal`a*bil"i*ty (?), n. The quality or condition of being salable; salableness. Duke of Argyll.
[1913 Webster]

Salable
Sal"a*ble (?), a. [From Sale.] Capable of being sold; fit to be sold; finding a ready market. -- Sal"a*ble*ness, n. -- Sal"a*bly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

Salacious
Sa*la"cious (?), n. [L. salax, -acis, fond of leaping, lustful, fr. salire to leap. See Salient.] Having a propensity to venery; lustful; lecherous. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

-- Sa*la"cious*ly, adv. -- Sa*la"cious*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Salacity
Sa*lac"i*ty (?), n. [L. salacitas: cf. F. salacité] Strong propensity to venery; lust; lecherousness.
[1913 Webster]

Salad
Sal"ad (săl"&aitalic_;d), n. [F. salade, OIt. salata, It. insalata, fr. salare to salt, fr. L. sal salt. See Salt, and cf. Slaw.] 1. A preparation of vegetables, as lettuce, celery, water cress, onions, etc., usually dressed with salt, vinegar, oil, and spice, and eaten for giving a relish to other food; as, lettuce salad; tomato salad, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Leaves eaten raw are termed salad. I. Watts.
[1913 Webster]

2. A dish composed of chopped meat or fish, esp. chicken or lobster, mixed with lettuce or other vegetables, and seasoned with oil, vinegar, mustard, and other condiments; as, chicken salad; lobster salad.
[1913 Webster]

Salad burnet (Bot.), the common burnet (Poterium Sanguisorba), sometimes eaten as a salad in Italy.
[1913 Webster]

Salad days
Sal"ad days` (?), n. pl. a period when a person is young and inexperienced.
[1913 Webster]

Salade
Sal"ade (?), n. A helmet. See Sallet.
[1913 Webster]

Salading
Sal"ad*ing (?), n. Vegetables for salad.
[1913 Webster]

Salaeratus
Sal`ae*ra"tus (?), n. See Saleratus.
[1913 Webster]

Salagane
Sal"a*gane (?), n. [From the Chinese name.] (Zool.) The esculent swallow. See under Esculent.
[1913 Webster]

Salal-berry
Sal"al-ber`ry (?), n. [Probably of American Indian origin.] (Bot.) The edible fruit of the Gaultheria Shallon, an ericaceous shrub found from California northwards. The berries are about the size of a common grape and of a dark purple color.
[1913 Webster]

Salam
Sa*lam (s&adot_;*läm"), n. [Ar. salām peace, safety.] A salutation or compliment of ceremony in the east by word or act; an obeisance, performed by bowing very low and placing the right palm on the forehead. [Written also salaam.]
[1913 Webster]

Salamander
Sal"a*man`der (?), n. [F. salamandre, L. salamandra, Gr. &unr_;; cf. Per. samander, samandel.] 1. (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of Urodela, belonging to Salamandra, Amblystoma, Plethodon, and various allied genera, especially those that are more or less terrestrial in their habits.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The salamanders have, like lizards, an elongated body, four feet, and a long tail, but are destitute of scales. They are true Amphibia, related to the frogs. Formerly, it was a superstition that the salamander could live in fire without harm, and even extinguish it by the natural coldness of its body.
[1913 Webster]

I have maintained that salamander of yours with fire any time this two and thirty years. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Whereas it is commonly said that a salamander extinguisheth fire, we have found by experience that on hot coals, it dieth immediately. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) The pouched gopher (Geomys tuza) of the Southern United States.
[1913 Webster]

3. A culinary utensil of metal with a plate or disk which is heated, and held over pastry, etc., to brown it.
[1913 Webster]

4. A large poker. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Metal.) Solidified material in a furnace hearth.
[1913 Webster]

Giant salamander. (Zool.) See under Giant. -- Salamander's hair or Salamander's wool (Min.), a species of asbestos or mineral flax. [Obs.] Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Salamandrina
Sal`a*man*dri"na (?), n.; pl. [NL.] (Zool.) A suborder of Urodela, comprising salamanders.
[1913 Webster]

Salamandrine
Sal`a*man"drine (?), a. Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a salamander; enduring fire. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

Salamandroid
Sal`a*man"droid (?), a. [Salamander + -oid.] (Zool.) Like or pertaining to the salamanders.
[1913 Webster]

Salamandroidea
Sal`a*man*droi"de*a (?), n. pl. [NL.] (Zool.) A division of Amphibia including the Salamanders and allied groups; the Urodela.
[1913 Webster]

Salamstone
Sal"am*stone` (? or ?), n. (Min.) A kind of blue sapphire brought from Ceylon. Dana.
[1913 Webster]

Salangana
Sa*lan"ga*na (?), n. The salagane.
[1913 Webster]

Salaried
Sal"a*ried (?), a. Receiving a salary; paid by a salary; having a salary attached; as, a salaried officer; a salaried office.
[1913 Webster]

Salary
Sal"a*ry (?), a. [L. salarius.] Saline [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Salary
Sal"a*ry (?), n.; pl. Salaries (#). [F. salaire, L. salarium, originally, salt money, the money given to the Roman soldiers for salt, which was a part of their pay, fr. salarius belonging to salt, fr. sal salt. See Salt.] The recompense or consideration paid, or stipulated to be paid, to a person at regular intervals for services; fixed wages, as by the year, quarter, or month; stipend; hire.
[1913 Webster]

This is hire and salary, not revenge. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Recompense for services paid at, or reckoned by, short intervals, as a day or week, is usually called wages.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Stipend; pay; wages; hire; allowance.
[1913 Webster]

Salary
Sal"a*ry v. t. [imp. & p. p. Salaried (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Salarying (?).] To pay, or agree to pay, a salary to; to attach salary to; as, to salary a clerk; to salary a position.
[1913 Webster]

Sale
Sale (?), n. See 1st Sallow. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Sale
Sale, n. [Icel. sala, sal, akin to E. sell. See Sell, v. t.] 1. The act of selling; the transfer of property, or a contract to transfer the ownership of property, from one person to another for a valuable consideration, or for a price in money.
[1913 Webster]

2. Opportunity of selling; demand; market.
[1913 Webster]

They shall have ready sale for them. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

3. Public disposal to the highest bidder, or exposure of goods in market; auction. Sir W. Temple.
[1913 Webster]

Bill of sale. See under Bill. -- Of sale, On sale, For sale, to be bought or sold; offered to purchasers; in the market. -- To set to sale, to offer for sale; to put up for purchase; to make merchandise of. [Obs.] Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Saleably
Saleable
Sale"a*ble (?), a., Sale"a*bly, adv., etc. See Salable, Salably, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Saleb
Sal"eb (?), n. (Med.) See Salep.
[1913 Webster]

Salebrosity
Sal`e*bros"i*ty (?), n. Roughness or ruggedness. [Obs.] Feltham.
[1913 Webster]

Salebrous
Sal"e*brous (?), a. [L. salebrosus, fr. salebra a rugged road, fr. salire to leap.] Rough; rugged. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Salep
Sal"ep (săl"&ebreve_;p), n. [Ar. sahleb, perhaps a corruption of an Arabic word for fox, one Ar. name of the orchis signifying literally, fox's testicles: cf. F. salep.] [Written also saleb, salop, and saloop.] The dried tubers of various species of Orchis, and Eulophia. It is used to make a nutritious beverage by treating the powdered preparation with hot water. U. S. Disp.
[1913 Webster]

Saleratus
Sal`e*ra"tus (?), n. [NL. sal aëratus; -- so called because it is a source of fixed air (carbon dioxide). See Sal, and and Aerated.] (Old Chem.) Aerated salt; a white crystalline substance having an alkaline taste and reaction, consisting of sodium bicarbonate (see under Sodium.) It is largely used in cooking, with sour milk (lactic acid) or cream of tartar as a substitute for yeast. It is also an ingredient of most baking powders, and is used in the preparation of effervescing drinks.
[1913 Webster]

Salesman
Sales"man (sālz"m&aitalic_;n), n.; pl. Salesmen (-m&eitalic_;n). [Sale + man.] One who sells anything; one whose occupation is to sell goods or merchandise.
[1913 Webster]

Sales tax
Sales" tax (sālz"tăks), n. [Sales + tax.] a tax imposed upon the retail sale of goods or the sale of services, usually collected by the seller at the time of purchase; -- it is typically calculated as a percentage of the price of the object sold, being commonly from 3% to 7% of the base price.
[PJC]

Saleswoman
Sales"wom`an (?), n.; pl. Saleswomen (&unr_;). A woman whose occupation is to sell goods or merchandise.
[1913 Webster]

Salework
Sale"work` (?), n. Work or things made for sale; hence, work done carelessly or slightingly. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Salian
Sa"lian (?), a. Denoting a tribe of Franks who established themselves early in the fourth century on the river Sala [now Yssel]; Salic. -- n. A Salian Frank.
[1913 Webster]

Saliant
Sa"li*ant (?), a. (Her.) Same as Salient.
[1913 Webster]

Saliaunce
Sal"i*aunce (?), a. [See Sally.] Salience; onslaught. [Obs.] “So fierce saliaunce.” Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Salic
Sal"ic (săl"&ibreve_;k), a. [F. salique, fr. the Salian Franks, who, in the fifth century, formed a body of laws called in Latin leges Salicae.] Of or pertaining to the Salian Franks, or to the Salic law so called. [Also salique.]
[1913 Webster]

Salic law. (a) A code of laws formed by the Salian Franks in the fifth century. By one provision of this code women were excluded from the inheritance of landed property. (b) Specifically, in modern times, a law supposed to be a special application of the above-mentioned provision, in accordance with which males alone can inherit the throne. This law has obtained in France, and at times in other countries of Europe, as Spain.
[1913 Webster]

Salicaceous
Sal`i*ca"ceous (săl`&ibreve_;*kā"shŭs), a. [L. salix, -icis, the willow.] Belonging or relating to the willow.
[1913 Webster]

Salicin
Sal"i*cin (?), n. [L. salix, -icis, a willow: cf. F. salicine. See Sallow the tree.] (Chem.) A glucoside found in the bark and leaves of several species of willow (Salix) and poplar, and extracted as a bitter white crystalline substance.
[1913 Webster]

Salicyl
Sal"i*cyl (?), n. [Salicin + -yl.] (Chem.) The hypothetical radical of salicylic acid and of certain related compounds.
[1913 Webster]

Salicylal
Sal"i*cyl`al (?), n. [Salicylic + aldehide.] (Chem.) A thin, fragrant, colorless oil, HO.C6H4.CHO, found in the flowers of meadow sweet (Spiraea), and also obtained by oxidation of salicin, saligenin, etc. It reddens on exposure. Called also salicylol, salicylic aldehyde, and formerly salicylous acid or spiroylous acid.
[1913 Webster]

Salicylate
Sal"i*cyl`ate (-&auptack_;t), n. (Chem.) A salt of salicylic acid.
[1913 Webster]

Salicylic
Sal`i*cyl"ic (?), a. (Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or designating, an acid formerly obtained by fusing salicin with potassium hydroxide, and now made in large quantities from phenol (carbolic acid) by the action of carbon dioxide on heated sodium phenolate. It is a white crystalline substance. It is used as an antiseptic, and in its salts in the treatment of rheumatism. Called also hydroxybenzoic acid.
[1913 Webster]

Salicylide
Sal"i*cyl`ide (?), n. [Salicylic + anhydride.] (Chem.) A white crystalline substance obtained by dehydration of salicylic acid.
[1913 Webster]

Salicylite
Sal"i*cyl`ite (?), n. (Chem.) A compound of salicylal; -- named after the analogy of a salt.
[1913 Webster]

Salicylol
Sal"i*cyl`ol (?), n. [Salicylic + L. oleum oil.] (Chem.) Same as Salicylal.
[1913 Webster]

Salicylous
Sa*lic"y*lous (? or ?), a. (Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, a substance formerly called salicylous acid, and now salicylal. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Salience
Sa"li*ence (?), n. [See Salient.] 1. The quality or condition of being salient; a leaping; a springing forward; an assaulting.
[1913 Webster]

2. The quality or state of projecting, or being projected; projection; protrusion. Sir W. Hamilton.
[1913 Webster]

Saliency
Sa"li*en*cy (?), n. Quality of being salient; hence, vigor. “A fatal lack of poetic saliency.” J. Morley.
[1913 Webster]

Salient
Sa"li*ent (?), a. [L. saliens, -entis, p. pr. of salire to leap; cf. F. saillant. See Sally, n. & v. i..] 1. Moving by leaps or springs; leaping; bounding; jumping. “Frogs and salient animals.” Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

2. Shooting out or up; springing; projecting.
[1913 Webster]

He had in himself a salient, living spring of generous and manly action. Burke.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hence, figuratively, forcing itself on the attention; prominent; conspicuous; noticeable.
[1913 Webster]

He [Grenville] had neither salient traits, nor general comprehensiveness of mind. Bancroft.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Math. & Fort.) Projecting outwardly; as, a salient angle; -- opposed to reentering. See Illust. of Bastion.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Her.) Represented in a leaping position; as, a lion salient.
[1913 Webster]

Salient angle. See Salient, a., 4. -- Salient polygon (Geom.), a polygon all of whose angles are salient. -- Salient polyhedron (Geom.), a polyhedron all of whose solid angles are salient.
[1913 Webster]

Salient
Sa"li*ent, a. (Fort.) A salient angle or part; a projection.
[1913 Webster]

Saliently
Sa"li*ent*ly, adv. In a salient manner.
[1913 Webster]

Saliferous
Sa*lif"er*ous (?), a. [L. sal salt + -ferous.] Producing, or impregnated with, salt.
[1913 Webster]

Saliferous rocks (Geol.), the New Red Sandstone system of some geologists; -- so called because, in Europe, this formation contains beds of salt. The saliferous beds of New York State belong largely to the Salina period of the Upper Silurian. See the Chart of Geology.
[1913 Webster]

Salifiable
Sal"i*fi`a*ble (?), a. [Cf. F. salifiable. See Salify.] (Chem.) Capable of neutralizing an acid to form a salt; -- said of bases; thus, ammonia is salifiable.
[1913 Webster]

Salification
Sal`i*fi*ca"tion (?), n. [Cf. F. salification.] (Chem.) The act, process, or result of salifying; the state of being salified.
[1913 Webster]

Salify
Sal"i*fy (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Salified (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Salifying (?).] [F. salifier; from L. sal salt + -ficare (only in comp.) to make. See -fy.] (Chem.) (a) To combine or impregnate with a salt. (b) To form a salt with; to convert into a salt; as, to salify a base or an acid.
[1913 Webster]

Saligenin
Sa*lig"e*nin (?), n. [Salicin + -gen.] (Chem.) A phenol alcohol obtained, by the decomposition of salicin, as a white crystalline substance; -- called also hydroxy-benzyl alcohol.
[1913 Webster]

Saligot
Sal"i*got (?), n. [F.] (Bot.) The water chestnut (Trapa natans).
[1913 Webster]

Salimeter
Sal*im"e*ter (?), n. [L. sal salt + -meter.] An instrument for measuring the amount of salt present in any given solution. [Written also salometer.]
[1913 Webster]

Salimetry
Sal*im"e*try (?), n. The art or process of measuring the amount of salt in a substance.
[1913 Webster]

Salina
Sa*li"na (?), n. [Cf. L. salinae, pl., salt works, from sal salt. See Saline, a.] 1. A salt marsh, or salt pond, inclosed from the sea.
[1913 Webster]

2. Salt works.
[1913 Webster]

Salina period
Sa*li"na pe"ri*od (?). [So called from Salina, a town in New York.] (Geol.) The period in which the American Upper Silurian system, containing the brine-producing rocks of central New York, was formed. See the Chart of Geology.
[1913 Webster]

Salination
Sal`i*na"tion (?), n. The act of washing with salt water. [R. & Obs.] Greenhill.
[1913 Webster]

Saline
Sa"line (? or ?; 277), a. [F. salin, fr. L. sal salt: cf. L. salinae salt works, salinum saltcellar. See Salt.] 1. Consisting of salt, or containing salt; as, saline particles; saline substances; a saline cathartic.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of the quality of salt; salty; as, a saline taste.
[1913 Webster]

Saline
Sa"line (? or ?; 277), n. [Cf. F. saline. See Saline, a.] A salt spring; a place where salt water is collected in the earth.
[1913 Webster]

Saline
Sal"ine (?), n. 1. (Chem.) A crude potash obtained from beet-root residues and other similar sources. [Written also salin.]
[1913 Webster]

2. (Med. Chem.) A metallic salt; esp., a salt of potassium, sodium, lithium, or magnesium, used in medicine.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Salineness
Sa*line"ness (?), n. The quality or state of being salt; saltness.
[1913 Webster]

Saliniferous
Sal`i*nif"er*ous (?), a. [Saline + -ferous.] Same as Saliferous.
[1913 Webster]

Saliniform
Sa*lin"i*form (?), a. Having the form or the qualities of a salt, especially of common salt.
[1913 Webster]

Salinity
Sa*lin"i*ty (?), n. Salineness. Carpenter.
[1913 Webster]

Salinometer
Sal`i*nom"e*ter (?), n. [Saline + -meter.] A salimeter.
[1913 Webster]

Salinous
Sa*lin"ous (?), a. Saline. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Salique
Sal"ique (? or ?), a. [F.] Salic. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

She fulmined out her scorn of laws salique. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Saliretin
Sal`i*re"tin (?), n. [Saligenin + Gr. &unr_; resin.] (Chem.) A yellow amorphous resinoid substance obtained by the action of dilute acids on saligenin.
[1913 Webster]

Salisburia
Sal`is*bu"ri*a (?), n. [Named after R. A. Salisbury, an English botanist.] (Bot.) The ginkgo tree (Ginkgo biloba, or Salisburia adiantifolia).
[1913 Webster]

Salite
Sal"ite (?), v. t. [L. salitus, p. p. of salire to salt, fr. sal salt.] To season with salt; to salt. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Salite
Sa"lite (?), n. [So called from Sala, a town in Sweden.] (Min.) A massive lamellar variety of pyroxene, of a dingy green color. [Written also sahlite.]
[1913 Webster]

Saliva
Sa*li"va (?), n. [L.; cf. Gr. &unr_;.] (Physiol.) The secretion from the salivary glands.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; In man the saliva is a more or less turbid and slighty viscid fluid, generally of an alkaline reaction, and is secreted by the parotid, submaxillary, and sublingual glands. In the mouth the saliva is mixed with the secretion from the buccal glands. The secretions from the individual salivary glands have their own special characteristics, and these are not the same in all animals. In man and many animals mixed saliva, i.e., saliva composed of the secretions of all three of the salivary glands, is an important digestive fluid on account of the presence of the peculiar enzyme, ptyalin.
[1913 Webster]

Salival
Sa*li"val (?; 277), a. Salivary.
[1913 Webster]

Salivant
Sal"i*vant (?), a. [L. salivans, p. pr. of salivare. See Salivate.] Producing salivation.
[1913 Webster]

Salivant
Sal"i*vant, n. That which produces salivation.
[1913 Webster]

Salivary
Sal"i*va*ry (?), a. [L. salivarius slimy, clammy: cf. F. salivaire.] (Physiol.) Of or pertaining to saliva; producing or carrying saliva; as, the salivary ferment; the salivary glands; the salivary ducts, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Salivate
Sal"i*vate (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Salivated (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Salivating.] [L. salivatus, p. p. of salivare to salivate. See Saliva.] To produce an abnormal flow of saliva in; to produce salivation or ptyalism in, as by the use of mercury.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Salivation
Sal`i*va"tion (?), n. [L. salivatio: cf. F. salivation.] (Physiol.) The act or process of salivating; an excessive secretion of saliva, often accompanied with soreness of the mouth and gums; ptyalism.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; It may be induced by direct chemical or mechanical stimulation, as in mastication of some tasteless substance like rubber, or indirectly by some agent which affects the whole system, as mercury compounds.
[1913 Webster]

Salivous
Sa*li"vous (?), a. [L. salivosus: cf. F. saliveux.] Pertaining to saliva; of the nature of saliva.
[1913 Webster]

Salix
Sa"lix (?), n.; pl. Salices (#). [L., the willow.] (Bot.) (a) A genus of trees or shrubs including the willow, osier, and the like, growing usually in wet grounds. (b) A tree or shrub of any kind of willow.
[1913 Webster]

Sallenders
Sal"len*ders (?), n. pl. [F. solandres, solandre.] (Far.) An eruption on the hind leg of a horse. [Written also sellanders, and sellenders.]
[1913 Webster]

On the inside of the hock, or a little below it, as well as at the bend of the knee, there is occasionally a scurfy eruption called “mallenders” in the fore leg, and “sallenders” in the hind leg. Youatt.
[1913 Webster]

Sallet
Sal"let (săl"l&ebreve_;t), n. [F. salade, Sp. celada, or It. celata, fr. L. (cassis) caelata, fr. caelare, caelatum, to engrave in relief. So called from the figures engraved upon it.] A light kind of helmet, with or without a visor, introduced during the 15th century. [Written also salade.]
[1913 Webster]

Then he must have a sallet wherewith his head may be saved. Latimer.
[1913 Webster]

Salleting
Sallet
{ Sal"let, Sal"let*ing, } n. Salad. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Salliance
Sal"li*ance (?), n. Salience. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sallow
Sal"low (săl"l&ouptack_;), n. [OE. salwe, AS. sealh; akin to OHG. salaha, G. salweide, Icel. selja, L. salix, Ir. sail, saileach, Gael. seileach, W. helyg, Gr. "eli`kh.] 1. The willow; willow twigs. [Poetic] Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

And bend the pliant sallow to a shield. Fawkes.
[1913 Webster]

The sallow knows the basketmaker's thumb. Emerson.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) A name given to certain species of willow, especially those which do not have flexible shoots, as Salix caprea, Salix cinerea, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Sallow thorn (Bot.), a European thorny shrub (Hippophae rhamnoides) much like an Elaeagnus. The yellow berries are sometimes used for making jelly, and the plant affords a yellow dye.
[1913 Webster]

Sallow
Sal"low, a. [Compar. Sallower (?); superl. Sallowest.] [AS. salu; akin to D. zaluw, OHG. salo, Icel. sölr yellow.] Having a yellowish color; of a pale, sickly color, tinged with yellow; as, a sallow skin. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sallow
Sal"low, v. t. To tinge with sallowness. [Poetic]
[1913 Webster]

July breathes hot, sallows the crispy fields. Lowell.
[1913 Webster]

Sallowish
Sal"low*ish, a. Somewhat sallow. Dickens.
[1913 Webster]

Sallowness
Sal"low*ness (?), n. The quality or condition of being sallow. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

Sally
Sal"ly (săl"l&ybreve_;), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Sallied (-l&ibreve_;d); p. pr. & vb. n. Sallying.] [F. saillir, fr. L. salire to leap, spring, akin to Gr. "a`llesqai; cf. Skr. s&rsdot_; to go, to flow. Cf. Salient, Assail, Assault, Exult, Insult, Saltation, Saltire.] To leap or rush out; to burst forth; to issue suddenly; as a body of troops from a fortified place to attack besiegers; to make a sally.
[1913 Webster]

They break the truce, and sally out by night. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

The foe retires, -- she heads the sallying host. Byron.
[1913 Webster]

Sally
Sal"ly, n.; pl. Sallies (#). [F. saillie, fr. saillir. See Sally, v.] 1. A leaping forth; a darting; a spring.
[1913 Webster]

2. A rushing or bursting forth; a quick issue; a sudden eruption; specifically, an issuing of troops from a place besieged to attack the besiegers; a sortie.
[1913 Webster]

Sallies were made by the Spaniards, but they were beaten in with loss. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

3. An excursion from the usual track; range; digression; deviation.
[1913 Webster]

Every one shall know a country better that makes often sallies into it, and traverses it up and down, than he that . . . goes still round in the same track. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

4. A flight of fancy, liveliness, wit, or the like; a flashing forth of a quick and active mind.
[1913 Webster]

The unaffected mirth with which she enjoyed his sallies. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

5. Transgression of the limits of soberness or steadiness; act of levity; wild gayety; frolic; escapade.
[1913 Webster]

The excursion was esteemed but a sally of youth. Sir H. Wotton.
[1913 Webster]

Sally port. (a) (Fort.) A postern gate, or a passage underground, from the inner to the outer works, to afford free egress for troops in a sortie. (b) (Naval) A large port on each quarter of a fireship, for the escape of the men into boats when the train is fired; a large port in an old-fashioned three-decker or a large modern ironclad.
[1913 Webster]

Sally Lunn
Sal"ly Lunn" (?). [From a woman, Sally Lunn, who is said to have first made the cakes, and sold them in the streets of Bath, Eng.] A tea cake slighty sweetened, and raised with yeast, baked in the form of biscuits or in a thin loaf, and eaten hot with butter.
[1913 Webster]

Sallyman
Sal"ly*man (?), n. (Zool.) The velella; -- called also saleeman.
[1913 Webster]

Salm
Salm (?), n. Psalm. [Obs2E] Piers Plowman.
[1913 Webster]

Salmagundi
Sal`ma*gun"di (?), n. [F. salmigondis, of uncertain origin; perhaps from L. salgama condita, pl.; salgama pickles + condita preserved (see Condite); or from the Countess Salmagondi, lady of honor to Maria de Medici, who is said to have invented it; or cf. It. salame salt meat, and F. salmis a ragout.] 1. A mixture of chopped meat and pickled herring, with oil, vinegar, pepper, and onions. Johnson.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, a mixture of various ingredients; an olio or medley; a potpourri; a miscellany. W. Irving.
[1913 Webster]

Salmi
Sal"mi (?), n. (Cookery) Same as Salmis.
[1913 Webster]

Salmiac
Sal"mi*ac (?), n. [Cf. F. salmiac, G. salmiak.] (Old Chem.) Sal ammoniac. See under Sal.
[1913 Webster]

Salmis
Sal`mis" (?), n. [F.] (Cookery) A ragout of partly roasted game stewed with sauce, wine, bread, and condiments suited to provoke appetite.
[1913 Webster]

Salmon
Salm"on (săm"ŭn), n.; pl. Salmons (-ŭnz) or (collectively) Salmon. [OE. saumoun, salmon, F. saumon, fr. L. salmo, salmonis, perhaps from salire to leap. Cf. Sally, v.] 1. (Zool.) Any one of several species of fishes of the genus Salmo and allied genera. The common salmon (Salmo salar) of Northern Europe and Eastern North America, and the California salmon, or quinnat, are the most important species. They are extensively preserved for food. See Quinnat.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head streams to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even leap over considerable falls which lie in the way of their progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of seventy-five pounds; more generally it is from fifteen to twenty-five pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and grilse. Among the true salmons are: Black salmon, or Lake salmon, the namaycush. -- Dog salmon, a salmon of Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). -- Humpbacked salmon, a Pacific-coast salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). -- King salmon, the quinnat. -- Landlocked salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var. Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions that prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also dwarf salmon.
[1913 Webster]

Among fishes of other families which are locally and erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the spotted, or southern, squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon; young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail.
[1913 Webster]

2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon.
[1913 Webster]

Salmon berry (Bot.), a large red raspberry growing from Alaska to California, the fruit of the Rubus Nutkanus. -- Salmon killer (Zool.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North America and Northern Asia. -- Salmon ladder, Salmon stair. See Fish ladder, under Fish. -- Salmon peel, a young salmon. -- Salmon pipe, a certain device for catching salmon. Crabb. -- Salmon trout. (Zool.) (a) The European sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon, but is smaller, and has smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The American namaycush. (c) A name that is also applied locally to the adult black spotted trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head and other large trout of the Pacific coast.
[1913 Webster]

Salmon
Salm"on, a. Of a reddish yellow or orange color, like that of the flesh of the salmon.
[1913 Webster]

Salmonella
Sal`mo*nel"la, prop. n. [After Daniel E. Salmon, a U. S. pathologist (1850-1914).] A genus of gram-negative bacteria that may be motile or non-motile; they are typically rod-shaped and may be aerobic or facultatively aerobic. They may be pathogenic for humans and other animals. Their metabolism is fermentative, and they produce acid and usually gas from glucose, but they do not metabolize lactose. The type species is Salmonella cholerae-suis, which is found in pigs. Other species, pathogenic in man, are Salmonella typhi (Salmonella typhosa), Salmonella typhimurium, and Salmonella schotmulleri, whih cause typhoid fever, food poisoning, and enteric fever, respectively. Stedman.
[PJC]

salmonellosis
sal`mo*nel*lo"sis, n. Infection with bacteria of the genus Salmonella. Stedman.
[PJC]

Salmonet
Salm"on*et (?), n. [Cf. Samlet.] (Zool.) A salmon of small size; a samlet.
[1913 Webster]

Salmonoid
Sal"mon*oid (?), a. [Salmon + -oid.] (Zool.) Like, or pertaining to, the Salmonidae, a family of fishes including the trout and salmon. -- n. Any fish of the family Salmonidae.
[1913 Webster]

Salogen
Sal"o*gen (?), n. [L. sal salt + -gen.] (Chem.) A halogen. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Salol
Sal"ol (?), n. [Salicylic + -ol.] (Chem.) A white crystalline substance consisting of phenol salicylate.
[1913 Webster]

salometer
sa*lom"e*ter (?), n. See Salimeter.
[1913 Webster]

Salometry
Sa*lom"e*try (?), n. Salimetry.
[1913 Webster]

Salon
Sa`lon" (?), n. [F. See Saloon.] 1. An apartment for the reception of company; hence, in the plural, fashionable parties; circles of fashionable society.
[1913 Webster]

2. An apartment for the reception and exhibition of works of art; hence, an annual exhibition of paintings, sculptures, etc., held in Paris by the Society of French Artists; -- sometimes called the Old Salon. New Salon is a popular name for an annual exhibition of paintings, sculptures, etc., held in Paris at the Champs de Mars, by the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts (National Society of Fine Arts), a body of artists who, in 1890, seceded from the Société des Artistes Français (Society of French Artists).
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Saloon
Sa*loon" (s&adot_;*l&oomacr_;n"), n. [F. salon (cf. It. salone), fr. F. salle a large room, a hall, of German or Dutch origin; cf. OHG. sal house, hall, G. saal; akin to AS. sael, sele, D. zaal, Icel. salr, Goth. saljan to dwell, and probably to L. solum ground. Cf. Sole of the foot, Soil ground, earth.] 1. A spacious and elegant apartment for the reception of company or for works of art; a hall of reception, esp. a hall for public entertainments or amusements; a large room or parlor; as, the saloon of a steamboat.
[1913 Webster]

The gilden saloons in which the first magnates of the realm . . . gave banquets and balls. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

2. Popularly, a public room for specific uses; esp., a barroom or grogshop; as, a drinking saloon; an eating saloon; a dancing saloon.
[1913 Webster]

We hear of no hells, or low music halls, or low dancing saloons [at Athens.] J. P. Mahaffy.
[1913 Webster]

Saloop
Sa*loop" (s&adot_;*l&oomacr_;p"), n. An aromatic drink prepared from sassafras bark and other ingredients, at one time much used in London. J. Smith (Dict. Econ. Plants).
[1913 Webster]

Saloop bush (Bot.), an Australian shrub (Rhagodia hastata) of the Goosefoot family, used for fodder.
[1913 Webster]

Salp
Salp (sălp), n. (Zool.) Any species of Salpa, or of the family Salpidae.
[1913 Webster]

Salpa
Sal"pa (săl"p&adot_;), n.; pl. L. Salpae (săl"pē), E. Salpas (săl"p&adot_;z). [NL.: cf. L. salpa a kind of stockfish.] (Zool.) A genus of transparent, tubular, free-swimming oceanic tunicates found abundantly in all the warmer latitudes. See Illustration in Appendix.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Each species exists in two distinct forms, one of which lives solitary, and produces, by budding from an internal organ, a series of the other kind. These are united together, side by side, so as to form a chain, or cluster, often of large size. Each of the individuals composing the chain carries a single egg, which develops into the solitary kind.
[1913 Webster]

Salpid
Salpian
{ Sal"pi*an (?), Sal"pid (?), } n. (Zool.) A salpa.
[1913 Webster]

Salpicon
Sal"pi*con (?), n. [F. salpicon, Sp. salpicon.] Chopped meat, bread, etc., used to stuff legs of veal or other joints; stuffing; farce. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Salpingitis
Sal`pin*gi"tis (?), n. [NL. See Salpinx, and -itis.] (Med.) Inflammation of the salpinx.
[1913 Webster]

Salpinx
Sal"pinx (?), n. [NL., from Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, a trumpet.] (Old Anat.) The Eustachian tube, or the Fallopian tube.
[1913 Webster]

Salsafy
Sal"sa*fy (?), n. (Bot.) See Salsify.
[1913 Webster]

Salsamentarious
Sal`sa*men*ta"ri*ous (?), a. [L. salsamentarius, fr. salsamentum brine, pickled fish, fr. salsus salted, p. p. of salire to salt.] Salt; salted; saline. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Salse
Salse (?), n. [F.] A mud volcano, the water of which is often impregnated with salts, whence the name.
[1913 Webster]

Salsify
Sal"si*fy (?; 277), n. [F. salsifis.] (Bot.) See Oyster plant (a), under Oyster.
[1913 Webster]

Salso-acid
Sal"so-ac`id (?), a. [L. salsus salted, salt + acidus acid.] Having a taste compounded of saltness and acidity; both salt and acid. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Salsoda
Sal`so"da (?), n. See Sal soda, under Sal.
[1913 Webster]

Salsola
Sal"so*la (?), n. [NL., fr. L. salsus salt, because they contain alkaline salts.] (Bot.) A genus of plants including the glasswort. See Glasswort.
[1913 Webster]

salsuginous
sal*su"gi*nous (?), a. [L. salsugo, -ginis, saltness, from salsus salted, salt: cf. F. salsugineux.] (Bot.) Growing in brackish places or in salt marshes.
[1913 Webster]

Salt
Salt (?), n. [AS. sealt; akin to OS. & OFries. salt, D. zout, G. salz, Icel., Sw., & Dan. salt, L. sal, Gr. &unr_;, Russ. sole, Ir. & Gael. salann, W. halen, of unknown origin. Cf. Sal, Salad, Salary, Saline, Sauce, Sausage.] 1. The chloride of sodium, a substance used for seasoning food, for the preservation of meat, etc. It is found native in the earth, and is also produced, by evaporation and crystallization, from sea water and other water impregnated with saline particles.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, flavor; taste; savor; smack; seasoning.
[1913 Webster]

Though we are justices and doctors and churchmen . . . we have some salt of our youth in us. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hence, also, piquancy; wit; sense; as, Attic salt.
[1913 Webster]

4. A dish for salt at table; a saltcellar.
[1913 Webster]

I out and bought some things; among others, a dozen of silver salts. Pepys.
[1913 Webster]

5. A sailor; -- usually qualified by old. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Around the door are generally to be seen, laughing and gossiping, clusters of old salts. Hawthorne.
[1913 Webster]

6. (Chem.) The neutral compound formed by the union of an acid and a base; thus, sulphuric acid and iron form the salt sulphate of iron or green vitriol.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Except in case of ammonium salts, accurately speaking, it is the acid radical which unites with the base or basic radical, with the elimination of hydrogen, of water, or of analogous compounds as side products. In the case of diacid and triacid bases, and of dibasic and tribasic acids, the mutual neutralization may vary in degree, producing respectively basic, neutral, or acid salts. See Phrases below.
[1913 Webster]

7. Fig.: That which preserves from corruption or error; that which purifies; a corrective; an antiseptic; also, an allowance or deduction; as, his statements must be taken with a grain of salt.
[1913 Webster]

Ye are the salt of the earth. Matt. v. 13.
[1913 Webster]

8. pl. Any mineral salt used as an aperient or cathartic, especially Epsom salts, Rochelle salt, or Glauber's salt.
[1913 Webster]

9. pl. Marshes flooded by the tide. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Above the salt, Below the salt, phrases which have survived the old custom, in the houses of people of rank, of placing a large saltcellar near the middle of a long table, the places above which were assigned to the guests of distinction, and those below to dependents, inferiors, and poor relations. See Saltfoot.
[1913 Webster] His fashion is not to take knowledge of him that is beneath him in clothes. He never drinks below the salt. B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster] -- Acid salt (Chem.) (a) A salt derived from an acid which has several replaceable hydrogen atoms which are only partially exchanged for metallic atoms or basic radicals; as, acid potassium sulphate is an acid salt. (b) A salt, whatever its constitution, which merely gives an acid reaction; thus, copper sulphate, which is composed of a strong acid united with a weak base, is an acid salt in this sense, though theoretically it is a neutral salt. -- Alkaline salt (Chem.), a salt which gives an alkaline reaction, as sodium carbonate. -- Amphid salt (Old Chem.), a salt of the oxy type, formerly regarded as composed of two oxides, an acid and a basic oxide. [Obsolescent] -- Basic salt (Chem.) (a) A salt which contains more of the basic constituent than is required to neutralize the acid. (b) An alkaline salt. -- Binary salt (Chem.), a salt of the oxy type conveniently regarded as composed of two ingredients (analogously to a haloid salt), viz., a metal and an acid radical. -- Double salt (Chem.), a salt regarded as formed by the union of two distinct salts, as common alum, potassium aluminium sulphate. See under Double. -- Epsom salts. See in the Vocabulary. -- Essential salt (Old Chem.), a salt obtained by crystallizing plant juices. -- Ethereal salt. (Chem.) See under Ethereal. -- Glauber's salt or Glauber's salts. See in Vocabulary. -- Haloid salt (Chem.), a simple salt of a halogen acid, as sodium chloride. -- Microcosmic salt. (Chem.). See under Microcosmic. -- Neutral salt. (Chem.) (a) A salt in which the acid and base (in theory) neutralize each other. (b) A salt which gives a neutral reaction. -- Oxy salt (Chem.), a salt derived from an oxygen acid. -- Per salt (Old Chem.), a salt supposed to be derived from a peroxide base or analogous compound. [Obs.] -- Permanent salt, a salt which undergoes no change on exposure to the air. -- Proto salt (Chem.), a salt derived from a protoxide base or analogous compound. -- Rochelle salt. See under Rochelle. -- Salt of amber (Old Chem.), succinic acid. -- Salt of colcothar (Old Chem.), green vitriol, or sulphate of iron. -- Salt of hartshorn. (Old Chem.) (a) Sal ammoniac, or ammonium chloride. (b) Ammonium carbonate. Cf. Spirit of hartshorn, under Hartshorn. -- Salt of lemons. (Chem.) See Salt of sorrel, below. -- Salt of Saturn (Old Chem.), sugar of lead; lead acetate; -- the alchemical name of lead being Saturn. -- Salt of Seignette. Same as Rochelle salt. -- Salt of soda (Old Chem.), sodium carbonate. -- Salt of sorrel (Old Chem.), acid potassium oxalate, or potassium quadroxalate, used as a solvent for ink stains; -- so called because found in the sorrel, or Oxalis. Also sometimes inaccurately called salt of lemon. -- Salt of tartar (Old Chem.), potassium carbonate; -- so called because formerly made by heating cream of tartar, or potassium tartrate. [Obs.] -- Salt of Venus (Old Chem.), blue vitriol; copper sulphate; -- the alchemical name of copper being Venus. -- Salt of wisdom. See Alembroth. -- Sedative salt (Old Med. Chem.), boric acid. -- Sesqui salt (Chem.), a salt derived from a sesquioxide base or analogous compound. -- Spirit of salt. (Chem.) See under Spirit. -- Sulpho salt (Chem.), a salt analogous to an oxy salt, but containing sulphur in place of oxygen.

[1913 Webster]

Salt
Salt (?), a. [Compar. Salter (?); superl. Saltest.] [AS. sealt, salt. See Salt, n.] 1. Of or relating to salt; abounding in, or containing, salt; prepared or preserved with, or tasting of, salt; salted; as, salt beef; salt water.Salt tears.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. Overflowed with, or growing in, salt water; as, a salt marsh; salt grass.
[1913 Webster]

3. Fig.: Bitter; sharp; pungent.
[1913 Webster]

I have a salt and sorry rheum offends me. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. Fig.: Salacious; lecherous; lustful. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Salt

[1913 Webster]

Salt acid (Chem.), hydrochloric acid. -- Salt block, an apparatus for evaporating brine; a salt factory. Knight. -- Salt bottom, a flat piece of ground covered with saline efflorescences. [Western U.S.] Bartlett. -- Salt cake (Chem.), the white caked mass, consisting of sodium sulphate, which is obtained as the product of the first stage in the manufacture of soda, according to Leblanc's process. -- Salt fish. (a) Salted fish, especially cod, haddock, and similar fishes that have been salted and dried for food. (b) A marine fish. -- Salt garden, an arrangement for the natural evaporation of sea water for the production of salt, employing large shallow basins excavated near the seashore. -- Salt gauge, an instrument used to test the strength of brine; a salimeter. -- Salt horse, salted beef. [Slang] -- Salt junk, hard salt beef for use at sea. [Slang] -- Salt lick. See Lick, n. -- Salt marsh, grass land subject to the overflow of salt water. -- Salt-marsh caterpillar (Zool.), an American bombycid moth (Spilosoma acraea which is very destructive to the salt-marsh grasses and to other crops. Called also woolly bear. See Illust. under Moth, Pupa, and Woolly bear, under Woolly. -- Salt-marsh fleabane (Bot.), a strong-scented composite herb (Pluchea camphorata) with rayless purplish heads, growing in salt marshes. -- Salt-marsh hen (Zool.), the clapper rail. See under Rail. -- Salt-marsh terrapin (Zool.), the diamond-back. -- Salt mine, a mine where rock salt is obtained. -- Salt pan. (a) A large pan used for making salt by evaporation; also, a shallow basin in the ground where salt water is evaporated by the heat of the sun. (b) pl. Salt works. -- Salt pit, a pit where salt is obtained or made. -- Salt rising, a kind of yeast in which common salt is a principal ingredient. [U.S.] -- Salt raker, one who collects salt in natural salt ponds, or inclosures from the sea. -- Salt sedative (Chem.), boracic acid. [Obs.] -- Salt spring, a spring of salt water. -- Salt tree (Bot.), a small leguminous tree (Halimodendron argenteum) growing in the salt plains of the Caspian region and in Siberia. -- Salt water, water impregnated with salt, as that of the ocean and of certain seas and lakes; sometimes, also, tears.
[1913 Webster] Mine eyes are full of tears, I can not see;
And yet salt water blinds them not so much
But they can see a sort of traitors here.
Shak.
[1913 Webster] -- Salt-water sailor, an ocean mariner. -- Salt-water tailor. (Zool.) See Bluefish.

[1913 Webster]

Salt
Salt, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Salted; p. pr. & vb. n. Salting.] 1. To sprinkle, impregnate, or season with salt; to preserve with salt or in brine; to supply with salt; as, to salt fish, beef, or pork; to salt cattle.
[1913 Webster]

2. To fill with salt between the timbers and planks, as a ship, for the preservation of the timber.
[1913 Webster]

To salt a mine, to artfully deposit minerals in a mine in order to deceive purchasers regarding its value. [Cant] -- To salt away, To salt down, to prepare with, or pack in, salt for preserving, as meat, eggs, etc.; hence, colloquially, to save, lay up, or invest sagely, as money.
[1913 Webster]

Salt
Salt (?), v. i. To deposit salt as a saline solution; as, the brine begins to salt.
[1913 Webster]

Salt
Salt (?), n. [L. saltus, fr. salire to leap.] The act of leaping or jumping; a leap. [Obs.] B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

Saltant
Sal"tant (?), a. [L. saltans, p. pr. of saltare to dance, v. intens. fr. salire to leap: cf. F. sautant. See Sally, v.] 1. Leaping; jumping; dancing.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Her.) In a leaping position; springing forward; -- applied especially to the squirrel, weasel, and rat, also to the cat, greyhound, monkey, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Saltarella
Sal`ta*rel"la (?), n. See Saltarello.
[1913 Webster]

Saltarello
Sal`ta*rel"lo (?), n. [It., fr. L. saltare to jump.] A popular Italian dance in quick 3-4 or 6-8 time, running mostly in triplets, but with a hop step at the beginning of each measure. See Tarantella.
[1913 Webster]

Saltate
Sal"tate (?), v. i. [See Saltant.] To leap or dance. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Saltation
Sal*ta"tion (?), n. [L. saltatio: cf. F. saltation.] 1. A leaping or jumping.
[1913 Webster]

Continued his saltation without pause. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

2. Beating or palpitation; as, the saltation of the great artery.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Biol.) An abrupt and marked variation in the condition or appearance of a species; a sudden modification which may give rise to new races.
[1913 Webster]

We greatly suspect that nature does make considerable jumps in the way of variation now and then, and that these saltations give rise to some of the gaps which appear to exist in the series of known forms. Huxley.
[1913 Webster]

Saltatoria
Sal`ta*to"ri*a (?), n. pl. [NL.] (Zool.) A division of Orthoptera including grasshoppers, locusts, and crickets.
[1913 Webster]

Saltatorial
Sal`ta*to"ri*al (?), a. 1. Relating to leaping; saltatory; as, saltatorial exercises.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) (a) Same as Saltatorious. (b) Of or pertaining to the Saltatoria.
[1913 Webster]

Saltatorious
Sal`ta*to"ri*ous (?), a. Capable of leaping; formed for leaping; saltatory; as, a saltatorious insect or leg.
[1913 Webster]

Saltatory
Sal"ta*to"ry (?), a. [L. saltatorius. See Saltant, and cf. Saltire.] Leaping or dancing; having the power of, or used in, leaping or dancing.
[1913 Webster]

Saltatory evolution (Biol.), a theory of evolution which holds that the transmutation of species is not always gradual, but that there may come sudden and marked variations. See Saltation. -- Saltatory spasm (Med.), an affection in which pressure of the foot on a floor causes the patient to spring into the air, so as to make repeated involuntary motions of hopping and jumping. J. Ross.
[1913 Webster]

Saltbush
Salt"bush` (?), n. (Bot.) An Australian plant (Atriplex nummularia) of the Goosefoot family.
[1913 Webster]

Saltcat
Salt"cat` (?), n. A mixture of salt, coarse meal, lime, etc., attractive to pigeons.
[1913 Webster]

Saltcellar
Salt"cel*lar (?), n. [OE. saltsaler; salt + F. salière saltcellar, from L. sal salt. See Salt, and cf. Salary.] Formerly a large vessel, now a small vessel of glass or other material, used for holding salt on the table.
[1913 Webster]

Salter
Salt"er (?), n. One who makes, sells, or applies salt; one who salts meat or fish.
[1913 Webster]

Saltern
Salt"ern (?), n. A building or place where salt is made by boiling or by evaporation; salt works.
[1913 Webster]

Saltfoot
Salt"foot` (?), n. A large saltcellar formerly placed near the center of the table. The superior guests were seated above the saltfoot.
[1913 Webster]

Salt-green
Salt"-green (?), a. Sea-green in color. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Saltie
Salt"ie (?), n. (Zool.) The European dab.
[1913 Webster]

Saltier
Sal"tier (?), n. See Saltire.
[1913 Webster]

Saltigradae
Sal`ti*gra"dae (?), n. pl. [NL. See Saltigrade.] (Zool.) A tribe of spiders including those which lie in wait and leap upon their prey; the leaping spiders; called also Salticidae.
[1913 Webster]

Saltigrade
Sal"ti*grade (?), a. [L. saltus a leap + gradi to walk, go: cf. F. saltigrade.] (Zool.) Having feet or legs formed for leaping.
[1913 Webster]

Saltigrade
Sal"ti*grade, n. (Zool.) One of the Saltigradae, a tribe of spiders which leap to seize their prey.
[1913 Webster]

Saltimbanco
Sal`tim*ban"co (?), n. [It., literally, one who leaps or mounts upon a bench; saltare to leap + in in, upon + banco a bench.] A mountebank; a quack. [Obs.] [Written also santinbanco.]
[1913 Webster]

Saltimbancos, quacksalvers, and charlatans. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

saltiness
salt"i*ness (s&asuml_;lt"&euptack_;*n&ebreve_;s), n. 1. The quality or state of containing salt; salt taste; as, the saltiness of sea water.
Syn. -- saltiness.
[1913 Webster + PJC]

Salting
Salt"ing (?), n. 1. The act of sprinkling, impregnating, or furnishing, with salt.
[1913 Webster]

2. A salt marsh.
[1913 Webster]

Saltire
Sal"tire (?), n. [F. sautoir, fr. LL. saltatorium a sort of stirrup, fr. L. saltatorius saltatory. See Saltatory, Sally, v.] (Her.) A St. Andrew's cross, or cross in the form of an X, -- one of the honorable ordinaries.
[1913 Webster]

Saltirewise
Sal"tire*wise` (?), adv. (Her.) In the manner of a saltire; -- said especially of the blazoning of a shield divided by two lines drawn in the direction of a bend and a bend sinister, and crossing at the center.
[1913 Webster]

Saltish
Salt"ish (?), a. Somewhat salt. -- Salt"ish*ly, adv. -- Salt"ish*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Saltless
Salt"less, a. Destitute of salt; insipid.
[1913 Webster]

Saltly
Salt"ly, adv. With taste of salt; in a salt manner.
[1913 Webster]

Saltmouth
Salt"mouth` (?), n. A wide-mouthed bottle with glass stopper for holding chemicals, especially crystallized salts.
[1913 Webster]

Saltness
Salt"ness (s&asuml_;lt"n&ebreve_;s), n. The quality or state of being salt, or impregnated with salt; salt taste; as, the saltness of sea water. In the sense of having salt content, saltiness is more commonly used.
Syn. -- saltiness.
[1913 Webster + PJC]

Saltpetre
Saltpeter
{ Salt`pe"ter, Salt`pe"tre, } (s&asuml_;lt`pē"t&etilde_;r), n. [F. salpêtre, NL. sal petrae, literally, rock salt, or stone salt; so called because it exudes from rocks or walls. See Salt, and Petrify.] (Chem.) Potassium nitrate; niter; a white crystalline substance, KNO3, having a cooling saline taste, obtained by leaching from certain soils in which it is produced by the process of nitrification (see Nitrification, 2). It is a strong oxidizer, is the chief constituent of gunpowder, and is also used as an antiseptic in curing meat, and in medicine as a diuretic, diaphoretic, and refrigerant.
[1913 Webster]

Chili salpeter (Chem.), sodium nitrate (distinguished from potassium nitrate, or true salpeter), a white crystalline substance, NaNO3, having a cooling, saline, slightly bitter taste. It is obtained by leaching the soil of the rainless districts of Chili and Peru. It is deliquescent and cannot be used in gunpowder, but is employed in the production of nitric acid. Called also cubic niter. -- Saltpeter acid (Chem.), nitric acid; -- sometimes so called because made from saltpeter.
[1913 Webster]

Saltpetrous
Salt`pe"trous (?), a. [Cf. F. salpêtreux.] Pertaining to saltpeter, or partaking of its qualities; impregnated with saltpeter. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Salt rheum
Salt" rheum (?). (Med.) A popular name, esp. in the United States, for various cutaneous eruptions, particularly for those of eczema. See Eczema.
[1913 Webster]

Saltwort
Salt"wort` (?), n. (Bot.) A name given to several plants which grow on the seashore, as the Batis maritima, and the glasswort. See Glasswort.
[1913 Webster]

Black saltwort, the sea milkwort.
[1913 Webster]

Salty
Salt"y (s&asuml_;lt"&ybreve_;), a. 1. Containing salt; tasting of salt; saltish; as, the salty sea; the potatoes are too salty.
[1913 Webster + PJC]

2. Interesting and witty; piquant; -- of discourse.
[PJC]

3. Racy; sexually suggestive; -- of discourse.
[PJC]

Salubrious
Sa*lu"bri*ous (?), a. [L. salubris, or saluber, fr. salus health; akin to salvus safe, sound, well. See Safe.] Favorable to health; healthful; promoting health; as, salubrious air, water, or climate.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Healthful; wholesome; healthy; salutary.
[1913 Webster]

-- Sa-lu"bri*ous*ly, adv. -- Sa*lu"bri*ous*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Salubrity
Sa*lu"bri*ty (?), n. [L. salubritas: cf. F. salubrité See Salubrious.] The quality of being salubrious; favorableness to the preservation of health; salubriousness; wholesomeness; healthfulness; as, the salubrity of the air, of a country, or a climate. “A sweet, dry smell of salubrity.” G. W. Cable.
[1913 Webster]

Salue
Sa*lue" (?), v. t. [F. saluer. See Salute.] To salute. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

There was no “good day” and no saluyng. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Salutary
Sal"u*ta*ry (?), a. [L. salutaris, from salus, -utis, health, safety: cf. F. salutaire. See Salubrious.] 1. Wholesome; healthful; promoting health; as, salutary exercise.
[1913 Webster]

2. Promotive of, or contributing to, some beneficial purpose; beneficial; advantageous; as, a salutary design.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Wholesome; healthful; salubrious; beneficial; useful; advantageous; profitable.
[1913 Webster]

-- Sal"u*ta*ri*ly (#), adv. -- Sal"u*ta*ri*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Salutation
Sal`u*ta"tion (?), n. [L. salutatio: cf. F. salutation. See Salute.] The act of saluting, or paying respect or reverence, by the customary words or actions; the act of greeting, or expressing good will or courtesy; also, that which is uttered or done in saluting or greeting.
[1913 Webster]

In all public meetings or private addresses, use those forms of salutation, reverence, and decency usual amongst the most sober persons. Jer. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Greeting; salute; address. -- Salutation, Greeting, Salute. Greeting is the general word for all manner of expressions of recognition, agreeable or otherwise, made when persons meet or communicate with each other. A greeting may be hearty and loving, chilling and offensive, or merely formal, as in the opening sentence of legal documents. Salutation more definitely implies a wishing well, and is used of expressions at parting as well as at meeting. It is used especially of uttered expressions of good will. Salute, while formerly and sometimes still in the sense of either greeting or salutation, is now used specifically to denote a conventional demonstration not expressed in words. The guests received a greeting which relieved their embarrassment, offered their salutations in well-chosen terms, and when they retired, as when they entered, made a deferential salute.
[1913 Webster]

Woe unto you, Pharisees! for ye love the uppermost seats in the synagogues, and greetings in the markets. Luke xi. 43.
[1913 Webster]

When Elisabeth heard the salutation of Mary, the babe leaped in her womb. Luke i. 41.
[1913 Webster]

I shall not trouble my reader with the first salutes of our three friends. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

Salutatorian
Sa*lu`ta*to"ri*an (?), n. The student who pronounces the salutatory oration at the annual Commencement or like exercises of a college, -- an honor commonly assigned to that member of the graduating class who ranks second in scholarship. [U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Salutatorily
Sa*lu"ta*to*ri*ly (?), adv. By way of salutation.
[1913 Webster]

Salutatory
Sa*lu"ta*to*ry (?), a. [L. salutatorius. See Salute.] Containing or expressing salutations; speaking a welcome; greeting; -- applied especially to the oration which introduces the exercises of the Commencements, or similar public exhibitions, in American colleges.
[1913 Webster]

Salutatory
Sa*lu"ta*to*ry, n. 1. A place for saluting or greeting; a vestibule; a porch. [Obs.] Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. (American Colleges) The salutatory oration.
[1913 Webster]

Salute
Sa*lute" (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saluted; p. pr. & vb. n. Saluting.] [L. salutare, salutatum, from salus, -utis, health, safety. See Salubrious.] 1. To address, as with expressions of kind wishes and courtesy; to greet; to hail.
[1913 Webster]

I salute you with this kingly title. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, to give a sign of good will; to compliment by an act or ceremony, as a kiss, a bow, etc.
[1913 Webster]

You have the prettiest tip of a finger . . . I must take the freedom to salute it. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Mil. & Naval) To honor, as some day, person, or nation, by a discharge of cannon or small arms, by dipping colors, by cheers, etc.
[1913 Webster]

4. To promote the welfare and safety of; to benefit; to gratify. [Obs.] “If this salute my blood a jot.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Salute
Sa*lute" (?), n. [Cf. F. salut. See Salute, v.] 1. The act of saluting, or expressing kind wishes or respect; salutation; greeting.
[1913 Webster]

2. A sign, token, or ceremony, expressing good will, compliment, or respect, as a kiss, a bow, etc. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Mil. & Naval) A token of respect or honor for some distinguished or official personage, for a foreign vessel or flag, or for some festival or event, as by presenting arms, by a discharge of cannon, volleys of small arms, dipping the colors or the topsails, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Saluter
Sa*lut"er (?), n. One who salutes.
[1913 Webster]

Salutiferous
Sal`u*tif"er*ous (?), a. [L. salutifer; salus, -utis, health + ferre to bring.] Bringing health; healthy; salutary; beneficial; as, salutiferous air. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Innumerable powers, all of them salutiferous. Cudworth.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Healthful; healthy; salutary; salubrious.
[1913 Webster]

Salutiferously
Sal`u*tif"er*ous*ly, adv. Salutarily. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Salvability
Sal`va*bil"i*ty (?), n. The quality or condition of being salvable; salvableness. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

In the Latin scheme of redemption, salvability was not possible outside the communion of the visible organization. A. V. G. Allen.
[1913 Webster]

Salvable
Sal"va*ble (?), a. [L. salvare to save, from salvus safe. Cf. Savable.] Capable of being saved; admitting of salvation. Dr. H. More.
[1913 Webster]

-- Sal"va*ble*ness, n. -- Sal"va*bly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

Salvage
Sal"vage (?; 48), n. [F. salvage, OF. salver to save, F. sauver, fr. L. salvare. See Save.] 1. The act of saving a vessel, goods, or life, from perils of the sea.
[1913 Webster]

Salvage of life from a British ship, or a foreign ship in British waters, ranks before salvage of goods. Encyc. Brit.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Maritime Law) (a) The compensation allowed to persons who voluntarily assist in saving a ship or her cargo from peril. (b) That part of the property that survives the peril and is saved. Kent. Abbot.
[1913 Webster]

Salvage
Sal"vage, a. & n. Savage. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Salvation
Sal*va"tion (?), n. [OE. salvacioun, sauvacion, F. salvation, fr. L. salvatio, fr. salvare to save. See Save.] 1. The act of saving; preservation or deliverance from destruction, danger, or great calamity.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Theol.) The redemption of man from the bondage of sin and liability to eternal death, and the conferring on him of everlasting happiness.
[1913 Webster]

To earn salvation for the sons of men. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Godly sorrow worketh repentance to salvation. 2. Cor. vii. 10.
[1913 Webster]

3. Saving power; that which saves.
[1913 Webster]

Fear ye not; stand still, and see the salvation of the Lord, which he will show to you to-day. Ex. xiv. 13.
[1913 Webster]

Salvation Army, an organization for prosecuting the work of Christian evangelization, especially among the degraded populations of cities. It is virtually a new sect founded in London in 1861 by William Booth. The evangelists, male and female, have military titles according to rank, that of the chief being “General.” They wear a uniform, and in their phraseology and mode of work adopt a quasi military style.
[1913 Webster]

Salvationist
Sal*va"tion*ist, n. An evangelist, a member, or a recruit, of the Salvation Army.
[1913 Webster]

Salvatory
Sal"va*to*ry (?), n. [LL. salvatorium, fr. salvare to save.] A place where things are preserved; a repository. [R.] Sir M. Hale.
[1913 Webster]

Salve
Sal"ve (?), interj. [L., hail, God save you, imperat. of salvere to be well. Cf. Salvo a volley.] Hail!
[1913 Webster]

Salve
Sal"ve (? or ?), v. t. To say “Salve” to; to greet; to salute. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

By this that stranger knight in presence came,
And goodly salved them.
Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Salve
Salve (?; 277), n. [AS. sealf ointment; akin to LG. salwe, D. zalve, zalf, OHG. salba, Dan. salve, Sw. salfva, Goth. salbōn to anoint, and probably to Gr. (Hesychius) &unr_; oil, &unr_; butter, Skr. sarpis clarified butter. √155, 291.] 1. An adhesive composition or substance to be applied to wounds or sores; a healing ointment. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. A soothing remedy or antidote.
[1913 Webster]

Counsel or consolation we may bring.
Salve to thy sores.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Salve bug (Zool.), a large, stout isopod crustacean (Aega psora), parasitic on the halibut and codfish, -- used by fishermen in the preparation of a salve. It becomes about two inches in length.
[1913 Webster]

Salve
Salve, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Salved (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Salving.] [AS. sealfian to anoint. See Salve, n.] 1. To heal by applications or medicaments; to cure by remedial treatment; to apply salve to; as, to salve a wound. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. To heal; to remedy; to cure; to make good; to soothe, as with an ointment, especially by some device, trick, or quibble; to gloss over.
[1913 Webster]

But Ebranck salved both their infamies
With noble deeds.
Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

What may we do, then, to salve this seeming inconsistence? Milton.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Salve
Salve (?), v. t. & i. [See Salvage] To save, as a ship or goods, from the perils of the sea. [Recent]
[1913 Webster]

Salver
Salv"er (?), n. One who salves, or uses salve as a remedy; hence, a quacksalver, or quack. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Salver
Sal"ver (?), n. [Cf. Salvage.] A salvor. Skeat.
[1913 Webster]

Salver
Sal"ver (?), n. [Sp. salva pregustation, the tasting of viands before they are served, salver, fr. salvar to save, to taste, to prove the food or drink of nobles, from L. salvare to save. See Save.] A tray or waiter on which anything is presented.
[1913 Webster]

Salver-shaped
Sal"ver-shaped` (?), a. (Bot.) Tubular, with a spreading border. See Hypocraterimorphous.
[1913 Webster]

Salvia
Sal"vi*a (?), n. [L., sage.] (Bot.) A genus of plants including the sage. See Sage.
[1913 Webster]

Salvific
Sal*vif"ic (?), a. [L. salficus saving; salvus saved, safe + facere to make.] Tending to save or secure safety. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Salvo
Sal"vo (?), n.; pl. Salvos (#). [L. salvo jure, literally, the right being reserved. See Safe.] An exception; a reservation; an excuse.
[1913 Webster]

They admit many salvos, cautions, and reservations. Eikon Basilike.
[1913 Webster]

Salvo
Sal"vo, n. [F. salve a discharge of heavy cannon, a volley, L. salve hail, imperat. of salvere to be well, akin to salvus well. See Safe.] 1. (Mil.) A concentrated fire from pieces of artillery, as in endeavoring to make a break in a fortification; a volley.
[1913 Webster]

2. A salute paid by a simultaneous, or nearly simultaneous, firing of a number of cannon.
[1913 Webster]

Salvor
Sal"vor (?), n. [See Salvation, Save] (Law) One who assists in saving a ship or goods at sea, without being under special obligation to do so. Wheaton.
[1913 Webster]

Sam
Sam (?), adv. [AS. same. See Same, a.] Together. [Obs.] “All in that city sam.” Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

SAM
SAM (săm), n. [acronym] (Mil.) a Surface to Air Missile.
[PJC]

Samaj
Sa*maj" (?), n. [Hind. samāj meeting, assembly, fr. Skr. samāja a community.] A society or congregation; a church or religious body. [India]
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Samara
Sa*ma"ra (? or ?), n. [L. samara, samera, the seed of the elm.] (Bot.) A dry, indehiscent, usually one-seeded, winged fruit, as that of the ash, maple, and elm; a key or key fruit.
[1913 Webster]

Samare
Sam"are (?), n. See Simar.
[1913 Webster]

Samaritan
Sa*mar"i*tan (?), a. [L. Samaritanus.] Of or pertaining to Samaria, in Palestine. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Samaria; also, the language of Samaria.
[1913 Webster]

Samarium
Sa*ma"ri*um (?), n. [NL., fr. E. samarskite.] (Chem.) A rare metallic element of doubtful identity.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Samarium was discovered, by means of spectrum analysis, in certain minerals (samarskite, cerite, etc.), in which it is associated with other elements of the earthy group. It has been confounded with the doubtful elements decipium, philippium, etc., and is possibly a complex mixture of elements not as yet clearly identified. Symbol Sm. Provisional atomic weight 150.2.
[1913 Webster]

Samaroid
Sam"a*roid (?; 277), a. [Samara + -oid.] (Bot.) Resembling a samara, or winged seed vessel.
[1913 Webster]

Samarra
Sa*mar"ra (?), n. See Simar.
[1913 Webster]

Samarskite
Sa*mar"skite (?), a. [After Samarski, a Russian.] (Min.) A rare mineral having a velvet-black color and submetallic luster. It is a niobate of uranium, iron, and the yttrium and cerium metals.
[1913 Webster]

Sambo
Sam"bo (?), n. [Sp. zambo bandy-legged, the child of a negro and an Indian; prob. of African origin.] 1. A negro; sometimes, the offspring of a black person and a mulatto; -- formerly used colloquially or with humorous intent, but now considered offensive or racist by African-Americans. [Derogatory and offensive] A children's book named Little Black Sambo was at one time popular in elementary schools, but the book has been removed from reading lists in many American schools due to the development of a reduced acceptance of patronizing depictions of negros, as well as the negative associations of the word itself.
[Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

2. In Central America, an Indian and negro half-breed, or mixed blood.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sambo
Sam"bo, n. [Sp. zambo, sambo.] A colloquial or humorous appellation for a negro; sometimes, the offspring of a black person and a mulatto; a zambo.
[1913 Webster]

Samboo
Sam"boo (?), n. (Zool.) Same as Sambur.
[1913 Webster]

Sambucus
Sam*bu"cus (?), n. [L., an elder tree.] (Bot.) A genus of shrubs and trees; the elder.
[1913 Webster]

Sambuke
Sam"buke (?), n. [L. sambuca, Gr. &unr_;.] (Mus.) An ancient stringed instrument used by the Greeks, the particular construction of which is unknown.
[1913 Webster]

Sambur
Sam"bur (?), n. [Hind. sāmbar, sābar.] (Zool.) An East Indian deer (Rusa Aristotelis) having a mane on its neck. Its antlers have but three prongs. Called also gerow. The name is applied to other species of the genus Rusa, as the Bornean sambur (Rusa equina).
[1913 Webster]

Same
Same (?), a. [AS. same, adv.; akin to OS. sama, samo, adv., OHG. sam, a., sama, adv., Icel. samr, a., Sw. samme, samma, Dan. samme, Goth. sama, Russ. samuii, Gr. &unr_;, Skr. sama, Gr. &unr_; like, L. simul at the same time, similis like, and E. some, a., -some. √191. Cf. Anomalous, Assemble, Homeopathy, Homily, Seem, v. i., Semi-, Similar, Some.] 1. Not different or other; not another or others; identical; unchanged.
[1913 Webster]

Thou art the same, and thy years shall have no end. Ps. cii. 27.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of like kind, species, sort, dimensions, or the like; not differing in character or in the quality or qualities compared; corresponding; not discordant; similar; like.
[1913 Webster]

The ethereal vigor is in all the same. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. Just mentioned, or just about to be mentioned.
[1913 Webster]

What ye know, the same do I know. Job. xiii. 2.
[1913 Webster]

Do but think how well the same he spends,
Who spends his blood his country to relieve.
Daniel.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Same is commonly preceded by the, this, or that and is often used substantively as in the citations above. In a comparative use it is followed by as or with.
[1913 Webster]

Bees like the same odors as we do. Lubbock.
[1913 Webster]

[He] held the same political opinions with his illustrious friend. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Sameliness
Same"li*ness (?), n. Sameness, 2. [R.] Bayne.
[1913 Webster]

Sameness
Same"ness, n. 1. The state of being the same; identity; absence of difference; near resemblance; correspondence; similarity; as, a sameness of person, of manner, of sound, of appearance, and the like. “A sameness of the terms.” Bp. Horsley.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, want of variety; tedious monotony.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Identity; identicalness; oneness.
[1913 Webster]

Samette
Sa*mette" (?), n. See Samite. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Samian
Sa"mi*an (?), a. [L. Samius.] Of or pertaining to the island of Samos.
[1913 Webster]

Fill high the cup with Samian wine. Byron.
[1913 Webster]

Samian earth, a species of clay from Samos, formerly used in medicine as an astringent.
[1913 Webster]

Samian
Sa"mi*an, n. A native or inhabitant of Samos.
[1913 Webster]

Samiel
Sa"mi*el (?; 277), n. [Turk. sam-yeli; Ar. samm poison + Turk. yel wind. Cf. Simoom.] A hot and destructive wind that sometimes blows, in Turkey, from the desert. It is identical with the simoom of Arabia and the kamsin of Syria.
[1913 Webster]

Samiot
Sa"mi*ot (?), a. & n. [Cf. F. samiote.] Samian.
[1913 Webster]

Samisen
Sam"i*sen (?), n. [Jap.] (Mus.) A Japanese musical instrument with three strings, resembling a guitar or banjo.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Samite
Sa"mite (?), a. [OF. samit, LL. samitum, examitum, from LGr. &unr_;, &unr_; woven with six threads; Gr. &unr_; six + &unr_; a thread. See Six, and cf. Dimity.] A species of silk stuff, or taffeta, generally interwoven with gold. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

In silken samite she was light arrayed. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Samlet
Sam"let (?), n. [Cf. Salmonet.] The parr.
[1913 Webster]

Sammier
Sam"mi*er (?), n. A machine for pressing the water from skins in tanning. Knight.
[1913 Webster]

Samoan
Sa*mo"an (?), a. Of or pertaining to the Samoan Islands (formerly called Navigators' Islands) in the South Pacific Ocean, or their inhabitants. -- n. An inhabitant of the Samoan Islands.
[1913 Webster]

Samovar
Sa"mo*var (?), n. [Russ. samovar'.] A metal urn used in Russia for making tea. It is filled with water, which is heated by charcoal placed in a pipe, with chimney attached, which passes through the urn.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Samoyedes
Sam`oy*edes" (?), n. pl.; sing. Samoyede (&unr_;). (Ethnol.) An ignorant and degraded Turanian tribe which occupies a portion of Northern Russia and a part of Siberia.
[1913 Webster]

Samp
Samp (sămp), n. [Massachusetts Indian nasàump unparched meal porridge.] An article of food consisting of maize broken or bruised, which is cooked by boiling, and usually eaten with milk; coarse hominy. [U. S.]
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sampan
Sam"pan (?), n. (Naut.) A Chinese boat from twelve to fifteen feet long, covered with a house, and sometimes used as a permanent habitation on the inland waters. [Written also sanpan.]
[1913 Webster]

Samphire
Sam"phire (? or ?; 277), n. [F. l'herbe de Saint Pierre. See Saint, and Petrel.] (Bot.) (a) A fleshy, suffrutescent, umbelliferous European plant (Crithmum maritimum). It grows among rocks and on cliffs along the seacoast, and is used for pickles.
[1913 Webster]

Hangs one that gathers samphire, dreadful trade! Shak.
[1913 Webster]

(b) The species of glasswort (Salicornia herbacea); -- called in England marsh samphire. (c) A seashore shrub (Borrichia arborescens) of the West Indies.
[1913 Webster]

Golden samphire. See under Golden.
[1913 Webster]

Sample
Sam"ple (?), n. [OE. sample, asaumple, OF. essample, example, fr. L. exemplum. See Example, and cf. Ensample, Sampler.] 1. Example; pattern. [Obs.] Spenser. “A sample to the youngest.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Thus he concludes, and every hardy knight
His sample followed.
Fairfax.
[1913 Webster]

2. A part of anything presented for inspection, or shown as evidence of the quality of the whole; a specimen; as, goods are often purchased by samples.
[1913 Webster]

I design this but for a sample of what I hope more fully to discuss. Woodward.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Specimen; example. See Specimen.
[1913 Webster]

Sample
Sam"ple, v. t. 1. To make or show something similar to; to match. Bp. Hall.
[1913 Webster]

2. To take or to test a sample or samples of; as, to sample sugar, teas, wools, cloths.
[1913 Webster]

Sampler
Sam"pler (?), n. [See Exampler, Exemplar.] 1. One who makes up samples for inspection; one who examines samples, or by samples; as, a wool sampler.
[1913 Webster]

2. A pattern; a specimen; especially, a collection of needlework patterns, as letters, borders, etc., to be used as samples, or to display the skill of the worker.
[1913 Webster]

Susie dear, bring your sampler and Mrs. Schumann will show you how to make that W you bothered over. E. E. Hale.
[1913 Webster]

Samshu
Samshoo
Sam"shoo, Sam"shu (&unr_;), n. [Chinese san-shao thrice fired.] A spirituous liquor distilled by the Chinese from the yeasty liquor in which boiled rice has fermented under pressure. S. W. Williams.
[1913 Webster]

Samson
Sam"son (?), n. An Israelite of Bible record (see Judges xiii.), distinguished for his great strength; hence, a man of extraordinary physical strength.
[1913 Webster]

Samson post. (a) (Naut.) A strong post resting on the keelson, and supporting a beam of the deck; also, a temporary or movable pillar carrying a leading block or pulley for various purposes. Brande & C. (b) In deep-well boring, the post which supports the walking beam of the apparatus.
[1913 Webster]

Samurai
Sa"mu*rai` (?), n. pl. & sing. [Jap.] In the former feudal system of Japan, the class or a member of the class, of military retainers of the daimios, constituting the gentry or lesser nobility. They possessed power of life and death over the commoners, and wore two swords as their distinguishing mark. Their special rights and privileges were abolished with the fall of feudalism in 1871. They were referred to as “a cross between a knight and a gentleman”.
[Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

Sanability
San`a*bil"i*ty (?), n. The quality or state of being sanable; sanableness; curableness.
[1913 Webster]

Sanable
San"a*ble (?), a. [L. sanabilis, fr. sanare to heal, fr. sanus sound, healthy. See Sane.] Capable of being healed or cured; susceptible of remedy.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Remediable; curable; healable.
[1913 Webster]

Sanableness
San"a*ble*ness, n. The quality of being sanable.
[1913 Webster]

Sanation
Sa*na"tion (?), n. [L. sanatio. See Sanable.] The act of healing or curing. [Obs.] Wiseman.
[1913 Webster]

Sanative
San"a*tive (?), a. [LL. sanativus.] Having the power to cure or heal; healing; tending to heal; sanatory. -- San"a*tive*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Sanatorium
San`a*to"ri*um (?), n. [NL. See Sanatory.] An establishment for the treatment of the sick; a resort for invalids. See Sanitarium.
[1913 Webster]

Sanatory
San"a*to*ry (?), a. [LL. sanatorius, fr. L. sanare to heal. See Sanable.] Conducive to health; tending to cure; healing; curative; sanative.
[1913 Webster]

Sanatory ordinances for the protection of public health, such as quarantine, fever hospitals, draining, etc. De Quincey.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Sanatory and sanitary should not be confounded. Sanatory signifies conducive to health, while sanitary has the more general meaning of pertaining to health.
[1913 Webster]

Sanbenito
San`be*ni"to (?), n. [Sp. & Pg. sambenito, contr. from L. saccus sack + benedictus blessed.] 1. Anciently, a sackcloth coat worn by penitents on being reconciled to the church.
[1913 Webster]

2. A garnment or cap, or sometimes both, painted with flames, figures, etc., and worn by persons who had been examined by the Inquisition and were brought forth for punishment at the auto-da-fé.
[1913 Webster]

Sancte bell
Sance-bell
{ Sance"-bell` (?), Sanc"te bell` (?), } n. See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus.
[1913 Webster]

Sancho
San"cho (?), n. [Sp., a proper name.] (Card Playing) The nine of trumps in sancho pedro.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sancho pedro
Sancho pedro. [Sp. Pedro Peter.] (Card Playing) A variety of auction pitch in which the nine (sancho) and five (pedro) of trumps are added as counting cards at their pip value, and the ten of trumps counts game.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sanctificate
Sanc"ti*fi*cate (?), v. t. [L. sanctificatus, p. p. of sanctificare.] To sanctify. [Obs.] Barrow.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctification
Sanc`ti*fi*ca"tion (?), n. [L. sanctificatio: cf. F. sanctification.] 1. The act of sanctifying or making holy; the state of being sanctified or made holy; esp. (Theol.), the act of God's grace by which the affections of men are purified, or alienated from sin and the world, and exalted to a supreme love to God; also, the state of being thus purified or sanctified.
[1913 Webster]

God hath from the beginning chosen you to salvation through sanctification of the Spirit and belief of the truth. 2 Thess. ii. 13.
[1913 Webster]

2. The act of consecrating, or of setting apart for a sacred purpose; consecration. Bp. Burnet.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctified
Sanc"ti*fied (?), a. Made holy; also, made to have the air of sanctity; sanctimonious.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctifier
Sanc"ti*fi`er (?), n. One who sanctifies, or makes holy; specifically, the Holy Spirit.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctify
Sanc"ti*fy (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sanctified (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sanctifying (?).] [F. sanctifier, L. sanctificare; sanctus holy + -ficare (in comp.) to make. See Saint, and -fy.] 1. To make sacred or holy; to set apart to a holy or religious use; to consecrate by appropriate rites; to hallow.
[1913 Webster]

God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it. Gen. ii. 3.
[1913 Webster]

Moses . . . sanctified Aaron and his garments. Lev. viii. 30.
[1913 Webster]

2. To make free from sin; to cleanse from moral corruption and pollution; to purify.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctify them through thy truth. John xvii. 17.
[1913 Webster]

3. To make efficient as the means of holiness; to render productive of holiness or piety.
[1913 Webster]

A means which his mercy hath sanctified so to me as to make me repent of that unjust act. Eikon Basilike.
[1913 Webster]

4. To impart or impute sacredness, venerableness, inviolability, title to reverence and respect, or the like, to; to secure from violation; to give sanction to.
[1913 Webster]

The holy man, amazed at what he saw,
Made haste to sanctify the bliss by law.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Truth guards the poet, sanctifies the line. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctifyingly
Sanc"ti*fy`ing*ly (?), adv. In a manner or degree tending to sanctify or make holy.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctiloquent
Sanc*til"o*quent (?), a. [L. sanctus holy + loquens, p. pr. of loqui to speak.] Discoursing on heavenly or holy things, or in a holy manner.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctimonial
Sanc`ti*mo"ni*al (?), a. [Cf. LL. sanctimonialis. ] Sanctimonious. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sanctimonious
Sanc`ti*mo"ni*ous (?), a. [See Sanctimony.] 1. Possessing sanctimony; holy; sacred; saintly. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Making a show of sanctity; affecting saintliness; hypocritically devout or pious. “Like the sanctimonious pirate.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

-- Sanc`ti*mo"ni*ous*ly, adv. -- Sanc`ti*mo"ni*ous*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctimony
Sanc"ti*mo*ny (?), n. [L. sanctimonia, fr. sanctus holy: cf. OF. sanctimonie. See Saint.] Holiness; devoutness; scrupulous austerity; sanctity; especially, outward or artificial saintliness; assumed or pretended holiness; hypocritical devoutness.
[1913 Webster]

Her pretense is a pilgrimage; . . . which holy undertaking with most austere sanctimony she accomplished. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sanction
Sanc"tion (?), n. [L. sanctio, from sancire, sanctum to render sacred or inviolable, to fix unalterably: cf. F. sanction. See Saint.] 1. Solemn or ceremonious ratification; an official act of a superior by which he ratifies and gives validity to the act of some other person or body; establishment or furtherance of anything by giving authority to it; confirmation; approbation.
[1913 Webster]

The strictest professors of reason have added the sanction of their testimony. I. Watts.
[1913 Webster]

2. Anything done or said to enforce the will, law, or authority of another; as, legal sanctions.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Ratification; authorization; authority; countenance; support.
[1913 Webster]

Sanction
Sanc"tion, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sanctioned (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sanctioning.] To give sanction to; to ratify; to confirm; to approve.
[1913 Webster]

Would have counseled, or even sanctioned, such perilous experiments. De Quincey.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- To ratify; confirm; authorize; countenance.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctionary
Sanc"tion*a*ry (?), a. Of, pertaining to, or giving, sanction.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctitude
Sanc"ti*tude (?), n. [L. sanctitudo.] Holiness; sacredness; sanctity. [R.] Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctity
Sanc"ti*ty (?), n.; pl. Sanctities (#). [L. sanctitas, from sanctus holy. See Saint.] 1. The state or quality of being sacred or holy; holiness; saintliness; moral purity; godliness.
[1913 Webster]

To sanctity she made no pretense, and, indeed, narrowly escaped the imputation of irreligion. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

2. Sacredness; solemnity; inviolability; religious binding force; as, the sanctity of an oath.
[1913 Webster]

3. A saint or holy being. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

About him all the sanctities of heaven. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Holiness; godliness; piety; devotion; goodness; purity; religiousness; sacredness; solemnity. See the Note under Religion.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctuarize
Sanc"tu*a*rize (?), v. t. To shelter by means of a sanctuary or sacred privileges. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctuary
Sanc"tu*a*ry (?), n.; pl. Sanctuaries (#). [OE. seintuarie, OF. saintuaire, F. sanctuaire, fr. L. sanctuarium, from sanctus sacred, holy. See Saint.] A sacred place; a consecrated spot; a holy and inviolable site. Hence, specifically: (a) The most retired part of the temple at Jerusalem, called the Holy of Holies, in which was kept the ark of the covenant, and into which no person was permitted to enter except the high priest, and he only once a year, to intercede for the people; also, the most sacred part of the tabernacle; also, the temple at Jerusalem. (b) (Arch.) The most sacred part of any religious building, esp. that part of a Christian church in which the altar is placed. (c) A house consecrated to the worship of God; a place where divine service is performed; a church, temple, or other place of worship. (d) A sacred and inviolable asylum; a place of refuge and protection; shelter; refuge; protection.
[1913 Webster]

These laws, whoever made them, bestowed on temples the privilege of sanctuary. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

The admirable works of painting were made fuel for the fire; but some relics of it took sanctuary under ground, and escaped the common destiny. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Sanctum
Sanc"tum (?), n. [L., p. p. of sancire to consecrate.] A sacred place; hence, a place of retreat; a room reserved for personal use; as, an editor's sanctum.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctum sanctorum [L.], the Holy of Holies; the most holy place, as in the Jewish temple.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctus
Sanc"tus (?), n. [L. sanctus, p. p. of sancire.] 1. (Eccl.) A part of the Mass, or, in Protestant churches, a part of the communion service, of which the first words in Latin are Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus [Holy, holy, holy]; -- called also Tersanctus.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Mus.) An anthem composed for these words.
[1913 Webster]

Sanctus bell, a small bell usually suspended in a bell cot at the apex of the nave roof, over the chancel arch, in mediaeval churches, but a hand bell is now often used; -- so called because rung at the singing of the sanctus, at the conclusion of the ordinary of the Mass, and again at the elevation of the host. Called also Mass bell, sacring bell, saints' bell, sance-bell, sancte bell.
[1913 Webster]

Sand
Sand (?), n. [AS. sand; akin to D. zand, G. sand, OHG. sant, Icel. sandr, Dan. & Sw. sand, Gr. &unr_;.] 1. Fine particles of stone, esp. of siliceous stone, but not reduced to dust; comminuted stone in the form of loose grains, which are not coherent when wet.
[1913 Webster]

That finer matter, called sand, is no other than very small pebbles. Woodward.
[1913 Webster]

2. A single particle of such stone. [R.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. The sand in the hourglass; hence, a moment or interval of time; the term or extent of one's life.
[1913 Webster]

The sands are numbered that make up my life. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. pl. Tracts of land consisting of sand, like the deserts of Arabia and Africa; also, extensive tracts of sand exposed by the ebb of the tide. “The Libyan sands.” Milton. “The sands o' Dee.” C. Kingsley.
[1913 Webster]

5. Courage; pluck; grit. [Slang]
[1913 Webster]

Sand badger (Zool.), the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand bag. (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as in fortification, for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand, used as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made into a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel of hot sand in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated are partially immersed. (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in hot sand. -- Sand bed, a thick layer of sand, whether deposited naturally or artificially; specifically, a thick layer of sand into which molten metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. -- Sand birds (Zool.), a collective name for numerous species of limicoline birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many others; -- called also shore birds. -- Sand blast, a process of engraving and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand against them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in the process. -- Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover, for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent slipping. -- Sand-box tree (Bot.), a tropical American tree (Hura crepitans). Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which, when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds. See Illust. of Regma. -- Sand bug (Zool.), an American anomuran crustacean (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is often used as bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand canal (Zool.), a tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and connecting the oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It appears to be excretory in function. -- Sand cock (Zool.), the redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zool.) Same as Sand saucer, below. -- Sand crab. (Zool.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or ocypodian. -- Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the coronet, in the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness. -- Sand cricket (Zool.), any one of several species of large terrestrial crickets of the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera, native of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk (Zool.), any ophidioid fish. See Illust. under Ophidioid. -- Sand dab (Zool.), a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called also rusty dab. The name is also applied locally to other allied species. -- Sand darter (Zool.), a small etheostomoid fish of the Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zool.), any one of several species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on sandy bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast. -- Sand drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand. -- Sand eel. (Zool.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific Ocean fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth. -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea. (Zool.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy places, especially the common dog flea. (b) The chigoe. (c) Any leaping amphipod crustacean; a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach flea, under Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by the wind. James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zool.) (a) The sandnecker. (b) The European smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called also kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zool.), any one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium, abounding on sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United States. They are very troublesome on account of their biting habits. Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall. (Geol.) See Sand pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in sand; especially, a tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous bearded joints, and acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic coast. -- Sand grouse (Zool.), any one of many species of Old World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both grouse and pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga. They mostly belong to the genus Pterocles, as the common Indian species (Pterocles exustus). The large sand grouse (Pterocles arenarius), the painted sand grouse (Pterocles fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (Pterocles alchata) are also found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. -- Sand hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zool.), the American brown crane (Grus Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zool.), a beach flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zool.), a sand wasp. -- Sand lark. (Zool.) (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of India. (b) A small sandpiper, or plover, as the ringneck, the sanderling, and the common European sandpiper. (c) The Australian red-capped dotterel (Aegialophilus ruficapillus); -- called also red-necked plover. -- Sand launce (Zool.), a lant, or launce. -- Sand lizard (Zool.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). -- Sand martin (Zool.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zool.), the coast rat. -- Sand monitor (Zool.), a large Egyptian lizard (Monitor arenarius) which inhabits dry localities. -- Sand mouse (Zool.), the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under Myrtle. -- Sand partridge (Zool.), either of two small Asiatic partridges of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus is spurless. One species (Ammoperdix Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The other species (Ammoperdix Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also seesee partridge, and teehoo. -- Sand picture, a picture made by putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike. (Zool.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand storm which takes the form of a whirling pillar in its progress in desert tracts like those of the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe (Geol.), a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in depth, occurring especially in calcareous rocks, and often filled with gravel, sand, etc.; -- called also sand gall. -- Sand pride (Zool.), a small British lamprey now considered to be the young of larger species; -- called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian well boring, a long, slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zool.), the pocket gopher. -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zool.), the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zool.), the mass of egg capsules, or oothecae, of any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera. It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand; -- called also sand collar. -- Sand screw (Zool.), an amphipod crustacean (Lepidactylis arenarius), which burrows in the sandy seabeaches of Europe and America. -- Sand shark (Zool.), an American shark (Odontaspis littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of the Eastern United States; -- called also gray shark, and dogfish shark. See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zool.), any one of several species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as, the ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand skipper (Zool.), a beach flea, or orchestian. -- Sand smelt (Zool.), a silverside. -- Sand snake. (Zool.) (a) Any one of several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native of Southern Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially Eryx jaculus of India and Eryx Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African snake of the genus Psammophis, especially Psammophis sibilans. -- Sand snipe (Zool.), the sandpiper. -- Sand star (Zool.), an ophiurioid starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a cloud of sand driven violently by the wind. -- Sand sucker, the sandnecker. -- Sand swallow (Zool.), the bank swallow. See under Bank. -- Sand trap, (Golf) a shallow pit on a golf course having a layer of sand in it, usually located near a green, and designed to function as a hazard, due to the difficulty of hitting balls effectively from such a position. -- Sand tube, a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of vitrified sand, produced by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b) (Zool.) Any tube made of cemented sand. (c) (Zool.) In starfishes, a tube having calcareous particles in its wall, which connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper. (Zool.) See Hognose snake. -- Sand wasp (Zool.), any one of numerous species of hymenopterous insects belonging to the families Pompilidae and Spheridae, which dig burrows in sand. The female provisions the nest with insects or spiders which she paralyzes by stinging, and which serve as food for her young.
[1913 Webster]

Sand
Sand (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sanded; p. pr. & vb. n. Sanding.] 1. To sprinkle or cover with sand.
[1913 Webster]

2. To drive upon the sand. [Obs.] Burton.
[1913 Webster]

3. To bury (oysters) beneath drifting sand or mud.
[1913 Webster]

4. To mix with sand for purposes of fraud; as, to sand sugar. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Sandal
San"dal (?), n. Same as Sendal.
[1913 Webster]

Sails of silk and ropes of sandal. Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

Sandal
San"dal, n. Sandalwood. “Fans of sandal.” Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Sandal
San"dal, n. [F. sandale, L. sandalium, Gr. &unr_;, dim. of &unr_;, probably from Per. sandal.] (a) A kind of shoe consisting of a sole strapped to the foot; a protection for the foot, covering its lower surface, but not its upper. (b) A kind of slipper. (c) An overshoe with parallel openings across the instep.
[1913 Webster]

Sandaled
San"daled (?), a. 1. Wearing sandals.
[1913 Webster]

The measured footfalls of his sandaled feet. Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

2. Made like a sandal.
[1913 Webster]

Sandaliform
San*dal"i*form (?), a. [Sandal + -form.] (Bot.) Shaped like a sandal or slipper.
[1913 Webster]

Sandalwood
San"dal*wood (?), n. [F. sandal, santal, fr. Ar. çandal, or Gr. sa`ntalon; both ultimately fr. Skr. candana. Cf. Sanders.] (Bot.) (a) The highly perfumed yellowish heartwood of an East Indian and Polynesian tree (Santalum album), and of several other trees of the same genus, as the Hawaiian Santalum Freycinetianum and Santalum pyrularium, the Australian Santalum latifolium, etc. The name is extended to several other kinds of fragrant wood. (b) Any tree of the genus Santalum, or a tree which yields sandalwood. (c) The red wood of a kind of buckthorn, used in Russia for dyeing leather (Rhamnus Dahuricus).
[1913 Webster]

False sandalwood, the fragrant wood of several trees not of the genus Santalum, as Ximenia Americana, Myoporum tenuifolium of Tahiti. -- Red sandalwood, a heavy, dark red dyewood, being the heartwood of two leguminous trees of India (Pterocarpus santalinus, and Adenanthera pavonina); -- called also red sanderswood, sanders or saunders, and rubywood.
[1913 Webster]

Sandarac
Sandarach
{ San"da*rach, San"da*rac, } (&unr_;), n. [L. sandaraca, Gr. &unr_;.] 1. (Min.) Realgar; red sulphide of arsenic. [Archaic]
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot. Chem.) A white or yellow resin obtained from a Barbary tree (Callitris quadrivalvis or Thuya articulata), and pulverized for pounce; -- probably so called from a resemblance to the mineral.
[1913 Webster]

sandbag
sand"bag` (?), n. A bag filled with sand; small sandbags may be used as a weapon, or larger ones to build walls or as ballast; as, they kept the flooding river from the area by buiding a temmporary dike out of sandbags.
[WordNet 1.6]

sandbag
sand"bag` (?), v. To treat harshly or unfairly. [wns=1]
[WordNet 1.6]

2. To hit something or somebody with or as if with a sandbag. [wns=2]
[WordNet 1.6]

3. To protect or strengthen with sandbags; stop up; as, the residents sandbagged the beach front. [wns=3]
[WordNet 1.6]

4. To thwart (another person's plans) by surreptitious maneuvers; as, he sandbagged my proposal by talking in private with other members of the committee. [informal]
[PJC]

5. To intimidate or coerce, especially by crude methods. [Informal]
[PJC]

6. To deceive and take advantage of (a person) by misrepresenting one's true intentions. [Informal]
[PJC]

7. Hence: (Poker) To encourage opponents into betting more by first refraining from betting while having a strong hand, and only later raising the stakes. In informal games, certain types of sandbagging are forbidden.
[PJC]

Sandbagger
Sand"bag`ger (?), n. An assaulter whose weapon is a sand bag. See Sand bag, under Sand.
[1913 Webster]

Sand-blind
Sand"-blind` (?), a. [For sam blind half blind; AS. sām- half (akin to semi-) + blind.] Having defective sight; dim-sighted; purblind. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sanded
Sand"ed, a. 1. Covered or sprinkled with sand; sandy; barren. Thomson.
[1913 Webster]

2. Marked with small spots; variegated with spots; speckled; of a sandy color, as a hound. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. Short-sighted. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Sandemanian
San`de*ma"ni*an (?), n. (Eccl. Hist.) A follower of Robert Sandeman, a Scotch sectary of the eighteenth century. See Glassite.
[1913 Webster]

Sandemanianism
San`de*ma"ni*an*ism (?), n. The faith or system of the Sandemanians. A. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

Sanderling
San"der*ling (?), n. [Sand + -ling. So called because it obtains its food by searching the moist sands of the seashore.] (Zool.) A small gray and brown sandpiper (Calidris arenaria) very common on sandy beaches in America, Europe, and Asia. Called also curwillet, sand lark, stint, and ruddy plover.
[1913 Webster]

Sanders
San"ders (?), n. [See Sandal.] An old name of sandalwood, now applied only to the red sandalwood. See under Sandalwood.
[1913 Webster]

Sanders-blue
San"ders-blue" (?), n. See Saunders-blue.
[1913 Webster]

Sandever
San"de*ver (?), n. See Sandiver. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sandfish
Sand"fish` (?), n. (Zool.) A small marine fish of the Pacific coast of North America (Trichodon trichodon) which buries itself in the sand.
[1913 Webster]

Sandglass
Sand"glass` (?), n. An instrument for measuring time by the running of sand. See Hourglass.
[1913 Webster]

Sandhiller
Sand"hill`er (?), n. A nickname given to any “poor white” living in the pine woods which cover the sandy hills in Georgia and South Carolina. [U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Sandiness
Sand"i*ness (?), n. The quality or state of being sandy, or of being of a sandy color.
[1913 Webster]

Sandish
Sand"ish, a. Approaching the nature of sand; loose; not compact. [Obs.] Evelyn.
[1913 Webster]

Sandiver
San"di*ver (?), n. [Perh. fr. OF. saïn grease, fat + de of + verre glass (cf. Saim), or fr. F. sel de verre sandiver.] A whitish substance which is cast up, as a scum, from the materials of glass in fusion, and, floating on the top, is skimmed off; -- called also glass gall. [Formerly written also sandever.]
[1913 Webster]

Sandix
San"dix (?), n. [L. sandix, sandyx, vermilion, or a color like vermilion, Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;.] A kind of minium, or red lead, made by calcining carbonate of lead, but inferior to true minium. [Written also sandyx.] [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sand-lot
sandlot
sand"lot, Sand"-lot`, a. 1. Lit., of or pert. to a lot or piece of sandy ground, -- hence, pert. to, or characteristic of, the policy or practices of the socialistic or communistic followers of the Irish agitator Denis Kearney, who delivered many of his speeches in the open sand lots about San Francisco; as, the sand-lot constitution of California, framed in 1879, under the influence of sand-lot agitation.

2. of or pertaining to a sandlot; -- used especially in reference to informal games played by children; as, sandlot baseball.
[PJC]

sandlot
sand"lot (sănd"l&obreve_;t), n. a vacant lot, especially one where children play games.
[PJC]

Sandman
Sand"man` (?), n. A mythical person who makes children sleepy, so that they rub their eyes as if there were sand in them.
[1913 Webster]

Sandnecker
Sand"neck`er (?), n. (Zool.) A European flounder (Hippoglossoides limandoides); -- called also rough dab, long fluke, sand fluke, and sand sucker.
[1913 Webster]

Sandpaper
Sand"pa`per (?), n. Paper covered on one side with sand glued fast, -- used for smoothing and polishing.
[1913 Webster]

Sandpaper
Sand"pa`per, v. t. To smooth or polish with sandpaper; as, to sandpaper a door.
[1913 Webster]

Sandpiper
Sand"pi`per (?), n. 1. (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of small limicoline game birds belonging to Tringa, Actodromas, Ereunetes, and various allied genera of the family Tringidae.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The most important North American species are the pectoral sandpiper (Tringa maculata), called also brownback, grass snipe, and jacksnipe; the red-backed, or black-breasted, sandpiper, or dunlin (Tringa alpina); the purple sandpiper (Tringa maritima: the red-breasted sandpiper, or knot (Tringa canutus); the semipalmated sandpiper (Ereunetes pusillus); the spotted sandpiper, or teeter-tail (Actitis macularia); the buff-breasted sandpiper (Tryngites subruficollis), and the Bartramian sandpiper, or upland plover. See under Upland. Among the European species are the dunlin, the knot, the ruff, the sanderling, and the common sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucus syn. Tringoides hypoleucus), called also fiddler, peeper, pleeps, weet-weet, and summer snipe. Some of the small plovers and tattlers are also called sandpipers.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) A small lamprey eel; the pride.
[1913 Webster]

Curlew sandpiper. See under Curlew. -- Stilt sandpiper. See under Stilt.
[1913 Webster]

Sandpit
Sand"pit` (?), n. A pit or excavation from which sand is or has been taken.
[1913 Webster]

Sandre
San"dre (?), n. (Zool.) A Russian fish (Lucioperca sandre) which yields a valuable oil, called sandre oil, used in the preparation of caviar.
[1913 Webster]

Sandstone
Sand"stone` (?), n. A rock made of sand more or less firmly united. Common or siliceous sandstone consists mainly of quartz sand.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Different names are applied to the various kinds of sandstone according to their composition; as, granitic, argillaceous, micaceous, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Flexible sandstone (Min.), the finer-grained variety of itacolumite, which on account of the scales of mica in the lamination is quite flexible. -- Red sandstone, a name given to two extensive series of British rocks in which red sandstones predominate, one below, and the other above, the coal measures. These were formerly known as the Old and the New Red Sandstone respectively, and the former name is still retained for the group preceding the Coal and referred to the Devonian age, but the term New Red Sandstone is now little used, some of the strata being regarded as Permian and the remained as Triassic. See the Chart of Geology.
[1913 Webster]

Sandwich
Sand"wich (?; 277), n. [Named from the Earl of Sandwich.] Two pieces of bread and butter with a thin slice of meat, cheese, or the like, between them.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Sandwich
Sand"wich, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sandwiched (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sandwiching.] To make into a sandwich; also, figuratively, to insert between portions of something dissimilar; to form of alternate parts or things, or alternating layers of a different nature; to interlard.
[1913 Webster]

Sandworm
Sand"worm` (?), n. (Zool.) (a) Any one of numerous species of annelids which burrow in the sand of the seashore. (b) Any species of annelids of the genus Sabellaria. They construct firm tubes of agglutinated sand on rocks and shells, and are sometimes destructive to oysters. (c) The chigoe, a species of flea.
[1913 Webster]

Sandwort
Sand"wort` (?), n. (Bot.) Any plant of the genus Arenaria, low, tufted herbs (order Caryophyllaceae.)
[1913 Webster]

Sandy
Sand"y (?), a. [Compar. Sandier (?); superl. Sandiest.] [AS. sandig.] 1. Consisting of, abounding with, or resembling, sand; full of sand; covered or sprinkled with sand; as, a sandy desert, road, or soil.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of the color of sand; of a light yellowish red color; as, sandy hair.
[1913 Webster]

Sandyx
San"dyx (?), n. [L.] See Sandix.
[1913 Webster]

Sane
Sane (?), a. [L. sanus; cf. Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, safe, sound. Cf. Sound, a.] 1. Being in a healthy condition; not deranged; acting rationally; -- said of the mind.
[1913 Webster]

2. Mentally sound; possessing a rational mind; having the mental faculties in such condition as to be able to anticipate and judge of the effect of one's actions in an ordinary maner; -- said of persons.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Sound; healthy; underanged; unbroken.
[1913 Webster]

Saneness
Sane"ness, n. The state of being sane; sanity.
[1913 Webster]

Sang
Sang (?), imp. of Sing.
[1913 Webster]

Sangu
Sanga
{ ‖San"ga (?), San"gu (?), } n. (Zool.) The Abyssinian ox (Bos Africanus syn. Bibos Africanus), noted for the great length of its horns. It has a hump on its back.
[1913 Webster]

Sangaree
San`ga*ree" (?), n. [Sp. sangria, lit., bleeding, from sangre, blood, L. sanguis.] Wine and water sweetened and spiced, -- a favorite West Indian drink.
[1913 Webster]

Sang-froid
Sang`-froid" (?), n. [F., cold blood.] Freedom from agitation or excitement of mind; coolness in trying circumstances; indifference; calmness. Burke.
[1913 Webster]

Sangiac
San"gi*ac (?), n. See Sanjak.
[1913 Webster]

Sangreal
Sangraal
{ San`graal" (?), San"gre*al (?), } n. [See Saint, and Grail.] See Holy Grail, under Grail.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguiferous
San*guif"er*ous (?), a. [L. sanguis blood + -ferous.] (Physiol.) Conveying blood; as, sanguiferous vessels, i. e., the arteries, veins, capillaries.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguification
San`gui*fi*ca"tion (?), n. [Cf. F. sanguification. See Sanguify.] (Physiol.) The production of blood; the conversion of the products of digestion into blood; hematosis.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguifier
San"gui*fi`er (?), n. A producer of blood.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguifluous
San*guif"lu*ous (?), a. [L. sanguis blood + fluere to flow.] Flowing or running with blood.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguify
San"gui*fy (?), v. t. [L. sanguis blood + -fy: cf. F. sanguifier.] To produce blood from.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguigenous
San*guig"e*nous (?), a. [L. sanguis + -genous.] Producing blood; as, sanguigenous food.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguinaceous
San`gui*na"ceous (?), n. Of a blood-red color; sanguine.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguinaria
San`gui*na"ri*a (?), n. [NL. See Sanguinary, a. & n.] 1. (Bot.) A genus of plants of the Poppy family.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Sanguinaria Canadensis, or bloodroot, is the only species. It has a perennial rootstock, which sends up a few roundish lobed leaves and solitary white blossoms in early spring. See Bloodroot.
[1913 Webster]

2. The rootstock of the bloodroot, used in medicine as an emetic, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguinarily
San"gui*na*ri*ly (?), adv. In a sanguinary manner.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguinariness
San"gui*na*ri*ness, n. The quality or state of being sanguinary.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguinary
San"gui*na*ry (?), a. [L. sanguinarius, fr. sanguis blood: cf. F. sanguinaire.] 1. Attended with much bloodshed; bloody; murderous; as, a sanguinary war, contest, or battle.
[1913 Webster]

We may not propagate religion by wars, or by sanguinary persecutions to force consciences. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

2. Bloodthirsty; cruel; eager to shed blood.
[1913 Webster]

Passion . . . makes us brutal and sanguinary. Broome.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Bloody; murderous; bloodthirsty; cruel.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguinary
San"gui*na*ry, n. [L. herba sanguinaria an herb that stanches blood: cf. F. sanguinaire. See Sanguinary, a.] (Bot.) (a) The yarrow. (b) The Sanguinaria.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguine
San"guine (?), a. [F. sanguin, L. sanguineus, fr. sanguis blood. Cf. Sanguineous.] 1. Having the color of blood; red.
[1913 Webster]

Of his complexion he was sanguine. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Like to that sanguine flower inscribed with woe. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Characterized by abundance and active circulation of blood; as, a sanguine bodily temperament.
[1913 Webster]

3. Warm; ardent; as, a sanguine temper.
[1913 Webster]

4. Anticipating the best; cheerfully optimistic; not desponding; confident; full of hope; as, sanguine of success; a sanguine disposition.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Warm; ardent; lively; confident; hopeful; optimistic.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguine
San"guine, n. 1. Blood color; red. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. Anything of a blood-red color, as cloth. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

In sanguine and in pes he clad was all. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Min.) Bloodstone.
[1913 Webster]

4. Red crayon. See the Note under Crayon, 1.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguine
San"guine, v. t. To stain with blood; to impart the color of blood to; to ensanguine.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguineless
San"guine*less, a. Destitute of blood; pale. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Sanguinely
San"guine*ly, adv. In a sanguine manner.
[1913 Webster]

I can not speculate quite so sanguinely as he does. Burke.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguineness
San"guine*ness, n. The quality of being sanguine.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguineous
San*guin"e*ous (?), a. [L. sanguineus. See Sanguine.] 1. Abounding with blood; sanguine.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of or pertaining to blood; bloody; constituting blood. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

3. Blood-red; crimson. Keats.
[1913 Webster]

sanguinity
san*guin"i*ty, n. The quality of being sanguine; sanguineness. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguinivorous
San"gui*niv"o*rous (?), a. [L. sanguis + vorare to devour.] Subsisting on blood.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguinolency
San*guin"o*len*cy (?), n. The state of being sanguinolent, or bloody.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguinolent
San*guin"o*lent (?), a. [L. sanguinolentus, from sanguis blood: cf. F. sanguinolent.] Tinged or mingled with blood; bloody; as, sanguinolent sputa.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguisuge
San"gui*suge (?), n. [L. sanguisuga; sanguis blood + sugere to suck.] (Zool.) A bloodsucker, or leech.
[1913 Webster]

Sanguivorous
San*guiv"o*rous (?), a. [L. sanguis blood + vorare to devour.] (Zool.) Subsisting upon blood; -- said of certain blood-sucking bats and other animals. See Vampire.
[1913 Webster]

Sanhedrim
Sanhedrin
{ San"he*drin (?), San"he*drim (?), } n. [Heb. sanhedrīn, fr. Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; with + &unr_; a seat, fr. &unr_; to sit. See Sit.] (Jewish Antiq.) the great council of the Jews, which consisted of seventy members, to whom the high priest was added. It had jurisdiction of religious matters.
[1913 Webster]

Sanhedrist
San"he*drist (?), n. A member of the sanhedrin. Schaeffer (Lange's Com.).
[1913 Webster]

Sanhita
San"hi*ta (?), n. [Skr. samhita, properly, combination.] A collection of vedic hymns, songs, or verses, forming the first part of each Veda.
[1913 Webster]

Sanicle
San"i*cle (?), n. [F., from L. sanare to heal.] (Bot.) Any plant of the umbelliferous genus Sanicula, reputed to have healing powers.
[1913 Webster]

Sanidine
San"i*dine (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;. &unr_;, a board. So called in allusion to the tabular crystals.] (Min.) A variety of orthoclase feldspar common in certain eruptive rocks, as trachyte; -- called also glassy feldspar.
[1913 Webster]

Sanies
Sa"ni*es (?), n. [L.] (Med.) A thin, serous fluid commonly discharged from ulcers or foul wounds.
[1913 Webster]

Sanious
Sa"ni*ous (?), a. [L. saniosus, fr. sanies: cf. F. sanieux.] 1. (Med.) Pertaining to sanies, or partaking of its nature and appearance; thin and serous, with a slight bloody tinge; as, the sanious matter of an ulcer.
[1913 Webster]

2. (med.) Discharging sanies; as, a sanious ulcer.
[1913 Webster]

Sanitarian
San`i*ta"ri*an (?), a. Of or pertaining to health, or the laws of health; sanitary.
[1913 Webster]

Sanitarian
San`i*ta"ri*an, n. An advocate of sanitary measures; one especially interested or versed in sanitary measures.
[1913 Webster]

Sanitarist
San"i*ta*rist (?), n. A sanitarian.
[1913 Webster]

Sanitarium
San`i*ta"ri*um (?), n. [NL. See Sanitary.] A health station or retreat; a sanatorium. “A sanitarium for troops.” L. Oliphant.
[1913 Webster]

Sanitary
San"i*ta*ry (?), a. [L. sanitas health: cf. F. sanitaire. See Sanity.] Of or pertaining to health; designed to secure or preserve health; relating to the preservation or restoration of health; hygienic; as, sanitary regulations. See the Note under Sanatory.
[1913 Webster]

Sanitary Commission. See under Commission.
[1913 Webster]

Sanitation
San`i*ta"tion (?), n. The act of rendering sanitary; the science of sanitary conditions; the preservation of health; the use of sanitary measures; hygiene.
[1913 Webster]

How much sanitation has advanced during the last half century. H. Hartshorne.
[1913 Webster]

Sanity
San"i*ty (?), n. [L. sanitas, from sanus sound, healthy. See Sane.] The condition or quality of being sane; soundness of health of body or mind, especially of the mind; saneness.
[1913 Webster]

Sanjak
San"jak (?), n. [Turk. sanjāg.] A district or a subvision of a vilayet. [Turkey]
[1913 Webster]

San Jose scale
San Jo*sé" scale (?). A very destructive scale insect (Aspidiotus perniciosus) that infests the apple, pear, and other fruit trees. So called because first introduced into the United States at San José, California.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sank
Sank (să&nsmacr_;k), imp. of Sink.
[1913 Webster]

Sankha
Sank"ha (?), n. [Skr. çankha a shell.] A chank shell (Turbinella pyrum); also, a shell bracelet or necklace made in India from the chank shell.
[1913 Webster]

Sankhya
Sankh"ya (?), n. A Hindu system of philosophy which refers all things to soul and a rootless germ called prakriti, consisting of three elements, goodness, passion, and darkness. Whitworth.
[1913 Webster]

Sannop
San"nop (săn"n&obreve_;p), n. Same as Sannup. Bancroft.
[1913 Webster]

Sannup
San"nup (-nŭp), n. A married male Indian; a brave; -- correlative of squaw.
[1913 Webster]

Sanny
San"ny (?), n. The sandpiper. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Sans
Sans (sän; E. sănz), prep. [F., from L. sine without.] Without; deprived or destitute of. Rarely used as an English word.Sans fail.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sanscrit
San"scrit (?), n. See Sanskrit.
[1913 Webster]

Sans-culotte
Sans`-cu`lotte" (F. &unr_;; E. &unr_;), n. [F., without breeches.] 1. A fellow without breeches; a ragged fellow; -- a name of reproach given in the first French revolution to the extreme republican party, who rejected breeches as an emblem peculiar to the upper classes or aristocracy, and adopted pantaloons.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, an extreme or radical republican; a violent revolutionist; a Jacobin.
[1913 Webster]

Sans-culottic
Sans`-cu*lot"tic (?), a. Pertaining to, or involving, sans-culottism; radical; revolutionary; Jacobinical. Carlyle.
[1913 Webster]

Sans-culottism
Sans`-cu*lot"tism (?), n. [F. sans-culottisme.] Extreme republican principles; the principles or practice of the sans-culottes.
[1913 Webster]

Sanskrit
San"skrit (?), n. [Skr. Samsk&rsdot_;ta the Sanskrit language, literally, the perfect, polished, or classical language, fr. samsk&rsdot_;ta prepared, wrought, made, excellent, perfect; sam together (akin to E. same) + k&rsdot_;ta made. See Same, Create.] [Written also Sanscrit.] The ancient language of the Hindoos, long since obsolete in vernacular use, but preserved to the present day as the literary and sacred dialect of India. It is nearly allied to the Persian, and to the principal languages of Europe, classical and modern, and by its more perfect preservation of the roots and forms of the primitive language from which they are all descended, is a most important assistance in determining their history and relations. Cf. Prakrit, and Veda.
[1913 Webster]

Sanskrit
San"skrit, a. Of or pertaining to Sanskrit; written in Sanskrit; as, a Sanskrit dictionary or inscription.
[1913 Webster]

Sanskritic
San*skrit"ic (?), a. Sanskrit.
[1913 Webster]

Sanskritist
San"skrit*ist, n. One versed in Sanskrit.
[1913 Webster]

Sans-souci
Sans`-sou`ci" (?), adv. [F.] Without care; free and easy.
[1913 Webster]

Santal
San"tal (?), n. [Santalum + piperonal.] (Chem.) A colorless crystalline substance, isomeric with piperonal, but having weak acid properties. It is extracted from sandalwood.
[1913 Webster]

Santalaceous
San`ta*la"ceous (?), a. (Bot.) Of or pertaining to a natural order of plants (Santalaceae), of which the genus Santalum is the type, and which includes the buffalo nut and a few other North American plants, and many peculiar plants of the southern hemisphere.
[1913 Webster]

Santalic
San*tal"ic (?), a. (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or obtained from, sandalwood (Santalum); -- used specifically to designate an acid obtained as a resinous or red crystalline dyestuff, which is called also santalin.
[1913 Webster]

Santalin
San"ta*lin (?), n. [Cf. F. santaline.] (Chem.) Santalic acid. See Santalic.
[1913 Webster]

Santalum
San"ta*lum (?), n. [NL. See Sandalwood.] (Bot.) A genus of trees with entire opposite leaves and small apetalous flowers. There are less than a dozen species, occurring from India to Australia and the Pacific Islands. See Sandalwood.
[1913 Webster]

Santees
San`tees" (?), n. pl.; sing. Santee (&unr_;). (Ethnol.) One of the seven confederated tribes of Indians belonging to the Sioux, or Dakotas.
[1913 Webster]

Santer
San"ter (?), v. i. See Saunter.
[1913 Webster]

Santon
San"ton (?), n. [Sp. santon, augmented fr. santo holy, L. sanctus.] A Turkish saint; a kind of dervish, regarded by the people as a saint: also, a hermit.
[1913 Webster]

Santonate
San"to*nate (?), n. (Chem.) A salt of santonic acid.
[1913 Webster]

Santonic
San*ton"ic (?), a. (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid (distinct from santoninic acid) obtained from santonin as a white crystalline substance.
[1913 Webster]

Santonin
San"to*nin (?), n. [L. herba santonica, a kind of plant, fr. Santoni a people of Aquitania; cf. Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. santonine.] (Chem.) A white crystalline substance having a bitter taste, extracted from the buds of levant wormseed and used as an anthelmintic. It occassions a peculiar temporary color blindness, causing objects to appear as if seen through a yellow glass.
[1913 Webster]

Santoninate
San"to*nin`ate (?), n. (Chem.) A salt of santoninic acid.
[1913 Webster]

Santoninic
San`to*nin"ic (?), a. (Chem.) Of or pertaining to santonin; -- used specifically to designate an acid not known in the free state, but obtained in its salts.
[1913 Webster]

Sao
Sa"o (?), n. (Zool.) Any marine annelid of the genus Hyalinaecia, especially Hyalinaecia tubicola of Europe, which inhabits a transparent movable tube resembling a quill in color and texture.
[1913 Webster]

Sap
Sap (?), n. [AS. saep; akin to OHG. saf, G. saft, Icel. safi; of uncertain origin; possibly akin to L. sapere to taste, to be wise, sapa must or new wine boiled thick. Cf. Sapid, Sapient.] 1. The juice of plants of any kind, especially the ascending and descending juices or circulating fluid essential to nutrition.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The ascending is the crude sap, the assimilation of which takes place in the leaves, when it becomes the elaborated sap suited to the growth of the plant.
[1913 Webster]

2. The sapwood, or alburnum, of a tree.
[1913 Webster]

3. A simpleton; a saphead; a milksop. [Slang]
[1913 Webster]

Sap ball (Bot.), any large fungus of the genus Polyporus. See Polyporus. -- Sap green, a dull light green pigment prepared from the juice of the ripe berries of the Rhamnus catharticus, or buckthorn. It is used especially by water-color artists. -- Sap rot, the dry rot. See under Dry. -- Sap sucker (Zool.), any one of several species of small American woodpeckers of the genus Sphyrapicus, especially the yellow-bellied woodpecker (Sphyrapicus varius) of the Eastern United States. They are so named because they puncture the bark of trees and feed upon the sap. The name is loosely applied to other woodpeckers. -- Sap tube (Bot.), a vessel that conveys sap.
[1913 Webster]

Sap
Sap, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sapped (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sapping.] [F. saper (cf. Sp. zapar, It. zapare), fr. sape a sort of scythe, LL. sappa a sort of mattock.] 1. To subvert by digging or wearing away; to mine; to undermine; to destroy the foundation of.
[1913 Webster]

Nor safe their dwellings were, for sapped by floods,
Their houses fell upon their household gods.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Mil.) To pierce with saps.
[1913 Webster]

3. To make unstable or infirm; to unsettle; to weaken.
[1913 Webster]

Ring out the grief that saps the mind. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Sap
Sap (?), v. i. To proceed by mining, or by secretly undermining; to execute saps. W. P. Craighill.
[1913 Webster]

Both assaults are carried on by sapping. Tatler.
[1913 Webster]

Sap
Sap, n. (Mil.) A narrow ditch or trench made from the foremost parallel toward the glacis or covert way of a besieged place by digging under cover of gabions, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Sap fagot (Mil.), a fascine about three feet long, used in sapping, to close the crevices between the gabions before the parapet is made. -- Sap roller (Mil.), a large gabion, six or seven feet long, filled with fascines, which the sapper sometimes rolls along before him for protection from the fire of an enemy.
[1913 Webster]

Sapadillo
Sap`a*dil"lo (?), n. See Sapodila.
[1913 Webster]

Sapajo
Sap"a*jo (?), n. (Zool.) The sapajou.
[1913 Webster]

Sapajou
Sap"a*jou (?), n. [F. sapajou, sajou, Braz. sajuassu.] (Zool.) Any one of several species of South American monkeys of the genus Cebus, having long and prehensile tails. Some of the species are called also capuchins. The bonnet sapajou (Cebus subcristatus), the golden-handed sapajou (Cebus chrysopus), and the white-throated sapajou (Cebus hypoleucus) are well known species. See Capuchin.
[1913 Webster]

Sapan wood
Sa*pan" wood (?). [Malay sapang.] (Bot.) A dyewood yielded by Caesalpinia Sappan, a thorny leguminous tree of Southern Asia and the neighboring islands. It is the original Brazil wood. [Written also sappan wood.]
[1913 Webster]

Sapful
Sap"ful (?), a. Abounding in sap; sappy.
[1913 Webster]

Saphead
Sap"head` (?), n. A weak-minded, stupid fellow; a milksop. [Low]
[1913 Webster]

Saphenous
Sa*phe"nous (?), a. [Gr. &unr_; manifest.] (Anat.) (a) Manifest; -- applied to the two principal superficial veins of the lower limb of man. (b) Of, pertaining to, or in the region of, the saphenous veins; as, the saphenous nerves; the saphenous opening, an opening in the broad fascia of the thigh through which the internal saphenous vein passes.
[1913 Webster]

Sapid
Sap"id (?), a. [L. sapidus, fr. sapere to taste: cf. F. sapide. See Sapient, Savor.] Having the power of affecting the organs of taste; possessing savor, or flavor.
[1913 Webster]

Camels, to make the water sapid, do raise the mud with their feet. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Sapidity
Sa*pid"i*ty (?), n. [Cf. F. sapidité.] The quality or state of being sapid; taste; savor; savoriness.
[1913 Webster]

Whether one kind of sapidity is more effective than another. M. S. Lamson.
[1913 Webster]

Sapidness
Sap"id*ness, n. Quality of being sapid; sapidity.
[1913 Webster]

When the Israelites fancied the sapidness and relish of the fleshpots, they longed to taste and to return. Jer. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

Sapience
Sa"pi*ence (?), n. [L. sapientia: cf. F. sapience. See Sapient..] The quality of being sapient; wisdom; sageness; knowledge. Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

Woman, if I might sit beside your feet,
And glean your scattered sapience.
Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Sapient
Sa"pi*ent (?), a. [L. sapiens, -entis, p. pr. of sapere to taste, to have sense, to know. See Sage, a.] Wise; sage; discerning; -- often in irony or contempt.
[1913 Webster]

Where the sapient king
Held dalliance with his fair Egyptian spouse.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Sage; sagacious; knowing; wise; discerning.
[1913 Webster]

Sapiential
Sa`pi*en"tial (?), a. [L. sapientialis.] Having or affording wisdom. -- Sa`pi*en"tial*ly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

The sapiential books of the Old [Testament]. Jer. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

Sapientious
Sa`pi*en"tious (?), a. Sapiential. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sapientize
Sa"pi*ent*ize, v. t. To make sapient. [R.] Coleridge.
[1913 Webster]

Sapiently
Sa"pi*ent*ly (?), adv. In a sapient manner.
[1913 Webster]

Sapindaceous
Sap`in*da"ceous (?), a. (Bot.) Of or pertaining to an order of trees and shrubs (Sapindaceae), including the (typical) genus Sapindus, the maples, the margosa, and about seventy other genera.
[1913 Webster]

Sapindus
Sa*pin"dus (?), n. [NL., fr. L. sapo soap + Indicus Indian.] (Bot.) A genus of tropical and subtropical trees with pinnate leaves and panicled flowers. The fruits of some species are used instead of soap, and their round black seeds are made into necklaces.
[1913 Webster]

Sapless
Sap"less (?), a. 1. Destitute of sap; not juicy.
[1913 Webster]

2. Fig.: Dry; old; husky; withered; spiritless. “A somewhat sapless womanhood.” Lowell.
[1913 Webster]

Now sapless on the verge of death he stands. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

sapling
sap"ling (?), n. A young tree. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sapodilla
Sap`o*dil"la (?), n. [Sp. zapote, sapotillo, zapotillo, Mexican cochit-zapotl. Cf. Sapota.] (Bot.) A tall, evergeen, tropical American tree (Achras Sapota); also, its edible fruit, the sapodilla plum. [Written also sapadillo, sappadillo, sappodilla, and zapotilla.]
[1913 Webster]

Sapodilla plum (Bot.), the fruit of Achras Sapota. It is about the size of an ordinary quince, having a rough, brittle, dull brown rind, the flesh being of a dirty yellowish white color, very soft, and deliciously sweet. Called also naseberry. It is eatable only when it begins to be spotted, and is much used in desserts.
[1913 Webster]

Sapogenin
Sa*pog"e*nin (?), n. [Saponin + -gen + -in.] (Chem.) A white crystalline substance obtained by the decomposition of saponin.
[1913 Webster]

Saponaceous
Sap`o*na"ceous (?), a. [L. sapo, -onis, soap, of Teutonic origin, and akin to E. soap. See Soap.] Resembling soap; having the qualities of soap; soapy.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Saponaceous bodies are compounds of an acid and a base, and are in reality a kind of salt.
[1913 Webster]

Saponacity
Sap`o*nac"i*ty (?), n. The quality or state of being saponaceous.
[1913 Webster]

Saponary
Sap"o*na*ry (?), a. Saponaceous. Boyle.
[1913 Webster]

Saponifiable
Sa*pon*i*fi`a*ble (?), a. Capable of conversion into soap; as, a saponifiable substance.
[1913 Webster]

Saponification
Sa*pon`i*fi*ca"tion (?), n. [Cf. F. saponification. See Saponify.] The act, process, or result, of soap making; conversion into soap; specifically (Chem.), the decomposition of fats and other ethereal salts by alkalies; as, the saponification of ethyl acetate.
[1913 Webster]

Saponifier
Sa*pon"i*fi`er (?), n. (Chem.) That which saponifies; any reagent used to cause saponification.
[1913 Webster]

Saponify
Sa*pon"i*fy (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saponified (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Saponifying (?).] [L. sapo, -onis, soap + -fy: cf. F. saponifier.] To convert into soap, as tallow or any fat; hence (Chem.), to subject to any similar process, as that which ethereal salts undergo in decomposition; as, to saponify ethyl acetate.
[1913 Webster]

Saponin
Sap"o*nin (?), n. [L. sapo, -onis soap: cf. F. saponine.] (Chem.) A poisonous glucoside found in many plants, as in the root of soapwort (Saponaria officinalis), in the bark of soap bark (Quillaja saponaria), etc. It is extracted as a white amorphous powder, which produces a soapy lather in solution, and produces a local anaesthesia. It is used as a detergent and for emulsifying oils. Formerly called also struthiin, quillaiin, senegin, polygalic acid, etc. By extension, any one of a group of related bodies of which saponin proper is the type.
[1913 Webster + PJC]

Saponite
Sap"o*nite (?), n. [Sw. saponit, fr. L. sapo, -onis, soap.] (Min.) A hydrous silicate of magnesia and alumina. It occurs in soft, soapy, amorphous masses, filling veins in serpentine and cavities in trap rock.
[1913 Webster]

Saponul
Sap"o*nul (?), n. [F. saponule, fr. L. sapo, -onis, soap.] (Old Chem.) A soapy mixture obtained by treating an essential oil with an alkali; hence, any similar compound of an essential oil. [Written also saponule.] [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sapor
Sa"por (?), n. [L. See Savor.] Power of affecting the organs of taste; savor; flavor; taste.
[1913 Webster]

There is some sapor in all aliments. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Saporific
Sap`o*rif"ic (?), a. [L. sapor taste + facere to make.] Having the power to produce the sensation of taste; producing taste, flavor, or relish.
[1913 Webster]

Saporosity
Sap`o*ros"i*ty (?), n. The quality of a body by which it excites the sensation of taste.
[1913 Webster]

Saporous
Sap"o*rous (?), a. [L. saporus that relishes well, savory, fr. sapor taste.] Having flavor or taste; yielding a taste. [R.] Bailey.
[1913 Webster]

Sapota
Sa*po"ta (?), n. [NL., from Sp. sapote, zapote. See Sapodilla.] (Bot.) The sapodilla.
[1913 Webster]

Sapotaceous
Sap`o*ta"ceous (?), a. (Bot.) Of or pertaining to a natural order (Sapotaceae) of (mostly tropical) trees and shrubs, including the star apple, the Lucuma, or natural marmalade tree, the gutta-percha tree (Isonandra), and the India mahwa, as well as the sapodilla, or sapota, after which the order is named.
[1913 Webster]

Sappan wood
Sap*pan" wood" (?). Sapan wood.
[1913 Webster]

Sappare
Sap"pare (?), n. [F. sappare; -- so called by Saussure.] (Min.) Kyanite. [Written also sappar.]
[1913 Webster]

Sapper
Sap"per (?), n. [Cf. F. sapeur.] One who saps; specifically (Mil.), one who is employed in working at saps, building and repairing fortifications, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

Sapphic
Sap"phic (?), a. [L. Sapphicus, Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; Sappho.] 1. Of or pertaining to Sappho, the Grecian poetess; as, Sapphic odes; Sapphic verse.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Pros.) Belonging to, or in the manner of, Sappho; -- said of a certain kind of verse reputed to have been invented by Sappho, consisting of five feet, of which the first, fourth, and fifth are trochees, the second is a spondee, and the third a dactyl.
[1913 Webster]

Sapphic
Sap"phic, n. (Pros.) A Sapphic verse.
[1913 Webster]

Sapphire
Sap"phire (? or ?; 277), n. [OE. saphir, F. saphir, L. sapphirus, Gr. &unr_;, of Oriental origin; cf. Heb. sappīr.] 1. (Min.) Native alumina or aluminium sesquioxide, Al2O3; corundum; esp., the blue transparent variety of corundum, highly prized as a gem.
[1913 Webster]

Of rubies, sapphires, and of pearlés white. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Sapphire occurs in hexagonal crystals and also in granular and massive forms. The name sapphire is usually restricted to the blue crystals, while the bright red crystals are called Oriental rubies (see under Ruby), the amethystine variety Oriental amethyst (see under Amethyst), and the dull massive varieties corundum (a name which is also used as a general term to include all varieties). See Corundum.
[1913 Webster]

2. The color of the gem; bright blue.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Zool.) Any humming bird of the genus Hylocharis, native of South America. The throat and breast are usually bright blue.
[1913 Webster]

Star sapphire, or Asteriated sapphire (Min.), a kind of sapphire which exhibits asterism.
[1913 Webster]

Sapphire
Sap"phire, a. Of or resembling sapphire; sapphirine; blue. “The sapphire blaze.” Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Sapphirine
Sap"phir*ine (?), n. Resembling sapphire; made of sapphire; having the color, or any quality of sapphire.Sapphirine degree of hardness.” Boyle.
[1913 Webster]

Sappho
Sap"pho (?), n. [See Sapphic.] (Zool.) Any one of several species of brilliant South American humming birds of the genus Sappho, having very bright-colored and deeply forked tails; -- called also firetail.
[1913 Webster]

Sappiness
Sap"pi*ness (?), n. The quality of being sappy; juiciness.
[1913 Webster]

Sappodilla
Sap`po*dil"la (?), n. (Bot.) See Sapodilla.
[1913 Webster]

Sappy
Sap"py (?), a. [Compar. Sappier (?); superl. Sappiest.] [From 1st Sap.]
[1913 Webster]

1. Abounding with sap; full of sap; juicy; succulent.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, young, not firm; weak, feeble.
[1913 Webster]

When he had passed this weak and sappy age. Hayward.
[1913 Webster]

3. Weak in intellect. [Low]
[1913 Webster]

4. (Bot.) Abounding in sap; resembling, or consisting largely of, sapwood.
[1913 Webster]

Sappy
Sap"py (?), a. [Written also sapy.] [Cf. L. sapere to taste.] Musty; tainted. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Saprophagan
Sa*proph"a*gan (?), n. [Gr. sapro`s rotten + fagei^n to eat: cf. F. saprophage.] (Zool.) One of a tribe of beetles which feed upon decaying animal and vegetable substances; a carrion beetle.
[1913 Webster]

Saprophagous
Sa*proph"a*gous (?), a. (Zool.) Feeding on carrion.
[1913 Webster]

Saprophyte
Sap"ro*phyte (?), n. [Gr. sapro`s rotten + fyto`n a plant.] (Bot.) Any plant growing on decayed animal or vegetable matter, as most fungi and some flowering plants with no green color, as the Indian pipe.
[1913 Webster]

Saprophytic
Sap`ro*phyt"ic (?), a. Feeding or growing upon decaying animal or vegetable matter; pertaining to a saprophyte or the saprophytes.
[1913 Webster]

Saprophytism
Sap"ro*phyt*ism (?), n. State or fact of being saprophytic.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sapsago
Sap"sa*go (?), n. [G. schabzieger; schaben to shave, to scrape + zieger a sort of whey.] A kind of Swiss cheese, of a greenish color, flavored with melilot.
[1913 Webster]

Sapskull
Sap"skull` (?), n. A saphead. [Low]
[1913 Webster]

Sapucaia
Sap`u*ca"ia (?; Pg. &unr_;), n. [Pg. sapucaya.] (Bot.) A Brazilian tree. See Lecythis, and Monkey-pot. [Written also sapucaya.]
[1913 Webster]

Sapucaia nut (Bot.), the seed of the sapucaia; -- called also paradise nut.
[1913 Webster]

Sapwood
Sap"wood` (?), n. (Bot.) The alburnum, or part of the wood of any exogenous tree next to the bark, being that portion of the tree through which the sap flows most freely; -- distinguished from heartwood.
[1913 Webster]

Sarabaite
Sar"a*ba*ite (?), n. [LL. Sarabaïtae, pl.] (Eccl. Hist.) One of certain vagrant or heretical Oriental monks in the early church.
[1913 Webster]

Saraband
Sar"a*band (?), n. [F. sarabande, Sp. zarabanda, fr. Per. serbend a song.] A slow Spanish dance of Saracenic origin, to an air in triple time; also, the air itself.
[1913 Webster]

She has brought us the newest saraband from the court of Queen Mab. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Saracen
Sar"a*cen (?), n. [L. Saracenus perhaps fr. Ar. sharqi, pl. sharqiīn, Oriental, Eastern, fr. sharaqa to rise, said of the sun: cf. F. sarrasin. Cf. Sarcenet, Sarrasin, Sirocco.] Anciently, an Arab; later, a Mussulman; in the Middle Ages, the common term among Christians in Europe for a Mohammedan hostile to the crusaders.
[1913 Webster]

Saracens' consound (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio Saracenicus), anciently used to heal wounds.
[1913 Webster]

Saracenical
Saracenic
{ Sar`a*cen"ic (?), Sar`a*cen"ic*al (?), } a. Of or pertaining to the Saracens; as, Saracenic architecture.Saracenic music.” Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Sarasin
Sar"a*sin (?), n. (Arch.) See Sarrasin.
[1913 Webster]

Saraswati
Sa`ras*wa"ti (?), n. [Skr. Sarasvatī.] (Hind. Myth.) The sakti or wife of Brahma; the Hindoo goddess of learning, music, and poetry.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcasm
Sar"casm (?), n. [F. sarcasme, L. sarcasmus, Gr. sarkasmo`s, from sarka`zein to tear flesh like dogs, to bite the lips in rage, to speak bitterly, to sneer, fr. sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh.] A keen, reproachful expression; a satirical remark uttered with some degree of scorn or contempt; a taunt; a gibe; a cutting jest.
[1913 Webster]

The sarcasms of those critics who imagine our art to be a matter of inspiration. Sir J. Reynolds.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Satire; irony; ridicule; taunt; gibe.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcasmous
Sar*cas"mous (?), a. Sarcastic. [Obs.]Sarcasmous scandal.” Hubidras.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcastical
Sarcastic
{ Sar*cas"tic (?), Sar*cas"tic*al (?), } a. Expressing, or expressed by, sarcasm; characterized by, or of the nature of, sarcasm; given to the use of sarcasm; bitterly satirical; scornfully severe; taunting.
[1913 Webster]

What a fierce and sarcastic reprehension would this have drawn from the friendship of the world! South.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcastically
Sar*cas"tic*al*ly, adv. In a sarcastic manner.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcel
Sar"cel (?), n. [OF. cercel, F. cerceau, L. circellus, dim. of circulus. See Circle.] One of the outer pinions or feathers of the wing of a bird, esp. of a hawk.
[1913 Webster]

Sarceled
Sar"celed (?), a. (her.) Cut through the middle.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcelle
Sar`celle" (?), n. [F., fr. L. querquedula.] (Zool.) The old squaw, or long-tailed duck.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcenet
Sarce"net (?), n. [OF. sarcenet; cf. LL. saracenicum cloth made by Saracens. See Saracen.] A species of fine thin silk fabric, used for linings, etc. [Written also sarsenet.]
[1913 Webster]

Thou green sarcenet flap for a sore eye. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcin
Sar"cin (?), n. Same as Hypoxanthin.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcina
Sar*ci"na (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; of flesh, fr. sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh.] (Biol.) A genus of bacteria found in various organic fluids, especially in those those of the stomach, associated with certain diseases. The individual organisms undergo division along two perpendicular partitions, so that multiplication takes place in two directions, giving groups of four cubical cells. Also used adjectively; as, a sarcina micrococcus; a sarcina group.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcina form (Biol.), the tetrad form seen in the division of a dumb-bell group of micrococci into four; -- applied particularly to bacteria. See micrococcus.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcle
Sar"cle (?), v. t. [F. sarcler to weed, fr. L. sarculare to hoe, fr. sarculum hoe.] To weed, or clear of weeds, with a hoe. [Obs.] Ainsworth.
[1913 Webster]

Sarco-
Sar"co- (?). A combining form from Gr. sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh; as, sarcophagous, flesh-eating; sarcology.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcobasis
Sar*cob"a*sis (?), n.; pl. Sarcobases (#). [NL., fr. Gr. sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh + &unr_; base.] (Bot.) A fruit consisting of many dry indehiscent cells, which contain but few seeds and cohere about a common style, as in the mallows.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcoblast
Sar"co*blast (?), n. [Sarco- + -blast.] (Zool.) A minute yellowish body present in the interior of certain rhizopods.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcocarp
Sar"co*carp (?), n. [Sarco- + Gr. &unr_; fruit: cf. F. sarcocarpe.] (Bot.) The fleshy part of a stone fruit, situated between the skin, or epicarp, and the stone, or endocarp, as in a peach. See Illust. of Endocarp.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The term has also been used to denote any fruit which is fleshy throughout. M. T. Masters.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcocele
Sar"co*cele (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;; sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh + &unr_; tumor: cf. F. sarcocèle.] (Med.) Any solid tumor of the testicle.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcocolla
Sarcocol
{ Sar"co*col (?), Sar`co*col"la (?), } n. [L. sarcocolla, from Gr. &unr_;; sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh + &unr_; glue: cf. F. sarcocolle.] A gum resin obtained from certain shrubs of Africa (Penaea), -- formerly thought to cause healing of wounds and ulcers.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcode
Sar"code (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; fleshy; sa`rx, flesh + e'i^dos form. Cf. Sarcoid.] (Biol.) A name applied by Dujardin in 1835 to the gelatinous material forming the bodies of the lowest animals; protoplasm.
[1913 Webster]

sarcoderma
Sarcoderm
{ Sar"co*derm (?), ‖sar`co*der"ma (?), } n. [NL. sarcoderma. See Sarco-, and Derm.] (Bot.) (a) A fleshy covering of a seed, lying between the external and internal integuments. (b) A sarcocarp.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcodic
Sar*cod"ic (? or ?), a. (Biol.) Of or pertaining to sarcode.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcoid
Sar"coid (?), a. [Gr. &unr_;. See Sarcode.] (Biol.) Resembling flesh, or muscle; composed of sarcode.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcolactic
Sar`co*lac"tic (?), a. [Sarco- + lactic.] (Physiol. Chem.) Relating to muscle and milk; as, sarcolactic acid. See Lactic acid, under Lactic.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcolemma
Sar`co*lem"ma (?), n. [NL., from Gr. sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh + &unr_; rind, skin.] (Anat.) The very thin transparent and apparently homogeneous sheath which incloses a striated muscular fiber; the myolemma.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcoline
Sar"co*line (?), a. [Gr. sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh.] (Min.) Flesh-colored.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcological
Sarcologic
{ Sar`co*log"ic (?), Sar`co*log"ic*al (?), } a. Of or pertaining to sarcology.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcology
Sar*col"o*gy (?), n. [Sarco- + -logy: cf. F. sarcologie.] That part of anatomy which treats of the soft parts. It includes myology, angiology, neurology, and splanchnology.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcoma
Sar*co"ma (?), n.; pl. L. Sarcomata (# or #), E. sarcomas (#). [NL., from Gr. &unr_;, from sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh.] (Med.) A tumor of fleshy consistence; -- formerly applied to many varieties of tumor, now restricted to a variety of malignant growth made up of cells resembling those of fetal development without any proper intercellular substance.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcomatous
Sar*com"a*tous (? or ?), a. (Med.) Of or pertaining to sarcoma; resembling sarcoma.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcophaga
Sar*coph"a*ga (?), n. pl. [NL., neut. pl. See Sarcophagus.] (Zool.) A suborder of carnivorous and insectivorous marsupials including the dasyures and the opossums.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcophaga
Sar*coph"a*ga, n. [NL., fem. sing. See Sarcophagus.] (Zool.) A genus of Diptera, including the flesh flies.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcophagan
Sar*coph"a*gan (?), n. 1. (Zool.) Any animal which eats flesh, especially any carnivorous marsupial.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) Any fly of the genus Sarcophaga.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcophagous
Sar*coph"a*gous (?), a. (Zool.) Feeding on flesh; flesh-eating; carnivorous.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcophagus
Sar*coph"a*gus (?), n.; pl. L. Sarcophagi (#), E. Sarcophaguses (#). [L., fr. Gr. sarkofa`gos, properly, eating flesh; sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh + fagei^n to eat. Cf. Sarcasm.] 1. A species of limestone used among the Greeks for making coffins, which was so called because it consumed within a few weeks the flesh of bodies deposited in it. It is otherwise called lapis Assius, or Assian stone, and is said to have been found at Assos, a city of Lycia. Holland.
[1913 Webster]

2. A coffin or chest-shaped tomb of the kind of stone described above; hence, any stone coffin.
[1913 Webster]

3. A stone shaped like a sarcophagus and placed by a grave as a memorial.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcophagy
Sar*coph"a*gy (?), n. [Gr. sarkofagi`a. See Sarcophagus.] The practice of eating flesh.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcophile
Sar"co*phile (?), n. [Sacro- + Gr. &unr_; a lover.] (Zool.) A flesh-eating animal, especially any one of the carnivorous marsupials.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcoptes
Sar*cop"tes (?), n. [NL., from Gr. sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh + ko`ptein to cut.] (Zool.) A genus of parasitic mites including the itch mites.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcoptid
Sar*cop"tid (?), n. (Zool.) Any species of the genus Sarcoptes and related genera of mites, comprising the itch mites and mange mites. -- a. Of or pertaining to the itch mites.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcorhamphi
Sar`co*rham"phi (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh + &unr_; beak.] (Zool.) A division of raptorial birds comprising the vultures.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcoseptum
Sar`co*sep"tum (?), n.; pl. Sarcosepta (#). [Sarco- + septum.] (Zool.) One of the mesenteries of an anthozoan.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcosin
Sar"co*sin (?), n. (Physiol. Chem.) A crystalline nitrogenous substance, formed in the decomposition of creatin (one of the constituents of muscle tissue). Chemically, it is methyl glycocoll.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcosis
Sar*co"sis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_;, fr. sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh.] (Med.) (a) Abnormal formation of flesh. (b) Sarcoma.
[1913 Webster]

Sarcotic
Sar*cot"ic (?), a. [Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. sarcotique.] (Med.) Producing or promoting the growth of flesh. [R.] -- n. A sarcotic medicine. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Sarcous
Sar"cous (?), a. [Gr. sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh.] (Anat.) Fleshy; -- applied to the minute structural elements, called sarcous elements, or sarcous disks, of which striated muscular fiber is composed.
[1913 Webster]

Sarculation
Sar`cu*la"tion (?), n. [L. sarculatio. See Sarcle.] A weeding, as with a hoe or a rake.
[1913 Webster]

Sard
Sard (?), n. [L. sarda, Gr. &unr_;, or &unr_; (sc. &unr_;), i.e., Sardian stone, fr. &unr_; Sardian, &unr_; Sardes, the capital of Lydia: cf. F. sarde. Cf. Sardius.] (Min.) A variety of carnelian, of a rich reddish yellow or brownish red color. See the Note under Chalcedony.
[1913 Webster]

Sardachate
Sar"da*chate (?), n. [L. sardachates: cf. F. sardachate. See Sard, and Agate.] (Min.) A variety of agate containing sard.
[1913 Webster]

Sardel
Sardan
{ Sar"dan (?), Sar"del (?), } n. [It. sardella. See Sardine a fish.] (Zool.) A sardine. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sardel
Sar"del, n. A precious stone. See Sardius.
[1913 Webster]

Sardine
Sar"dine (? or ?; 277), n. [F. sardine (cf. Sp. sardina, sarda, It. sardina, sardella), L. sardina, sarda; cf. Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;; so called from the island of Sardinia, Gr. &unr_;.] (Zool.) Any one of several small species of herring which are commonly preserved in olive oil for food, especially the pilchard, or European sardine (Clupea pilchardus). The California sardine (Clupea sagax) is similar. The American sardines of the Atlantic coast are mostly the young of the common herring and of the menhaden.
[1913 Webster]

Sardine
Sar"dine (? or ?; 277), n. See Sardius.
[1913 Webster]

Sardinian
Sar*din"i*an (?), a. [L. Sardinianus.] Of or pertaining to the island, kingdom, or people of Sardinia. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Sardinia.
[1913 Webster]

Sardius
Sar"di*us (?), n. [L. sardius, lapis sardinus, Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, &unr_;. See Sard.] A precious stone, probably a carnelian, one of which was set in Aaron's breastplate. Ex. xxviii. 17.
[1913 Webster]

Sardoin
Sar"doin (?), n. [Cf. F. sardoine.] (Min.) Sard; carnelian.
[1913 Webster]

Sardonian
Sar*do"ni*an (?), a. [Cf. F. sardonien.] Sardonic. [Obs.] “With Sardonian smile.” Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Sardonic
Sar*don"ic (?), a. [F. sardonique, L. sardonius, Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, perhaps fr. &unr_; to grin like a dog, or from a certain plant of Sardinia, Gr. &unr_;, which was said to screw up the face of the eater.] Forced; unnatural; insincere; hence, derisive, mocking, malignant, or bitterly sarcastic; -- applied only to a laugh, smile, or some facial semblance of gayety.
[1913 Webster]

Where strained, sardonic smiles are glozing still,
And grief is forced to laugh against her will.
Sir H. Wotton.
[1913 Webster]

The scornful, ferocious, sardonic grin of a bloody ruffian. Burke.
[1913 Webster]

Sardonic grin or Sardonic laugh, an old medical term for a spasmodic affection of the muscles of the face, giving it an appearance of laughter.
[1913 Webster]

Sardonic
Sar*don"ic, a. Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a kind of linen made at Colchis.
[1913 Webster]

Sardonyx
Sar"do*nyx (?), n. [L., fr. Gr. &unr_;. See Sard, and Onyx.] (Min.) A variety of onyx consisting of sard and white chalcedony in alternate layers.
[1913 Webster]

Saree
Sa"ree (?), n. [Hind. &unr_;.] The principal garment of a Hindoo woman. It consists of a long piece of cloth, which is wrapped round the middle of the body, a portion being arranged to hang down in front, and the remainder passed across the bosom over the left shoulder.
[1913 Webster]

Sargasso
Sar*gas"so (?), n. [Sp. sargazo seaweed.] (Bot.) The gulf weed. See under Gulf.
[1913 Webster]

Sargasso Sea, a large tract of the North Atlantic Ocean where sargasso in great abundance floats on the surface.
[1913 Webster]

Sargassum
Sar*gas"sum (?), n. [NL.] A genus of algae including the gulf weed.
[1913 Webster]

Sargo
Sar"go (?), n. [Sp. sargo, L. sargus a kind of fish.] (Zool.) Any one of several species of sparoid fishes belonging to Sargus, Pomadasys, and related genera; -- called also sar, and saragu.
[1913 Webster]

Sari
Sa"ri (?), n. Same as Saree.
[1913 Webster]

Sarigue
Sa*rigue" (?), n. [F., from Braz. çarigueia, çarigueira.] (Zool.) A small South American opossum (Didelphys opossum), having four white spots on the face.
[1913 Webster]

Sark
Sark (?), n. [AS. serce, syrce, a shirt; akin to Icel. serkr, Sw. särk.] A shirt. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Sark
Sark, v. t. (Carp.) To cover with sarking, or thin boards.
[1913 Webster]

Sarkin
Sar"kin (?), n. [Gr. sa`rx, sa`rkos, flesh.] (Physiol. Chem.) Same as Hypoxanthin.
[1913 Webster]

Sarking
Sark"ing (?), n. [From Sark shirt.] (Carp.) Thin boards for sheathing, as above the rafters, and under the shingles or slates, and for similar purposes.
[1913 Webster]

Sarlyk
Sarlac
{ Sar"lac (?), Sar"lyk (?), } n. [Mongolian sarlyk.] (Zool.) The yak.
[1913 Webster]

Sarmatic
Sarmatian
{ Sar*ma"tian (?), Sar*mat"ic (?), } a. [L. Sarmaticus.] Of or pertaining to Sarmatia, or its inhabitants, the ancestors of the Russians and the Poles.
[1913 Webster]

Sarment
Sar"ment (?), n. [L. sarmentum a twig, fr. sarpere to cut off, to trim: cf. F. sarment.] (Bot.) A prostrate filiform stem or runner, as of the strawberry. See Runner.
[1913 Webster]

Sarmentaceous
Sar`men*ta"ceous (?), a. (Bot.) Bearing sarments, or runners, as the strawberry.
[1913 Webster]

Sarmentose
Sar`men*tose" (? or ?), a. [L. sarmentosus: cf. F. sarmenteux. See Sarment.] (Bot.) (a) Long and filiform, and almost naked, or having only leaves at the joints where it strikes root; as, a sarmentose stem. (b) Bearing sarments; sarmentaceous.
[1913 Webster]

Sarmentous
Sar*men"tous (?), a. (Bot.) Sarmentose.
[1913 Webster]

Sarn
Sarn (?), n. [W. sarn a causeway, paving.] A pavement or stepping-stone. [Prov. Eng.] Johnson.
[1913 Webster]

Sarong
Sa"rong (?), n. [Malay sārung.] A sort of petticoat worn by both sexes in Java and the Malay Archipelago. Balfour (Cyc. of India)
[1913 Webster]

Saros
Sa"ros (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_;] (Astron) A Chaldean astronomical period or cycle, the length of which has been variously estimated from 3,600 years to 3,600 days, or a little short of 10 years. Brande & C.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Sarplar
Sar"plar (?), n. [Cf. LL. sarplare. See Sarplier.] A large bale or package of wool, containing eighty tods, or 2,240 pounds, in weight. [Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Sarplier
Sar"plier (?), n. [F. serpillière; cf. Pr. sarpelheira, LL. serpelleria, serpleria, Catalan sarpallera, Sp. arpillera.] A coarse cloth made of hemp, and used for packing goods, etc. [Written also sarpelere.] Tyrwhitt.
[1913 Webster]

Sarpo
Sar"po (?), n. [Corruption of Sp. sapo a toad.] (Zool.) A large toadfish of the Southern United States and the Gulf of Mexico (Batrachus tau, var. pardus).
[1913 Webster]

Sarracenia
Sar`ra*ce"ni*a (?), prop. n. [NL. So named after a Dr. Sarrazin of Quebec.] (Bot.) A genus of American perennial herbs growing in bogs; the American pitcher plant.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; They have hollow pitcher-shaped or tubular leaves, and solitary flowers with an umbrella-shaped style. Sarracenia purpurea, the sidesaddle flower, is common at the North; Sarracenia flava, Sarracenia rubra, Sarracenia Drummondii, Sarracenia variolaris, and Sarracenia psittacina are Southern species. All are insectivorous, catching and drowning insects in their curious leaves. See Illust. of Sidesaddle flower, under Sidesaddle.
[1913 Webster]

Sarrasine
Sarrasin
{ Sar"ra*sin, Sar"ra*sine } (?), n. [F. sarrasine, LL. saracina. See Saracen.] (Fort.) A portcullis, or herse. [Written also sarasin.]
[1913 Webster]

Sarsa
Sar"sa (?), n. Sarsaparilla. [Written also sarza.]
[1913 Webster]

Sarsaparilla
Sar`sa*pa*ril"la (?), n. [Sp. zarzaparrilla; zarza a bramble (perhaps fr. Bisc. zartzia) + parra a vine, or Parillo, a physician said to have discovered it.] (Bot.) (a) Any plant of several tropical American species of Smilax. (b) The bitter mucilaginous roots of such plants, used in medicine and in sirups for soda, etc.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The name is also applied to many other plants and their roots, especially to the Aralia nudicaulis, the wild sarsaparilla of the United States.
[1913 Webster]

Sarsaparillin
Sar`sa*pa*ril"lin (?), n. See Parillin.
[1913 Webster]

Sarse
Sarse (?), n. [F. sas, OF. saas, LL. setatium, fr. L. seta a stiff hair.] A fine sieve; a searce. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sarse
Sarse, v. t. To sift through a sarse. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sarsen
Sar"sen (?), n. [Etymol. uncertain; perhaps for saracen stone, i.e., a heathen or pagan stone or monument.] One of the large sandstone blocks scattered over the English chalk downs; -- called also sarsen stone, and Druid stone. [Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Sarsenet
Sarse"net (?), n. See Sarcenet.
[1913 Webster]

Sart
Sart (?), n. An assart, or clearing. [Obs.] Bailey.
[1913 Webster]

Sartorial
Sar*to"ri*al (?), a. [See Sartorius.] 1. Of or pertaining to a tailor or his work.
[1913 Webster]

Our legs skulked under the table as free from sartorial impertinences as those of the noblest savages. Lowell.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sartorius muscle.
[1913 Webster]

Sartorius
Sar*to"ri*us (?), n. [NL., fr. L. sartor a patcher, tailor, fr. sarcire, sartum, to patch, mend.] (Anat.) A muscle of the thigh, called the tailor's muscle, which arises from the hip bone and is inserted just below the knee. So named because its contraction was supposed to produce the position of the legs assumed by the tailor in sitting.
[1913 Webster]

Sarum use
Sa"rum use` (?). (Ch. of Eng.) A liturgy, or use, put forth about 1087 by St. Osmund, bishop of Sarum, based on Anglo-Saxon and Norman customs.
[1913 Webster]

Sash
Sash (?), n. [Pers. shast a sort of girdle.] A scarf or band worn about the waist, over the shoulder, or otherwise; a belt; a girdle, -- worn by women and children as an ornament; also worn as a badge of distinction by military officers, members of societies, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Sash
Sash, v. t. To adorn with a sash or scarf. Burke.
[1913 Webster]

Sash
Sash, n. [F. châssis a frame, sash, fr. châsse a shrine, reliquary, frame, L. capsa. See Case a box.] 1. The framing in which the panes of glass are set in a glazed window or door, including the narrow bars between the panes.
[1913 Webster]

2. In a sawmill, the rectangular frame in which the saw is strained and by which it is carried up and down with a reciprocating motion; -- also called gate.
[1913 Webster]

French sash, a casement swinging on hinges; -- in distinction from a vertical sash sliding up and down.
[1913 Webster]

Sash
Sash, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sashed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sashing.] To furnish with a sash or sashes; as, to sash a door or a window.
[1913 Webster]

Sashery
Sash"er*y (?), n. [From 1st Sash.] A collection of sashes; ornamentation by means of sashes. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Distinguished by their sasheries and insignia. Carlyle.
[1913 Webster]

Sashoon
Sash"oon (?), n. [Etymology uncertain.] A kind of pad worn on the leg under the boot. [Obs.] Nares.
[1913 Webster]

Sasin
Sa"sin (?), n. (Zool.) The Indian antelope (Antilope bezoartica syn. Antilope cervicapra), noted for its beauty and swiftness. It has long, spiral, divergent horns.
[1913 Webster]

Sassabye
Sassaby
{ Sas"sa*by (?), Sas"sa*bye (?), } n. (Zool.) A large African antelope (Alcelaphus lunata), similar to the hartbeest, but having its horns regularly curved.
[1913 Webster]

Sassafras
Sas"sa*fras (?), n. [F. sassafras (cf. It. sassafrasso, sassafras, Sp. sasafras, salsafras, salsifrax, salsifragia, saxifragia), fr. L. saxifraga saxifrage. See Saxifrage.] (Bot.) An American tree of the Laurel family (Sassafras officinale); also, the bark of the roots, which has an aromatic smell and taste.
[1913 Webster]

Australian sassafras, a lofty tree (Doryophora Sassafras) with aromatic bark and leaves. -- Chilian sassafras, an aromatic tree (Laurelia sempervirens). -- New Zealand sassafras, a similar tree (Laurelia Novae Zelandiae). -- Sassafras nut. See Pichurim bean. -- Swamp sassafras, the sweet bay (Magnolia glauca). See Magnolia.
[1913 Webster]

Sassanage
Sas"sa*nage (?), n. [See Sarse a sieve.] Stones left after sifting. Smart.
[1913 Webster]

Sassarara
Sas`sa*ra"ra (?), n. [Perh. a corruption of certiorari, the name of a writ.] A word used to emphasize a statement. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Out she shall pack, with a sassarara. Goldsmith.
[1913 Webster]

Sasse
Sasse (?), n. [D. sas, fr. F. sas the basin of a waterfall.] A sluice or lock, as in a river, to make it more navigable. [Obs.] Pepys.
[1913 Webster]

Sassenach
Sas"sen*ach (?), n. [Gael. sasunnach.] A Saxon; an Englishman; a Lowlander. [Celtic] Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Sassoline
Sassolin
{ Sas"so*lin (?), Sas"so*line (?), } n. [From Sasso, a town in Italy: cf. F. sassolin.] (Min.) Native boric acid, found in saline incrustations on the borders of hot springs near Sasso, in the territory of Florence.
[1913 Webster]

Sassorolla
Sassorol
{ Sas"so*rol (?), Sas`so*rol"la (?), } n. (Zool.) The rock pigeon. See under Pigeon.
[1913 Webster]

Sassy bark
Sas"sy bark` (?). (Bot.) The bark of a West African leguminous tree (Erythrophlaeum Guineense, used by the natives as an ordeal poison, and also medicinally; -- called also mancona bark.
[1913 Webster]

Sastra
Sas"tra (?), n. Same as Shaster.
[1913 Webster]

Sastrugi
Sas*tru"gi (?). Incorrect, but common, var. of Zastrugi.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sat
Sat (săt), imp. of Sit. [Written also sate.]
[1913 Webster]

Satan
Sa"tan (sā"t&aitalic_;n, săt"&aitalic_;n obs ), n. [Heb. sātān an adversary, fr. sātan to be adverse, to persecute: cf. Gr. Sata^n, Satana^s, L. Satan, Satanas.] The grand adversary of man; the Devil, or Prince of darkness; the chief of the fallen angels; the archfiend.
[1913 Webster]

I beheld Satan as lightning fall from heaven. Luke x. 18.
[1913 Webster]

Satanical
Satanic
{ Sa*tan"ic (?), Sa*tan"ic*al (?), } a. [Cf. F. satanique, Gr. &unr_;.] Of or pertaining to Satan; having the qualities of Satan; resembling Satan; extremely malicious or wicked; devilish; infernal.Satanic strength.” “Satanic host.” Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Detest the slander which, with a Satanic smile, exults over the character it has ruined. Dr. T. Dwight.
[1913 Webster]

-- Sa*tan"ic*al*ly, adv. -- Sa*tan"ic*al*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Satanism
Sa"tan*ism (?), n. 1. The evil and malicious disposition of Satan; a diabolical spirit. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

2. The worship of Satan.
[PJC]

Satanist
Sa"tan*ist, n. 1. A very wicked person. [R.] Granger.
[1913 Webster]

2. A worshiper of Satan.
[PJC]

Satanophany
Sa`tan*oph"a*ny (?), n. [Satan + Gr. &unr_; to appear.] An incarnation of Satan; a being possessed by a demon. [R.] O. A. Brownson.
[1913 Webster]

Satchel
Satch"el (?) n. [OF. sachel, fr. L. saccellus, dim. of saccus. See Sack a bag.] A little sack or bag for carrying papers, books, or small articles of wearing apparel; a hand bag. [Spelled also sachel.]
[1913 Webster]

The whining schoolboy with his satchel. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sate
Sate (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sated; p. pr. & vb. n. Sating.] [Probably shortened fr. satiate: cf. L. satur full. See Satiate.] To satisfy the desire or appetite of; to satiate; to glut; to surfeit.
[1913 Webster]

Crowds of wanderers sated with the business and pleasure of great cities. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Sate
Sate (?), imp. of Sit.
[1913 Webster]

But sate an equal guest at every board. Lowell.
[1913 Webster]

Sateen
Sat*een" (?), n. [Cf. Satin.] A kind of dress goods made of cotton or woolen, with a glossy surface resembling satin.
[1913 Webster]

Sateless
Sate"less (?), a. Insatiable. [R.] Young.
[1913 Webster]

Satellite
Sat"el*lite (?), n. [F., fr. L. satelles, -itis, an attendant.] 1. An attendant attached to a prince or other powerful person; hence, an obsequious dependent. “The satellites of power.” I. Disraeli.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Astron.) A secondary planet which revolves about another planet; as, the moon is a satellite of the earth. See Solar system, under Solar.
[1913 Webster]

Satellite moth (Zool.), a handsome European noctuid moth (Scopelosoma satellitia).
[1913 Webster]

Satellite
Sat"el*lite, a. (Anat.) Situated near; accompanying; as, the satellite veins, those which accompany the arteries.
[1913 Webster]

Satellitious
Sat`el*li"tious (?), a. Pertaining to, or consisting of, satellites. [R.] Cheyne.
[1913 Webster]

Sathanas
Sath"an*as (?), n. [L. Satanas. See Satan] Satan. [Obs.] Chaucer. Wyclif.
[1913 Webster]

Satiate
Sa"ti*ate (?), a. [L. satiatus, p. p. of satiare to satisfy, from sat, satis, enough. See Sad, a., and cf. Sate.] Filled to satiety; glutted; sated; -- followed by with or of.Satiate of applause.” Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Satiate
Sa"ti*ate (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Satiated (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Satiating.] 1. To satisfy the appetite or desire of; to feed to the full; to furnish enjoyment to, to the extent of desire; to sate; as, to satiate appetite or sense.
[1913 Webster]

These [smells] rather woo the sense than satiate it. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

I may yet survive the malice of my enemies, although they should be satiated with my blood. Eikon Basilike.
[1913 Webster]

2. To full beyond natural desire; to gratify to repletion or loathing; to surfeit; to glut.
[1913 Webster]

3. To saturate. [Obs.] Sir I. Newton.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- To satisfy; sate; suffice; cloy; gorge; overfill; surfeit; glut. -- Satiate, Satisfy, Content. These words differ principally in degree. To content is to make contented, even though every desire or appetite is not fully gratified. To satisfy is to appease fully the longings of desire. To satiate is to fill so completely that it is not possible to receive or enjoy more; hence, to overfill; to cause disgust in.
[1913 Webster]

Content with science in the vale of peace. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

His whole felicity is endless strife;
No peace, no satisfaction, crowns his life.
Beaumont.
[1913 Webster]

He may be satiated, but not satisfied. Norris.
[1913 Webster]

Satiation
Sa`ti*a"tion (?), n. Satiety.
[1913 Webster]

Satiety
Sa*ti"e*ty (?), n. [L. satietas, from satis, sat, enough: cf. F. satiété.] The state of being satiated or glutted; fullness of gratification, either of the appetite or of any sensual desire; fullness beyond desire; an excess of gratification which excites wearisomeness or loathing; repletion; satiation.
[1913 Webster]

In all pleasures there is satiety. Hakewill.
[1913 Webster]

But thy words, with grace divine
Imbued, bring to their sweetness no satiety.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Repletion; satiation; surfeit; cloyment.
[1913 Webster]

Satin
Sat"in (?), n. [F. satin (cf. Pg. setim), fr. It. setino, from seta silk, L. saeta, seta, a thick, stiff hair, a bristle; or possibly ultimately of Chinese origin; cf. Chin. sz-tün, sz-twan. Cf. Sateen.] A silk cloth, of a thick, close texture, and overshot woof, which has a glossy surface.
[1913 Webster]

Cloths of gold and satins rich of hue. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Denmark satin, a kind of lasting; a stout worsted stuff, woven with a satin twill, used for women's shoes. -- Farmer's satin. See under Farmer. -- Satin bird (Zool.), an Australian bower bird. Called also satin grackle. -- Satin flower (Bot.) See Honesty, 4. -- Satin spar. (Min.) (a) A fine fibrous variety of calcite, having a pearly luster. (b) A similar variety of gypsum. -- Satin sparrow (Zool.), the shining flycatcher (Myiagra nitida) of Tasmania and Australia. The upper surface of the male is rich blackish green with a metallic luster. -- Satin stone, satin spar.
[1913 Webster]

Satinet
Sat`i*net" (?), n. [F., fr. satin. See Satin.] 1. A thin kind of satin.
[1913 Webster]

2. A kind of cloth made of cotton warp and woolen filling, used chiefly for trousers.
[1913 Webster]

Satinette
Sat`i*nette" (?), n. One of a breed of fancy frilled pigeons allied to the owls and turbits, having the body white, the shoulders tricolored, and the tail bluish black with a large white spot on each feather.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Satin weave
Sat"in weave. A style of weaving producing smooth-faced fabric in which the warp interlaces with the filling at points distributed over the surface.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Satinwood
Sat"in*wood` (?), n. (Bot.) The hard, lemon-colored, fragrant wood of an East Indian tree (Chloroxylon Swietenia). It takes a lustrous finish, and is used in cabinetwork. The name is also given to the wood of a species of prickly ash (Xanthoxylum Caribaeum) growing in Florida and the West Indies.
[1913 Webster]

Satiny
Sat"in*y (?), a. Like or composed of satin; glossy; as, to have a satiny appearance; a satiny texture.
[1913 Webster]

Sation
Sa"tion (?), n. [L. satio, fr. serere, satum, to sow.] A sowing or planting. [Obs.] Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Satire
Sat"ire (?; in Eng. often &unr_;; 277), n. [L. satira, satura, fr. satura (sc. lanx) a dish filled with various kinds of fruits, food composed of various ingredients, a mixture, a medley, fr. satur full of food, sated, fr. sat, satis, enough: cf. F. satire. See Sate, Sad, a., and cf. Saturate.] 1. A composition, generally poetical, holding up vice or folly to reprobation; a keen or severe exposure of what in public or private morals deserves rebuke; an invective poem; as, the Satires of Juvenal.
[1913 Webster]

2. Keeness and severity of remark; caustic exposure to reprobation; trenchant wit; sarcasm.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Lampoon; sarcasm; irony; ridicule; pasquinade; burlesque; wit; humor.
[1913 Webster]

Satirical
Satiric
{ Sa*tir"ic (?), Sa*tir"ic*al (?), } a. [L. satiricus: cf. F. satirique.] 1. Of or pertaining to satire; of the nature of satire; as, a satiric style.
[1913 Webster]

2. Censorious; severe in language; sarcastic; insulting.Satirical rogue.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Cutting; caustic; poignant; sarcastic; ironical; bitter; reproachful; abusive.
[1913 Webster]

-- Sa*tir"ic*al*ly, adv. -- Sa*tir"ic*al*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Satirist
Sat"ir*ist (?), n. [Cf. F. satiriste.] One who satirizes; especially, one who writes satire.
[1913 Webster]

The mighty satirist, who . . . had spread terror through the Whig ranks. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Satirize
Sat"ir*ize (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Satirized (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Satirizing (?).] [Cf. F. satiriser.] To make the object of satire; to attack with satire; to censure with keenness or severe sarcasm.
[1913 Webster]

It is as hard to satirize well a man of distinguished vices, as to praise well a man of distinguished virtues. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Satisfaction
Sat`is*fac"tion (?), n. [OE. satisfaccioun, F. satisfaction, fr. L. satisfactio, fr. satisfacere to satisfy. See Satisfy.] 1. The act of satisfying, or the state of being satisfied; gratification of desire; contentment in possession and enjoyment; repose of mind resulting from compliance with its desires or demands.
[1913 Webster]

The mind having a power to suspend the execution and satisfaction of any of its desires. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

2. Settlement of a claim, due, or demand; payment; indemnification; adequate compensation.
[1913 Webster]

We shall make full satisfaction. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. That which satisfies or gratifies; atonement.
[1913 Webster]

Die he, or justice must; unless for him
Some other, able, and as willing, pay
The rigid satisfaction, death for death.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Contentment; content; gratification; pleasure; recompense; compensation; amends; remuneration; indemnification; atonement.
[1913 Webster]

Satisfactive
Sat`is*fac"tive (?), a. Satisfactory. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Satisfactive discernment of fish. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Satisfactory
Sat`is*fac"to*ry (?), a. [Cf. F. satisfactoire.] 1. Giving or producing satisfaction; yielding content; especially, relieving the mind from doubt or uncertainty, and enabling it to rest with confidence; sufficient; as, a satisfactory account or explanation.
[1913 Webster]

2. Making amends, indemnification, or recompense; causing to cease from claims and to rest content; compensating; atoning; as, to make satisfactory compensation, or a satisfactory apology.
[1913 Webster]

A most wise and sufficient means of redemption and salvation, by the satisfactory and meritorious death and obedience of the incarnate Son of God, Jesus Christ. Bp. Sanderson.
[1913 Webster]

-- Sat`is*fac"to*ri*ly (#), adv. -- Sat`is*fac"to*ri*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Satisfiable
Sat"is*fi`a*ble, a. That may be satisfied.
[1913 Webster]

Satisfier
Sat"is*fi`er (?), n. One who satisfies.
[1913 Webster]

Satisfy
Sat"is*fy (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Satisfied (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Satisfying (?).] [OF. satisfier; L. satis enough + -ficare (in comp.) to make; cf. F. satisfaire, L. satisfacere. See Sad, a., and Fact.] 1. In general, to fill up the measure of a want of (a person or a thing); hence, to grafity fully the desire of; to make content; to supply to the full, or so far as to give contentment with what is wished for.
[1913 Webster]

Death shall . . . with us two
Be forced to satisfy his ravenous maw.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. To pay to the extent of claims or deserts; to give what is due to; as, to satisfy a creditor.
[1913 Webster]

3. To answer or discharge, as a claim, debt, legal demand, or the like; to give compensation for; to pay off; to requite; as, to satisfy a claim or an execution.
[1913 Webster]

4. To free from doubt, suspense, or uncertainty; to give assurance to; to set at rest the mind of; to convince; as, to satisfy one's self by inquiry.
[1913 Webster]

The standing evidences of the truth of the gospel are in themselves most firm, solid, and satisfying. Atterbury.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- To satiate; sate; content; grafity; compensate. See Satiate.
[1913 Webster]

Satisfy
Sat"is*fy (?), v. i. 1. To give satisfaction; to afford gratification; to leave nothing to be desired.
[1913 Webster]

2. To make payment or atonement; to atone. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Satisfyingly
Sat"is*fy`ing*ly (?), adv. So as to satisfy; satisfactorily.
[1913 Webster]

Sative
Sa"tive (?), a. [L. sativus, fr. serere, satum, to sow.] Sown; propagated by seed. [Obs.] Evelyn.
[1913 Webster]

Satle
Sa"tle (?), v. t. & i. To settle. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Satrap
Sa"trap (? or ?; 277), n. [L. satrapes, Gr. &unr_;, fr. OPers. khshatrapāvan ruler: cf. F. satrape.] The governor of a province in ancient Persia; hence, a petty autocrat despot.
[1913 Webster]

Satrapal
Sa"trap*al (? or ?), a. Of or pertaining to a satrap, or a satrapy.
[1913 Webster]

Satrapess
Sa"trap*ess (? or ?), n. A female satrap.
[1913 Webster]

Satrapical
Sa*trap"ic*al (?), a. Satrapal. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Satrapy
Sa"trap*y (?; 277), n.; pl. Satrapies (#). [L. satrapia, satrapea, Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. satrapie.] The government or jurisdiction of a satrap; a principality. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Satsuma ware
Sat"su*ma ware" (? or ?). (Fine Arts) A kind of ornamental hard-glazed pottery made at Satsuma in Kiushu, one of the Japanese islands.
[1913 Webster]

Saturable
Sat"u*ra*ble (?; 135), a. [L. saturabilis: cf. F. saturable.] Capable of being saturated; admitting of saturation. -- Sat`u*ra*bil"i*ty (#), n.
[1913 Webster]

Saturant
Sat"u*rant (?), a. [L. saturans, p. pr. See Saturate.] Impregnating to the full; saturating.
[1913 Webster]

Saturant
Sat"u*rant, n. 1. (Chem.) A substance used to neutralize or saturate the affinity of another substance.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Med.) An antacid, as magnesia, used to correct acidity of the stomach.
[1913 Webster]

Saturate
Sat"u*rate (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saturated (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Saturating.] [L. saturatus, p. p. of saturare to saturate, fr. satur full of food, sated. See Satire.] 1. To cause to become completely penetrated, impregnated, or soaked; to fill fully; to sate.
[1913 Webster]

Innumerable flocks and herds covered that vast expanse of emerald meadow saturated with the moisture of the Atlantic. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Fill and saturate each kind
With good according to its mind.
Emerson.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Chem.) To satisfy the affinity of; to cause to become inert by chemical combination with all that it can hold; as, to saturate phosphorus with chlorine.
[1913 Webster]

Saturate
Sat"u*rate (?), p. a. [L. saturatus, p. p.] Filled to repletion; saturated; soaked.
[1913 Webster]

Dries his feathers saturate with dew. Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

The sand beneath our feet is saturate
With blood of martyrs.
Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

Saturated
Sat"u*ra`ted (?), a. 1. Filled to repletion; holding by absorption, or in solution, all that is possible; as, saturated garments; a saturated solution of salt.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Chem.) Having its affinity satisfied; combined with all it can hold; -- said of certain atoms, radicals, or compounds; thus, methane is a saturated compound. Contrasted with unsaturated.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; A saturated compound may exchange certain ingredients for others, but can not take on more without such exchange.
[1913 Webster]

Saturated color (Optics), a color not diluted with white; a pure unmixed color, like those of the spectrum.
[1913 Webster]

Saturation
Sat`u*ra"tion (?), n. [L. saturatio: cf. F. saturation.] 1. The act of saturating, or the state of being saturating; complete penetration or impregnation.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Chem.) The act, process, or result of saturating a substance, or of combining it to its fullest extent.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Optics) Freedom from mixture or dilution with white; purity; -- said of colors.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The degree of saturation of a color is its relative purity, or freedom from admixture with white.
[1913 Webster]

Saturator
Sat"u*ra`tor (?), n. [L.] One who, or that which, saturates.
[1913 Webster]

Saturday
Sat"ur*day (?; 48), n. [OE. Saterday, AS. Saeterdaeg, Saeterndaeg, Saeternesdaeg, literally, Saturn's day, fr. L. Saturnus Saturn + AS. daeg day; cf. L. dies Saturni.] The seventh or last day of the week; the day following Friday and preceding Sunday.
[1913 Webster]

Saturity
Sa*tu"ri*ty (?), n. [L. saturitas, fr. satur full of food, sated.] The state of being saturated; fullness of supply. [Obs.] Warner.
[1913 Webster]

Saturn
Sa"turn (?), n. [L. Saturnus, literally, the sower, fr. serere, satum, to sow. See Season.] 1. (Roman Myth.) One of the elder and principal deities, the son of Coelus and Terra (Heaven and Earth), and the father of Jupiter. The corresponding Greek divinity was Kro`nos, later CHro`nos, Time.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Astron.) One of the planets of the solar system, next in magnitude to Jupiter, but more remote from the sun. Its diameter is seventy thousand miles, its mean distance from the sun nearly eight hundred and eighty millions of miles, and its year, or periodical revolution round the sun, nearly twenty-nine years and a half. It is surrounded by a remarkable system of rings, and has eight satellites.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Alchem.) The metal lead. [Archaic]
[1913 Webster]

Saturnalia
Sat`ur*na"li*a (?), n. pl. [L. See Saturn.] 1. (Rom. Antiq.) The festival of Saturn, celebrated in December, originally during one day, but afterward during seven days, as a period of unrestrained license and merriment for all classes, extending even to the slaves.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence: A period or occasion of general license, in which the passions or vices have riotous indulgence.
[1913 Webster]

Saturnalian
Sat`ur*na"li*an (?), a. 1. Of or pertaining to the Saturnalia.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of unrestrained and intemperate jollity; riotously merry; dissolute.Saturnalian amusement.” Burke.
[1913 Webster]

Saturnian
Sa*tur"ni*an (?), a. [L. Saturnius.] 1. (Roman Myth.) Of or pertaining to Saturn, whose age or reign, from the mildness and wisdom of his government, is called the golden age.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence: Resembling the golden age; distinguished for peacefulness, happiness, contentment.
[1913 Webster]

Augustus, born to bring Saturnian times. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Astron.) Of or pertaining to the planet Saturn; as, the Saturnian year.
[1913 Webster]

Saturnian verse (Pros.), a meter employed by early Roman satirists, consisting of three iambics and an extra syllable followed by three trochees, as in the line: -- Th&ebreve_; quēen | wăs īn | th&ebreve_; kītch | &ebreve_;n ‖ ēat&ibreve_;ng | brēad ănd | hōn&ebreve_;y.
[1913 Webster]

Saturnian
Sa*tur"ni*an, n. (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of large handsome moths belonging to Saturnia and allied genera. The luna moth, polyphemus, and promethea, are examples. They belong to the Silkworn family, and some are raised for their silk. See Polyphemus.
[1913 Webster]

Saturnicentric
Sat`urn*i*cen"tric (?), a. (Astron.) Appearing as if seen from the center of the planet Saturn; relating or referred to Saturn as a center.
[1913 Webster]

Saturnine
Sat"ur*nine (?), a. [L. Saturnus the god Saturn, also, the planet Saturn: cf. F. saturnin of or pertaining to lead (Saturn, in old chemistry, meaning lead), saturnien saturnine, saturnian. See Saturn.] 1. Born under, or influenced by, the planet Saturn.
[1913 Webster]

2. Heavy; grave; gloomy; dull; -- the opposite of mercurial; as, a saturnine person or temper. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Old Chem.) Of or pertaining to lead; characterized by, or resembling, lead, which was formerly called Saturn. [Archaic]
[1913 Webster]

Saturnine colic (Med.), lead colic.
[1913 Webster]

Saturnism
Sat"ur*nism (?), n. (Med.) Plumbism. Quain.
[1913 Webster]

Saturnist
Sat"ur*nist (?), n. A person of a dull, grave, gloomy temperament. W. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Satyr
Sa"tyr (?; 277), n. [L. satyrus, Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. satyre.] 1. (Class. Myth.) A sylvan deity or demigod, represented as part man and part goat, and characterized by riotous merriment and lasciviousness.
[1913 Webster]

Rough Satyrs danced; and Fauns, with cloven heel,
From the glad sound would not be absent long.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) Any one of many species of butterflies belonging to the family Nymphalidae. Their colors are commonly brown and gray, often with ocelli on the wings. Called also meadow browns.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Zool.) The orang-outang.
[1913 Webster]

Satyriasis
Sat`y*ri"a*sis (?), n. [L., fr. Gr. &unr_;. See Satyr.] Immoderate venereal appetite in the male. Quain.
[1913 Webster]

Satyrical
Satyric
{ Sa*tyr"ic (?), Sa*tyr"ic*al (?), } a. [L. satyricus, Gr. satyriko`s.] Of or pertaining to satyrs; burlesque; as, satyric tragedy. P. Cyc.
[1913 Webster]

Satyrion
Sa*tyr"i*on (?), n. [L., fr. Gr. saty`rion.] (Bot.) Any one of several kinds of orchids. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sauba ant
Sau"ba ant` (?). (Zool.) A South American ant (Oecodoma cephalotes) remarkable for having two large kinds of workers besides the ordinary ones, and for the immense size of its formicaries. The sauba ant cuts off leaves of plants and carries them into its subterranean nests, and thus often does great damage by defoliating trees and cultivated plants.
[1913 Webster]

Sauce
Sauce (?), n. [F., fr. OF. sausse, LL. salsa, properly, salt pickle, fr. L. salsus salted, salt, p. p. of salire to salt, fr. sal salt. See Salt, and cf. Saucer, Souse pickle, Souse to plunge.] 1. A composition of condiments and appetizing ingredients eaten with food as a relish; especially, a dressing for meat or fish or for puddings; as, mint sauce; sweet sauce, etc. “Poignant sauce.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

High sauces and rich spices fetched from the Indies. Sir S. Baker.
[1913 Webster]

2. Any garden vegetables eaten with meat. [Prov. Eng. & Colloq. U.S.] Forby. Bartlett.
[1913 Webster]

Roots, herbs, vine fruits, and salad flowers . . . they dish up various ways, and find them very delicious sauce to their meats, both roasted and boiled, fresh and salt. Beverly.
[1913 Webster]

3. Stewed or preserved fruit eaten with other food as a relish; as, apple sauce, cranberry sauce, etc. [U.S.] “Stewed apple sauce.” Mrs. Lincoln (Cook Book).
[1913 Webster]

4. Sauciness; impertinence. [Low.] Haliwell.
[1913 Webster]

To serve one the same sauce, to retaliate in the same kind. [Vulgar]
[1913 Webster]

Sauce
Sauce (s&asuml_;s), v. t. [Cf. F. saucer.] [imp. & p. p. Sauced (s&asuml_;st); p. pr. & vb. n. Saucing (s&asuml_;"s&ibreve_;ng).] 1. To accompany with something intended to give a higher relish; to supply with appetizing condiments; to season; to flavor.
[1913 Webster]

2. To cause to relish anything, as if with a sauce; to tickle or gratify, as the palate; to please; to stimulate; hence, to cover, mingle, or dress, as if with sauce; to make an application to. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Earth, yield me roots;
Who seeks for better of thee, sauce his palate
With thy most operant poison!
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. To make poignant; to give zest, flavor or interest to; to set off; to vary and render attractive.
[1913 Webster]

Then fell she to sauce her desires with threatenings. Sir P. Sidney.
[1913 Webster]

Thou sayest his meat was sauced with thy upbraidings. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. To treat with bitter, pert, or tart language; to be impudent or saucy to. [Colloq. or Low]
[1913 Webster]

I'll sauce her with bitter words. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sauce
Sauce (sōs), n. [F.] (Fine Art) A soft crayon for use in stump drawing or in shading with the stump.
[1913 Webster]

Sauce-alone
Sauce"-a*lone` (?), n. [Etymol. uncertain.] (Bot.) Jack-by-the-hedge. See under Jack.
[1913 Webster]

Saucebox
Sauce"box` (?), n. [See Sauce, and Saucy.] A saucy, impudent person; especially, a pert child.
[1913 Webster]

Saucebox, go, meddle with your lady's fan,
And prate not here!
A. Brewer.
[1913 Webster]

Saucepan
Sauce"pan` (?), n. A small pan with a handle, in which sauce is prepared over a fire; a stewpan.
[1913 Webster]

Saucer
Sau"cer (?), n. [F. saucière, from sauce. See Sauce.] 1. A small pan or vessel in which sauce was set on a table. [Obs.] Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

2. A small dish, commonly deeper than a plate, in which a cup is set at table.
[1913 Webster]

3. Something resembling a saucer in shape. Specifically: (a) A flat, shallow caisson for raising sunken ships. (b) A shallow socket for the pivot of a capstan.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Saucily
Sau"ci*ly (?), adv. In a saucy manner; impudently; with impertinent boldness. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

Sauciness
Sau"ci*ness, n. The quality or state of being saucy; that which is saucy; impertinent boldness; contempt of superiors; impudence.
[1913 Webster]

Your sauciness will jest upon my love. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Impudence; impertinence; rudeness; insolence. See Impudence.
[1913 Webster]

Saucisse
Saucisson
{ ‖Sau`cis`son" (?), Sau`cisse" (?), } n. [F., fr. saucisse sausage. See Sausage.] 1. (Mining or Gun.) A long and slender pipe or bag, made of cloth well pitched, or of leather, filled with powder, and used to communicate fire to mines, caissons, bomb chests, etc.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Fort.) A fascine of more than ordinary length.
[1913 Webster]

Saucy
Sau"cy (?), a. [Compar. Saucier (?); superl. Sauciest.] [From Sauce.] 1. Showing impertinent boldness or pertness; transgressing the rules of decorum; treating superiors with contempt; impudent; insolent; as, a saucy fellow.
[1913 Webster]

Am I not protector, saucy priest? Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Expressive of, or characterized by, impudence; impertinent; as, a saucy eye; saucy looks.
[1913 Webster]

We then have done you bold and saucy wrongs. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Impudent; insolent; impertinent; rude.
[1913 Webster]

Sauerkraut
Sauer"kraut` (?), n. [G., fr. sauer sour + kraut herb, cabbage.] Cabbage cut fine and allowed to ferment in a brine made of its own juice with salt, -- a German dish.
[1913 Webster]

Sauf
Sauf (?), a. Safe. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Sauf
Sauf, conj. & prep. Save; except. [Obs.]Sauf I myself.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Saufly
Sauf"ly, adv. Safely. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Sauger
Sau"ger (?), n. (Zool.) An American fresh-water food fish (Stizostedion Canadense); -- called also gray pike, blue pike, hornfish, land pike, sand pike, pickering, and pickerel.
[1913 Webster]

Sauh
Saugh
{ Saugh, Sauh (?), } obs. imp. sing. of See. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Sauks
Sauks (?), n. pl. (Ethnol.) Same as Sacs.
[1913 Webster]

Saul
Saul (?), n. Soul. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Saul
Saul, n. Same as Sal, the tree.
[1913 Webster]

Saulie
Sau"lie (?), n. A hired mourner at a funeral. [Scot.] Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Sault
Sault (?), n. [OF., F. saut, fr. L. saltus. See Salt a leap.] A rapid in some rivers; as, the Sault Ste. Marie. [U.S.] Bartlett.
[1913 Webster]

Saunders
Saun"ders (?), n. See Sandress.
[1913 Webster]

Saunders-blue
Saun"ders-blue` (?), n. [Corrupted fr. F. cendres bleues blue ashes.] A kind of color prepared from calcined lapis lazuli; ultramarine; also, a blue prepared from carbonate of copper. [Written also sanders-blue.]
[1913 Webster]

Saunter
Saun"ter (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Sauntered (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sauntering.] [Written also santer.] [Probably fr. F. s'aventurer to adventure (one's self), through a shortened form s'auntrer. See Adventure, n. & v.] To wander or walk about idly and in a leisurely or lazy manner; to lounge; to stroll; to loiter.
[1913 Webster]

One could lie under elm trees in a lawn, or saunter in meadows by the side of a stream. Masson.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- To loiter; linger; stroll; wander.
[1913 Webster]

Saunter
Saun"ter, n. A sauntering, or a sauntering place.
[1913 Webster]

That wheel of fops, that saunter of the town. Young.
[1913 Webster]

Saunterer
Saun"ter*er (?), n. One who saunters.
[1913 Webster]

Saur
Saur (?), n. [Contracted from Gael. salachar filth, nastiness, fr. salach nasty, fr. sal filth, refuse.] Soil; dirt; dirty water; urine from a cowhouse. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Saurel
Sau"rel (?), n. (Zool.) Any carangoid fish of the genus Trachurus, especially Trachurus trachurus, or Trachurus saurus, of Europe and America, and Trachurus picturatus of California. Called also skipjack, and horse mackerel.
[1913 Webster]

Sauria
Sau"ri*a (?), n. pl. [NL., from Gr. &unr_; a lizard.] (Zool.) A division of Reptilia formerly established to include the Lacertilia, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, and other groups. By some writers the name is restricted to the Lacertilia.
[1913 Webster]

Saurian
Sau"ri*an (?), a. (Zool.) Of or pertaining to, or of the nature of, the Sauria. -- n. One of the Sauria.
[1913 Webster]

Saurioid
Sau"ri*oid (?), a. (Zool.) Same as Sauroid.
[1913 Webster]

Saurobatrachia
Sau"ro*ba*tra"chi*a (?), n. pl. [NL. See Sauria, and Batrachia.] (Zool.) The Urodela.
[1913 Webster]

Saurognathous
Sau*rog"na*thous (?), a. [Gr. &unr_; a lizard + &unr_; the jaw.] (Zool.) Having the bones of the palate arranged as in saurians, the vomer consisting of two lateral halves, as in the woodpeckers (Pici).
[1913 Webster]

Sauroid
Sau"roid (?), a. [Gr. &unr_; a lizard + -oid: cf. Gr. &unr_; lizardlike.] (Zool.) (a) Like or pertaining to the saurians. (b) Resembling a saurian superficially; as, a sauroid fish.
[1913 Webster]

Sauroidichnite
Sau`roid*ich"nite (?), n. [See Sauroid, and Ichnite.] (Paleon.) The fossil track of a saurian.
[1913 Webster]

Sauropoda
Sau*rop"o*da (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; a lizard + -poda.] (Paleon.) An extinct order of herbivorous dinosaurs having the feet of a saurian type, instead of birdlike, as they are in many dinosaurs. It includes the largest known land animals, belonging to Brontosaurus, Camarasaurus, and allied genera. See Illustration in Appendix.
[1913 Webster]

Sauropsida
Sau*rop"si*da (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; a lizard + &unr_; appearance.] (Zool.) A comprehensive group of vertebrates, comprising the reptiles and birds.
[1913 Webster]

Sauropterygia
Sau*rop`te*ryg"i*a (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; a lizard + &unr_;, &unr_;, a wing.] (Paleon.) Same as Plesiosauria.
[1913 Webster]

Saururae
Sau*ru"rae (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; a lizard + &unr_; a tail.] (Paleon.) An extinct order of birds having a long vertebrated tail with quills along each side of it. Archaeopteryx is the type. See Archaeopteryx, and Odontornithes.
[1913 Webster]

Saury
Sau"ry (?), n.; pl. Sauries (#). [Etymol. uncertain.] (Zool.) A slender marine fish (Scomberesox saurus) of Europe and America. It has long, thin, beaklike jaws. Called also billfish, gowdnook, gawnook, skipper, skipjack, skopster, lizard fish, and Egypt herring.
[1913 Webster]

Sausage
Sau"sage (?; 48), n. [F. saucisse, LL. salcitia, salsicia, fr. salsa. See Sauce.] 1. An article of food consisting of meat (esp. pork) minced and highly seasoned, and inclosed in a cylindrical case or skin usually made of the prepared intestine of some animal.
[1913 Webster]

2. A saucisson. See Saucisson. Wilhelm.
[1913 Webster]

Sauseflem
Sau"se*flem (?), a. [OF. saus salt (L. salsus) + flemme phlegm.] Having a red, pimpled face. [Obs.] [Written also sawceflem.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Saussurite
Saus"sur*ite (?), n. [F. So called from M. Saussure.] (Min.) A tough, compact mineral, of a white, greenish, or grayish color. It is near zoisite in composition, and in part, at least, has been produced by the alteration of feldspar.
[1913 Webster]

Saute
Saut
{ Saut, Saute (?), } n. An assault. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Saute
Sau`te" (?), p. p. of Sauter. C. Owen.
[1913 Webster]

Sauter
Sau`ter" (?), v. t. [F., properly, to jump.] To fry lightly and quickly, as meat, by turning or tossing it over frequently in a hot pan greased with a little fat.
[1913 Webster]

Sauter
Sau"ter (?), n. Psalter. [Obs.] Piers Plowman.
[1913 Webster]

Sauterelle
Sau`te*relle (?), n. [F.] An instrument used by masons and others to trace and form angles.
[1913 Webster]

Sauterne
Sau`terne" (?), n. [F.] A white wine made in the district of Sauterne, France.
[1913 Webster]

Sautrie
Sau"trie (?), n. Psaltery. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Sauvegarde
Sau`ve*garde" (?), n. [F.] (Zool.) The monitor.
[1913 Webster]

Savable
Sav"a*ble (?), a. [From Save. Cf. Salvable.] Capable of, or admitting of, being saved.
[1913 Webster]

In the person prayed for there ought to be the great disposition of being in a savable condition. Jer. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

Savableness
Sav"a*ble*ness, n. Capability of being saved.
[1913 Webster]

Savacioun
Sa*va"ci*oun` (?), n. Salvation. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Savage
Sav"age (?; 48), a. [F. sauvage, OF. salvage, fr. L. silvaticus belonging to a wood, wild, fr. silva a wood. See Silvan, and cf. Sylvatic.] 1. Of or pertaining to the forest; remote from human abodes and cultivation; in a state of nature; wild; as, a savage wilderness.
[1913 Webster]

2. Wild; untamed; uncultivated; as, savage beasts.
[1913 Webster]

Cornels, and savage berries of the wood. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. Uncivilized; untaught; unpolished; rude; as, savage life; savage manners.
[1913 Webster]

What nation, since the commencement of the Christian era, ever rose from savage to civilized without Christianity? E. D. Griffin.
[1913 Webster]

4. Characterized by cruelty; barbarous; fierce; ferocious; inhuman; brutal; as, a savage spirit.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Ferocious; wild; uncultivated; untamed; untaught; uncivilized; unpolished; rude; brutish; brutal; heathenish; barbarous; cruel; inhuman; fierce; pitiless; merciless; unmerciful; atrocious. See Ferocious.
[1913 Webster]

Savage
Sav"age, n. 1. A human being in his native state of rudeness; one who is untaught, uncivilized, or without cultivation of mind or manners.
[1913 Webster]

2. A man of extreme, unfeeling, brutal cruelty; a barbarian.
[1913 Webster]

Savage
Sav"age (?; 48), v. t. To make savage. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Its bloodhounds, savaged by a cross of wolf. Southey.
[1913 Webster]

Savagely
Sav"age*ly, adv. In a savage manner.
[1913 Webster]

Savageness
Sav"age*ness, n. The state or quality of being savage.
[1913 Webster]

Wolves and bears, they say,
Casting their savageness aside have done
Like offices of pity.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Savagery
Sav"age*ry (?; 277), n. [F. sauvagerie.] 1. The state of being savage; savageness; savagism.
[1913 Webster]

A like work of primeval savagery. C. Kingsley.
[1913 Webster]

2. An act of cruelty; barbarity.
[1913 Webster]

The wildest savagery, the vilest stroke,
That ever wall-eyed wrath or staring rage
Presented to the tears of soft remorse.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. Wild growth, as of plants. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Savagism
Sav"a*gism (?), n. The state of being savage; the state of rude, uncivilized men, or of men in their native wildness and rudeness.
[1913 Webster]

Savanilla
Sav`a*nil"la (?), n. (Zool.) The tarpum. [Local, U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Savanna
Sa*van"na (?), n. [Of American Indian origin; cf. Sp. sabana, F. savane.] A tract of level land covered with the vegetable growth usually found in a damp soil and warm climate, -- as grass or reeds, -- but destitute of trees. [Spelt also savannah.]
[1913 Webster]

Savannahs are clear pieces of land without woods. Dampier.
[1913 Webster]

Savanna flower (Bot.), a West Indian name for several climbing apocyneous plants of the genus Echites. -- Savanna sparrow (Zool.), an American sparrow (Ammodramus sandwichensis or Passerculus savanna) of which several varieties are found on grassy plains from Alaska to the Eastern United States. -- Savanna wattle (Bot.), a name of two West Indian trees of the genus Citharexylum.
[1913 Webster]

Savant
Sa`vant" (?), n.; pl. Savants (F. &unr_;; E. &unr_;). [F., fr. savoir to know, L. sapere. See Sage, a.] A man of learning; one versed in literature or science; a person eminent for acquirements.
[1913 Webster]

Save
Save (?), n. [See Sage the herb.] The herb sage, or salvia. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Save
Save (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saved (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Saving.] [OE. saven, sauven, salven, OF. salver, sauver, F. sauver, L. salvare, fr. salvus saved, safe. See Safe, a.] 1. To make safe; to procure the safety of; to preserve from injury, destruction, or evil of any kind; to rescue from impending danger; as, to save a house from the flames.
[1913 Webster]

God save all this fair company. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

He cried, saying, Lord, save me. Matt. xiv. 30.
[1913 Webster]

Thou hast . . . quitted all to save
A world from utter loss.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Theol.) Specifically, to deliver from sin and its penalty; to rescue from a state of condemnation and spiritual death, and bring into a state of spiritual life.
[1913 Webster]

Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners. 1 Tim. i. 15.
[1913 Webster]

3. To keep from being spent or lost; to secure from waste or expenditure; to lay up; to reserve.
[1913 Webster]

Now save a nation, and now save a groat. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

4. To rescue from something undesirable or hurtful; to prevent from doing something; to spare.
[1913 Webster]

I'll save you
That labor, sir. All's now done.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

5. To hinder from doing, suffering, or happening; to obviate the necessity of; to prevent; to spare.
[1913 Webster]

Will you not speak to save a lady's blush? Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

6. To hold possession or use of; to escape loss of.
[1913 Webster]

Just saving the tide, and putting in a stock of merit. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

To save appearances, to preserve a decent outside; to avoid exposure of a discreditable state of things.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- To preserve; rescue; deliver; protect; spare; reserve; prevent.
[1913 Webster]

Save
Save, v. i. To avoid unnecessary expense or expenditure; to prevent waste; to be economical.
[1913 Webster]

Brass ordnance saveth in the quantity of the material. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Save
Save, prep. or conj. [F. sauf, properly adj., safe. See Safe, a.] Except; excepting; not including; leaving out; deducting; reserving; saving.
[1913 Webster]

Five times received I forty stripes save one. 2 Cor. xi. 24.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- See Except.
[1913 Webster]

Save
Save, conj. Except; unless.
[1913 Webster]

Saveable
Save"a*ble (?), a. See Savable.
[1913 Webster]

Save-all
Save"-all` (?), n. [Save + all.] Anything which saves fragments, or prevents waste or loss. Specifically: (a) A device in a candlestick to hold the ends of candles, so that they be burned. (b) (Naut.) A small sail sometimes set under the foot of another sail, to catch the wind that would pass under it. Totten.
[1913 Webster]

(c) A trough to prevent waste in a paper-making machine.
[1913 Webster]

Saveloy
Sav"e*loy (?), n. [F. cervelas, It. cervellata, fr. cervello brain, L. cerebellum, dim. of cerebrum brain. See Cerebral.] A kind of dried sausage. McElrath.
[1913 Webster]

Savely
Save"ly (?), adv. Safely. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Savement
Save"ment (?), n. The act of saving. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Saver
Sav"er (?), n. One who saves.
[1913 Webster]

Savine
Savin
{ Sav"in, Sav"ine (?), } n. [OE. saveine, AS. safinae, savine, L. sabina herba. Cf. Sabine.] [Written also sabine.] (Bot.) (a) A coniferous shrub (Juniperus Sabina) of Western Asia, occasionally found also in the northern parts of the United States and in British America. It is a compact bush, with dark-colored foliage, and produces small berries having a glaucous bloom. Its bitter, acrid tops are sometimes used in medicine for gout, amenorrhoea, etc. (b) The North American red cedar (Juniperus Virginiana.)
[1913 Webster]

Saving
Sav"ing (?), a. 1. Preserving; rescuing.
[1913 Webster]

He is the saving strength of his anointed. Ps. xxviii. 8.
[1913 Webster]

2. Avoiding unnecessary expense or waste; frugal; not lavish or wasteful; economical; as, a saving cook.
[1913 Webster]

3. Bringing back in returns or in receipts the sum expended; incurring no loss, though not gainful; as, a saving bargain; the ship has made a saving voyage.
[1913 Webster]

4. Making reservation or exception; as, a saving clause.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Saving is often used with a noun to form a compound adjective; as, labor-saving, life-saving, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Saving
Sav"ing (sāv"&ibreve_;ng), prep. or conj.; but properly a participle. With the exception of; except; excepting; also, without disrespect to.Saving your reverence.” Shak.Saving your presence.” Burns.
[1913 Webster]

None of us put off our clothes, saving that every one put them off for washing. Neh. iv. 23.
[1913 Webster]

And in the stone a new name written, which no man knoweth saving he that receiveth it. Rev. ii. 17.
[1913 Webster]

Saving
Sav"ing, n. 1. Something kept from being expended or lost; that which is saved or laid up; as, the savings of years of economy.
[1913 Webster]

2. Exception; reservation.
[1913 Webster]

Contend not with those that are too strong for us, but still with a saving to honesty. L'Estrange.
[1913 Webster]

Savings bank, a bank in which savings or earnings are deposited and put at interest.
[1913 Webster]

Savingly
Sav"ing*ly, adv. 1. In a saving manner; with frugality or parsimony.
[1913 Webster]

2. So as to be finally saved from eternal death.
[1913 Webster]

Savingly born of water and the Spirit. Waterland.
[1913 Webster]

Savingness
Sav"ing*ness, n. 1. The quality of being saving; carefulness not to expend money uselessly; frugality; parsimony. Mrs. H. H. Jackson.
[1913 Webster]

2. Tendency to promote salvation. Johnson.
[1913 Webster]

Savior
Sav"ior (sāv"y&etilde_;r), n. [OE. saveour, OF. salveor, F. sauveur, fr. L. salvator, fr. salvare to save. See Save, v.] [Written also saviour.] 1. One who saves, preserves, or delivers from destruction or danger.
[1913 Webster]

2. Specifically: The (or our, your, etc.) Savior, he who brings salvation to men; Jesus Christ, the Redeemer.
[1913 Webster]

Savioress
Sav"ior*ess, n. A female savior. [Written also saviouress.] [R.] Bp. Hall.
[1913 Webster]

Savor
Sa"vor (?), n. [OE. savour, savor, savur, OF. savor, savour, F. saveur, fr. L. sapor, fr. sapere to taste, savor. See Sage, a., and cf. Sapid, Insipid, Sapor.] [Written also savour.] 1. That property of a thing which affects the organs of taste or smell; taste and odor; flavor; relish; scent; as, the savor of an orange or a rose; an ill savor.
[1913 Webster]

I smell sweet savors and I feel soft things. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, specific flavor or quality; characteristic property; distinctive temper, tinge, taint, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

Why is not my life a continual joy, and the savor of heaven perpetually upon my spirit? Baxter.
[1913 Webster]

3. Sense of smell; power to scent, or trace by scent. [R.] “Beyond my savor.” Herbert.
[1913 Webster]

4. Pleasure; delight; attractiveness. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

She shall no savor have therein but lite. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Taste; flavor; relish; odor; scent; smell.
[1913 Webster]

Savor
Sa"vor, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Savored (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Savoring.] [Cf. OF. savorer, F. savourer. See Savor, n.] [Written also savour.] 1. To have a particular smell or taste; -- with of.
[1913 Webster]

2. To partake of the quality or nature; to indicate the presence or influence; to smack; -- with of.
[1913 Webster]

This savors not much of distraction. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

I have rejected everything that savors of party. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

3. To use the sense of taste. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

By sight, hearing, smelling, tasting or savoring, and feeling. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Savor
Sa"vor, v. t. 1. To perceive by the smell or the taste; hence, to perceive; to note. [Obs.] B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

2. To have the flavor or quality of; to indicate the presence of. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

That cuts us off from hope, and savors only
Rancor and pride, impatience and despite.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. To taste or smell with pleasure; to delight in; to relish; to like; to favor. [R.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Savorily
Sa"vor*i*ly (?), adv. In a savory manner.
[1913 Webster]

Savoriness
Sa"vor*i*ness, n. The quality of being savory.
[1913 Webster]

Savorless
Sa"vor*less, a. Having no savor; destitute of smell or of taste; insipid.
[1913 Webster]

Savorly
Sa"vor*ly, a. Savory. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Savorly
Sa"vor*ly, adv. In a savory manner. [Obs.] Barrow.
[1913 Webster]

Savorous
Sa"vor*ous (-ŭs), a. [Cf. F. savoureux, OF. saveros, L. saporosus. Cf. Saporous, and see Savor, n.] Having a savor; savory. [Obs.] Rom. of R.
[1913 Webster]

Savory
Sa"vor*y (-&ybreve_;), a. [From Savor.] Pleasing to the organs of taste or smell. [Written also savoury.]
[1913 Webster]

The chewing flocks
Had ta'en their supper on the savory herb.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Savory
Sa"vo*ry (sā"v&ouptack_;*r&ybreve_;), n. [F. savorée; cf. It. santoreggia, satureja, L. satureia,] (Bot.) An aromatic labiate plant (Satureia hortensis), much used in cooking; -- also called summer savory. [Written also savoury.]
[1913 Webster]

Savoy
Sa*voy" (?), n. [F. chou de Savoie cabbage of Savoy.] (Bot.) A variety of the common cabbage (Brassica oleracea major), having curled leaves, -- much cultivated for winter use.
[1913 Webster]

Savoyard
Sav`oy*ard" (?), n. [F.] A native or inhabitant of Savoy.
[1913 Webster]

Savvey
Savvy
{ Sav"vy, Sav"vey } (?), v. t. & i. [Written also savey.] [Sp. saber to know, sabe usted do you know?] To understand; to comprehend; know. [Slang, U. S.]
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Savvey
Savvy
{ Sav"vy, Sav"vey }, n. Comprehension; knowledge of affairs; mental grasp; also, practical know-how; common sense. [Slang, U. S.] also adj. knowledgeable; well-informed; clever; canny; wise.
[Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

Saw
Saw (s&asuml_;), imp. of See.
[1913 Webster]

Saw
Saw, n. [OE. sawe, AS. sagu; akin to secgan to say. See Say, v. t. and cf. Saga.]
[1913 Webster]

1. Something said; speech; discourse. [Obs.] “To hearken all his sawe.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. A saying; a proverb; a maxim.
[1913 Webster]

His champions are the prophets and apostles,
His weapons holy saws of sacred writ.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. Dictate; command; decree. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

[Love] rules the creatures by his powerful saw. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Saw
Saw, n. [OE. sawe, AS. sage; akin to D. zaag, G. säge, OHG. sega, saga, Dan. sav, Sw. såg, Icel. sög, L. secare to cut, securis ax, secula sickle. Cf. Scythe, Sickle, Section, Sedge.] An instrument for cutting or dividing substances, as wood, iron, etc., consisting of a thin blade, or plate, of steel, with a series of sharp teeth on the edge, which remove successive portions of the material by cutting and tearing.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Saw is frequently used adjectively, or as the first part of a compound.
[1913 Webster]

Band saw, Crosscut saw, etc. See under Band, Crosscut, etc. -- Circular saw, a disk of steel with saw teeth upon its periphery, and revolved on an arbor. -- Saw bench, a bench or table with a flat top for for sawing, especially with a circular saw which projects above the table. -- Saw file, a three-cornered file, such as is used for sharpening saw teeth. -- Saw frame, the frame or sash in a sawmill, in which the saw, or gang of saws, is held. -- Saw gate, a saw frame. -- Saw gin, the form of cotton gin invented by Eli Whitney, in which the cotton fibers are drawn, by the teeth of a set of revolving circular saws, through a wire grating which is too fine for the seeds to pass. -- Saw grass (Bot.), any one of certain cyperaceous plants having the edges of the leaves set with minute sharp teeth, especially the Cladium Mariscus of Europe, and the Cladium effusum of the Southern United States. Cf. Razor grass, under Razor. -- Saw log, a log of suitable size for sawing into lumber. -- Saw mandrel, a mandrel on which a circular saw is fastened for running. -- Saw pit, a pit over which timbor is sawed by two men, one standing below the timber and the other above. Mortimer. -- Saw sharpener (Zool.), the great titmouse; -- so named from its harsh call note. [Prov. Eng.] -- Saw whetter (Zool.), the marsh titmouse (Parus palustris); -- so named from its call note. [Prov. Eng.] -- Scroll saw, a ribbon of steel with saw teeth upon one edge, stretched in a frame and adapted for sawing curved outlines; also, a machine in which such a saw is worked by foot or power.
[1913 Webster]

Saw
Saw (?), v. t. [imp. Sawed (?); p. p. Sawed or Sawn (&unr_;); p. pr. & vb. n. Sawing.] 1. To cut with a saw; to separate with a saw; as, to saw timber or marble.
[1913 Webster]

2. To form by cutting with a saw; as, to saw boards or planks, that is, to saw logs or timber into boards or planks; to saw shingles; to saw out a panel.
[1913 Webster]

3. Also used figuratively; as, to saw the air.
[1913 Webster]

Saw
Saw, v. i. 1. To use a saw; to practice sawing; as, a man saws well.
[1913 Webster]

2. To cut, as a saw; as, the saw or mill saws fast.
[1913 Webster]

3. To be cut with a saw; as, the timber saws smoothly.
[1913 Webster]

Sawarra nut
Sa*war"ra nut` (?). See Souari nut.
[1913 Webster]

Sawbelly
Saw"bel`ly (?), n. The alewife. [Local, U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Sawbill
Saw"bill` (?), n. The merganser. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Sawbones
Saw"bones` (?), n. A nickname for a surgeon.
[1913 Webster]

Sawbuck
Saw"buck` (?), n. 1. A sawhorse.
[1913 Webster]

2. [Colloq., from the Roman X for ten, like the support of a sawbuck.] a ten-dollar bill; also, double sawbuck, a twenty-dollar bill.
[PJC]

Sawceflem
Saw"ce*flem (?), a. See Sauseflem. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Sawder
Saw"der (?), n. A corrupt spelling and pronunciation of solder.
[1913 Webster]

Soft sawder, seductive praise; flattery; blarney. [Slang]
[1913 Webster]

Sawdust
Saw"dust` (?), n. Dust or small fragments of wood (or of stone, etc.) made by the cutting of a saw.
[1913 Webster]

Sawer
Saw"er` (?), n. One who saws; a sawyer.
[1913 Webster]

Sawfish
Saw"fish` (?), n. (Zool.) Any one of several species of elasmobranch fishes of the genus Pristis. They have a sharklike form, but are more nearly allied to the rays. The flattened and much elongated snout has a row of stout toothlike structures inserted along each edge, forming a sawlike organ with which it mutilates or kills its prey.
[1913 Webster]

Sawfly
Saw"fly` (?), n. (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of hymenopterous insects belonging to the family Tenthredinidae. The female usually has an ovipositor containing a pair of sawlike organs with which she makes incisions in the leaves or stems of plants in which to lay the eggs. The larvae resemble those of Lepidoptera.
[1913 Webster]

Sawhorse
Saw"horse` (?), n. A kind of rack, shaped like a double St. Andrew's cross, on which sticks of wood are laid for sawing by hand; -- called also buck, and sawbuck.
[1913 Webster]

Sawmill
Saw"mill` (?), n. A mill for sawing, especially one for sawing timber or lumber.
[1913 Webster]

Sawneb
Saw"neb` (?), n. A merganser. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Saw palmetto
Saw" pal*met"to. See under Palmetto.
[1913 Webster]

Saw-set
Saw"-set` (?), n. An instrument used to set or turn the teeth of a saw a little sidewise, that they may make a kerf somewhat wider than the thickness of the blade, to prevent friction; -- called also saw-wrest.
[1913 Webster]

Sawtooth
Saw"tooth` (?), n. (Zool.) An arctic seal (Lobodon carcinophaga), having the molars serrated; -- called also crab-eating seal.
[1913 Webster]

Saw-toothed
Saw"-toothed" (?), a. Having a tooth or teeth like those of a saw; serrate.
[1913 Webster]

Sawtry
Saw"try (?), n. A psaltery. [Obs.] Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Saw-whet
Saw"-whet` (?), n. (Zool.) A small North American owl (Nyctale Acadica), destitute of ear tufts and having feathered toes; -- called also Acadian owl.
[1913 Webster]

Saw-wort
Saw"-wort` (?), n. (Bot.) Any plant of the composite genus Serratula; -- so named from the serrated leaves of most of the species.
[1913 Webster]

Saw-wrest
Saw"-wrest` (?), n. See Saw-set.
[1913 Webster]

Sawyer
Saw"yer (?), n. [Saw + -yer, as in lawyer. Cf. Sawer.] 1. One whose occupation is to saw timber into planks or boards, or to saw wood for fuel; a sawer.
[1913 Webster]

2. A tree which has fallen into a stream so that its branches project above the surface, rising and falling with a rocking or swaying motion in the current. [U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

3. (Zool.) The bowfin. [Local, U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Sax
Sax (?), n. [AS. seax a knife.] A kind of chopping instrument for trimming the edges of roofing slates.
[1913 Webster]

Saxatile
Sax"a*tile (?), a. [L. saxatilis, fr. saxum a rock: cf. F. saxatile.] Of or pertaining to rocks; living among rocks; as, a saxatile plant.
[1913 Webster]

Saxhorn
Sax"horn` (?), n. (Mus.) A name given to a numerous family of brass wind instruments with valves, invented by Antoine Joseph Adolphe Sax (known as Adolphe Sax), of Belgium and Paris, and much used in military bands and in orchestras.
[1913 Webster]

Saxicava
Sax`i*ca"va (?), n.; pl. E. saxicavas (#), L. Saxicavae (#). [NL. See Saxicavous.] (Zool.) Any species of marine bivalve shells of the genus Saxicava. Some of the species are noted for their power of boring holes in limestone and similar rocks.
[1913 Webster]

Saxicavid
Sax`i*ca"vid (?), a. (Zool.) Of or pertaining to the saxicavas. -- n. A saxicava.
[1913 Webster]

Saxicavous
Sax`i*ca"vous (?), a. [L. saxum rock + cavare to make hollow, fr. cavus hollow: cf. F. saxicave.] (Zool.) Boring, or hollowing out, rocks; -- said of certain mollusks which live in holes which they burrow in rocks. See Illust. of Lithodomus.
[1913 Webster]

Saxicoline
Sax*ic"o*line (?), a. [L. saxum a rock + colere to inhabit.] (Zool.) Stone-inhabiting; pertaining to, or having the characteristics of, the stonechats.
[1913 Webster]

Saxicolous
Sax*ic"o*lous (?), a. [See Saxicoline.] (Bot.) Growing on rocks.
[1913 Webster]

Saxifraga
Sax*if"ra*ga (?), n. [L., saxifrage. See Saxifrage.] (Bot.) A genus of exogenous polypetalous plants, embracing about one hundred and eighty species. See Saxifrage.
[1913 Webster]

Saxifragaceous
Sax`i*fra*ga"ceous (?), a. (Bot.) Of or pertaining to a natural order of plants (Saxifragaceae) of which saxifrage is the type. The order includes also the alum root, the hydrangeas, the mock orange, currants and gooseberries, and many other plants.
[1913 Webster]

Saxifragant
Sax*if"ra*gant (?), a. [See Saxifrage.] Breaking or destroying stones; saxifragous. [R.] -- n. That which breaks or destroys stones. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Saxifrage
Sax"i*frage (?; 48), n. [L. saxifraga, from saxifragus stone-breaking; saxum rock + frangere to break: cf. F. saxifrage. See Fracture, and cf. Sassafras, Saxon.] (Bot.) Any plant of the genus Saxifraga, mostly perennial herbs growing in crevices of rocks in mountainous regions.
[1913 Webster]

Burnet saxifrage, a European umbelliferous plant (Pimpinella Saxifraga). -- Golden saxifrage, a low half-succulent herb (Chrysosplenium oppositifolium) growing in rivulets in Europe; also, Chrysosplenium Americanum, common in the United States. See also under Golden. -- Meadow saxifrage, or Pepper saxifrage. See under Meadow.
[1913 Webster]

Saxifragous
Sax*if"ra*gous (?), a. [L. saxifragus: cf. F. saxifrage. See Saxifrage.] Dissolving stone, especially dissolving stone in the bladder.
[1913 Webster]

Saxon
Sax"on (săks"ŭn or -'n), n. [L. Saxo, pl. Saxones, from the Saxon national name; cf. AS. pl. Seaxe, Seaxan, fr. seax a knife, a short sword, a dagger (akin to OHG. sahs, and perhaps to L. saxum rock, stone, knives being originally made of stone); and cf. G. Sachse, pl. Sachsen. Cf. Saxifrage.] 1. (a) One of a nation or people who formerly dwelt in the northern part of Germany, and who, with other Teutonic tribes, invaded and conquered England in the fifth and sixth centuries. (b) Also used in the sense of Anglo-Saxon. (c) A native or inhabitant of modern Saxony.
[1913 Webster]

2. The language of the Saxons; Anglo-Saxon.
[1913 Webster]

Old Saxon, the Saxon of the continent of Europe in the old form of the language, as shown particularly in the “Heliand”, a metrical narration of the gospel history preserved in manuscripts of the 9th century.
[1913 Webster]

Saxon
Sax"on, a. Of or pertaining to the Saxons, their country, or their language. (b) Anglo-Saxon. (c) Of or pertaining to Saxony or its inhabitants.
[1913 Webster]

Saxon blue (Dyeing), a deep blue liquid used in dyeing, and obtained by dissolving indigo in concentrated sulphuric acid. Brande & C. -- Saxon green (Dyeing), a green color produced by dyeing with yellow upon a ground of Saxon blue.
[1913 Webster]

Saxonic
Sax*on"ic (?), a. Relating to the Saxons or Anglo- Saxons.
[1913 Webster]

Saxonism
Sax"on*ism (?), n. An idiom of the Saxon or Anglo-Saxon language. T. Warton.
[1913 Webster]

Saxonist
Sax"on*ist, n. One versed in the Saxon language.
[1913 Webster]

Saxonite
Sax"on*ite (?), n. (Min.) See Mountain soap, under Mountain.
[1913 Webster]

Saxony
Sax"o*ny (?), n. [So named after the kingdom of Saxony, reputed to produce fine wool.] 1. A kind of glossy woolen cloth formerly much used.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

2. Saxony yarn, or flannel made of it or similar yarn.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Saxony yarn
Saxony yarn. A fine grade of woolen yarn twisted somewhat harder and smoother than zephyr yarn.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Saxophone
Sax"o*phone (?), n. [A.A.J. Sax, the inventor (see Saxhorn) + Gr. &unr_; tone.] (Mus.) A wind instrument of brass, containing a reed, and partaking of the qualities both of a brass instrument and of a clarinet.
[1913 Webster]

Sax-tuba
Sax"-tu`ba (?), n. [See Saxhorn, and Tube.] (Mus.) A powerful instrument of brass, curved somewhat like the Roman buccina, or tuba.
[1913 Webster]

Say
Say (sā), obs. imp. of See. Saw. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Say
Say (sā), n. [Aphetic form of assay.] 1. Trial by sample; assay; sample; specimen; smack. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

If those principal works of God . . . be but certain tastes and says, as it were, of that final benefit. Hooker.
[1913 Webster]

Thy tongue some say of breeding breathes. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Tried quality; temper; proof. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

He found a sword of better say. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

3. Essay; trial; attempt. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

To give a say at, to attempt. B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

Say
Say, v. t. To try; to assay. [Obs.] B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

Say
Say, n. [OE. saie, F. saie, fr. L. saga, equiv. to sagum, sagus, a coarse woolen mantle; cf. Gr. sa`gos. See Sagum.] 1. A kind of silk or satin. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Thou say, thou serge, nay, thou buckram lord! Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. A delicate kind of serge, or woolen cloth. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

His garment neither was of silk nor say. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Say
Say, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Said (s&ebreve_;d), contracted from sayed; p. pr. & vb. n. Saying.] [OE. seggen, seyen, siggen, sayen, sayn, AS. secgan; akin to OS. seggian, D. zeggen, LG. seggen, OHG. sagēn, G. sagen, Icel. segja, Sw. säga, Dan. sige, Lith. sakyti; cf. OL. insece tell, relate, Gr. 'e`nnepe (for 'en-sepe), 'e`spete. Cf. Saga, Saw a saying.] 1. To utter or express in words; to tell; to speak; to declare; as, he said many wise things.
[1913 Webster]

Arise, and say how thou camest here. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. To repeat; to rehearse; to recite; to pronounce; as, to say a lesson.
[1913 Webster]

Of my instruction hast thou nothing bated
In what thou hadst to say?
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

After which shall be said or sung the following hymn. Bk. of Com. Prayer.
[1913 Webster]

3. To announce as a decision or opinion; to state positively; to assert; hence, to form an opinion upon; to be sure about; to be determined in mind as to.
[1913 Webster]

But what it is, hard is to say. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

4. To mention or suggest as an estimate, hypothesis, or approximation; hence, to suppose; -- in the imperative, followed sometimes by the subjunctive; as, he had, say fifty thousand dollars; the fox had run, say ten miles.
[1913 Webster]

Say, for nonpayment that the debt should double,
Is twenty hundred kisses such a trouble?
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

It is said, or They say, it is commonly reported; it is rumored; people assert or maintain. -- That is to say, that is; in other words; otherwise.
[1913 Webster]

Say
Say, v. i. To speak; to express an opinion; to make answer; to reply.
[1913 Webster]

You have said; but whether wisely or no, let the forest judge. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

To this argument we shall soon have said; for what concerns it us to hear a husband divulge his household privacies? Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Say
Say, n. [From Say, v. t.; cf. Saw a saying.] A speech; something said; an expression of opinion; a current story; a maxim or proverb. [Archaic or Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

He no sooner said out his say, but up rises a cunning snap. L'Estrange.
[1913 Webster]

That strange palmer's boding say,
That fell so ominous and drear
Full on the object of his fear.
Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Sayer
Say"er (?), n. One who says; an utterer.
[1913 Webster]

Mr. Curran was something much better than a sayer of smart sayings. Jeffrey.
[1913 Webster]

Sayette
Sa*yette" (?), n. [F. Cf. Say a kind of serge.] A mixed stuff, called also sagathy. See Sagathy.
[1913 Webster]

Saying
Say"ing (?), n. That which is said; a declaration; a statement, especially a proverbial one; an aphorism; a proverb.
[1913 Webster]

Many are the sayings of the wise,
In ancient and in modern books enrolled.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Declaration; speech; adage; maxim; aphorism; apothegm; saw; proverb; byword.
[1913 Webster]

Sayman
Say"man (?), n. [Say sample + man.] One who assays. [Obs.] Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Saymaster
Say"mas`ter (?), n. A master of assay; one who tries or proves. [Obs.] “Great saymaster of state.” B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

Saynd
Saynd (?), obs. p. p. of Senge, to singe. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

'Sblood
'Sblood (?), interj. An abbreviation of God's blood; -- used as an oath. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scab
Scab (skăb), n. [OE. scab, scabbe, shabbe; cf. AS. scaeb, sceabb, scebb, Dan. & Sw. skab, and also L. scabies, fr. scabere to scratch, akin to E. shave. See Shave, and cf. Shab, Shabby.] 1. An incrustation over a sore, wound, vesicle, or pustule, formed by the drying up of the discharge from the diseased part.
[1913 Webster]

2. The itch in man; also, the scurvy. [Colloq. or Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

3. The mange, esp. when it appears on sheep. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

4. A disease of potatoes producing pits in their surface, caused by a minute fungus (Tiburcinia Scabies).
[1913 Webster]

5. (Founding) A slight irregular protuberance which defaces the surface of a casting, caused by the breaking away of a part of the mold.
[1913 Webster]

6. A mean, dirty, paltry fellow. [Low] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

7. A nickname for a workman who engages for lower wages than are fixed by the trades unions; also, for one who takes the place of a workman on a strike. [Cant]
[1913 Webster]

8. (Bot.) Any one of various more or less destructive fungus diseases attacking cultivated plants, and usually forming dark-colored crustlike spots.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scab
Scab, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scabbed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scabbing.] 1. To become covered with a scab; as, the wound scabbed over.
[1913 Webster]

2. to take the place of a striking worker.
[PJC]

Scabbard
Scab"bard (?), n. [OE. scaubert, scauberk, OF. escaubers, escauberz, pl., scabbards, probably of German or Scan. origin; cf. Icel. skālpr scabbard, and G. bergen to conceal. Cf. Hauberk.] The case in which the blade of a sword, dagger, etc., is kept; a sheath.
[1913 Webster]

Nor in thy scabbard sheathe that famous blade. Fairfax.
[1913 Webster]

Scabbard fish (Zool.), a long, compressed, silver-colored taenioid fish (Lepidopus argyreus syn. Lepidopus caudatus), found on the European coasts, and more abundantly about New Zealand, where it is called frostfish and considered an excellent food fish.
[1913 Webster]

Scabbard
Scab"bard (?), v. t. To put in a scabbard.
[1913 Webster]

Scabbard plane
Scab"bard plane` (?). See Scaleboard plane, under Scaleboard.
[1913 Webster]

Scabbed
Scab"bed (? or ?), a. 1. Abounding with scabs; diseased with scabs.
[1913 Webster]

2. Fig.: Mean; paltry; vile; worthless. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Scabbedness
Scab"bed*ness (?), n. Scabbiness.
[1913 Webster]

Scabbily
Scab"bi*ly (?), adv. In a scabby manner.
[1913 Webster]

Scabbiness
Scab"bi*ness, n. The quality or state of being scabby.
[1913 Webster]

Scabble
Scab"ble (?), v. t. See Scapple.
[1913 Webster]

Scabby
Scab"by (?), a. [Compar. Scabbier (&unr_;); superl. Scabbiest.] 1. Affected with scabs; full of scabs.
[1913 Webster]

2. Diseased with the scab, or mange; mangy. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Scabies
Sca"bi*es (?), n. (Med.) The itch.
[1913 Webster]

Scabious
Sca"bi*ous (?), a. [L. scabiosus, from scabies the scab: cf. F. scabieux.] Consisting of scabs; rough; itchy; leprous; as, scabious eruptions. Arbuthnot.
[1913 Webster]

Scabious
Sca"bi*ous, n. [Cf. F. scabieuse. See Scabious, a.] (Bot.) Any plant of the genus Scabiosa, several of the species of which are common in Europe. They resemble the Compositae, and have similar heads of flowers, but the anthers are not connected.
[1913 Webster]

Sweet scabious. (a) Mourning bride. (b) A daisylike plant (Erigeron annuus) having a stout branching stem.
[1913 Webster]

Scabling
Scab"ling (?), n. [See Scapple.] A fragment or chip of stone. [Written also scabline.]
[1913 Webster]

Scabredity
Sca*bred"i*ty (?), n. [L. scabredo, fr. scaber rough.] Roughness; ruggedness. [Obs.] Burton.
[1913 Webster]

Scabrous
Sca"brous (?), a. [L. scabrosus, fr. scaber rough: cf. F. scabreux.] 1. Rough to the touch, like a file; having small raised dots, scales, or points; scabby; scurfy; scaly. Arbuthnot.
[1913 Webster]

2. Fig.: Harsh; unmusical. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

His verse is scabrous and hobbling. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Scabrousness
Sca"brous*ness, n. The quality of being scabrous.
[1913 Webster]

Scabwort
Scab"wort` (?), n. (Bot.) Elecampane.
[1913 Webster]

Scad
Scad (?), n. [Gael. & Ir. sgadan a herring.] (Zool.) (a) A small carangoid fish (Trachurus saurus) abundant on the European coast, and less common on the American. The name is applied also to several allied species. (b) The goggler; -- called also big-eyed scad. See Goggler. (c) The friar skate. [Scot.] (d) The cigar fish, or round robin.
[1913 Webster]

Scaffold
Scaf"fold (?), n. [OF. eschafault, eschafaut, escafaut, escadafaut, F. échafaud; probably originally the same word as E. & F. catafalque, It. catafalco. See Catafalque.] 1. A temporary structure of timber, boards, etc., for various purposes, as for supporting workmen and materials in building, for exhibiting a spectacle upon, for holding the spectators at a show, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Pardon, gentles all,
The flat, unraised spirits that have dared
On this unworthy scaffold to bring forth
So great an object.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Specifically, a stage or elevated platform for the execution of a criminal; as, to die on the scaffold.
[1913 Webster]

That a scaffold of execution should grow a scaffold of coronation. Sir P. Sidney.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Metal.) An accumulation of adherent, partly fused material forming a shelf, or dome-shaped obstruction, above the tuyères in a blast furnace.
[1913 Webster]

Scaffold
Scaf"fold, v. t. To furnish or uphold with a scaffold.
[1913 Webster]

Scaffoldage
Scaf"fold*age (?), n. A scaffold. [R.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scaffolding
Scaf"fold*ing, n. 1. A scaffold; a supporting framework; as, the scaffolding of the body. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

2. Materials for building scaffolds.
[1913 Webster]

Scaglia
Scagl"ia (?), n. [It. scaglia a scale, a shell, a chip of marble.] A reddish variety of limestone.
[1913 Webster]

Scagliola
Scagl*io"la (?), n. [It. scagliuola, dim. of scaglia. See Scaglia.] An imitation of any veined and ornamental stone, as marble, formed by a substratum of finely ground gypsum mixed with glue, the surface of which, while soft, is variegated with splinters of marble, spar, granite, etc., and subsequently colored and polished.
[1913 Webster]

Scala
Sca"la (?), n.; pl. Scalae (#). [L., a ladder.] 1. (Surg.) A machine formerly employed for reducing dislocations of the humerus.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Anat.) A term applied to any one of the three canals of the cochlea.
[1913 Webster]

Scalable
Scal"a*ble (?), a. Capable of being scaled.
[1913 Webster]

Scalado
Scalade
{ Sca*lade" (?), Sca*la"do (?), } n. (Mil.) See Escalade. Fairfax.
[1913 Webster]

Scalar
Sca"lar (?), n. (Math.) In the quaternion analysis, a quantity that has magnitude, but not direction; -- distinguished from a vector, which has both magnitude and direction.
[1913 Webster]

Scalaria
Sca*la"ri*a (?), n. [L., flight of steps.] (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of marine gastropods of the genus Scalaria, or family Scalaridae, having elongated spiral turreted shells, with rounded whorls, usually crossed by ribs or varices. The color is generally white or pale. Called also ladder shell, and wentletrap. See Ptenoglossa, and Wentletrap.
[1913 Webster]

Scalariform
Sca*lar"i*form (?), a. [L. scalare, scalaria, staircase, ladder + -form: cf. F. scalariforme.] 1. Resembling a ladder in form or appearance; having transverse bars or markings like the rounds of a ladder; as, the scalariform cells and scalariform pits in some plants.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) Like or pertaining to a scalaria.
[1913 Webster]

Scalary
Sca"la*ry (?), a. [L. scalaris, fr. scalae, pl. scala, staircase, ladder.] Resembling a ladder; formed with steps. [Obs.] Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Scalawag
Scal"a*wag (?), n. A scamp; a scapegrace. [Spelt also scallawag.] [Slang, U.S.] Bartlett.
[1913 Webster]

Scald
Scald (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scalded; p. pr. & vb. n. Scalding.] [OF. eschalder, eschauder, escauder, F. échauder, fr. L. excaldare; ex + caldus, calidus, warm, hot. See Ex, and Caldron.] 1. To burn with hot liquid or steam; to pain or injure by contact with, or immersion in, any hot fluid; as, to scald the hand.
[1913 Webster]

Mine own tears
Do scald like molten lead.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Here the blue flames of scalding brimstone fall. Cowley.
[1913 Webster]

2. To expose to a boiling or violent heat over a fire, or in hot water or other liquor; as, to scald milk or meat.
[1913 Webster]

Scald
Scald, n. A burn, or injury to the skin or flesh, by some hot liquid, or by steam.
[1913 Webster]

Scald
Scald, a. [For scalled. See Scall.] 1. Affected with the scab; scabby. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Scurvy; paltry; as, scald rhymers. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scald crow (Zool.), the hooded crow. [Ireland] -- Scald head (Med.), a name popularly given to several diseases of the scalp characterized by pustules (the dried discharge of which forms scales) and by falling out of the hair.
[1913 Webster]

Scald
Scald, n. Scurf on the head. See Scall. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Scald
Scald (skăld or sk&asuml_;ld; 277), n. [Icel. skāld.] One of the ancient Scandinavian poets and historiographers; a reciter and singer of heroic poems, eulogies, etc., among the Norsemen; more rarely, a bard of any of the ancient Teutonic tribes. [Written also skald.]
[1913 Webster]

A war song such as was of yore chanted on the field of battle by the scalds of the yet heathen Saxons. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Scalder
Scald"er (?), n. A Scandinavian poet; a scald.
[1913 Webster]

Scaldfish
Scald"fish` (?), n. [Scald, a. + fish.] (Zool.) A European flounder (Arnoglossus laterna, or Psetta arnoglossa); -- called also megrim, and smooth sole.
[1913 Webster]

Scaldic
Scald"ic (? or ?), a. Of or pertaining to the scalds of the Norsemen; as, scaldic poetry.
[1913 Webster]

Scale
Scale (skāl), n. [AS. scāle; perhaps influenced by the kindred Icel. skāl balance, dish, akin also to D. schaal a scale, bowl, shell, G. schale, OHG. scāla, Dan. skaal drinking cup, bowl, dish, and perh. to E. scale of a fish. Cf. Scale of a fish, Skull the brain case.] 1. The dish of a balance; hence, the balance itself; an instrument or machine for weighing; as, to turn the scale; -- chiefly used in the plural when applied to the whole instrument or apparatus for weighing. Also used figuratively.
[1913 Webster]

Long time in even scale
The battle hung.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

The scales are turned; her kindness weighs no more
Now than my vows.
Waller.
[1913 Webster]

2. pl. (Astron.) The sign or constellation Libra.
[1913 Webster]

Platform scale. See under Platform.
[1913 Webster]

Scale
Scale, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scaled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scaling.] To weigh or measure according to a scale; to measure; also, to grade or vary according to a scale or system.
[1913 Webster]

Scaling his present bearing with his past. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

To scale a debt, wages, etc. or To scale down a debt, wages, etc., to reduce a debt, etc., according to a fixed ratio or scale. [U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scale
Scale, n. [Cf. AS. scealu, scalu, a shell, parings; akin to D. schaal, G. schale, OHG. scala, Dan. & Sw. skal a shell, Dan. skiael a fish scale, Goth. skalja tile, and E. shale, shell, and perhaps also to scale of a balance; but perhaps rather fr. OF. escale, escaile, F. écaille scale of a fish, and écale shell of beans, pease, eggs, nuts, of German origin, and akin to Goth. skalja, G. schale. See Shale.] 1. (Anat.) One of the small, thin, membranous, bony or horny pieces which form the covering of many fishes and reptiles, and some mammals, belonging to the dermal part of the skeleton, or dermoskeleton. See Cycloid, Ctenoid, and Ganoid.
[1913 Webster]

Fish that, with their fins and shining scales,
Glide under the green wave.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, any layer or leaf of metal or other material, resembling in size and thinness the scale of a fish; as, a scale of iron, of bone, etc.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Zool.) One of the small scalelike structures covering parts of some invertebrates, as those on the wings of Lepidoptera and on the body of Thysanura; the elytra of certain annelids. See Lepidoptera.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Zool.) A scale insect. (See below.)
[1913 Webster]

5. (Bot.) A small appendage like a rudimentary leaf, resembling the scales of a fish in form, and often in arrangement; as, the scale of a bud, of a pine cone, and the like. The name is also given to the chaff on the stems of ferns.
[1913 Webster]

6. The thin metallic side plate of the handle of a pocketknife. See Illust. of Pocketknife.
[1913 Webster]

7. An incrustation deposit on the inside of a vessel in which water is heated, as a steam boiler.
[1913 Webster]

8. (Metal.) The thin oxide which forms on the surface of iron forgings. It consists essentially of the magnetic oxide, Fe3O4. Also, a similar coating upon other metals.
[1913 Webster]

Covering scale (Zool.), a hydrophyllium. -- Ganoid scale. (Zool.) See under Ganoid. -- Scale armor (Mil.), armor made of small metallic scales overlapping, and fastened upon leather or cloth. -- Scale beetle (Zool.), the tiger beetle. -- Scale carp (Zool.), a carp having normal scales. -- Scale insect (Zool.), any one of numerous species of small hemipterous insects belonging to the family Coccidae, in which the females, when adult, become more or less scalelike in form. They are found upon the leaves and twigs of various trees and shrubs, and often do great damage to fruit trees. See Orange scale,under Orange. -- Scale moss (Bot.), any leafy-stemmed moss of the order Hepaticae; -- so called from the small imbricated scalelike leaves of most of the species. See Hepatica, 2, and Jungermannia.
[1913 Webster]

Scale
Scale (?), v. t. 1. To strip or clear of scale or scales; as, to scale a fish; to scale the inside of a boiler.
[1913 Webster]

2. To take off in thin layers or scales, as tartar from the teeth; to pare off, as a surface. “If all the mountains were scaled, and the earth made even.” T. Burnet.
[1913 Webster]

3. To scatter; to spread. [Scot. & Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

4. (Gun.) To clean, as the inside of a cannon, by the explosion of a small quantity of powder. Totten.
[1913 Webster]

Scale
Scale, v. i. 1. To separate and come off in thin layers or laminae; as, some sandstone scales by exposure.
[1913 Webster]

Those that cast their shell are the lobster and crab; the old skins are found, but the old shells never; so it is likely that they scale off. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

2. To separate; to scatter. [Scot. & Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scale
Scale, n. [L. scalae, pl., scala staircase, ladder; akin to scandere to climb. See Scan; cf. Escalade.] 1. A ladder; a series of steps; a means of ascending. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, anything graduated, especially when employed as a measure or rule, or marked by lines at regular intervals. Specifically: (a) A mathematical instrument, consisting of a slip of wood, ivory, or metal, with one or more sets of spaces graduated and numbered on its surface, for measuring or laying off distances, etc., as in drawing, plotting, and the like. See Gunter's scale. (b) A series of spaces marked by lines, and representing proportionately larger distances; as, a scale of miles, yards, feet, etc., for a map or plan. (c) A basis for a numeral system; as, the decimal scale; the binary scale, etc. (d) (Mus.) The graduated series of all the tones, ascending or descending, from the keynote to its octave; -- called also the gamut. It may be repeated through any number of octaves. See Chromatic scale, Diatonic scale, Major scale, and Minor scale, under Chromatic, Diatonic, Major, and Minor.
[1913 Webster]

3. Gradation; succession of ascending and descending steps and degrees; progressive series; scheme of comparative rank or order; as, a scale of being.
[1913 Webster]

There is a certain scale of duties . . . which for want of studying in right order, all the world is in confusion. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

4. Relative dimensions, without difference in proportion of parts; size or degree of the parts or components in any complex thing, compared with other like things; especially, the relative proportion of the linear dimensions of the parts of a drawing, map, model, etc., to the dimensions of the corresponding parts of the object that is represented; as, a map on a scale of an inch to a mile.
[1913 Webster]

Scale of chords, a graduated scale on which are given the lengths of the chords of arcs from 0° to 90° in a circle of given radius, -- used in measuring given angles and in plotting angles of given numbers of degrees.
[1913 Webster]

Scale
Scale, v. t. [Cf. It. scalare, fr. L. scalae, scala. See Scale a ladder.] To climb by a ladder, or as if by a ladder; to ascend by steps or by climbing; to clamber up; as, to scale the wall of a fort.
[1913 Webster]

Oft have I scaled the craggy oak. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Scale
Scale, v. i. To lead up by steps; to ascend. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Satan from hence, now on the lower stair,
That scaled by steps of gold to heaven-gate,
Looks down with wonder.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Scaleback
Scale"back` (?), n. (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of marine annelids of the family Polynoidae, and allies, which have two rows of scales, or elytra, along the back. See Illust. under Chaetopoda.
[1913 Webster]

Scalebeam
Scale"beam` (?), n. 1. The lever or beam of a balance; the lever of a platform scale, to which the poise for weighing is applied.
[1913 Webster]

2. A weighing apparatus with a sliding weight, resembling a steelyard.
[1913 Webster]

Scaleboard
Scale"board` (?; commonly &unr_;), n. [3d scale + board.] 1. (Print.) A thin slip of wood used to justify a page. [Obs.] Crabb.
[1913 Webster]

2. A thin veneer of leaf of wood used for covering the surface of articles of furniture, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

Scaleboard plane, a plane for cutting from a board a wide shaving forming a scaleboard.
[1913 Webster]

Scaled
Scaled (?), a. 1. Covered with scales, or scalelike structures; -- said of a fish, a reptile, a moth, etc.
[1913 Webster]

2. Without scales, or with the scales removed; as, scaled herring.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Zool.) Having feathers which in form, color, or arrangement somewhat resemble scales; as, the scaled dove.
[1913 Webster]

Scaled dove (Zool.), any American dove of the genus Scardafella. Its colored feather tips resemble scales.
[1913 Webster]

Scaleless
Scale"less (?), a. Destitute of scales.
[1913 Webster]

Scalene
Sca*lene" (?), a. [L. scalenus, Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. scalène.] 1. (Geom.) (a) Having the sides and angles unequal; -- said of a triangle. (b) Having the axis inclined to the base, as a cone.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Anat.) (a) Designating several triangular muscles called scalene muscles. (b) Of or pertaining to the scalene muscles.
[1913 Webster]

Scalene muscles (Anat.), a group of muscles, usually three on each side in man, extending from the cervical vertebrae to the first and second ribs.
[1913 Webster]

Scalene
Sca*lene", n. (Geom.) A triangle having its sides and angles unequal.
[1913 Webster]

Scalenohedral
Sca*le`no*he"dral (sk&adot_;*lē`n&ouptack_;*hē"dr&aitalic_;l), a. (Crystallog.) Of or pertaining to a scalenohedron.
[1913 Webster]

Scalenohedron
Sca*le`no*he"dron (-dr&obreve_;n), n. [Gr. skalhno`s uneven + "e`dra seat, base.] (Crystallog.) A pyramidal form under the rhombohedral system, inclosed by twelve faces, each a scalene triangle.
[1913 Webster]

Scaler
Scal"er (?), n. One who, or that which, scales; specifically, a dentist's instrument for removing tartar from the teeth.
[1913 Webster]

Scale-winged
Scale"-winged` (?), a. (Zool.) Having the wings covered with small scalelike structures, as the Lepidoptera; scaly-winged.
[1913 Webster]

Scaliness
Scal"i*ness (?), n. The state of being scaly; roughness.
[1913 Webster]

Scaling
Scal"ing (skāl"&ibreve_;ng), a. 1. Adapted for removing scales, as from a fish; as, a scaling knife; adapted for removing scale, as from the interior of a steam boiler; as, a scaling hammer, bar, etc.
[1913 Webster]

2. Serving as an aid in clambering; as, a scaling ladder, used in assaulting a fortified place.
[1913 Webster]

Scaliola
Scal*io"la (?), n. Same as Scagliola.
[1913 Webster]

Scall
Scall (?), n. [Icel. skalli a bald head. Cf. Scald, a.] A scurf or scabby disease, especially of the scalp.
[1913 Webster]

It is a dry scall, even a leprosy upon the head. Lev. xiii. 30.
[1913 Webster]

Scall
Scall, a. Scabby; scurfy. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scalled
Scalled (?), a. Scabby; scurfy; scall. [Obs.] “With scalled brows black.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Scalled head. (Med.) See Scald head, under Scald, a.
[1913 Webster]

Scallion
Scal"lion (?), n. [OF. escalone, eschaloingne, L. caepa Ascalonia onion of Ascalon; caepa onion + Ascalonius of Ascalon, fr. Ascalo Ascalon, a town in Palestine. Cf. Shallot.] 1. (Bot.) A kind of small onion (Allium Ascalonicum), native of Palestine; the eschalot, or shallot.
[1913 Webster]

2. Any onion which does not “bottom out,” but remains with a thick stem like a leek. Amer. Cyc.
[1913 Webster]

Scallop
Scal"lop (?; 277), n. [OF. escalope a shell, probably of German or Dutch origin, and akin to E. scale of a fish; cf. D. schelp shell. See Scale of a fish, and cf. Escalop.] [Written also scollop.] 1. (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of marine bivalve mollusks of the genus Pecten and allied genera of the family Pectinidae. The shell is usually radially ribbed, and the edge is therefore often undulated in a characteristic manner. The large adductor muscle of some the species is much used as food. One species (Vola Jacobaeus) occurs on the coast of Palestine, and its shell was formerly worn by pilgrims as a mark that they had been to the Holy Land. Called also fan shell. See Pecten, 2.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The common edible scallop of the Eastern United States is Pecten irradians; the large sea scallop, also used as food, is Pecten Clintonius syn. Pecten tenuicostatus.
[1913 Webster]

2. One of series of segments of circles joined at their extremities, forming a border like the edge or surface of a scallop shell.
[1913 Webster]

3. One of the shells of a scallop; also, a dish resembling a scallop shell.
[1913 Webster]

Scallop
Scal"lop, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scalloped (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scalloping.] 1. To mark or cut the edge or border of into segments of circles, like the edge or surface of a scallop shell. See Scallop, n., 2.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Cookery) To bake in scallop shells or dishes; to prepare with crumbs of bread or cracker, and bake. See Scalloped oysters, below.
[1913 Webster]

Scalloped
Scal"loped (?), a. 1. Furnished with a scallop; made or done with or in a scallop.
[1913 Webster]

2. Having the edge or border cut or marked with segments of circles. See Scallop, n., 2.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Cookery) Baked in a scallop; cooked with crumbs.
[1913 Webster]

Scalloped oysters (Cookery), opened oysters baked in a deep dish with alternate layers of bread or cracker crumbs, seasoned with pepper, nutmeg, and butter. This was at first done in scallop shells.
[1913 Webster]

Scalloper
Scal"lop*er (?), n. One who fishes for scallops.
[1913 Webster]

Scalloping
Scal"lop*ing, n. Fishing for scallops.
[1913 Webster]

Scalp
Scalp (skălp), n. [Cf. Scallop.] A bed of oysters or mussels. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Scalp
Scalp, n. [Perhaps akin to D. schelp shell. Cf. Scallop.] 1. That part of the integument of the head which is usually covered with hair.
[1913 Webster]

By the bare scalp of Robin Hodd's fat friar,
This fellow were a king for our wild faction!
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. A part of the skin of the head, with the hair attached, cut or torn off from an enemy by the Indian warriors of North America, as a token of victory.
[1913 Webster]

3. Fig.: The top; the summit. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Scalp lock, a long tuft of hair left on the crown of the head by the warriors of some tribes of American Indians.
[1913 Webster]

Scalp
Scalp, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scalped (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scalping.] 1. To deprive of the scalp; to cut or tear the scalp from the head of.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Surg.) To remove the skin of.
[1913 Webster]

We must scalp the whole lid [of the eye]. J. S. Wells.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Milling) To brush the hairs or fuzz from, as wheat grains, in the process of high milling. Knight.
[1913 Webster]

Scalp
Scalp, v. i. To make a small, quick profit by slight fluctuations of the market; -- said of brokers who operate in this way on their own account. [Cant]
[1913 Webster]

Scalpel
Scal"pel (skăl"p&ebreve_;l), n. [L. scalpellum, dim. of scalprum a knife, akin to scalpere to cut, carve, scrape: cf. F. scalpel.] (Surg.) A small knife with a thin, keen blade, -- used by surgeons, and in dissecting.
[1913 Webster]

Scalper
Scalper (skălp"&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who, or that which, scalps.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Surg.) Same as Scalping iron, under Scalping.
[1913 Webster]

3. A broker who, dealing on his own account, tries to get a small and quick profit from slight fluctuations of the market. [Cant]
[1913 Webster]

4. A person who buys and sells the unused parts of railroad tickets. [Cant]
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Scalping
Scalp"ing (skălp"&ibreve_;ng), a. & n. from Scalp.
[1913 Webster]

Scalping iron (Surg.), an instrument used in scraping foul and carious bones; a raspatory. -- Scalping knife, a knife used by North American Indians in scalping.
[1913 Webster]

Scalpriform
Scal"pri*form (?), a. [L. scalprum chisel, knife + -form.] (Anat.) Shaped like a chisel; as, the scalpriform incisors of rodents.
[1913 Webster]

Scaly
Scal"y (?), a. 1. Covered or abounding with scales; as, a scaly fish.Scaly crocodile.” Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Resembling scales, laminae, or layers.
[1913 Webster]

3. Mean; low; as, a scaly fellow. [Low]
[1913 Webster]

4. (Bot.) Composed of scales lying over each other; as, a scaly bulb; covered with scales; as, a scaly stem.
[1913 Webster]

Scaly ant-eater (Zool.), the pangolin.
[1913 Webster]

Scaly-winged
Scal"y-winged` (?), a. (Zool.) Scale-winged.
[1913 Webster]

Scamble
Scam"ble (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scambled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scambling.] [Cf. OD. schampelen to deviate, to slip, schampen to go away, escape, slip, and E. scamper, shamble.] 1. To move awkwardly; to be shuffling, irregular, or unsteady; to sprawl; to shamble. “Some scambling shifts.” Dr. H. More. “A fine old hall, but a scambling house.” Evelyn.
[1913 Webster]

2. To move about pushing and jostling; to be rude and turbulent; to scramble. “The scambling and unquiet time did push it out of . . . question.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scamble
Scam"ble, v. t. To mangle. [Obs.] Mortimer.
[1913 Webster]

Scambler
Scam"bler (?), n. 1. One who scambles.
[1913 Webster]

2. A bold intruder upon the hospitality of others; a mealtime visitor. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Scamblingly
Scam"bling*ly (?), adv. In a scambling manner; with turbulence and noise; with bold intrusiveness.
[1913 Webster]

Scammel
Scamell
{ Scam"ell (?), or Scam"mel, } n. (Zool.) The female bar-tailed godwit. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Whether this is the scamel mentioned by Shakespeare [“Tempest,” ii. 2] is not known.
[1913 Webster]

Scamillus
Sca*mil"lus (?), n.; pl. Scamilli (#). [L., originally, a little bench, dim. of scamnum bench, stool.] (Arch.) A sort of second plinth or block, below the bases of Ionic and Corinthian columns, generally without moldings, and of smaller size horizontally than the pedestal.
[1913 Webster]

Scammoniate
Scam*mo"ni*ate (?), a. Made from scammony; as, a scammoniate aperient.
[1913 Webster]

Scammony
Scam"mo*ny (skăm"m&ouptack_;*n&ybreve_;), n. [F. scammonée, L. scammonia, scammonea, Gr. skammwni`a.] 1. (Bot.) A species of bindweed or Convolvulus (Convolvulus Scammonia).
[1913 Webster]

2. An inspissated sap obtained from the root of the Convolvulus Scammonia, of a blackish gray color, a nauseous smell like that of old cheese, and a somewhat acrid taste. It is used in medicine as a cathartic.
[1913 Webster]

Scamp
Scamp (skămp), n. [OF. escamper to run away, to make one's escape. Originally, one who runs away, a fugitive, a vagabond. See Scamper.] A rascal; a swindler; a rogue. De Quincey.
[1913 Webster]

Scamp
Scamp, v. t. [Cf. Scamp,n., or Scant, a., and Skimp.] To perform in a hasty, neglectful, or imperfect manner; to do superficially. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

A workman is said to scamp his work when he does it in a superficial, dishonest manner. Wedgwood.
[1913 Webster]

Much of the scamping and dawdling complained of is that of men in establishments of good repute. T. Hughes.
[1913 Webster]

Scampavia
Scam`pa*vi"a (?), n. [It.] A long, low war galley used by the Neapolitans and Sicilians in the early part of the nineteenth century.
[1913 Webster]

Scamper
Scam"per (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scampered (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scampering.] [OF. escamper to escape, to save one's self; L. ex from + campus the field (sc. of battle). See Camp, and cf. Decamp, Scamp, n., Shamble, v. t.] To run with speed; to run or move in a quick, hurried manner; to hasten away. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

The lady, however, . . . could not help scampering about the room after a mouse. S. Sharpe.
[1913 Webster]

Scamper
Scam"per, n. A scampering; a hasty flight.
[1913 Webster]

Scamperer
Scam"per*er (?), n. One who scampers. Tyndell.
[1913 Webster]

Scampish
Scamp"ish (?), a. Of or like a scamp; knavish; as, scampish conduct.
[1913 Webster]

Scan
Scan (skăn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scanned (skănd); p. pr. & vb. n. Scanning.] [L. scandere, scansum, to climb, to scan, akin to Skr. skand to spring, leap: cf. F. scander. Cf. Ascend, Descend, Scale a ladder.] 1. To mount by steps; to go through with step by step. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Nor stayed till she the highest stage had scand. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

2. Specifically (Pros.), to go through with, as a verse, marking and distinguishing the feet of which it is composed; to show, in reading, the metrical structure of; to recite metrically.
[1913 Webster]

3. To go over and examine point by point; to examine with care; to look closely at or into; to scrutinize.
[1913 Webster]

The actions of men in high stations are all conspicuous, and liable to be scanned and sifted. Atterbury.
[1913 Webster]

4. To examine quickly, from point to point, in search of something specific; as, to scan an article for mention of a particular person.
[PJC]

5. (Electronics) To form an image or an electronic representation of, by passing a beam of light or electrons over, and detecting and recording the reflected or transmitted signal.
[PJC]

Scandal
Scan"dal (?), n. [F. scandale, fr. L. scandalum, Gr. &unr_;, a snare laid for an enemy, a stumbling block, offense, scandal: cf. OE. scandle, OF. escandle. See Slander.] 1. Offense caused or experienced; reproach or reprobation called forth by what is regarded as wrong, criminal, heinous, or flagrant: opprobrium or disgrace.
[1913 Webster]

O, what a scandal is it to our crown,
That two such noble peers as ye should jar!
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

[I] have brought scandal
To Israel, diffidence of God, and doubt
In feeble hearts.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. Reproachful aspersion; opprobrious censure; defamatory talk, uttered heedlessly or maliciously.
[1913 Webster]

You must not put another scandal on him. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

My known virtue is from scandal free. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Equity) Anything alleged in pleading which is impertinent, and is reproachful to any person, or which derogates from the dignity of the court, or is contrary to good manners. Daniell.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Defamation; detraction; slander; calumny; opprobrium; reproach; shame; disgrace.
[1913 Webster]

Scandal
Scan"dal (?), v. t. 1. To treat opprobriously; to defame; to asperse; to traduce; to slander. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

I do fawn on men and hug them hard
And after scandal them.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. To scandalize; to offend. [Obs.] Bp. Story.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- To defame; traduce; reproach; slander; calumniate; asperse; vilify; disgrace.
[1913 Webster]

Scandalize
Scan"dal*ize (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scandalized (&unr_;); p. pr. & vb. n. Scandalizing (&unr_;).] [F. scandaliser, L. scandalizare, from Gr. skandali`zein.] 1. To offend the feelings or the conscience of (a person) by some action which is considered immoral or criminal; to bring shame, disgrace, or reproach upon.
[1913 Webster]

I demand who they are whom we scandalize by using harmless things. Hooker.
[1913 Webster]

The congregation looked on in silence, the better class scandalized, and the lower orders, some laughing, others backing the soldier or the minister, as their fancy dictated. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

2. To reproach; to libel; to defame; to slander.
[1913 Webster]

To tell his tale might be interpreted into scandalizing the order. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Scandalous
Scan"dal*ous (?), a. [Cf. F. scandaleux.] 1. Giving offense to the conscience or moral feelings; exciting reprobation; calling out condemnation.
[1913 Webster]

Nothing scandalous or offensive unto any. Hooker.
[1913 Webster]

2. Disgraceful to reputation; bringing shame or infamy; opprobrious; as, a scandalous crime or vice.
[1913 Webster]

3. Defamatory; libelous; as, a scandalous story.
[1913 Webster]

Scandalously
Scan"dal*ous*ly, adv. 1. In a manner to give offense; shamefully.
[1913 Webster]

His discourse at table was scandalously unbecoming the dignity of his station. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

2. With a disposition to impute immorality or wrong.
[1913 Webster]

Shun their fault, who, scandalously nice,
Will needs mistake an author into vice.
Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Scandalousness
Scan"dal*ous*ness, n. Quality of being scandalous.
[1913 Webster]

Scandalum magnatum
Scan"da*lum mag*na"tum` (?). [L., scandal of magnates.] (Law) A defamatory speech or writing published to the injury of a person of dignity; -- usually abbreviated scan. mag.
[1913 Webster]

Scandent
Scan"dent (?), a. [L. scandens, -entis, p. pr. of scandere to climb.] Climbing.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Scandent plants may climb either by twining, as the hop, or by twisted leafstalks, as the clematis, or by tendrils, as the passion flower, or by rootlets, as the ivy.
[1913 Webster]

Scandia
Scan"di*a (?), n. [NL. See Scandium.] (Chem.) A chemical earth, the oxide of scandium.
[1913 Webster]

Scandic
Scan"dic (?), a. (Chem.) Of or pertaining to scandium; derived from, or containing, scandium.
[1913 Webster]

Scandinavian
Scan`di*na"vi*an (?), a. Of or pertaining to Scandinavia, that is, Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Scandinavia.
[1913 Webster]

Scandium
Scan"di*um (?), n. [NL. So called because found in Scandinavian minerals.] (Chem.) A rare metallic element of the boron group, whose existence was predicted under the provisional name ekaboron by means of the periodic law, and subsequently discovered by spectrum analysis in certain rare Scandinavian minerals (euxenite and gadolinite). It has not yet been isolated. Symbol Sc. Atomic weight 44.
[1913 Webster]

Scansion
Scan"sion (?), n. [L. scansio, fr. scandere, scansum, to climb. See Scan.] (Pros.) The act of scanning; distinguishing the metrical feet of a verse by emphasis, pauses, or otherwise.
[1913 Webster]

Scansores
Scan*so"res (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. L. scandere, scansum, to climb.] (Zool.) An artifical group of birds formerly regarded as an order. They are distributed among several orders by modern ornithologists.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The toes are in pairs, two before and two behind, by which they are enabled to cling to, and climb upon, trees, as the woodpeckers, parrots, cuckoos, and trogons. See Illust. under Aves.
[1913 Webster]

Scansorial
Scan*so"ri*al (?), a. (Zool.) (a) Capable of climbing; as, the woodpecker is a scansorial bird; adapted for climbing; as, a scansorial foot. (b) Of or pertaining to the Scansores. See Illust. under Aves.
[1913 Webster]

Scansorial tail (Zool.), a tail in which the feathers are stiff and sharp at the tip, as in the woodpeckers.
[1913 Webster]

Scant
Scant (?), a. [Compar. Scanter (?); superl. Scantest.] [Icel. skamt, neuter of skamr, skammr, short; cf. skamta to dole out, to portion.] 1. Not full, large, or plentiful; scarcely sufficient; less than is wanted for the purpose; scanty; meager; not enough; as, a scant allowance of provisions or water; a scant pattern of cloth for a garment.
[1913 Webster]

His sermon was scant, in all, a quarter of an hour. Ridley.
[1913 Webster]

2. Sparing; parsimonious; chary.
[1913 Webster]

Be somewhat scanter of your maiden presence. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- See under Scanty.
[1913 Webster]

Scant
Scant, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scanted; p. pr. & vb. n. Scanting.] 1. To limit; to straiten; to treat illiberally; to stint; as, to scant one in provisions; to scant ourselves in the use of necessaries.
[1913 Webster]

Where a man hath a great living laid together and where he is scanted. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

I am scanted in the pleasure of dwelling on your actions. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. To cut short; to make small, narrow, or scanty; to curtail.Scant not my cups.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scant
Scant, v. i. To fail, or become less; to scantle; as, the wind scants.
[1913 Webster]

Scant
Scant, adv. In a scant manner; with difficulty; scarcely; hardly. [Obs.] Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

So weak that he was scant able to go down the stairs. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

Scant
Scant, n. Scantness; scarcity. [R.] T. Carew.
[1913 Webster]

Scantily
Scant"i*ly (?), adv. In a scanty manner; not fully; not plentifully; sparingly; parsimoniously.
[1913 Webster]

His mind was very scantily stored with materials. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Scantiness
Scant"i*ness, n. Quality or condition of being scanty.
[1913 Webster]

Scantle
Scan"tle (?), v. i. [Dim. of scant, v.] To be deficient; to fail. [Obs.] Drayton.
[1913 Webster]

Scantle
Scan"tle (?), v. t. [OF. escanteler, eschanteler, to break into contles; pref. es- (L. ex) + cantel, chantel, corner, side, piece. Confused with E. scant. See Cantle.] To scant; to be niggard of; to divide into small pieces; to cut short or down. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

All their pay
Must your discretion scantle; keep it back.
J. Webster.
[1913 Webster]

Scantlet
Scant"let (?), n. [OF. eschantelet corner.] A small pattern; a small quantity. [Obs.] Sir M. Hale.
[1913 Webster]

Scantling
Scant"ling (?), a. [See Scant, a.] Not plentiful; small; scanty. [Obs.] Jer. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

Scantling
Scant"ling, n. [Cf. OF. eschantillon, F. échantillon, a sample, pattern, example. In some senses confused with scant insufficient. See Scantle, v. t.] 1. A fragment; a bit; a little piece. Specifically: (a) A piece or quantity cut for a special purpose; a sample. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Such as exceed not this scantling; -- to be solace to the sovereign and harmless to the people. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

A pretty scantling of his knowledge may taken by his deferring to be baptized so many years. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

(b) A small quantity; a little bit; not much. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Reducing them to narrow scantlings. Jer. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

2. A piece of timber sawed or cut of a small size, as for studs, rails, etc.
[1913 Webster]

3. The dimensions of a piece of timber with regard to its breadth and thickness; hence, the measure or dimensions of anything.
[1913 Webster]

4. A rough draught; a rude sketch or outline.
[1913 Webster]

5. A frame for casks to lie upon; a trestle. Knight.
[1913 Webster]

Scantly
Scant"ly, adv. 1. In a scant manner; not fully or sufficiently; narrowly; penuriously. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. Scarcely; hardly; barely.
[1913 Webster]

Scantly they durst their feeble eyes dispread
Upon that town.
Fairfax.
[1913 Webster]

We hold a tourney here to-morrow morn,
And there is scantly time for half the work.
Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Scantness
Scant"ness, n. The quality or condition of being scant; narrowness; smallness; insufficiency; scantiness.Scantness of outward things.” Barrow.
[1913 Webster]

Scanty
Scant"y (?), a. [Compar. Scantier (?); superl. Scantiest.] [From Scant, a.] 1. Lacking amplitude or extent; narrow; small; not abundant.
[1913 Webster]

His dominions were very narrow and scanty. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

Now scantier limits the proud arch confine. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

2. Somewhat less than is needed; insufficient; scant; as, a scanty supply of words; a scanty supply of bread.
[1913 Webster]

3. Sparing; niggardly; parsimonious.
[1913 Webster]

In illustrating a point of difficulty, be not too scanty of words. I. Watts.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Scant; narrow; small; poor; deficient; meager; scarce; chary; sparing; parsimonious; penurious; niggardly; grudging.
[1913 Webster]

Scape
Scape (?), n. [L. scapus shaft, stem, stalk; cf. Gr. &unr_; a staff: cf. F. scape. Cf. Scepter.] 1. (Bot.) A peduncle rising from the ground or from a subterranean stem, as in the stemless violets, the bloodroot, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) The long basal joint of the antennae of an insect.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Arch.) (a) The shaft of a column. (b) The apophyge of a shaft.
[1913 Webster]

Scape
Scape, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. Scaped (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scaping.] [Aphetic form of escape.] To escape. [Obs. or Poetic.] Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Out of this prison help that we may scape. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Scape
Scape, n. 1. An escape. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

I spake of most disastrous chances, . . .
Of hairbreadth scapes in the imminent, deadly breach.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Means of escape; evasion. [Obs.] Donne.
[1913 Webster]

3. A freak; a slip; a fault; an escapade. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Not pardoning so much as the scapes of error and ignorance. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

4. Loose act of vice or lewdness. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scapegallows
Scape"gal`lows (?), n. One who has narrowly escaped the gallows for his crimes. [Colloq.] Dickens.
[1913 Webster]

Scapegoat
Scape"goat` (?), n. [Scape (for escape) + goat.] 1. (Jewish Antiq.) A goat upon whose head were symbolically placed the sins of the people, after which he was suffered to escape into the wilderness. Lev. xvi. 10.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, a person or thing that is made to bear blame for others. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Scapegrace
Scape"grace` (?), n. A graceless, unprincipled person; one who is wild and reckless. Beaconsfield.
[1913 Webster]

Scapeless
Scape"less, a. (Bot.) Destitute of a scape.
[1913 Webster]

Scapement
Scape"ment (?), n. [See Scape, v., Escapement.] Same as Escapement, 3.
[1913 Webster]

Scape-wheel
Scape"-wheel` (?), n. (Horol.) The wheel in an escapement (as of a clock or a watch) into the teeth of which the pallets play.
[1913 Webster]

Scaphander
Sca*phan"der (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, anything hollowed + &unr_;, &unr_;, a man: cf. F. scaphandre.] The case, or impermeable apparel, in which a diver can work while under water.
[1913 Webster]

Scaphism
Scaph"ism (?), n. [Gr. ska`fh a trough.] An ancient mode of punishing criminals among the Persians, by confining the victim in a trough, with his head and limbs smeared with honey or the like, and exposed to the sun and to insects until he died.
[1913 Webster]

Scaphite
Scaph"ite (?), n. [L. scapha a boat, fr. Gr. ska`fh a boat, anything dug or scooped out, fr. ska`ptein to dig.] (Paleon.) Any fossil cephalopod shell of the genus Scaphites, belonging to the Ammonite family and having a chambered boat-shaped shell. Scaphites are found in the Cretaceous formation.
[1913 Webster]

Scaphocephalic
Scaph`o*ce*phal"ic (?), a. (Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or affected with, scaphocephaly.
[1913 Webster]

Scaphocephaly
Scaph`o*ceph"a*ly (?), n. [Gr. ska`fh a boat + kefalh` head.] (Anat.) A deformed condition of the skull, in which the vault is narrow, elongated, and more or less boat-shaped.
[1913 Webster]

Scaphocerite
Scaph`o*ce"rite (?), n. [Gr. ska`fh boat + E. cerite.] (Zool.) A flattened plate or scale attached to the second joint of the antennae of many Crustacea.
[1913 Webster]

Scaphognathite
Sca*phog"na*thite (?), n. [Gr. ska`fh boat + gna`qos jaw.] (Zool.) A thin leafike appendage (the exopodite) of the second maxilla of decapod crustaceans. It serves as a pumping organ to draw the water through the gill cavity.
[1913 Webster]

Scaphoid
Scaph"oid (?; 277), a. [Gr. ska`fh a boat + -oid: cf. F. scaphoïde.] (Anat.) Resembling a boat in form; boat-shaped. -- n. The scaphoid bone.
[1913 Webster]

Scaphoid bone (a) One of the carpal bones, which articulates with the radius; the radiale. (b) One of the tarsal bones; the navicular bone. See under Navicular.
[1913 Webster]

Scapholunar
Scaph`o*lu"nar (?), a. [Scaphoid + lunar.] (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the scaphoid and lunar bones of the carpus. -- n. The scapholunar bone.
[1913 Webster]

Scapholunar bone, a bone formed by the coalescence of the scaphoid and lunar in the carpus of carnivora.
[1913 Webster]

Scaphopoda
Sca*phop"o*da (?), n. pl. [NL., from Gr. ska`fh a boat + -poda.] (Zool.) A class of marine cephalate Mollusca having a tubular shell open at both ends, a pointed or spadelike foot for burrowing, and many long, slender, prehensile oral tentacles. It includes Dentalium, or the tooth shells, and other similar shells. Called also Prosopocephala, and Solenoconcha.
[1913 Webster]

Scapiform
Sca"pi*form (?), a. (Bot.) Resembling a scape, or flower stem.
[1913 Webster]

Scapolite
Scap"o*lite (skăp"&ouptack_;*līt), n. [Gr. &unr_; a staff, or L. scapus a stem, stalk + -lite: cf. F. scapolite.] (Mon.) A grayish white mineral occuring in tetragonal crystals and in cleavable masses. It is essentially a silicate of alumina and soda.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The scapolite group includes scapolite proper, or wernerite, also meionite, dipyre, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Scapple
Scap"ple (skăp"p'l), v. t. [Cf. OF. eskapeler, eschapler, to cut, hew, LL. scapellare. Cf. Scabble.] (a) To work roughly, or shape without finishing, as stone before leaving the quarry. (b) To dress in any way short of fine tooling or rubbing, as stone. Gwilt.
[1913 Webster]

Scapula
Scap"u*la (skăp"&uuptack_;*l&adot_;), n.; pl. L. Scapulae (#), E. Scapulas (#). [L.] 1. (Anat.) The principal bone of the shoulder girdle in mammals; the shoulder blade.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) One of the plates from which the arms of a crinoid arise.
[1913 Webster]

Scapular
Scap"u*lar (?), a. [Cf. F. scapulaire. Cf. Scapulary.] Of or pertaining to the scapula or the shoulder.
[1913 Webster]

Scapular arch (Anat.), the pectoral arch. See under pectoral. -- Scapular region, or Scapular tract (Zool.), a definite longitudinal area over the shoulder and along each side of the back of a bird, from which the scapular feathers arise.
[1913 Webster]

Scapular
Scap"u*lar, n. (Zool.) One of a special group of feathers which arise from each of the scapular regions and lie along the sides of the back.
[1913 Webster]

Scapulary
Scapular
{ Scap"u*lar (?), Scap"u*la*ry (?), } n. [F. scapulaire, LL. scapularium, scapulare, fr. L. scapula shoulder blade.] 1. (R. C. Ch.) (a) A loose sleeveless vestment falling in front and behind, worn by certain religious orders and devout persons. (b) The name given to two pieces of cloth worn under the ordinary garb and over the shoulders as an act of devotion. Addis & Arnold.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Surg.) A bandage passing over the shoulder to support it, or to retain another bandage in place.
[1913 Webster]

Scapulary
Scap"u*la*ry, a. Same as Scapular, a.
[1913 Webster]

Scapulary
Scap"u*la*ry, n. (Zool.) Same as 2d and 3d Scapular.
[1913 Webster]

Scapulet
Scap"u*let (?), n. [Dim. of scapula.] (Zool.) A secondary mouth fold developed at the base of each of the armlike lobes of the manubrium of many rhizostome medusae. See Illustration in Appendix.
[1913 Webster]

Scapulo-
Scap"u*lo- (&unr_;). A combining form used in anatomy to indicate connection with, or relation to, the scapula or the shoulder; as, the scapulo-clavicular articulation, the articulation between the scapula and clavicle.
[1913 Webster]

Scapus
Sca"pus (?), n. [L.] See 1st Scape.
[1913 Webster]

Scar
Scar (?), n. [OF. escare, F. eschare an eschar, a dry slough (cf. It. & Sp. escara), L. eschara, fr. Gr. &unr_; hearth, fireplace, scab, eschar. Cf. Eschar.] 1. A mark in the skin or flesh of an animal, made by a wound or ulcer, and remaining after the wound or ulcer is healed; a cicatrix; a mark left by a previous injury; a blemish; a disfigurement.
[1913 Webster]

This earth had the beauty of youth, . . . and not a wrinkle, scar, or fracture on all its body. T. Burnet.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) A mark left upon a stem or branch by the fall of a leaf, leaflet, or frond, or upon a seed by the separation of its support. See Illust. under Axillary.
[1913 Webster]

Scar
Scar, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scarred (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scarring.] To mark with a scar or scars.
[1913 Webster]

Yet I'll not shed her blood;
Nor scar that whiter skin of hers than snow.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

His cheeks were deeply scarred. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Scar
Scar, v. i. To form a scar.
[1913 Webster]

Scar
Scar, n. [Scot. scar, scaur, Icel. sker a skerry, an isolated rock in the sea; akin to Dan. skiaer, Sw. skär. Cf. Skerry.] An isolated or protruding rock; a steep, rocky eminence; a bare place on the side of a mountain or steep bank of earth. [Written also scaur.]
[1913 Webster]

O sweet and far, from cliff and scar,
The horns of Elfland faintly blowing.
Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Scar
Scar, n. [L. scarus, a kind of fish, Gr. ska`ros.] (Zool.) A marine food fish, the scarus, or parrot fish.
[1913 Webster]

Scarabee
Scarab
{ Scar"ab (?), Scar"a*bee (?), } n. [L. scarabaeus; cf. F. scarabée.] 1. (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of lamellicorn beetles of the genus Scarabaeus, or family Scarabaeidae, especially the sacred, or Egyptian, species (Scarabaeus sacer, and Scarabaeus Egyptiorum).
[1913 Webster]

2. (Egyptian Archaeology, Jewelry) A stylized representation of a scarab beetle carved in stone or faience, or made in baked clay, usually in a conventionalized form in which the beetle has its legs held closely at its sides, and commonly having an inscription on the flat underside; -- a symbol of resurrection, used by the ancient Egyptians as an ornament or a talisman, and in modern times used in jewelry, usually by engraving the formalized scarab design on cabuchon stones. Also used attributively; as, a scarab bracelet [a bracelet containing scarabs]; a ring with a scarab [the carved stone itelf].
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Scarabaeus
Scar`a*bae"us (?), n. Same as Scarab in both senses.

Scaraboid
Scar"a*boid (?), a. [Scarab + -oid.] (Zool.) Of or pertaining to the family Scarabaeidae, an extensive group which includes the Egyptian scarab, the tumbledung, and many similar lamellicorn beetles.
[1913 Webster]

Scaraboid
Scar"a*boid, n. (Zool.) A scaraboid beetle.
[1913 Webster]

Scaramouch
Scar"a*mouch` (?), n. [F. scaramouche, It. scaramuccio, scaramuccia, originally the name of a celebrated Italian comedian; cf. It. scaramuccia, scaramuccio, F. escarmouche, skirmish. Cf. Skirmish.] A personage in the old Italian comedy (derived from Spain) characterized by great boastfulness and poltroonery; hence, a person of like characteristics; a buffoon.
[1913 Webster]

Scarce
Scarce (skârs), a. [Compar. Scarcer (skâr"s&etilde_;r); superl. Scarcest.] [OE. scars, OF. escars, eschars, LL. scarpsus, excarpsus, for L. excerptus, p. p. of excerpere to pick out, and hence to contract, to shorten; ex (see Ex-) + carpere. See Carpet, and cf. Excerp.] 1. Not plentiful or abundant; in small quantity in proportion to the demand; not easily to be procured; rare; uncommon.
[1913 Webster]

You tell him silver is scarcer now in England, and therefore risen one fifth in value. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

The scarcest of all is a Pescennius Niger on a medallion well preserved. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

2. Scantily supplied (with); deficient (in); -- with of. [Obs.] “A region scarce of prey.” Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. Sparing; frugal; parsimonious; stingy. [Obs.] “Too scarce ne too sparing.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

To make one's self scarce, to decamp; to depart. [Slang]
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Rare; infrequent; deficient. See Rare.
[1913 Webster]

Scarcely
Scarce
{ Scarce, Scarce"ly, } adv. 1. With difficulty; hardly; scantly; barely; but just.
[1913 Webster]

With a scarce well-lighted flame. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

The eldest scarcely five year was of age. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Slowly she sails, and scarcely stems the tides. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

He had scarcely finished, when the laborer arrived who had been sent for my ransom. W. Irving.
[1913 Webster]

2. Frugally; penuriously. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Scarcement
Scarce"ment (?), n. (Arch. & Engin.) An offset where a wall or bank of earth, etc., retreats, leaving a shelf or footing.
[1913 Webster]

Scarcity
Scarceness
{ Scarce"ness (?), Scar"ci*ty (?), } n. The quality or condition of being scarce; smallness of quantity in proportion to the wants or demands; deficiency; lack of plenty; short supply; penury; as, a scarcity of grain; a great scarcity of beauties. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

A scarcity of snow would raise a mutiny at Naples. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

Praise . . . owes its value to its scarcity. Rambler.
[1913 Webster]

The value of an advantage is enhanced by its scarceness. Collier.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Deficiency; lack; want; penury; dearth; rareness; rarity; infrequency.
[1913 Webster]

Scard
Scard (?), n. A shard or fragment. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scare
Scare (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scared (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scaring.] [OE. skerren, skeren, Icel. skirra to bar, prevent, skirrask to shun , shrink from; or fr. OE. skerre, adj., scared, Icel. skjarr; both perhaps akin to E. sheer to turn.] To frighten; to strike with sudden fear; to alarm.
[1913 Webster]

The noise of thy crossbow
Will scare the herd, and so my shoot is lost.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

To scare away, to drive away by frightening. -- To scare up, to find by search, as if by beating for game. [Slang]
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- To alarm; frighten; startle; affright; terrify.
[1913 Webster]

Scare
Scare, n. Fright; esp., sudden fright produced by a trifling cause, or originating in mistake. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

Scarecrow
Scare"crow` (?), n. 1. Anything set up to frighten crows or other birds from cornfields; hence, anything terifying without danger.
[1913 Webster]

A scarecrow set to frighten fools away. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. A person clad in rags and tatters.
[1913 Webster]

No eye hath seen such scarecrows. I'll not march with them through Coventry, that's flat. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Zool.) The black tern. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scarefire
Scare"fire` (?), n. 1. An alarm of fire. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

2. A fire causing alarm. [Obs.] Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

Scarf
Scarf (skärf), n. [Icel. skarfr.] A cormorant. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Scarf
Scarf, n.; pl. Scarfs, rarely Scarves (skärvz). [Cf. OF. escharpe a pilgrim's scrip, or wallet (hanging about the neck), F. écharpe sash, scarf; probably from OHG. scharpe pocket; also (from the French) Dan. skiaerf; Sw. skärp, Prov. G. schärfe, LG. scherf, G. schärpe; and also AS. scearf a fragment; possibly akin to E. scrip a wallet. Cf. Scarp a scarf.] An article of dress of a light and decorative character, worn loosely over the shoulders or about the neck or the waist; a light shawl or handkerchief for the neck; also, a cravat; a neckcloth.
[1913 Webster]

Put on your hood and scarf. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

With care about the banners, scarves, and staves. R. Browning.
[1913 Webster]

Scarf
Scarf, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scarfed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scarfing.] 1. To throw on loosely; to put on like a scarf. “My sea-gown scarfed about me.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. To dress with a scarf, or as with a scarf; to cover with a loose wrapping. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scarf
Scarf, v. t. [Sw. skarfva to eke out, to join together, skarf a seam, joint; cf. Dan. skarre to joint, to unite timber, Icel. skara to clinch the planks of a boat, G. scharben to chop, to cut small.] (a) To form a scarf on the end or edge of, as for a joint in timber, metal rods, etc. (b) To unite, as two pieces of timber or metal, by a scarf joint.
[1913 Webster]

Scarf
Scarf (?), n. (a) In a piece which is to be united to another by a scarf joint, the part of the end or edge that is tapered off, rabbeted, or notched so as to be thinner than the rest of the piece. (b) A scarf joint.
[1913 Webster]

Scarf joint (a) A joint made by overlapping and bolting or locking together the ends of two pieces of timber that are halved, notched, or cut away so that they will fit each other and form a lengthened beam of the same size at the junction as elsewhere. (b) A joint formed by welding, riveting, or brazing together the overlapping scarfed ends, or edges, of metal rods, sheets, etc. -- Scarf weld. See under Weld.
[1913 Webster]

Scarfskin
Scarf"skin` (?), n. (Anat.) See Epidermis.
[1913 Webster]

Scarification
Scar`i*fi*ca"tion (?), n. [L. scarificatio: cf. F. scarification.] The act of scarifying.
[1913 Webster]

Scarificator
Scar"i*fi*ca`tor (?), n. [Cf. F. scarificateur.] (Surg.) An instrument, principally used in cupping, containing several lancets moved simultaneously by a spring, for making slight incisions.
[1913 Webster]

Scarifier
Scar"i*fi`er (?), n. 1. One who scarifies.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Surg.) The instrument used for scarifying.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Agric.) An implement for stripping and loosening the soil, without bringing up a fresh surface.
[1913 Webster]

You have your scarifiers to make the ground clean. Southey.
[1913 Webster]

Scarify
Scar"i*fy (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scarified (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scarifying (?).] [F. scarifier, L. scarificare, scarifare, fr. Gr. &unr_; to scratch up, fr. &unr_; a pointed instrument.] 1. To scratch or cut the skin of; esp. (Med.), to make small incisions in, by means of a lancet or scarificator, so as to draw blood from the smaller vessels without opening a large vein.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Agric.) To stir the surface soil of, as a field.
[1913 Webster]

Scarious
Scariose
{ Sca"ri*ose (?), Sca"ri*ous (?), } a. [F. scarieux, NL. scariosus. Cf. Scary.] (Bot.) Thin, dry, membranous, and not green. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Scarlatina
Scar`la*ti"na (?), n. [NL.: cf. F. scarlatine. See Scarlet.] (Med.) Scarlet fever. -- Scar`la*ti"nal (#), a. -- Scar*lat"i*nous (# or #), a.
[1913 Webster]

Scarless
Scar"less (?), a. Free from scar. Drummond.
[1913 Webster]

Scarlet
Scar"let (?), n. [OE. scarlat, scarlet, OF. escarlate, F. écarlate (cf. Pr. escarlat, escarlata, Sp. & Pg. escarlata, It. scarlatto, LL. scarlatum), from Per. sakirlāt.] A deep bright red tinged with orange or yellow, -- of many tints and shades; a vivid or bright red color.
[1913 Webster]

2. Cloth of a scarlet color.
[1913 Webster]

All her household are clothed with scarlet. Prov. xxxi. 21.
[1913 Webster]

Scarlet
Scar"let, a. Of the color called scarlet; as, a scarlet cloth or thread.
[1913 Webster]

Scarlet admiral (Zool.), the red admiral. See under Red. -- Scarlet bean (Bot.), a kind of bean (Phaseolus multiflorus) having scarlet flowers; scarlet runner. -- Scarlet fever (Med.), a contagious febrile disease characterized by inflammation of the fauces and a scarlet rash, appearing usually on the second day, and ending in desquamation about the sixth or seventh day. -- Scarlet fish (Zool.), the telescope fish; -- so called from its red color. See under Telescope. -- Scarlet ibis (Zool.) See under Ibis. -- Scarlet maple (Bot.), the red maple. See Maple. -- Scarlet mite (Zool.), any one of numerous species of bright red carnivorous mites found among grass and moss, especially Thombidium holosericeum and allied species. The young are parasitic upon spiders and insects. -- Scarlet oak (Bot.), a species of oak (Quercus coccinea) of the United States; -- so called from the scarlet color of its leaves in autumn. -- Scarlet runner (Bot.), the scarlet bean. -- Scarlet tanager. (Zool.) See under Tanager.
[1913 Webster]

Scarlet
Scar"let, v. t. To dye or tinge with scarlet. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

The ashy paleness of my cheek
Is scarleted in ruddy flakes of wrath.
Ford.
[1913 Webster]

Scarmoge
Scarmage
{ Scar"mage (?), Scar"moge (?), } n. A slight contest; a skirmish. See Skirmish. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Such cruel game my scarmoges disarms. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Scarn
Scarn (?), n. [Icel. skarn; akin to AS. scearn. Cf. Shearn.] Dung. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] Ray.
[1913 Webster]

Scarn bee (Zool.), a dung beetle.
[1913 Webster]

Scaroid
Sca"roid, a. [Scarus + -oid.] (Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Scaridae, a family of marine fishes including the parrot fishes.
[1913 Webster]

Scarp
Scarp (?), n. [OF. escharpe. See 2d Scarf.] (Her.) A band in the same position as the bend sinister, but only half as broad as the latter.
[1913 Webster]

Scarp
Scarp, n. [Aphetic form of Escarp.] 1. (Fort.) The slope of the ditch nearest the parapet; the escarp.
[1913 Webster]

2. A steep descent or declivity.
[1913 Webster]

Scarp
Scarp, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scarped (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scarping.] To cut down perpendicularly, or nearly so; as, to scarp the face of a ditch or a rock.
[1913 Webster]

From scarped cliff and quarried stone. Tennyson.
[1913 Webster]

Sweep ruins from the scarped mountain. Emerson.
[1913 Webster]

Scarring
Scar"ring (?), n. A scar; a mark.
[1913 Webster]

We find upon the limestone rocks the scarrings of the ancient glacier which brought the bowlder here. Tyndall.
[1913 Webster]

Scarry
Scar"ry (?), a. Bearing scars or marks of wounds.
[1913 Webster]

Scarry
Scar"ry, a. [See 4th Scar.] Like a scar, or rocky eminence; containing scars. Holinshed.
[1913 Webster]

Scarus
Sca"rus (?), n. [L. See Scar a kind of fish.] (Zool.) A Mediterranean food fish (Sparisoma scarus) of excellent quality and highly valued by the Romans; -- called also parrot fish.
[1913 Webster]

Scary
Sca"ry (?), n. [Prov. E. scare scraggy.] Barren land having only a thin coat of grass. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scary
Scar"y (?), a. [From Scare.] 1. Subject to sudden alarm. [Colloq. U. S.] Whittier.
[1913 Webster]

2. Causing fright; alarming. [Colloq. U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scasely
Scase"ly (?), adv. Scarcely; hardly. [Obs. or Colloq.] Robynson (More's Utopia)
[1913 Webster]

Scat
Scat (skăt), interj. Go away; begone; away; -- chiefly used in driving off a cat.
[1913 Webster]

Scatt
Scat
{ Scat, Scatt, } n. [Icel. skattr.] Tribute. [R.] “Seizing scatt and treasure.” Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

Scat
Scat, n. A shower of rain. [Prov. Eng.] Wright.
[1913 Webster]

Scatch
Scatch (?), n. [F. escache.] A kind of bit for the bridle of a horse; -- called also scatchmouth. Bailey.
[1913 Webster]

Scatches
Scatch"es (?), n. pl. [OF. eschaces, F. échasses, fr. D. schaats a high-heeled shoe, a skate. See Skate, for the foot.] Stilts. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scate
Scate (skāt), n. See Skate, for the foot.
[1913 Webster]

Scatebrous
Scat"e*brous (?), a. [L. scatebra a gushing up of water, from scatere to bubble, gush.] Abounding with springs. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scath
Scath (skăth; 277), n. [Icel. skaði; akin to Dan. skade, Sw. skada, AS. sceaða, scaða, foe, injurer, OS. skaðo, D. schade, harm, injury, OHG. scade, G. schade, schaden; cf. Gr. 'askhqh`s unharmed. Cf. Scathe, v.] Harm; damage; injury; hurt; waste; misfortune. [Written also scathe.]
[1913 Webster]

But she was somedeal deaf, and that was skathe. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Great mercy, sure, for to enlarge a thrall,
Whose freedom shall thee turn to greatest scath.
Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Wherein Rome hath done you any scath,
Let him make treble satisfaction.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scath
Scathe
{ Scathe (skā&thlig_;; 277), Scath (skăth; 277), } v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scathed (skā&thlig_;d or skătht); p. pr. & vb. n. Scathing (skā&thlig_;"&ibreve_;ng or skăth"-).] [Icel. skaða; akin to AS. sceaðan, sceððan, Dan. skade, Sw. skada, D. & G. schaden, OHG. scadōn, Goth. skaþjan.] To do harm to; to injure; to damage; to waste; to destroy.
[1913 Webster]

As when heaven's fire
Hath scathed the forest oaks or mountain pines.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Strokes of calamity that scathe and scorch the soul. W. Irving.
[1913 Webster]

Scathful
Scath"ful (?), a. Harmful; doing damage; pernicious. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

-- Scath"ful*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Scathless
Scath"less, a. Unharmed. R. L. Stevenson.
[1913 Webster]

He, too, . . . is to be dismissed scathless. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Scathly
Scath"ly, a. Injurious; scathful. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scatter
Scat"ter (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scattered (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scattering.] [OE. scateren. See Shatter.] 1. To strew about; to sprinkle around; to throw down loosely; to deposit or place here and there, esp. in an open or sparse order.
[1913 Webster]

And some are scattered all the floor about. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Why should my muse enlarge on Libyan swains,
Their scattered cottages, and ample plains?
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Teach the glad hours to scatter, as they fly,
Soft quiet, gentle love, and endless joy.
Prior.
[1913 Webster]

2. To cause to separate in different directions; to reduce from a close or compact to a loose or broken order; to dissipate; to disperse.
[1913 Webster]

Scatter and disperse the giddy Goths. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hence, to frustrate, disappoint, and overthrow; as, to scatter hopes, plans, or the like.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- To disperse; dissipate; spread; strew.
[1913 Webster]

Scatter
Scat"ter, v. i. To be dispersed or dissipated; to disperse or separate; as, clouds scatter after a storm.
[1913 Webster]

Scatter-brain
Scat"ter-brain` (?), n. A giddy or thoughtless person; one incapable of concentration or attention. [Written also scatter-brains.]
[1913 Webster]

Scatter-brained
Scat"ter-brained` (?), a. Giddy; thoughtless.
[1913 Webster]

Scattered
Scat"tered (?), a. 1. Dispersed; dissipated; sprinkled, or loosely spread.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) Irregular in position; having no regular order; as, scattered leaves.
[1913 Webster]

-- Scat"tered*ly, adv. -- Scat"tered*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Scattergood
Scat"ter*good` (?), n. One who wastes; a spendthrift.
[1913 Webster]

Scattering
Scat"ter*ing, a. Going or falling in various directions; not united or aggregated; divided among many; as, scattering votes.
[1913 Webster]

Scattering
Scat"ter*ing, n. Act of strewing about; something scattered. South.
[1913 Webster]

Scatteringly
Scat"ter*ing*ly, adv. In a scattering manner; dispersedly.
[1913 Webster]

Scatterling
Scat"ter*ling (?), n. [Scatter + -ling.] One who has no fixed habitation or residence; a vagabond. [Obs.] “Foreign scatterlings.” Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Scaturient
Sca*tu"ri*ent (?), a.[L. scaturiens, p. pr. of scaturire gush out, from scatere to bubble, gush.] Gushing forth; full to overflowing; effusive. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

A pen so scaturient and unretentive. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Scaturiginous
Scat`u*rig"i*nous (?), a. [L. scaturiginosus, fr. scaturigo gushing water. See Scaturient.] Abounding with springs. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scaup
Scaup (sk&asuml_;p), n. [See Scalp a bed of oysters or mussels.] 1. A bed or stratum of shellfish; scalp. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) A scaup duck. See below.
[1913 Webster]

Scaup duck (Zool.), any one of several species of northern ducks of the genus Aythya, or Fuligula. The adult males are, in large part, black. The three North American species are: the greater scaup duck (Aythya marila, var. nearctica), called also broadbill, bluebill, blackhead, flock duck, flocking fowl, and raft duck; the lesser scaup duck (Aythya affinis), called also little bluebill, river broadbill, and shuffler; the tufted, or ring-necked, scaup duck (Aythya collaris), called also black jack, ringneck, ringbill, ringbill shuffler, etc. See Illust. of Ring-necked duck, under Ring-necked. The common European scaup, or mussel, duck (Aythya marila), closely resembles the American variety.
[1913 Webster]

Scauper
Scaup"er (?), n. [Cf. Scalper.] A tool with a semicircular edge, -- used by engravers to clear away the spaces between the lines of an engraving. Fairholt.
[1913 Webster]

Scaur
Scaur (?), n. A precipitous bank or rock; a scar.
[1913 Webster]

Scavage
Scav"age (?; 48), n. [LL. scavagium, fr. AS. sceáwian to look at, to inspect. See Show.] (O. Eng. Law) A toll or duty formerly exacted of merchant strangers by mayors, sheriffs, etc., for goods shown or offered for sale within their precincts. Cowell.
[1913 Webster]

Scavenge
Scav"enge (?), v. t. To cleanse, as streets, from filth. C. Kingsley.
[1913 Webster]

2. to salvage (usable items or material) from discarded or waste material.
[PJC]

3. To remove (burned gases) from the cylinder after a working stroke.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scavenge
Scav"enge (?), v. i. (Internal-combustion Engines) To remove the burned gases from the cylinder after a working stroke; as, this engine does not scavenge well.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scavenger
Scav"en*ger (?), n. [OE. scavager an officer with various duties, originally attending to scavage, fr. OE. & E. scavage. See Scavage, Show, v.] A person whose employment is to clean the streets of a city, by scraping or sweeping, and carrying off the filth. The name is also applied to any animal which devours refuse, carrion, or anything injurious to health.
[1913 Webster]

Scavenger beetle (Zool.), any beetle which feeds on decaying substances, as the carrion beetle. -- Scavenger crab (Zool.), any crab which feeds on dead animals, as the spider crab. -- Scavenger's daughter [corrupt. of Skevington's daughter], an instrument of torture invented by Sir W. Skevington, which so compressed the body as to force the blood to flow from the nostrils, and sometimes from the hands and feet. Am. Cyc.
[1913 Webster]

Scavenger hunt
Scav"en*ger hunt (?), n. a game in which individuals or teams are given a list of items and must go out, gather them together without purchasing them, and bring them back; the first person or team to return with the complete list is the winner. The items are sometimes common but often of a humorous sort.
[PJC]

Scavenging
Scav"eng*ing (?), p. pr. & vb. n. of Scavenge. Hence, n. (Internal-combustion Engines) Act or process of expelling the exhaust gases from the cylinder by some special means, as, in many four-cycle engines, by utilizing the momentum of the exhaust gases in a long exhaust pipe.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scazon
Sca"zon (?), n. [L., fr. Gr. ska`zwn, fr. ska`zein to limp.] (Lat. Pros.) A choliamb.
[1913 Webster]

Scelerat
Scel"er*at (?), n. [F. scélérat from L. sceleratus, p. p. of scelerare to pollute, from scelus, sceleris, a crime.] A villain; a criminal. [Obs.] Cheyne.
[1913 Webster]

Scelestic
Sce*les"tic (?), a. [L. scelestus, from scelus wickedness.] Evil; wicked; atrocious. [Obs.]Scelestic villainies.” Feltham.
[1913 Webster]

Scelet
Scel"et (?), n. [See Skeleton.] A mummy; a skeleton. [Obs.] Holland.
[1913 Webster]

Scena
Sce"na (?), n. [It.] (Mus.) (a) A scene in an opera. (b) An accompanied dramatic recitative, interspersed with passages of melody, or followed by a full aria. Rockstro.
[1913 Webster]

Scenario
Sce*na"ri*o (?), n. [It.] A preliminary sketch of the plot, or main incidents, of an opera.
[1913 Webster]

Scenary
Scen"a*ry (?), n. [Cf. L. scaenarius belonging to the stage.] Scenery. [Obs.] Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Scene
Scene (?), n. [L. scaena, scena, Gr. skhnh` a covered place, a tent, a stage.] 1. The structure on which a spectacle or play is exhibited; the part of a theater in which the acting is done, with its adjuncts and decorations; the stage.
[1913 Webster]

2. The decorations and fittings of a stage, representing the place in which the action is supposed to go on; one of the slides, or other devices, used to give an appearance of reality to the action of a play; as, to paint scenes; to shift the scenes; to go behind the scenes.
[1913 Webster]

3. So much of a play as passes without change of locality or time, or important change of character; hence, a subdivision of an act; a separate portion of a play, subordinate to the act, but differently determined in different plays; as, an act of four scenes.
[1913 Webster]

My dismal scene I needs must act alone. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. The place, time, circumstance, etc., in which anything occurs, or in which the action of a story, play, or the like, is laid; surroundings amid which anything is set before the imagination; place of occurrence, exhibition, or action. “In Troy, there lies the scene.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

The world is a vast scene of strife. J. M. Mason.
[1913 Webster]

5. An assemblage of objects presented to the view at once; a series of actions and events exhibited in their connection; a spectacle; a show; an exhibition; a view.
[1913 Webster]

Through what new scenes and changes must we pass! Addison.
[1913 Webster]

6. A landscape, or part of a landscape; scenery.
[1913 Webster]

A sylvan scene with various greens was drawn,
Shades on the sides, and in the midst a lawn.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

7. An exhibition of passionate or strong feeling before others; often, an artifical or affected action, or course of action, done for effect; a theatrical display.
[1913 Webster]

Probably no lover of scenes would have had very long to wait for some explosions between parties, both equally ready to take offense, and careless of giving it. De Quincey.
[1913 Webster]

Behind the scenes, behind the scenery of a theater; out of the view of the audience, but in sight of the actors, machinery, etc.; hence, conversant with the hidden motives and agencies of what appears to public view.
[1913 Webster]

Scene
Scene, v. t. To exhibit as a scene; to make a scene of; to display. [Obs.] Abp. Sancroft.
[1913 Webster]

Sceneful
Scene"ful (?), a. Having much scenery. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Sceneman
Scene"man (?), n.; pl. Scenemen (&unr_;). The man who manages the movable scenes in a theater.
[1913 Webster]

Scenery
Scen"er*y (?), n. 1. Assemblage of scenes; the paintings and hangings representing the scenes of a play; the disposition and arrangement of the scenes in which the action of a play, poem, etc., is laid; representation of place of action or occurence.
[1913 Webster]

2. Sum of scenes or views; general aspect, as regards variety and beauty or the reverse, in a landscape; combination of natural views, as woods, hills, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Never need an American look beyond his own country for the sublime and beautiful of natural scenery. W. Irving.
[1913 Webster]

Sceneshifter
Scene"shift`er (?), n. One who moves the scenes in a theater; a sceneman.
[1913 Webster]

Scenical
Scenic
{ Scen"ic (?), Scen"ic*al (?), } a. [L. scaenicus, scenicus, Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. scénique. See Scene.] Of or pertaining to scenery; of the nature of scenery; theatrical.
[1913 Webster]

All these situations communicate a scenical animation to the wild romance, if treated dramatically. De Quincey.
[1913 Webster]

Scenograph
Scen"o*graph (?), n. [See Scenography.] A perspective representation or general view of an object.
[1913 Webster]

Scenographical
Scenographic
{ Scen`o*graph"ic (?), Scen`o*graph"ic*al (?), } a. [Cf. F. scénographique, Gr. &unr_;.] Of or pertaining to scenography; drawn in perspective. -- Scen`o*graph"ic*al*ly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

Scenography
Sce*nog"ra*phy (?), n. [L. scaenographia, Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; scene, stage + gra`fein to write: cf. F. scénographie.] The art or act of representing a body on a perspective plane; also, a representation or description of a body, in all its dimensions, as it appears to the eye. Greenhill.
[1913 Webster]

Scent
Scent (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scented; p. pr. & vb. n. Scenting.] [Originally sent, fr. F. sentir to feel, to smell. See Sense.] 1. To perceive by the olfactory organs; to smell; as, to scent game, as a hound does.
[1913 Webster]

Methinks I scent the morning air. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. To imbue or fill with odor; to perfume.
[1913 Webster]

Balm from a silver box distilled around,
Shall all bedew the roots, and scent the sacred ground.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Scent
Scent, v. i. 1. To have a smell. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Thunderbolts . . . do scent strongly of brimstone. Holland.
[1913 Webster]

2. To hunt animals by means of the sense of smell.
[1913 Webster]

Scent
Scent, n. 1. That which, issuing from a body, affects the olfactory organs of animals; odor; smell; as, the scent of an orange, or of a rose; the scent of musk.
[1913 Webster]

With lavish hand diffuses scents ambrosial. Prior.
[1913 Webster]

2. Specifically, the odor left by an animal on the ground in passing over it; as, dogs find or lose the scent; hence, course of pursuit; track of discovery.
[1913 Webster]

He gained the observations of innumerable ages, and traveled upon the same scent into Ethiopia. Sir W. Temple.
[1913 Webster]

3. The power of smelling; the sense of smell; as, a hound of nice scent; to divert the scent. I. Watts.
[1913 Webster]

Scentful
Scent"ful (?), a. 1. Full of scent or odor; odorous. “A scentful nosegay.” W. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of quick or keen smell.
[1913 Webster]

The scentful osprey by the rock had fished. W. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Scentingly
Scent"ing*ly (?), adv. By scent. [R.] Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

Scentless
Scent"less, a. Having no scent.
[1913 Webster]

The scentless and the scented rose. Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

Scepsis
Scep"sis (?), n. [NL., from Gr. &unr_; doubt, fr. &unr_; to consider: cf. G. skepsis. See Skeptic.] Skepticism; skeptical philosophy. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Among their products were the system of Locke, the scepsis of Hume, the critical philosophy of Kant. J. Martineau.
[1913 Webster]

Sceptre
Scepter
{ Scep"ter, Scep"tre } (?), n. [F. sceptre, L. sceptrum, from Gr. &unr_; a staff to lean upon, a scepter; probably akin to E. shaft. See Shaft, and cf. Scape a stem, shaft.] 1. A staff or baton borne by a sovereign, as a ceremonial badge or emblem of authority; a royal mace.
[1913 Webster]

And the king held out Esther the golden scepter that was in his hand. Esther v. 2.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, royal or imperial power or authority; sovereignty; as, to assume the scepter.
[1913 Webster]

The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor a lawgiver from between his feet, until Shiloh come. Gen. xlix. 10.
[1913 Webster]

Sceptre
Scepter
{ Scep"ter, Scep"tre }, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sceptered (?) or Sceptred (&unr_;); p. pr. & vb. n. Sceptering (?) or Sceptring (&unr_;).] To endow with the scepter, or emblem of authority; to invest with royal authority.
[1913 Webster]

To Britain's queen the sceptered suppliant bends. Tickell.
[1913 Webster]

Scepterellate
Scep`ter*el"late (?), a. (Zool.) Having a straight shaft with whorls of spines; -- said of certain sponge spicules. See Illust. under Spicule.
[1913 Webster]

Sceptreless
Scepterless
{ Scep"ter*less, Scep"tre*less }, a. Having no scepter; without authority; powerless; as, a scepterless king.
[1913 Webster]

Scepticism
Sceptical
Sceptic
{ Scep"tic (?), Scep"tic*al, Scep"ti*cism, etc. } See Skeptic, Skeptical, Skepticism, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Sceptral
Scep"tral (?), a. Of or pertaining to a scepter; like a scepter.
[1913 Webster]

Scern
Scern (?), v. t. To discern; to perceive. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Schade
Schade (?), n. Shade; shadow. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; English words now beginning with sh, like shade, were formerly often spelled with a c between the s and h; as, schade; schame; schape; schort, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Schah
Schah (?), n. See Shah.
[1913 Webster]

Schappe
Schap"pe (?), n. [G. dial. (Swiss), waste, impurity.] A silk yarn or fabric made out of carded spun silk.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Schatchen
Schat"chen (?), n. [Yiddish, fr. NHeb. shadkhān, fr. shādakh to bring about a marriage, orig., to persuade.] A person whose business is marriage brokage; a marriage broker, esp. among certain Jews.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Schediasm
Sche"di*asm (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; an extempore, fr. &unr_; to do offhand, &unr_; sudden, fr. &unr_; near.] Cursory writing on a loose sheet. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Schedule
Sched"ule (?; in England commonly ?; 277), n. [F. cédule, formerly also spelt schedule, L. schedula, dim. of scheda, scida, a strip of papyrus bark, a leaf of paper; akin to (or perh. from) Gr. &unr_; a tablet, leaf, and to L. scindere to cleave, Gr. &unr_;. See Schism, and cf. Cedule.] A written or printed scroll or sheet of paper; a document; especially, a formal list or inventory; a list or catalogue annexed to a larger document, as to a will, a lease, a statute, etc.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Catalogue; list; inventory. see List.
[1913 Webster]

Schedule
Sched"ule, v. t. To form into, or place in, a schedule.
[1913 Webster]

Scheele's green
Scheele's" green` (?). [See Scheelite.] (Chem.) See under Green.
[1913 Webster]

Scheelin
Scheel"in (?), n. (Chem.) Scheelium. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scheelite
Scheel"ite (&unr_;), n. [From C.W. Scheele, a Swedish chemist.] (Min.) Calcium tungstate, a mineral of a white or pale yellowish color and of the tetragonal system of crystallization.
[1913 Webster]

Scheelium
Schee"li*um (?), n. [NL. From C.W. Scheele, who discovered it.] (Chem.) The metal tungsten. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scheik
Scheik (shēk or shāk), n. See Sheik.
[1913 Webster]

Schelly
Schel"ly (?), n. (Zool.) The powan. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Schema
Sche"ma (?), n.; pl. Schemata (#), E. Schemas (#). [G. See Scheme.] (Kantian Philos.) An outline or image universally applicable to a general conception, under which it is likely to be presented to the mind; as, five dots in a line are a schema of the number five; a preceding and succeeding event are a schema of cause and effect.
[1913 Webster]

Schematic
Sche*mat"ic (?), a. [Cf. Gr. &unr_; pretended.] Of or pertaining to a scheme or a schema.
[1913 Webster]

Schematism
Sche"ma*tism (?), n. [Cf. F. schématisme (cf. L. schematismos florid speech), fr. Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; to form. See Scheme.] 1. (Astrol.) Combination of the aspects of heavenly bodies.
[1913 Webster]

2. Particular form or disposition of a thing; an exhibition in outline of any systematic arrangement. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Schematist
Sche"ma*tist (?), n. One given to forming schemes; a projector; a schemer. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Schematize
Sche"ma*tize (?), v. i. [Cf. F. schématiser, Gr. &unr_;.] To form a scheme or schemes.
[1913 Webster]

Scheme
Scheme (?), n. [L. schema a rhetorical figure, a shape, figure, manner, Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, form, shape, outline, plan, fr. &unr_;, &unr_;, to have or hold, to hold out, sustain, check, stop; cf. Skr. sah to be victorious, to endure, to hold out, AS. sige victory, G. sieg. Cf. Epoch, Hectic, School.] 1. A combination of things connected and adjusted by design; a system.
[1913 Webster]

The appearance and outward scheme of things. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

Such a scheme of things as shall at once take in time and eternity. Atterbury.
[1913 Webster]

Arguments . . . sufficient to support and demonstrate a whole scheme of moral philosophy. J. Edwards.
[1913 Webster]

The Revolution came and changed his whole scheme of life. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

2. A plan or theory something to be done; a design; a project; as, to form a scheme.
[1913 Webster]

The stoical scheme of supplying our wants by lopping off our desires, is like cutting off our feet when we want shoes. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

3. Any lineal or mathematical diagram; an outline.
[1913 Webster]

To draw an exact scheme of Constantinople, or a map of France. South.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Astrol.) A representation of the aspects of the celestial bodies for any moment or at a given event.
[1913 Webster]

A blue silk case, from which was drawn a scheme of nativity. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Plan; project; contrivance; purpose; device; plot. -- Scheme, Plan. Scheme and plan are subordinate to design; they propose modes of carrying our designs into effect. Scheme is the least definite of the two, and lies more in speculation. A plan is drawn out into details with a view to being carried into effect. As schemes are speculative, they often prove visionary; hence the opprobrious use of the words schemer and scheming. Plans, being more practical, are more frequently carried into effect.
[1913 Webster]

He forms the well-concerted scheme of mischief;
'T is fixed, 't is done, and both are doomed to death.
Rowe.
[1913 Webster]

Artists and plans relieved my solemn hours;
I founded palaces, and planted bowers.
Prior.
[1913 Webster]

Scheme
Scheme, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Schemed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scheming.] To make a scheme of; to plan; to design; to project; to plot.
[1913 Webster]

That wickedness which schemed, and executed, his destruction. G. Stuart.
[1913 Webster]

Scheme
Scheme, v. i. To form a scheme or schemes.
[1913 Webster]

Schemeful
Scheme"ful (?), a. Full of schemes or plans.
[1913 Webster]

Schemer
Schem"er (?), n. One who forms schemes; a projector; esp., a plotter; an intriguer.
[1913 Webster]

Schemers and confederates in guilt. Paley.
[1913 Webster]

Scheming
Schem"ing, a. Given to forming schemes; artful; intriguing. -- Schem"ing*ly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

Schemist
Schem"ist, n. A schemer. [R.] Waterland.
[1913 Webster]

Schene
Schene (?), n. [L. schoenus, Gr. &unr_; a rush, a reed, a land measure: cf. F. schène.] (Antiq.) An Egyptian or Persian measure of length, varying from thirty-two to sixty stadia.
[1913 Webster]

Schenkbeer
Schenk"beer` (?), n. [G. schenkbier; schenken to pour out + bier beer; -- so called because put on draught soon after it is made.] A mild German beer.
[1913 Webster]

Scherbet
Scher"bet (?), n. See Sherbet.
[1913 Webster]

Scherif
Scher"if (? or ?), n. See Sherif.
[1913 Webster]

Scherzando
Scher*zan"do (?), adv. [It.] (Mus.) In a playful or sportive manner.
[1913 Webster]

Scherzo
Scher"zo (?), n. [It.] (Mus.) A playful, humorous movement, commonly in 3-4 measure, which often takes the place of the old minuet and trio in a sonata or a symphony.
[1913 Webster]

Schesis
Sche"sis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_;, &unr_;, to have or hold. See Scheme.] 1. General state or disposition of the body or mind, or of one thing with regard to other things; habitude. [Obs.] Norris.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Rhet.) A figure of speech whereby the mental habitude of an adversary or opponent is feigned for the purpose of arguing against him. Crabb.
[1913 Webster]

Schetical
Schetic
{ Schet"ic (?), Schet"ic*al (?), } a. [Cf. Gr. &unr_; holding back.] Of or pertaining to the habit of the body; constitutional. [Obs.] Cudworth.
[1913 Webster]

Schiedam
Schie*dam" (?), n. [Short for Schiedam schnapps.] Holland gin made at Schiedam in the Netherlands.
[1913 Webster]

Schiller
Schil"ler (?), n. [G., play of colors.] (Min.) The peculiar bronzelike luster observed in certain minerals, as hypersthene, schiller spar, etc. It is due to the presence of minute inclusions in parallel position, and is sometimes of secondary origin.
[1913 Webster]

Schiller spar (Min.), an altered variety of enstatite, exhibiting, in certain positions, a bronzelike luster.
[1913 Webster]

Schillerization
Schil`ler*i*za"tion (&unr_;), n. (Min.) The act or process of producing schiller in a mineral mass.
[1913 Webster]

Schilling
Schil"ling (?), n. [G. See Shilling.] Any one of several small German and Dutch coins, worth from about one and a half cents to about five cents.
[1913 Webster]

Schindylesis
Schin`dy*le"sis (?), n. [NL., from Gr. &unr_; a splitting into fragments.] (Anat.) A form of articulation in which one bone is received into a groove or slit in another.
[1913 Webster]

Schirrhus
Schir"rhus (?), n. See Scirrhus.
[1913 Webster]

Schism
Schism (?), n. [OE. scisme, OF. cisme, scisme, F. schisme, L. schisma, Gr. schi`sma, fr. schi`zein to split; akin to L. scindere, Skr. chid, and prob. to E. shed, v.t. (which see); cf. Rescind, Schedule, Zest.] Division or separation; specifically (Eccl.), permanent division or separation in the Christian church; breach of unity among people of the same religious faith; the offense of seeking to produce division in a church without justifiable cause.
[1913 Webster]

Set bounds to our passions by reason, to our errors by truth, and to our schisms by charity. Eikon Basilike.
[1913 Webster]

Greek schism (Eccl.), the separation of the Greek and Roman churches. -- Great schism, or Western schism (Eccl.) a schism in the Roman church in the latter part of the 14th century, on account of rival claimants to the papal throne. -- Schism act (Law), an act of the English Parliament requiring all teachers to conform to the Established Church, -- passed in 1714, repealed in 1719.
[1913 Webster]

Schisma
Schis"ma (?), n. [L., a split, separation, Gr. schi`sma: cf. F. schisma. See Schism.] (Anc. Mus.) An interval equal to half a comma.
[1913 Webster]

Schismatic
Schis*mat"ic (s&ibreve_;z*măt"&ibreve_;k; so nearly all orthoepists), a. [L. schismaticus, Gr. &unr_;: cf. F. schismatique.] Of or pertaining to schism; implying schism; partaking of the nature of schism; tending to schism; as, schismatic opinions or proposals.
[1913 Webster]

Schismatic
Schis*mat"ic (?; 277), n. One who creates or takes part in schism; one who separates from an established church or religious communion on account of a difference of opinion. “They were popularly classed together as canting schismatics.” Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Heretic; partisan. See Heretic.
[1913 Webster]

Schismatical
Schis*mat"ic*al (?), a. Same as Schismatic. -- Schis*mat"ic*al*ly, adv. -- Schis*mat"ic*al*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Schismatize
Schis"ma*tize (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Schismatized (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Schismatizing (?).] [Cf. F. schismatiser.] To take part in schism; to make a breach of communion in the church.
[1913 Webster]

Schismless
Schism"less (?), a. Free from schism.
[1913 Webster]

Schist
Schist (sh&ibreve_;st), n. [Gr. &unr_; divided, divisible, fr. &unr_; to divide: cf. F. schiste. See Schism.] (Geol.) Any crystalline rock having a foliated structure (see Foliation) and hence admitting of ready division into slabs or slates. The common kinds are mica schist, and hornblendic schist, consisting chiefly of quartz with mica or hornblende and often feldspar.
[1913 Webster]

Schistaceous
Schis*ta"ceous (?), a. Of a slate color.
[1913 Webster]

Schistic
Schist"ic (?), a. Schistose.
[1913 Webster]

Schistous
Schistose
{ Schis*tose" (?; 277), Schist*ous (?), } a. [Cf. F. schisteux.] (Geol.) Of or pertaining to schist; having the structure of a schist.
[1913 Webster]

Schistosity
Schis*tos"i*ty (?), n. [Cf. F. schistosité.] (Geol.) The quality or state of being schistose.
[1913 Webster]

Schizo-
Schiz"o- (?). [Gr. &unr_; to split, cleave.] A combining form denoting division or cleavage; as, schizogenesis, reproduction by fission or cell division.
[1913 Webster]

Schizocarp
Schiz"o*carp (?), n. [Schizo- + Gr. &unr_; fruit.] (Bot.) A dry fruit which splits at maturity into several closed one-seeded portions.
[1913 Webster]

Schizocoele
Schiz"o*coele (?), n. [Schizo- + Gr. &unr_; hollow.] (Anat.) See Enterocoele.
[1913 Webster]

Schizocoelous
Schiz`o*coe"lous (?), a. (Zool.) Pertaining to, or of the nature of, a schizocoele.
[1913 Webster]

Schizogenesis
Schiz`o*gen"e*sis (?), n. [Schizo- + genesis.] (Biol.) Reproduction by fission. Haeckel.
[1913 Webster]

Schizognath
Schiz"og*nath (?), n. [See Schizognathous.] (Zool.) Any bird with a schizognathous palate.
[1913 Webster]

Schizognathae
Schi*zog"na*thae (?), n. pl. [NL.] (Zool.) The schizognathous birds.
[1913 Webster]

Schizognathism
Schi*zog"na*thism (?), n. (Zool.) The condition of having a schizognathous palate.
[1913 Webster]

Schizognathous
Schi*zog"na*thous (?), a. [Schizo- + Gr. &unr_; the jaw.] (Zool.) Having the maxillo-palatine bones separate from each other and from the vomer, which is pointed in front, as in the gulls, snipes, grouse, and many other birds.
[1913 Webster]

Schizomycetes
Schiz`o*my*ce"tes (?), n. pl., [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; to split + &unr_;, -&unr_;, a fungus.] (Biol.) An order of Schizophyta, including the so-called fission fungi, or bacteria. See Schizophyta, in the Supplement.
[1913 Webster]

Schizonemertea
Schiz`o*ne*mer"te*a (?), n. pl. [NL. See Schizo-, and Nemertes.] (Zool.) A group of nemerteans comprising those having a deep slit along each side of the head. See Illust. in Appendix.
[1913 Webster]

Schizont
Schi"zont (skī"z&obreve_;nt or skīz"&obreve_;nt), n. [Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, p.pr., cleaving.] (Zool.) In certain Sporozoa, a cell formed by the growth of a sporozoite or merozoite (in a cell or corpuscle of the host) which segment by superficial cleavage, without encystment or conjugation, into merozoites.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Schizopelmous
Schiz`o*pel"mous (?), a. [Schizo- + Gr. pe`lma the sole of the foot.] (Zool.) Having the two flexor tendons of the toes entirely separate, and the flexor hallucis going to the first toe only.
[1913 Webster]

Schizophyte
Schiz"o*phyte (?), n. [Schizo- + Gr. &unr_; a plant.] (Biol.) One of a class of vegetable organisms, in the classification of Cohn, which includes all of the inferior forms that multiply by fission, whether they contain chlorophyll or not.
[1913 Webster]

Schizopod
Schiz"o*pod (?; 277), n. (Zool.) one of the Schizopoda. Also used adjectively.
[1913 Webster]

Schizopodous
Schizopod
{ Schiz"o*pod (?; 277), Schi*zop"o*dous (?), } a. Of or pertaining to a schizopod, or the Schizopoda.
[1913 Webster]

Schizopoda
Schi*zop"o*da (?), n. pl., [NL. See Schizo-, and -poda.] (Zool.) A division of shrimplike Thoracostraca in which each of the thoracic legs has a long fringed upper branch (exopodite) for swimming.
[1913 Webster]

Schizorhinal
Schiz`o*rhi"nal (?), a. [Schizo- + rhinal.] 1. (Anat.) Having the nasal bones separate.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) Having the anterior nostrils prolonged backward in the form of a slit.
[1913 Webster]

Schlich
Schlich (?), n. [G.; akin to LG. slick mud, D. slijk, MHG. slīch.] (Metal.) The finer portion of a crushed ore, as of gold, lead, or tin, separated by the water in certain wet processes. [Written also slich, slick.]
[1913 Webster]

Schmelze
Schmel"ze (?), n. [G. schmelz, schmelzglas.] A kind of glass of a red or ruby color, made in Bohemia.
[1913 Webster]

Schnapps
Schnapps (?), n. [G., a dram of spirits.] Holland gin. [U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Schneiderian
Schnei*de"ri*an (&unr_;), a. (Anat.) Discovered or described by C. V. Schneider, a German anatomist of the seventeenth century.
[1913 Webster]

Schneiderian membrane, the mucous membrane which lines the nasal chambers; the pituitary membrane.
[1913 Webster]

Schnorrer
Schnor"rer (?), n. [Yiddish, fr. G. schnurrer, fr. schnurren to hum, whir, hence, from the sound of the musical instrument used by strolling beggars, to beg.] Among the Jews, a beggar.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Schoharie grit
Scho*har"ie grit` (?). (Geol.) The formation belonging to the middle of the three subdivisions of the Corniferous period in the American Devonian system; -- so called from Schoharie, in New York, where it occurs. See the Chart of Geology.
[1913 Webster]

Scholar
Schol"ar (?), n. [OE. scoler, AS. scōlere, fr. L. scholaris belonging to a school, fr. schola a school. See School.] 1. One who attends a school; one who learns of a teacher; one under the tuition of a preceptor; a pupil; a disciple; a learner; a student.
[1913 Webster]

I am no breeching scholar in the schools. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. One engaged in the pursuits of learning; a learned person; one versed in any branch, or in many branches, of knowledge; a person of high literary or scientific attainments; a savant. Shak. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

3. A man of books. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

4. In English universities, an undergraduate who belongs to the foundation of a college, and receives support in part from its revenues.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Pupil; learner; disciple. -- Scholar, Pupil. Scholar refers to the instruction, and pupil to the care and government, of a teacher. A scholar is one who is under instruction; a pupil is one who is under the immediate and personal care of an instructor; hence we speak of a bright scholar, and an obedient pupil.
[1913 Webster]

Scholarity
Scho*lar"i*ty (?), n. [OF. scholarité, or LL. scholaritas.] Scholarship. [Obs.] B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

Scholarlike
Schol"ar*like` (?), a. Scholarly. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Scholarly
Schol"ar*ly, a. Like a scholar, or learned person; showing the qualities of a scholar; as, a scholarly essay or critique. -- adv. In a scholarly manner.
[1913 Webster]

Scholarship
Schol"ar*ship, n. 1. The character and qualities of a scholar; attainments in science or literature; erudition; learning.
[1913 Webster]

A man of my master's . . . great scholarship. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

2. Literary education. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Any other house of scholarship. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

3. Maintenance for a scholar; a foundation for the support of a student. T. Warton.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Learning; erudition; knowledge.
[1913 Webster]

Scholastic
Scho*las"tic (?), a. [L. scholasticus, Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; to have leisure, to give lectures, to keep a school, from &unr_; leisure, a lecture, a school: cf. F. scholastique, scolastique. See School.] 1. Pertaining to, or suiting, a scholar, a school, or schools; scholarlike; as, scholastic manners or pride; scholastic learning. Sir K. Digby.
[1913 Webster]

2. Of or pertaining to the schoolmen and divines of the Middle Ages (see Schoolman); as, scholastic divinity or theology; scholastic philosophy. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hence, characterized by excessive subtilty, or needlessly minute subdivisions; pedantic; formal.
[1913 Webster]

Scholastic
Scho*las"tic, n. 1. One who adheres to the method or subtilties of the schools. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. (R. C. Ch.) See the Note under Jesuit.
[1913 Webster]

Scholastical
Scho*las"tic*al (?), a. & n. Scholastic.
[1913 Webster]

Scholastically
Scho*las"tic*al*ly, adv. In a scholastic manner.
[1913 Webster]

Scholasticism
Scho*las"ti*cism (?), n. The method or subtilties of the schools of philosophy; scholastic formality; scholastic doctrines or philosophy.
[1913 Webster]

The spirit of the old scholasticism . . . spurned laborious investigation and slow induction. J. P. Smith.
[1913 Webster]

Scholia
Scho"li*a (?), n. pl. See Scholium.
[1913 Webster]

Scholiast
Scho"li*ast (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; a scholium: cf. F. scoliate. See Scholium.] A maker of scholia; a commentator or annotator.
[1913 Webster]

No . . . quotations from Talmudists and scholiasts . . . ever marred the effect of his grave temperate discourses. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Scholiastic
Scho`li*as"tic (?), a. Of or pertaining to a scholiast, or his pursuits. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Scholiaze
Scho"li*aze (?), v. i. [Cf. Gr. &unr_;.] To write scholia. [Obs.] Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Scholical
Schol"ic*al (?), a. [L. scholicus, Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_;. See School.] Scholastic. [Obs.] Hales.
[1913 Webster]

Scholion
Scho"li*on (?), n. [NL.] A scholium.
[1913 Webster]

A judgment which follows immediately from another is sometimes called a corollary, or consectary . . . One which illustrates the science where it appears, but is not an integral part of it, is a scholion. Abp. Thomson (Laws of Thought).
[1913 Webster]

Scholium
Scho"li*um (?), n.; pl. L. Scholia (#), E. Scholiums (#). [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_;. See School.] 1. A marginal annotation; an explanatory remark or comment; specifically, an explanatory comment on the text of a classic author by an early grammarian.
[1913 Webster]

2. A remark or observation subjoined to a demonstration or a train of reasoning.
[1913 Webster]

Scholy
Scho"ly (?), n. A scholium. [Obs.] Hooker.
[1913 Webster]

Scholy
Scho"ly (?), v. i. & t. To write scholia; to annotate. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

School
School (?), n. [For shoal a crowd; prob. confused with school for learning.] A shoal; a multitude; as, a school of fish.
[1913 Webster]

School
School, n. [OE. scole, AS. sc&unr_;lu, L. schola, Gr. &unr_; leisure, that in which leisure is employed, disputation, lecture, a school, probably from the same root as &unr_;, the original sense being perhaps, a stopping, a resting. See Scheme.] 1. A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training; as, the school of the prophets.
[1913 Webster]

Disputing daily in the school of one Tyrannus. Acts xix. 9.
[1913 Webster]

2. A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school.
[1913 Webster]

As he sat in the school at his primer. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

3. A session of an institution of instruction.
[1913 Webster]

How now, Sir Hugh! No school to-day? Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. One of the seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics, and theology, which were formed in the Middle Ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning.
[1913 Webster]

At Cambridge the philosophy of Descartes was still dominant in the schools. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

5. The room or hall in English universities where the examinations for degrees and honors are held.
[1913 Webster]

6. An assemblage of scholars; those who attend upon instruction in a school of any kind; a body of pupils.
[1913 Webster]

What is the great community of Christians, but one of the innumerable schools in the vast plan which God has instituted for the education of various intelligences? Buckminster.
[1913 Webster]

7. The disciples or followers of a teacher; those who hold a common doctrine, or accept the same teachings; a sect or denomination in philosophy, theology, science, medicine, politics, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Let no man be less confident in his faith . . . by reason of any difference in the several schools of Christians. Jer. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

8. The canons, precepts, or body of opinion or practice, sanctioned by the authority of a particular class or age; as, he was a gentleman of the old school.
[1913 Webster]

His face pale but striking, though not handsome after the schools. A. S. Hardy.
[1913 Webster]

9. Figuratively, any means of knowledge or discipline; as, the school of experience.
[1913 Webster]

Boarding school, Common school, District school, Normal school, etc. See under Boarding, Common, District, etc. -- High school, a free public school nearest the rank of a college. [U. S.] -- School board, a corporation established by law in every borough or parish in England, and elected by the burgesses or ratepayers, with the duty of providing public school accommodation for all children in their district. -- School committee, School board, an elected committee of citizens having charge and care of the public schools in any district, town, or city, and responsible for control of the money appropriated for school purposes. [U. S.] -- School days, the period in which youth are sent to school. -- School district, a division of a town or city for establishing and conducting schools. [U.S.] -- Sunday school, or Sabbath school, a school held on Sunday for study of the Bible and for religious instruction; the pupils, or the teachers and pupils, of such a school, collectively.
[1913 Webster]

School
School, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Schooled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Schooling.] 1. To train in an institution of learning; to educate at a school; to teach.
[1913 Webster]

He's gentle, never schooled, and yet learned. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. To tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove; to subject to systematic discipline; to train.
[1913 Webster]

It now remains for you to school your child,
And ask why God's Anointed be reviled.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

The mother, while loving her child with the intensity of a sole affection, had schooled herself to hope for little other return than the waywardness of an April breeze. Hawthorne.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolbook
School"book` (?), n. A book used in schools for learning lessons.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolboy
School"boy` (?), n. A boy belonging to, or attending, a school.
[1913 Webster]

Schooldame
School"dame` (?). n. A schoolmistress.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolery
School"er*y (&unr_;), n. Something taught; precepts; schooling. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolfellow
School"fel`low (?), n. One bred at the same school; an associate in school.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolgirl
School"girl` (?), n. A girl belonging to, or attending, a school.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolhouse
School"house` (?), n. A house appropriated for the use of a school or schools, or for instruction.
[1913 Webster]

Schooling
School"ing, n. 1. Instruction in school; tuition; education in an institution of learning; act of teaching.
[1913 Webster]

2. Discipline; reproof; reprimand; as, he gave his son a good schooling. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

3. Compensation for instruction; price or reward paid to an instructor for teaching pupils.
[1913 Webster]

Schooling
School"ing, a. [See School a shoal.] (Zool.) Collecting or running in schools or shoals.
[1913 Webster]

Schooling species like the herring and menhaden. G. B. Goode.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolma'am
School"ma'am (?), n. A schoolmistress. [Colloq.U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Schoolmaid
School"maid` (?), n. A schoolgirl. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolman
School"man` (?), n.; pl. Schoolmen (&unr_;). One versed in the niceties of academical disputation or of school divinity.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The schoolmen were philosophers and divines of the Middle Ages, esp. from the 11th century to the Reformation, who spent much time on points of nice and abstract speculation. They were so called because they taught in the mediaeval universities and schools of divinity.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolmaster
School"mas`ter (?), n. 1. The man who presides over and teaches a school; a male teacher of a school.
[1913 Webster]

Let the soldier be abroad if he will; he can do nothing in this age. There is another personage abroad, -- a person less imposing, -- in the eyes of some, perhaps, insignificant. The schoolmaster is abroad; and I trust to him, armed with his primer, against the soldier in full military array. Brougham.
[1913 Webster]

2. One who, or that which, disciplines and directs.
[1913 Webster]

The law was our schoolmaster, to bring us unto Christ. Gal. iii. 24.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolmate
School"mate` (?), n. A pupil who attends the same school as another.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolmistress
School"mis`tress (?), n. A woman who governs and teaches a school; a female school-teacher.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolroom
School"room` (?), n. A room in which pupils are taught.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolship
School"ship` (?), n. A vessel employed as a nautical training school, in which naval apprentices receive their education at the expense of the state, and are trained for service as sailors. Also, a vessel used as a reform school to which boys are committed by the courts to be disciplined, and instructed as mariners.
[1913 Webster]

School-teacher
School"-teach`er (?), n. One who teaches or instructs a school. -- School"-teach`ing, n.
[1913 Webster]

Schoolward
School"ward (?), adv. Toward school. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Schooner
Schoon"er (?), n. [See the Note below. Cf. Shun.] (Naut.) Originally, a small, sharp-built vessel, with two masts and fore-and-aft rig. Sometimes it carried square topsails on one or both masts and was called a topsail schooner. About 1840, longer vessels with three masts, fore-and-aft rigged, came into use, and since that time vessels with four masts and even with six masts, so rigged, are built. Schooners with more than two masts are designated three-masted schooners, four-masted schooners, etc. See Illustration in Appendix.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The first schooner ever constructed is said to have been built in Gloucester, Massachusetts, about the year 1713, by a Captain Andrew Robinson, and to have received its name from the following trivial circumstance: When the vessel went off the stocks into the water, a bystander cried out,“O, how she scoons!” Robinson replied, “ A scooner let her be;” and, from that time, vessels thus masted and rigged have gone by this name. The word scoon is popularly used in some parts of New England to denote the act of making stones skip along the surface of water. The Scottish scon means the same thing. Both words are probably allied to the Icel. skunda, skynda, to make haste, hurry, AS. scunian to avoid, shun, Prov. E. scun. In the New England records, the word appears to have been originally written scooner. Babson, in his “History of Gloucester,” gives the following extract from a letter written in that place Sept. 25, 1721, by Dr. Moses Prince, brother of the Rev. Thomas Prince, the annalist of New England: “This gentleman (Captain Robinson) was first contriver of schooners, and built the first of that sort about eight years since.”
[1913 Webster]

Schooner
Schoon"er, n. [D.] A large goblet or drinking glass, -- used for lager beer or ale. [U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Schorl
Schorl (shôrl), n. [G. schörl; cf. Sw. skörl.] (Min.) Black tourmaline. [Written also shorl.]
[1913 Webster]

Schorlaceous
Schor*la"ceous (?), a. Partaking of the nature and character of schorl; resembling schorl.
[1913 Webster]

Schorlous
Schorl"ous (?), a. Schorlaceous.
[1913 Webster]

Schorly
Schorl"y (&unr_;), a. Pertaining to, or containing, schorl; as, schorly granite.
[1913 Webster]

Schottische
Schottish
{ Schot"tish, Schot"tische }, (&unr_;), n. [F. schottish, schotisch from G. schottisch Scottish, Scotch.] A Scotch round dance in 2-4 time, similar to the polka, only slower; also, the music for such a dance; -- not to be confounded with the Écossaise.
[1913 Webster]

Schreibersite
Schrei"bers*ite (?), n. [Named after Carl von Schreibers, of Vienna.] (Min.) A mineral occurring in steel-gray flexible folia. It contains iron, nickel, and phosphorus, and is found only in meteoric iron.
[1913 Webster]

Schrode
Schrode (?), n. See Scrod.
[1913 Webster]

Schwann's sheath
Schwann's" sheath` (?). [So called from Theodor Schwann, a German anatomist of the 19th century.] (Anat.) The neurilemma.
[1913 Webster]

Schwann's white substance
Schwann's white" sub"stance (?). (Anat.) The substance of the medullary sheath.
[1913 Webster]

Schwanpan
Schwan"pan` (?), n. Chinese abacus.
[1913 Webster]

Schweitzerkaese
Schweit"zer*kä"se (?), n. [G. schweizerkäse Swiss cheese.] Gruyère cheese.
[1913 Webster]

Schwenkfeldian
Schwenkfelder
{ Schwenk"feld`er (?), Schwenk"feld`i*an (?), } n. A member of a religious sect founded by Kaspar von Schwenkfeld, a Silesian reformer who disagreed with Luther, especially on the deification of the body of Christ.
[1913 Webster]

Sciaenoid
Sci*ae"noid (?), a. [L. sciaena a kind of fish (fr. Gr. &unr_;) + -oid.] (Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Sciaenidae, a family of carnivorous marine fishes which includes the meagre (Sciaena umbra or Sciaena aquila), and fish of the drum and croaker families. The croaker is so called because it may make a croaking noise by use of its bladder; the Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus, formerly Micropogon undulatus) and the squeteague are a members of the croaker family, and the kingfish is a drum.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Sciagraph
Sci"a*graph (?), n. [See Sciagraphy.] 1. (Arch.) An old term for a vertical section of a building; -- called also sciagraphy. See Vertical section, under Section.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Phys.) A radiograph. [Written also skiagraph.]
[1913 Webster]

Sciagraphical
Sci`a*graph"ic*al (?), a. [Cf. F. sciagraphique, Gr. &unr_;.] Pertaining to sciagraphy. -- Sci`a*graph"ic*al*ly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

Sciagraphy
Sci*ag"ra*phy (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; drawing in light and shade; &unr_; a shadow + &unr_; to delineate, describe: cf. F. sciagraphie.] 1. The art or science of projecting or delineating shadows as they fall in nature. Gwilt.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Arch.) Same as Sciagraph.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Physics) Same as Radiography.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sciamachy
Sci*am"a*chy (?), n. See Sciomachy.
[1913 Webster]

Sciatherical
Sciatheric
{ Sci`a*ther"ic (?), Sci`a*ther"ic*al (?), } a. [Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; a sundial; &unr_; a shadow + &unr_; to hunt, to catch.] Belonging to a sundial. [Obs.] Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

-- Sci`a*ther"ic*al*ly, adv. [Obs.] J. Gregory.
[1913 Webster]

Sciatic
Sci*at"ic (?), a. [F. sciatique, LL. sciaticus, from L. ischiadicus, Gr. &unr_;. See Ischiadic.] (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the hip; in the region of, or affecting, the hip; ischial; ischiatic; as, the sciatic nerve, sciatic pains.
[1913 Webster]

Sciatic
Sci*at"ic, n. [Cf. F. sciatique.] (Med.) Sciatica.
[1913 Webster]

Sciatica
Sci*at"i*ca (?), n. [NL.] (Med.) Neuralgia of the sciatic nerve, an affection characterized by paroxysmal attacks of pain in the buttock, back of the thigh, or in the leg or foot, following the course of the branches of the sciatic nerve. The name is also popularly applied to various painful affections of the hip and the parts adjoining it. See Ischiadic passion, under Ischiadic.
[1913 Webster]

Sciatical
Sci*at"ic*al (?), a. (Anat.) Sciatic.
[1913 Webster]

Sciatically
Sci*at"ic*al*ly, adv. With, or by means of, sciatica.
[1913 Webster]

Scibboleth
Scib"bo*leth (?), n. Shibboleth. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Science
Sci"ence (?), n. [F., fr. L. scientia, fr. sciens, -entis, p. pr. of scire to know. Cf. Conscience, Conscious, Nice.] 1. Knowledge; knowledge of principles and causes; ascertained truth of facts.
[1913 Webster]

If we conceive God's sight or science, before the creation, to be extended to all and every part of the world, seeing everything as it is, . . . his science or sight from all eternity lays no necessity on anything to come to pass. Hammond.
[1913 Webster]

Shakespeare's deep and accurate science in mental philosophy. Coleridge.
[1913 Webster]

2. Accumulated and established knowledge, which has been systematized and formulated with reference to the discovery of general truths or the operation of general laws; knowledge classified and made available in work, life, or the search for truth; comprehensive, profound, or philosophical knowledge.
[1913 Webster]

All this new science that men lere [teach]. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Science is . . . a complement of cognitions, having, in point of form, the character of logical perfection, and in point of matter, the character of real truth. Sir W. Hamilton.
[1913 Webster]

3. Especially, such knowledge when it relates to the physical world and its phenomena, the nature, constitution, and forces of matter, the qualities and functions of living tissues, etc.; -- called also natural science, and physical science.
[1913 Webster]

Voltaire hardly left a single corner of the field entirely unexplored in science, poetry, history, philosophy. J. Morley.
[1913 Webster]

4. Any branch or department of systematized knowledge considered as a distinct field of investigation or object of study; as, the science of astronomy, of chemistry, or of mind.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The ancients reckoned seven sciences, namely, grammar, rhetoric, logic, arithmetic, music, geometry, and astronomy; -- the first three being included in the Trivium, the remaining four in the Quadrivium.
[1913 Webster]

Good sense, which only is the gift of Heaven,
And though no science, fairly worth the seven.
Pope.
[1913 Webster]

5. Art, skill, or expertness, regarded as the result of knowledge of laws and principles.
[1913 Webster]

His science, coolness, and great strength. G. A. Lawrence.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Science is applied or pure. Applied science is a knowledge of facts, events, or phenomena, as explained, accounted for, or produced, by means of powers, causes, or laws. Pure science is the knowledge of these powers, causes, or laws, considered apart, or as pure from all applications. Both these terms have a similar and special signification when applied to the science of quantity; as, the applied and pure mathematics. Exact science is knowledge so systematized that prediction and verification, by measurement, experiment, observation, etc., are possible. The mathematical and physical sciences are called the exact sciences.
[1913 Webster]

Comparative sciences, Inductive sciences. See under Comparative, and Inductive.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Literature; art; knowledge. -- Science, Literature, Art. Science is literally knowledge, but more usually denotes a systematic and orderly arrangement of knowledge. In a more distinctive sense, science embraces those branches of knowledge of which the subject-matter is either ultimate principles, or facts as explained by principles or laws thus arranged in natural order. The term literature sometimes denotes all compositions not embraced under science, but usually confined to the belles-lettres. [See Literature.] Art is that which depends on practice and skill in performance. “In science, scimus ut sciamus; in art, scimus ut producamus. And, therefore, science and art may be said to be investigations of truth; but one, science, inquires for the sake of knowledge; the other, art, for the sake of production; and hence science is more concerned with the higher truths, art with the lower; and science never is engaged, as art is, in productive application. And the most perfect state of science, therefore, will be the most high and accurate inquiry; the perfection of art will be the most apt and efficient system of rules; art always throwing itself into the form of rules.” Karslake.
[1913 Webster]

Science
Sci"ence, v. t. To cause to become versed in science; to make skilled; to instruct. [R.] Francis.
[1913 Webster]

science fiction
sci"ence fic"tion (sī"&eitalic_;ns f&ibreve_;k"shŭn), n. [science fiction.] A genre of fiction in which scientific and technological issues feature prominently, especially including scenarios in which speculative but unproven scientific advances are accepted as fact, and usually set at some time in the future, or in some distant region of the universe.
[PJC]

Scient
Sci"ent (?), a. [L. sciens, -entis, p. pr.] Knowing; skillful. [Obs.] Cockeram.
[1913 Webster]

Scienter
Sci*en"ter (?), adv. [L.] (Law) Knowingly; willfully. Bouvier.
[1913 Webster]

Sciential
Sci*en"tial (?), a. [LL. scientialis, fr. L. scientia.] Pertaining to, or producing, science. [R.] Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Scientific
Sci`en*tif"ic (?), a. [F. scientifique; L. scientia science + facere to make.] 1. Of or pertaining to science; used in science; as, scientific principles; scientific apparatus; scientific observations.
[1913 Webster]

2. Agreeing with, or depending on, the rules or principles of science; as, a scientific classification; a scientific arrangement of fossils.
[1913 Webster]

3. Having a knowledge of science, or of a science; evincing science or systematic knowledge; as, a scientific chemist; a scientific reasoner; a scientific argument.
[1913 Webster]

Bossuet is as scientific in the structure of his sentences. Landor.
[1913 Webster]

Scientific method, the method employed in exact science and consisting of: (a) Careful and abundant observation and experiment. (b) generalization of the results into formulated “Laws” and statements.
[1913 Webster]

Scientifical
Sci`en*tif"ic*al (?), a. Scientific. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

Scientifically
Sci`en*tif"ic*al*ly, adv. In a scientific manner; according to the rules or principles of science.
[1913 Webster]

It is easier to believe than to be scientifically instructed. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

Scientist
Sci"en*tist (?), n. One learned in science; a scientific investigator; one devoted to scientific study; a savant. [Recent]
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Twenty years ago I ventured to propose one [a name for the class of men who give their lives to scientific study] which has been slowly finding its way to general adoption; and the word scientist, though scarcely euphonious, has gradually assumed its place in our vocabulary. B. A. Gould (Address, 1869).
[1913 Webster]

scifi
Sci-Fi
Sci"-Fi", sci"fi" (sī"fī"), n. [From science fiction.] Science fiction; -- a common shortened form for the name of the literaray genre. See science fiction. [informal]
[PJC]

Scilicet
Scil"i*cet (?), adv. [L., fr. scire licet you may know.] To wit; namely; videlicet; -- often abbreviated to sc., or ss.
[1913 Webster]

Scillain
Scil"la*in (?), n. (Chem.) A glucoside extracted from squill (Scilla maritima) as a light porous substance.
[1913 Webster + PJC]

Scillitin
Scil"li*tin (?), n. [Cf. F. scilitine.] (Chem.) A bitter principle extracted from the bulbs of the squill (Scilla maritima), and probably consisting of a complex mixture of several substances.
[1913 Webster + PJC]

Scimitar
Scimiter
{ Scim"i*ter , Scim"i*tar } (?), n. [F. cimeterre, cf. It. scimitarra, Sp. cimitarra; fr. Biscayan cimetarra with a sharp edge; or corrupted from Per. shimshīr.] 1. A saber with a much curved blade having the edge on the convex side, -- in use among Mohammedans, esp., the Arabs and persians. [Written also cimeter, and scymetar.]
[1913 Webster]

2. A long-handled billhook. See Billhook.
[1913 Webster]

Scimiter pods (Bot.), the immense curved woody pods of a leguminous woody climbing plant (Entada scandens) growing in tropical India and America. They contain hard round flattish seeds two inches in diameter, which are made into boxes.
[1913 Webster]

Scincoid
Scin"coid (?), a. [L. scincus a kind of lizard (fr. Gr. &unr_;) + -oid. Cf. Skink.] (Zool.) Of or pertaining to the family Scincidae, or skinks. -- n. A scincoidian.
[1913 Webster]

Scincoidea
Scin*coi"de*a (?), n. pl. [NL.] (Zool.) A tribe of lizards including the skinks. See Skink.
[1913 Webster]

Scincoidian
Scin*coid"i*an (?), n. (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of lizards of the family Scincidae or tribe Scincoidea. The tongue is not extensile. The body and tail are covered with overlapping scales, and the toes are margined. See Illust. under Skink.
[1913 Webster]

Sciniph
Scin"iph (?), n. [L. scinifes, cinifes, or ciniphes, pl., Gr. &unr_;.] Some kind of stinging or biting insect, as a flea, a gnat, a sandfly, or the like. Ex. viii. 17 (Douay version).
[1913 Webster]

Scink
Scink (?), n. (Zool.) A skink.
[1913 Webster]

Scink
Scink (?), n. A slunk calf. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scintilla
Scin*til"la (?), n. [L.] A spark; the least particle; an iota; a tittle. R. North.
[1913 Webster]

Scintillant
Scin"til*lant (?), a. [L. scintillans, p. pr. of scintillare to sparkle. See Scintillate.] Emitting sparks, or fine igneous particles; sparkling. M. Green.
[1913 Webster]

Scintillate
Scin"til*late (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scintillated (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scintillating.] [L. scintillare, scintillatum, from scintilla a spark. Cf. Stencil.] 1. To emit sparks, or fine igneous particles.
[1913 Webster]

As the electrical globe only scintillates when rubbed against its cushion. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

2. To sparkle, as the fixed stars.
[1913 Webster]

Scintillation
Scin`til*la"tion (?), n. [L. scintillatio: cf. F. scintillation.] 1. The act of scintillating.
[1913 Webster]

2. A spark or flash emitted in scintillating.
[1913 Webster]

These scintillations are . . . the inflammable effluences discharged from the bodies collided. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Scintillous
Scin"til*lous (?), a. Scintillant. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Scintillously
Scin"til*lous*ly, adv. In a scintillant manner. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Sciography
Sci*og"ra*phy (?), n. See Sciagraphy.
[1913 Webster]

Sciolism
Sci"o*lism (?), n. [See Sciolist.] The knowledge of a sciolist; superficial knowledge.
[1913 Webster]

Sciolist
Sci"o*list (?), n. [L. sciolus. See Sciolous.] One who knows many things superficially; a pretender to science; a smatterer.
[1913 Webster]

These passages in that book were enough to humble the presumption of our modern sciolists, if their pride were not as great as their ignorance. Sir W. Temple.
[1913 Webster]

A master were lauded and sciolists shent. R. Browning.
[1913 Webster]

Sciolistic
Sci`o*lis"tic (?), a. Of or pertaining to sciolism, or a sciolist; partaking of sciolism; resembling a sciolist.
[1913 Webster]

Sciolous
Sci"o*lous (?), a. [L. scilus, dim. of scius knowing, fr. scire to know. See Science.] Knowing superficially or imperfectly. Howell.
[1913 Webster]

Sciomachy
Sci*om"a*chy (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;; &unr_; a shadow + &unr_; battle: cf. F. sciomachie, sciamachie.] A fighting with a shadow; a mock contest; an imaginary or futile combat. [Written also scimachy.] Cowley.
[1913 Webster]

Sciomancy
Sci"o*man`cy (?), n. [Gr. &unr_; a shadow + -mancy: cf. F. sciomance, sciamancie.] Divination by means of shadows.
[1913 Webster]

Scion
Sci"on (?), n. [OF. cion, F. scion, probably from scier to saw, fr. L. secare to cut. Cf. Section.] 1. (Bot.) (a) A shoot or sprout of a plant; a sucker. (b) A piece of a slender branch or twig cut for grafting. [Formerly written also cion, and cyon.]
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, a descendant; an heir; as, a scion of a royal stock.
[1913 Webster]

Scioptic
Sci*op"tic (?), a. [Gr. &unr_; shadow + &unr_; belonging to sight: cf. F. scioptique. See Optic.] (Opt.) Of or pertaining to an optical arrangement for forming images in a darkened room, usually called scioptic ball.
[1913 Webster]

Scioptic ball (Opt.), the lens of a camera obscura mounted in a wooden ball which fits a socket in a window shutter so as to be readily turned, like the eye, to different parts of the landscape.
[1913 Webster]

Sciopticon
Sci*op"ti*con (?), n. [NL. See Scioptic.] A kind of magic lantern.
[1913 Webster]

Scioptics
Sci*op"tics (?), n. The art or process of exhibiting luminous images, especially those of external objects, in a darkened room, by arrangements of lenses or mirrors.
[1913 Webster]

Scioptric
Sci*op"tric (?), a. (Opt.) Scioptic.
[1913 Webster]

Sciot
Sci"ot (?), a. Of or pertaining to the island Scio (Chio or Chios). -- n. A native or inhabitant of Scio. [Written also Chiot.]
[1913 Webster]

Sciotheric
Sci`o*ther"ic (?), a. [Cf. L. sciothericon a sundial. See Sciatheric.] Of or pertaining to a sundial.
[1913 Webster]

Sciotheric telescope (Dialing), an instrument consisting of a horizontal dial, with a telescope attached to it, used for determining the time, whether of day or night.
[1913 Webster]

Scious
Sci"ous (?), a. [L. scius.] Knowing; having knowledge. “Brutes may be and are scious.” Coleridge.
[1913 Webster]

Scire facias
Sci`re fa"ci*as (sī`r&euptack_; fā"sh&ibreve_;*ăs). [L., do you cause to know.] (Law) A judicial writ, founded upon some record, and requiring the party proceeded against to show cause why the party bringing it should not have advantage of such record, or (as in the case of scire facias to repeal letters patent) why the record should not be annulled or vacated. Wharton. Bouvier.
[1913 Webster]

Scirrhoid
Scir"rhoid (sk&ibreve_;r"roid), a. [Scirrhus + -oid.] Resembling scirrhus. Dunglison.
[1913 Webster]

Scirrhosity
Scir*rhos"i*ty (sk&ibreve_;r*r&obreve_;s"&ibreve_;*t&ybreve_;), n. (Med.) A morbid induration, as of a gland; state of being scirrhous.
[1913 Webster]

Scirrhous
Scir"rhous (sk&ibreve_;r"rŭs), a. [NL. scirrhosus.] (Med.) Proceeding from scirrhus; of the nature of scirrhus; indurated; knotty; as, scirrhous affections; scirrhous disease. [Written also skirrhous.]
[1913 Webster]

Scirrhus
Scir"rhus (?), n.; pl. L. Scirrhi (#), E. Scirrhuses (#). [NL., from L. scirros, Gr. &unr_;, &unr_;, fr. &unr_;, &unr_;, hard.] (Med.) (a) An indurated organ or part; especially, an indurated gland. [Obs.] (b) A cancerous tumor which is hard, translucent, of a gray or bluish color, and emits a creaking sound when incised. [Sometimes incorrectly written schirrus; written also skirrhus.]
[1913 Webster]

Sciscitation
Scis`ci*ta"tion (?), n. [L. sciscitatio, fr. sciscitari to inquire, from sciscere to seek to know, v. incho. from scire to know.] The act of inquiring; inquiry; demand. [Obs.] Bp. Hall.
[1913 Webster]

Scise
Scise (?), v. i. [L. scindere, scissum, to cut, split.] To cut; to penetrate. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

The wicked steel scised deep in his right side. Fairfax.
[1913 Webster]

Scissel
Scis"sel (?), n. [Cf. Scissile.] 1. The clippings of metals made in various mechanical operations.
[1913 Webster]

2. The slips or plates of metal out of which circular blanks have been cut for the purpose of coinage.
[1913 Webster]

Scissible
Scis"si*ble (?), a. [L. scindere, scissum, to split.] Capable of being cut or divided by a sharp instrument. [R.] Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Scissil
Scis"sil (?), n. See Scissel.
[1913 Webster]

Scissile
Scis"sile (?), a. [L. scissilis, fr. scindere, scissum, to cut, to split: cf. F. scissile. See Schism.] Capable of being cut smoothly; scissible. [R.] Arbuthnot.
[1913 Webster]

Scission
Scis"sion (?), n. [L. scissio, fr. scindere, scissum, to cut, to split: cf. F. scission.] The act of dividing with an instrument having a sharp edge. Wiseman.
[1913 Webster]

Scissiparity
Scis`si*par"i*ty (?), n. [L. scissus (p. p. of scindere to split) + parere to bring forth: cf. F. scissiparité.] (Biol.) Reproduction by fission.
[1913 Webster]

Scissor
Scis"sor (?), v. t. To cut with scissors or shears; to prepare with the aid of scissors. Massinger.
[1913 Webster]

Scissors
Scis"sors (?), n. pl. [OE. sisoures, OF. cisoires (cf. F. ciseaux), probably fr. LL. cisorium a cutting instrument, fr. L. caedere to cut. Cf. Chisel, Concise. The modern spelling is due to a mistaken derivation from L. scissor one who cleaves or divides, fr. scindere, scissum, to cut, split.] A cutting instrument resembling shears, but smaller, consisting of two cutting blades with handles, movable on a pin in the center, by which they are held together. Often called a pair of scissors. [Formerly written also cisors, cizars, and scissars.]
[1913 Webster]

Scissors grinder (Zool.), the European goatsucker. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scissorsbill
Scis"sors*bill` (?), n. (Zool.) See Skimmer.
[1913 Webster]

Scissorstail
Scis"sors*tail` (?), n. (Zool.) A tyrant flycatcher (Milvulus forficatus) of the Southern United States and Mexico, which has a deeply forked tail. It is light gray above, white beneath, salmon on the flanks, and fiery red at the base of the crown feathers.
[1913 Webster]

Scissors-tailed
Scis"sors-tailed` (?), a. (Zool.) Having the outer feathers much the longest, the others decreasing regularly to the median ones.
[1913 Webster]

Scissure
Scis"sure (?), n. [L. scissura, from scindere, scissum, to cut, split.] A longitudinal opening in a body, made by cutting; a cleft; a fissure. Hammond.
[1913 Webster]

Scitamineous
Scit`a*min"e*ous (?; 277), a. [NL. scitamineosus, fr. Scitamineae, fr. L. scitamentum a delicacy, dainty.] (Bot.) Of or pertaining to a natural order of plants (Scitamineae), mostly tropical herbs, including the ginger, Indian shot, banana, and the plants producing turmeric and arrowroot.
[1913 Webster]

Sciurine
Sci"u*rine (?; 277), a. [Cf. F. sciurien. See Sciurus.] (Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Squirrel family. -- n. A rodent of the Squirrel family.
[1913 Webster]

Sciuroid
Sci"u*roid (?), a. [Sciurus + -oid.] (Bot.) Resembling the tail of a squirrel; -- generally said of branches which are close and dense, or of spikes of grass like barley.
[1913 Webster]

Sciuromorpha
Sci`u*ro*mor"pha (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. L. sciurus squirrel + Gr. morfh` form.] (Zool.) A tribe of rodents containing the squirrels and allied animals, such as the gophers, woodchucks, beavers, and others.
[1913 Webster]

Sciurus
Sci*u"rus (?), n. [L., a squirrel, Gr. &unr_;. See Squirrel.] (Zool.) A genus of rodents comprising the common squirrels.
[1913 Webster]

Sclaff
Sclaff (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Sclaffed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sclaffing.] [Orig. uncert.] 1. To scuff or shuffle along. [Scot.]
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

2. (Golf) To scrape the ground with the sole of the club, before striking the ball, in making a stroke.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sclaff
Sclaff, v. t. (Golf) To scrape (the club) on the ground, in a stroke, before hitting the ball; also, to make (a stroke) in that way.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sclaff
Sclaff, n. [Scot.] 1. A slight blow; a slap; a soft fall; also, the accompanying noise.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

2. (Golf) The stroke made by one who sclaffs.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

3. A thin, solid substance, esp. a thin shoe or slipper.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Sclaundre
Sclaun"dre (?), n. Slander. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Sclave
Sclav
{ Sclav (?), Sclave }, n. Same as Slav.
[1913 Webster]

Sclavic
Sclav"ic (?), a. Same as Slavic.
[1913 Webster]

Sclavism
Sclav"ism (?), n. Same as Slavism.
[1913 Webster]

Sclavonian
Scla*vo"nian (?), a. & n. Same as Slavonian.
[1913 Webster]

Sclavonic
Scla*von"ic (?), a. Same as Slavonic.
[1913 Webster]

Sclender
Sclen"der (?), a. Slender. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Scleragogy
Scler"a*go`gy (?), n. [Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; hard + &unr_; a leading or training.] Severe discipline. [Obs.] Bp. Hacket.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerema
Scle*re"ma (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. sklhro`s hard.] (Med.) Induration of the cellular tissue.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerema of adults. See Scleroderma. -- ‖Sclerema neonatorum (&unr_;) [NL., of the newborn], an affection characterized by a peculiar hardening and rigidity of the cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues in the newly born. It is usually fatal. Called also skinbound disease.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerenchyma
Scle*ren"chy*ma (?), n. [NL., from Gr. sklhro`s hard + -enchyma as in parenchyma.] 1. (Bot.) Vegetable tissue composed of short cells with thickened or hardened walls, as in nutshells and the gritty parts of a pear. See Sclerotic.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; By recent German writers and their English translators, this term is used for liber cells. Goodale.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) The hard calcareous deposit in the tissues of Anthozoa, constituting the stony corals.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerenchymatous
Scler`en*chym"a*tous (?), a. (Bot. & Zool.) Pertaining to, or composed of, sclerenchyma.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerenchyme
Scle*ren"chyme (?), n. Sclerenchyma.
[1913 Webster]

Scleriasis
Scle*ri"a*sis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_;.] (Med.) (a) A morbid induration of the edge of the eyelid. (b) Induration of any part, including scleroderma.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerite
Scle"rite (sklē"rīt), n. (Zool.) A hard chitinous or calcareous process or corpuscle, especially a spicule of the Alcyonaria.
[1913 Webster]

Scleritis
Scle*ri"tis (skl&euptack_;*rī"t&ibreve_;s), n. [NL.] See Sclerotitis.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerobase
Scler"o*base (? or ?), n. [Gr. sklhro`s hard + ba`sis base.] (Zool.) The calcareous or hornlike coral forming the central stem or axis of most compound alcyonarians; -- called also foot secretion. See Illust. under Gorgoniacea, and Coenenchyma. -- Scler`o*ba"sic (#), a.
[1913 Webster]

Scleroderm
Scler"o*derm (? or ?; 277), n. [Gr. sklhro`s hard + de`rma skin: cf. F. scléroderme.] (a) (Zool.) One of a tribe of plectognath fishes (Sclerodermi) having the skin covered with hard scales, or plates, as the cowfish and the trunkfish. (b) One of the Sclerodermata. (c) Hardened, or bony, integument of various animals.
[1913 Webster]

Scleroderma
Scler`o*der"ma (?), n. [NL.] (Med.) A disease of adults, characterized by a diffuse rigidity and hardness of the skin.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerodermata
Scler`o*der"ma*ta (?), n. pl. [NL.] (Zool.) The stony corals; the Madreporaria.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerodermous
Sclerodermic
{ Scler`o*der"mic (?), Scler`o*der"mous (?), } (Zool.) (a) Having the integument, or skin, hard, or covered with hard plates. (b) Of or pertaining to the Sclerodermata.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerodermite
Scler`o*der"mite (?), n. (Zool.) (a) The hard integument of Crustacea. (b) Sclerenchyma.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerogen
Scler"o*gen (? or ?), n. [Gr. sklhro`s hard + -gen.] (Bot.) The thickening matter of woody cells; lignin.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerogenous
Scle*rog"e*nous (?), a. [Gr. sklhro`s hard + -genous.] (Anat.) Making or secreting a hard substance; becoming hard.
[1913 Webster]

Scleroid
Scle"roid (?), a. [Gr. &unr_;; sklhro`s hard + e'i^dos form.] (Bot.) Having a hard texture, as nutshells.
[1913 Webster]

Scleroma
Scle*ro"ma (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. sklhro`s hard + -oma.] (Med.) Induration of the tissues. See Sclerema, Scleroderma, and Sclerosis.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerometer
Scle*rom"e*ter (?), n. [Gr. sklhro`s hard + -meter.] An instrument for determining with accuracy the degree of hardness of a mineral.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerosed
Scle*rosed" (?), a. Affected with sclerosis.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerosis
Scle*ro"sis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. (&unr_;&unr_;, fr. sklhro`s hard.] 1. (Med.) Induration; hardening; especially, that form of induration produced in an organ by increase of its interstitial connective tissue.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) Hardening of the cell wall by lignification.
[1913 Webster]

Cerebro-spinal sclerosis (Med.), an affection in which patches of hardening, produced by increase of the neuroglia and atrophy of the true nerve tissue, are found scattered throughout the brain and spinal cord. It is associated with complete or partial paralysis, a peculiar jerking tremor of the muscles, headache, and vertigo, and is usually fatal. Formerly referred to as multiple sclerosis, disseminated sclerosis, or insular sclerosis, but now usually called only multiple sclerosis, or MS.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Scleroskeleton
Scle`ro*skel"e*ton (?), n. [Gr. sklhro`s hard + E. skeleton.] (Anat.) That part of the skeleton which is developed in tendons, ligaments, and aponeuroses.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerotal
Scle*ro"tal (?), a. (Anat.) Sclerotic. -- n. The optic capsule; the sclerotic coat of the eye. Owen.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerotic
Scle*rot"ic (?), a. [Gr. sklhro`s hard: cf. F. sclérotique.] 1. Hard; firm; indurated; -- applied especially in anatomy to the firm outer coat of the eyeball, which is often cartilaginous and sometimes bony.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sclerotic coat of the eye; sclerotical.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Med.) Affected with sclerosis; sclerosed.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerotic parenchyma (Bot.), sclerenchyma. By some writers a distinction is made, sclerotic parenchyma being applied to tissue composed of cells with the walls hardened but not thickened, and sclerenchyma to tissue composed of cells with the walls both hardened and thickened.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerotic
Scle*rot"ic, n. [Cf. F. sclérotique.] (Anat.) The sclerotic coat of the eye. See Illust. of Eye (d).
[1913 Webster]

Sclerotic
Scle*rot"ic, a. (Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained from ergot or the sclerotium of a fungus growing on rye.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerotical
Scle*rot"ic*al (?), a. (Anat.) Sclerotic.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerotitis
Scler`o*ti"tis (?), n. [NL. See Sclerotic, and -itis.] (Med.) Inflammation of the sclerotic coat.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerotium
Scle*ro"ti*um (?), n.; pl. Sclerotia (#). [NL., fr. Gr. sklhro`s hard.] 1. (Bot.) A hardened body formed by certain fungi, as by the Claviceps purpurea, which produces ergot.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) The mature or resting stage of a plasmodium.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerotome
Scler"o*tome (skl&ebreve_;r"&ouptack_;*tōm or sklēr"&ouptack_;*tōm), n. [Gr. sklhro`s hard + te`mnein to cut.] (Zool.) One of the bony, cartilaginous, or membranous partitions which separate the myotomes. -- Scler`o*tom"ic (#), a.
[1913 Webster]

Sclerous
Scle"rous (?), a. [Gr. &unr_;.] (Anat.) Hard; indurated; sclerotic.
[1913 Webster]

Scoat
Scoat (?), v. t. To prop; to scotch. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scobby
Scob"by (?), n. The chaffinch. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scobiform
Scob"i*form (?), a. [L. scobs, or scobis, sawdust, scrapings + -form: cf. F. scobiforme.] Having the form of, or resembling, sawdust or raspings.
[1913 Webster]

Scobs
Scobs, n. sing. & pl. [L. scobs, or scobis, fr. scabere to scrape.] 1. Raspings of ivory, hartshorn, metals, or other hard substance. Chambers.
[1913 Webster]

2. The dross of metals.
[1913 Webster]

Scoff
Scoff (?; 115), n. [OE. scof; akin to OFries. schof, OHG. scoph, Icel. skaup, and perh. to E. shove.] 1. Derision; ridicule; mockery; derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach.
[1913 Webster]

With scoffs, and scorns, and contumelious taunts. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. An object of scorn, mockery, or derision.
[1913 Webster]

The scoff of withered age and beardless youth. Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

Scoff
Scoff, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scoffed (?; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. Scoffing.] [Cf. Dan. skuffe to deceive, delude, Icel. skopa to scoff, OD. schoppen. See Scoff, n.] To show insolent ridicule or mockery; to manifest contempt by derisive acts or language; -- often with at.
[1913 Webster]

Truth from his lips prevailed with double sway,
And fools who came to scoff, remained to pray.
Goldsmith.
[1913 Webster]

God's better gift they scoff at and refuse. Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- To sneer; mock; gibe; jeer. See Sneer.
[1913 Webster]

Scoff
Scoff, v. t. To treat or address with derision; to assail scornfully; to mock at.
[1913 Webster]

To scoff religion is ridiculously proud and immodest. Glanvill.
[1913 Webster]

Scoffer
Scoff"er (?), n. One who scoffs. 2 Pet. iii. 3.
[1913 Webster]

Scoffery
Scoff"er*y (?), n. The act of scoffing; scoffing conduct; mockery. Holinshed.
[1913 Webster]

Scoffingly
Scoff"ing*ly, adv. In a scoffing manner. Broome.
[1913 Webster]

Scoke
Scoke (?), n. (Bot.) Poke (Phytolacca decandra).
[1913 Webster]

Scolay
Sco*lay" (?), v. i. See Scoley. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scold
Scold (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scolded; p. pr. & vb. n. Scolding.] [Akin to D. schelden, G. schelten, OHG. sceltan, Dan. skielde.] To find fault or rail with rude clamor; to brawl; to utter harsh, rude, boisterous rebuke; to chide sharply or coarsely; -- often with at; as, to scold at a servant.
[1913 Webster]

Pardon me, lords, 't is the first time ever
I was forced to scold.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scold
Scold, v. t. To chide with rudeness and clamor; to rate; also, to rebuke or reprove with severity.
[1913 Webster]

Scold
Scold, n. 1. One who scolds, or makes a practice of scolding; esp., a rude, clamorous woman; a shrew.
[1913 Webster]

She is an irksome, brawling scold. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. A scolding; a brawl.
[1913 Webster]

Scolder
Scold"er (?), n. 1. One who scolds.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) (a) The oyster catcher; -- so called from its shrill cries. (b) The old squaw. [Local U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scolding
Scold"ing, a. & n. from Scold, v.
[1913 Webster]

Scolding bridle, an iron frame. See Brank, n., 2.
[1913 Webster]

Scoldingly
Scold"ing*ly, adv. In a scolding manner.
[1913 Webster]

Scole
Scole (?), n. School. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Scolecida
Sco*le"ci*da (? or ?), n. pl. [NL. See Scolex.] (Zool.) Same as Helminthes.
[1913 Webster]

Scolecite
Scol"e*cite (? or ?; 277), n. [Gr. skw`lhx, -hkos, a worm, earthworm.] (Min.) A zeolitic mineral occuring in delicate radiating groups of white crystals. It is a hydrous silicate of alumina and lime. Called also lime mesotype.
[1913 Webster]

Scolecomorpha
Sco*le`co*mor"pha (&unr_;), n. pl. [NL. See Scolex, -morphous.] (Zool.) Same as Scolecida.
[1913 Webster]

Scolex
Sco"lex (?), n.; pl. Scoleces (#). [NL., from Gr. skw`lhx worm, grub.] (Zool.) (a) The embryo produced directly from the egg in a metagenetic series, especially the larva of a tapeworm or other parasitic worm. See Illust. of Echinococcus. (b) One of the Scolecida.
[1913 Webster]

Scoley
Sco*ley" (?), v. i. [Cf. OF. escoler to teach. See School.] To go to school; to study. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Scoliosis
Sco`li*o"sis (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. skolio`s crooked.] (Med.) A lateral curvature of the spine.
[1913 Webster]

Scolithus
Scol"i*thus (? or ?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. skw`lhx a worm + li`qos a stone.] (Paleon.) A tubular structure found in Potsdam sandstone, and believed to be the fossil burrow of a marine worm.
[1913 Webster]

Scollop
Scol"lop (?), n. & v. See Scallop.
[1913 Webster]

Scolopacine
Scol`o*pa"cine (?), a. [L. scolopax a snipe, Gr. &unr_;.] (Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Scolopacidae, or Snipe family.
[1913 Webster]

Scolopendra
Scol`o*pen"dra (?), n. [L., a kind of multiped, fr. Gr. &unr_;.] 1. (Zool.) A genus of venomous myriapods including the centipeds. See Centiped.
[1913 Webster]

2. A sea fish. [R.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Scolopendrine
Scol`o*pen"drine (?), a. (Zool.) Like or pertaining to the Scolopendra.
[1913 Webster]

Scolytid
Scol"y*tid (?), n. [Gr. skoly`ptein to cut short.] (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of small bark-boring beetles of the genus Scolytus and allied genera. Also used adjectively.
[1913 Webster]

Scomber
Scom"ber (?), n. [L., a mackerel, Gr. sko`mbros.] (Zool.) A genus of acanthopterygious fishes which includes the common mackerel.
[1913 Webster]

Scomberoid
Scom"ber*oid (?), a. & n. [Cf. F. scombéroïde.] (Zool.) Same as Scombroid.
[1913 Webster]

Scombriformes
Scom`bri*for"mes (sk&obreve_;m`br&ibreve_;*fôr"mēz), n. pl. [NL.] (Zool.) A division of fishes including the mackerels, tunnies, and allied fishes.
[1913 Webster]

Scombroid
Scom"broid (sk&obreve_;m"broid), a. [Scomber + -oid.] (Zool.) Like or pertaining to the Mackerel family. -- n. Any fish of the family Scombridae, of which the mackerel (Scomber) is the type, and including the tuna (Thunnus and related genera).
[1913 Webster +PJC]

Scomfish
Scom"fish (sk&obreve_;m"f&ibreve_;sh or skŭm"-), v. t. & i. To suffocate or stifle; to smother. [Scot. & Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scomfit
Scom"fit (skŭm"f&ibreve_;y), n. & v. Discomfit. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scomm
Scomm (sk&obreve_;m), n. [L. scomma a taunt, jeer, scoff, Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; to mock, scoff at.] 1. A buffoon. [Obs.] L'Estrange.
[1913 Webster]

2. A flout; a jeer; a gibe; a taunt. [Obs.] Fotherby.
[1913 Webster]

Sconce
Sconce (?), n. [D. schans, OD. schantse, perhaps from OF. esconse a hiding place, akin to esconser to hide, L. absconsus, p. p. of abscondere. See Abscond, and cf. Ensconce, Sconce a candlestick.] 1. A fortification, or work for defense; a fort.
[1913 Webster]

No sconce or fortress of his raising was ever known either to have been forced, or yielded up, or quitted. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. A hut for protection and shelter; a stall.
[1913 Webster]

One that . . . must raise a sconce by the highway and sell switches. Beau. & Fl.
[1913 Webster]

3. A piece of armor for the head; headpiece; helmet.
[1913 Webster]

I must get a sconce for my head. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. Fig.: The head; the skull; also, brains; sense; discretion. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

To knock him about the sconce with a dirty shovel. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

5. A poll tax; a mulct or fine. Johnson.
[1913 Webster]

6. [OF. esconse a dark lantern, properly, a hiding place. See Etymol. above.] A protection for a light; a lantern or cased support for a candle; hence, a fixed hanging or projecting candlestick.
[1913 Webster]

Tapers put into lanterns or sconces of several-colored, oiled paper, that the wind might not annoy them. Evelyn.
[1913 Webster]

Golden sconces hang not on the walls. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

7. Hence, the circular tube, with a brim, in a candlestick, into which the candle is inserted.
[1913 Webster]

8. (Arch.) A squinch.
[1913 Webster]

9. A fragment of a floe of ice. Kane.
[1913 Webster]

10. [Perhaps a different word.] A fixed seat or shelf. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Sconce
Sconce, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sconced (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sconcing.] 1. To shut up in a sconce; to imprison; to insconce. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Immure him, sconce him, barricade him in 't. Marston.
[1913 Webster]

2. To mulct; to fine. [Obs.] Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Sconcheon
Scon"cheon (?), n. (Arch.) A squinch.
[1913 Webster]

Scone
Scone (?), n. A cake, thinner than a bannock, made of wheat or barley or oat meal. [Written variously, scon, skone, skon, etc.] [Scot.] Burns.
[1913 Webster]

Scoop
Scoop (?), n. [OE. scope, of Scand. origin; cf. Sw. skopa, akin to D. schop a shovel, G. schüppe, and also to E. shove. See Shovel.] 1. A large ladle; a vessel with a long handle, used for dipping liquids; a utensil for bailing boats.
[1913 Webster]

2. A deep shovel, or any similar implement for digging out and dipping or shoveling up anything; as, a flour scoop; the scoop of a dredging machine.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Surg.) A spoon-shaped instrument, used in extracting certain substances or foreign bodies.
[1913 Webster]

4. A place hollowed out; a basinlike cavity; a hollow.
[1913 Webster]

Some had lain in the scoop of the rock. J. R. Drake.
[1913 Webster]

5. A sweep; a stroke; a swoop.
[1913 Webster]

6. The act of scooping, or taking with a scoop or ladle; a motion with a scoop, as in dipping or shoveling.
[1913 Webster]

7. a quantity sufficient to fill a scoop; -- used especially for ice cream, dispensed with an ice cream scoop; as, an ice cream cone with two scoops.
[PJC]

8. an act of reporting (news, research results) before a rival; also called a beat. [Newspaper or laboratory cant]
[Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

9. news or information; as, what's the scoop on John's divorce?. [informal]
[PJC]

Scoop net, a kind of hand net, used in fishing; also, a net for sweeping the bottom of a river. -- Scoop wheel, a wheel for raising water, having scoops or buckets attached to its circumference; a tympanum.
[1913 Webster]

Scoop
Scoop, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scooped (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scooping.] [OE. scopen. See Scoop, n.] 1. To take out or up with, a scoop; to lade out.
[1913 Webster]

He scooped the water from the crystal flood. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. To empty by lading; as, to scoop a well dry.
[1913 Webster]

3. To make hollow, as a scoop or dish; to excavate; to dig out; to form by digging or excavation.
[1913 Webster]

Those carbuncles the Indians will scoop, so as to hold above a pint. Arbuthnot.
[1913 Webster]

Scoop
Scoop, v. t. to report a story first, before (a rival); to get a scoop, or a beat, on (a rival); -- used commonly in the passive; as, we were scooped. Also used in certain situations in scientific research, when one scientist or team of scientists reports their results before another who is working on the same problem.
[Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

Scooper
Scoop"er (?), n. 1. One who, or that which, scoops.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) The avocet; -- so called because it scoops up the mud to obtain food.
[1913 Webster]

Scoot
Scoot (?), v. i. To walk fast; to go quickly; to run hastily away. [Colloq. & Humorous, U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scoparin
Sco"pa*rin (?), n. (Chem.) A yellow gelatinous or crystalline substance found in broom (Cytisus scoparius) accompanying sparteine.
[1913 Webster]

Scopate
Sco"pate (?), a. [L. scopae, scopa, a broom.] (Zool.) Having the surface closely covered with hairs, like a brush.
[1913 Webster]

-scope
-scope (&unr_;). [Gr. skopo`s a watcher, spy. See Scope.] A combining form usually signifying an instrument for viewing (with the eye) or observing (in any way); as in microscope, telescope, altoscope, anemoscope.
[1913 Webster]

Scope
Scope (?), n. [It. scopo, L. scopos a mark, aim, Gr. skopo`s, a watcher, mark, aim; akin to &unr_;, &unr_; to view, and perh. to E. spy. Cf. Skeptic, Bishop.] 1. That at which one aims; the thing or end to which the mind directs its view; that which is purposed to be reached or accomplished; hence, ultimate design, aim, or purpose; intention; drift; object. “Shooting wide, do miss the marked scope.” Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Your scope is as mine own,
So to enforce or qualify the laws
As to your soul seems good.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

The scope of all their pleading against man's authority, is to overthrow such laws and constitutions in the church. Hooker.
[1913 Webster]

2. Room or opportunity for free outlook or aim; space for action; amplitude of opportunity; free course or vent; liberty; range of view, intent, or action.
[1913 Webster]

Give him line and scope. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

In the fate and fortunes of the human race, scope is given to the operation of laws which man must always fail to discern the reasons of. I. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

Excuse me if I have given too much scope to the reflections which have arisen in my mind. Burke.
[1913 Webster]

An intellectual cultivation of no moderate depth or scope. Hawthorne.
[1913 Webster]

3. Extended area. [Obs.] “The scopes of land granted to the first adventurers.” Sir J. Davies.
[1913 Webster]

4. Length; extent; sweep; as, scope of cable.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Scopeline
Sco"pe*line (?), a. (Zool.) Scopeloid.
[1913 Webster]

Scopeloid
Sco"pe*loid (?), a. [NL. Scopelus, typical genus (fr. Gr. &unr_; a headland) + -oid.] (Zool.) Like or pertaining to fishes of the genus Scopelus, or family Scopelodae, which includes many small oceanic fishes, most of which are phosphorescent. -- n. (Zool.) Any fish of the family Scopelidae.
[1913 Webster]

Scopiferous
Sco*pif"er*ous (?), a. [L. scopae, scopa + -ferous.] (Zool.) Bearing a tuft of brushlike hairs.
[1913 Webster]

Scopiform
Sco"pi*form (?), a. [L. scopae, scopa, a broom + -form.] Having the form of a broom or besom. “Zeolite, stelliform or scopiform.” Kirwan.
[1913 Webster]

Scopiped
Sco"pi*ped (?; 277), n. [L. scopae, scopa, a broom + pes, pedis, a foot.] (Zool.) Same as Scopuliped.
[1913 Webster]

Scoppet
Scop"pet (?), v. t. [From Scoop, v. t.] To lade or dip out. [Obs.] Bp. Hall.
[1913 Webster]

Scops owl
Scops" owl` (?). [NL. scops, fr. Gr. &unr_; the little horned owl.] (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of small owls of the genus Scops having ear tufts like those of the horned owls, especially the European scops owl (Scops giu), and the American screech owl (Scops asio).
[1913 Webster]

Scoptical
Scoptic
{ Scop"tic (?), Scop"tic*al (?), } a. [Gr. skwptiko`s, from skw`ptein to mock, to scoff at.] Jesting; jeering; scoffing. [Obs.] South.
[1913 Webster]

-- Scop"tic*al*ly, adv. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scopula
Scop"u*la (?), n.; pl. E. Scopulas (#), L. Scopulae (#). [L. scopulae, pl. a little broom.] (Zool.) (a) A peculiar brushlike organ found on the foot of spiders and used in the construction of the web. (b) A special tuft of hairs on the leg of a bee.
[1913 Webster]

Scopuliped
Scop"u*li*ped (?), n. [L. scopulae, pl., a little broom (fr. scopae a broom) + pes, pedis, foot.] (Zool.) Any species of bee which has on the hind legs a brush of hairs used for collecting pollen, as the hive bees and bumblebees.
[1913 Webster]

Scopulous
Scop"u*lous (?), a. [L. scopulosus, fr. scopulus a rock, Gr. &unr_;.] Full of rocks; rocky. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scorbute
Scor"bute (?), n. [LL. scorbutus: cf. F. scorbut. See Scurvy, n.] Scurvy. [Obs.] Purchas.
[1913 Webster]

Scorbutical
Scorbutic
{ Scor*bu"tic (?), Scor*bu"tic*al (?), } a. [Cf. F. scorbutique.] (Med.) Of or pertaining to scurvy; of the nature of, or resembling, scurvy; diseased with scurvy; as, a scorbutic person; scorbutic complaints or symptoms. -- Scor*bu"tic*al*ly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

Scorbutus
Scor*bu"tus (?), n. [LL. See Scorbute.] (Med.) Scurvy.
[1913 Webster]

Scorce
Scorce (?), n. Barter. [Obs.] See Scorse.
[1913 Webster]

Scorch
Scorch (skôrch), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scorched (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scorching.] [OE. scorchen, probably akin to scorcnen; cf. Norw. skrokken shrunk up, skrekka, skrökka, to shrink, to become wrinkled up, dial. Sw. skråkkla to wrinkle (see Shrug); but perhaps influenced by OF. escorchier to strip the bark from, to flay, to skin, F. écorcher, LL. excorticare; L. ex from + cortex, -icis, bark (cf. Cork); because the skin falls off when scorched.] 1. To burn superficially; to parch, or shrivel, the surface of, by heat; to subject to so much heat as changes color and texture without consuming; as, to scorch linen.
[1913 Webster]

Summer drouth or singèd air
Never scorch thy tresses fair.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. To affect painfully with heat, or as with heat; to dry up with heat; to affect as by heat.
[1913 Webster]

Lashed by mad rage, and scorched by brutal fires. Prior.
[1913 Webster]

3. To burn; to destroy by, or as by, fire.
[1913 Webster]

Power was given unto him to scorch men with fire. Rev. xvi. 8.
[1913 Webster]

The fire that scorches me to death. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Scorch
Scorch, v. i. 1. To be burnt on the surface; to be parched; to be dried up.
[1913 Webster]

Scatter a little mungy straw or fern amongst your seedlings, to prevent the roots from scorching. Mortimer.
[1913 Webster]

2. To burn or be burnt.
[1913 Webster]

He laid his long forefinger on the scarlet letter, which forthwith seemed to scorch into Hester's breast, as if it had been red hot. Hawthorne.
[1913 Webster]

3. To ride or drive at great, usually at excessive, speed; -- applied chiefly to automobilists and bicyclists. [Colloq.] -- Scorch"er, n. [Colloq.]

scorcher
scorch"er a very hot day. [Informal]
[PJC]

Scorching
Scorch"ing, a. 1. Burning; parching or shriveling with heat.
[1913 Webster]

2. sufficiently hot to cause scorching.
[PJC]

-- Scorch"ing*ly, adv. -- Scorch"ing*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Score
Score (skōr), n. [AS. scor twenty, fr. sceran, scieran, to shear, cut, divide; or rather the kindred Icel. skor incision, twenty, akin to Dan. skure a notch, Sw. skåra. See Shear.] 1. A notch or incision; especially, one that is made as a tally mark; hence, a mark, or line, made for the purpose of account.
[1913 Webster]

Whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. An account or reckoning; account of dues; bill; hence, indebtedness.
[1913 Webster]

He parted well, and paid his score. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. Account; reason; motive; sake; behalf.
[1913 Webster]

But left the trade, as many more
Have lately done on the same score.
Hudibras.
[1913 Webster]

You act your kindness in Cydaria's score. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

4. The number twenty, as being marked off by a special score or tally; hence, in pl., a large number.
[1913 Webster]

Amongst three or four score hogsheads. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

At length the queen took upon herself to grant patents of monopoly by scores. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

5. A distance of twenty yards; -- a term used in ancient archery and gunnery. Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

6. A weight of twenty pounds. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

7. The number of points gained by the contestants, or either of them, in any game, as in cards or cricket.
[1913 Webster]

8. A line drawn; a groove or furrow.
[1913 Webster]

9. (Mus.) The original and entire draught, or its transcript, of a composition, with the parts for all the different instruments or voices written on staves one above another, so that they can be read at a glance; -- so called from the bar, which, in its early use, was drawn through all the parts. Moore (Encyc. of Music).
[1913 Webster]

10. the grade received on an examination, such as those given in school or as a qualifying examination for a job or admission to school; -- it may be expressed as a percentage of answers which are correct, or as a number or letter; as, a score of 98 in a civil service exam.
[PJC]

In score (Mus.), having all the parts arranged and placed in juxtaposition. Smart. -- To quit scores, to settle or balance accounts; to render an equivalent; to make compensation.
[1913 Webster] Does not the earth quit scores with all the elements in the noble fruits that issue from it? South.

[1913 Webster]

Score
Score (skōr), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scored (skōrd); p. pr. & vb. n. Scoring.] 1. To mark with lines, scratches, or notches; to cut notches or furrows in; to notch; to scratch; to furrow; as, to score timber for hewing; to score the back with a lash.
[1913 Webster]

Let us score their backs. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

A briar in that tangled wilderness
Had scored her white right hand.
M. Arnold.
[1913 Webster]

2. Especially, to mark with significant lines or notches, for indicating or keeping account of something; as, to score a tally.
[1913 Webster]

3. To mark or signify by lines or notches; to keep record or account of; to set down; to record; to charge.
[1913 Webster]

Madam, I know when,
Instead of five, you scored me ten.
Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Nor need I tallies thy dear love to score. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. To engrave, as upon a shield. [R.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

5. To make a score of, as points, runs, etc., in a game.
[1913 Webster]

6. (Mus.) To write down in proper order and arrangement; as, to score an overture for an orchestra. See Score, n., 9.
[1913 Webster]

7. (Geol.) To mark with parallel lines or scratches; as, the rocks of New England and the Western States were scored in the drift epoch.
[1913 Webster]

Score
Score (?), v. i. 1. To keep the score in a game; to act as scorer.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

2. To make or count a point or points, as in a game; to tally.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

3. To run up a score, or account of dues.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

4. To succeed in finding a partner for sexual intercourse; to make a sexual conquest. [slang]
[PJC]

5. To purchase drugs illegally. [slang]
[PJC]

Scorer
Scor"er (?), n. One who, or that which, scores.
[1913 Webster]

Scoria
Sco"ri*a (?), n.; pl. Scoriae (#). [L., fr. Gr. &unr_;, fr. &unr_; dung, ordure.] 1. The recrement of metals in fusion, or the slag rejected after the reduction of metallic ores; dross.
[1913 Webster]

2. Cellular slaggy lava; volcanic cinders.
[1913 Webster]

Scoriac
Sco"ri*ac (?), a. Scoriaceous. E. A. Poe.
[1913 Webster]

Scoriaceous
Sco`ri*a"ceous (?), a. [Cf. F. scoriacé.] Of or pertaining to scoria; like scoria or the recrement of metals; partaking of the nature of scoria.
[1913 Webster]

Scorie
Sco"rie (?), n. (Zool.) The young of any gull. [Written also scaurie.] [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scorification
Sco`ri*fi*ca"tion (?), n. [Cf. F. scorification. See Scorify.] (Chem.) The act, process, or result of scorifying, or reducing to a slag; hence, the separation from earthy matter by means of a slag; as, the scorification of ores.
[1913 Webster]

Scorifier
Sco"ri*fi`er (?), n. (Chem.) One who, or that which, scorifies; specifically, a small flat bowl-shaped cup used in the first heating in assaying, to remove the earth and gangue, and to concentrate the gold and silver in a lead button.
[1913 Webster]

Scoriform
Sco"ri*form (?), a. In the form of scoria.
[1913 Webster]

Scorify
Sco"ri*fy (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scorified (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scorifying (?).] [Scoria + -fy: cf. F. scorifier.] (Chem.) To reduce to scoria or slag; specifically, in assaying, to fuse so as to separate the gangue and earthy material, with borax, lead, soda, etc., thus leaving the gold and silver in a lead button; hence, to separate from, or by means of, a slag.
[1913 Webster]

Scorious
Sco"ri*ous (?), a. Scoriaceous. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Scorn
Scorn (skôrn), n. [OE. scorn, scarn, scharn, OF. escarn, escharn, eschar, of German origin; cf. OHG. skern mockery, skernōn to mock; but cf. also OF. escorner to mock.] 1. Extreme and lofty contempt; haughty disregard; that disdain which springs from the opinion of the utter meanness and unworthiness of an object.
[1913 Webster]

Scorn at first makes after love the more. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

And wandered backward as in scorn,
To wait an aeon to be born.
Emerson.
[1913 Webster]

2. An act or expression of extreme contempt.
[1913 Webster]

Every sullen frown and bitter scorn
But fanned the fuel that too fast did burn.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. An object of extreme disdain, contempt, or derision.
[1913 Webster]

Thou makest us a reproach to our neighbors, a scorn and a derision to them that are round about us. Ps. xliv. 13.
[1913 Webster]

To think scorn, to regard as worthy of scorn or contempt; to disdain. “He thought scorn to lay hands on Mordecai alone.” Esther iii. 6. -- To laugh to scorn, to deride; to make a mock of; to ridicule as contemptible.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Contempt; disdain; derision; contumely; despite; slight; dishonor; mockery.
[1913 Webster]

Scorn
Scorn, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scorned (skôrnd); p. pr. & vb. n. Scoring.] [OE. scornen, scarnen, schornen, OF. escarnir, escharnir. See Scorn, n.] 1. To hold in extreme contempt; to reject as unworthy of regard; to despise; to contemn; to disdain.
[1913 Webster]

I scorn thy meat; 't would choke me. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

This my long sufferance, and my day of grace,
Those who neglect and scorn shall never taste.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

We scorn what is in itself contemptible or disgraceful. C. J. Smith.
[1913 Webster]

2. To treat with extreme contempt; to make the object of insult; to mock; to scoff at; to deride.
[1913 Webster]

His fellow, that lay by his bed's side,
Gan for to laugh, and scorned him full fast.
Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

To taunt and scorn you thus opprobriously. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- To contemn; despise; disdain. See Contemn.
[1913 Webster]

Scorn
Scorn (skôrn), v. i. To scoff; to mock; to show contumely, derision, or reproach; to act disdainfully.
[1913 Webster]

He said mine eyes were black and my hair black,
And, now I am remembered, scorned at me.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scorner
Scorn"er (?), n. One who scorns; a despiser; a contemner; specifically, a scoffer at religion. “Great scorners of death.” Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Surely he scorneth the scorners: but he giveth grace unto the lowly. Prov. iii. 34.
[1913 Webster]

Scornful
Scorn"ful (?), a. 1. Full of scorn or contempt; contemptuous; disdainful.
[1913 Webster]

Scornful of winter's frost and summer's sun. Prior.
[1913 Webster]

Dart not scornful glances from those eyes. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. Treated with scorn; exciting scorn. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

The scornful mark of every open eye. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Contemptuous; disdainful; contumelious; reproachful; insolent.
[1913 Webster]

-- Scorn"ful*ly, adv. -- Scorn"ful*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Scorny
Scorn"y (?), a. Deserving scorn; paltry. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scorodite
Scor"o*dite (?), n. [G. scorodit; -- so called in allusion to its smell under the blowpipe, from Gr. &unr_; garlic.] (Min.) A leek-green or brownish mineral occurring in orthorhombic crystals. It is a hydrous arseniate of iron. [Written also skorodite.]
[1913 Webster]

Scorpaenoid
Scor*pae"noid (?), a. [NL. Scorpaena, a typical genus (see Scorpene) + -oid.] (Zool.) Of or pertaining to the family Scorpaenidae, which includes the scorpene, the rosefish, the California rockfishes, and many other food fishes. [Written also scorpaenid.] See Illust. under Rockfish.
[1913 Webster]

Scorpene
Scor"pene (?), n. [F. scorpène, fr. L. scorpaena a kind of fish, Gr. &unr_;.] (Zool.) A marine food fish of the genus Scorpaena, as the European hogfish (Scorpaena scrofa), and the California species (Scorpaena guttata).
[1913 Webster]

Scorper
Scor"per (?), n. Same as Scauper.
[1913 Webster]

Scorpio
Scor"pi*o (?), n.; pl. Scorpiones (#). [L.] 1. (Zool.) A scorpion.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Astron.) (a) The eighth sign of the zodiac, which the sun enters about the twenty-third day of October, marked thus [&scorpius_;] in almanacs. (b) A constellation of the zodiac containing the bright star Antares. It is drawn on the celestial globe in the figure of a scorpion.
[1913 Webster]

Scorpiodea
Scor`pi*o"de*a (?), n. pl. [NL.] (Zool.) Same as Scorpiones.
[1913 Webster]

Scorpioidal
Scorpioid
{ Scor"pi*oid (?), Scor`pi*oid"al (?), } a. [Gr. &unr_;; &unr_; a scorpion + e'i^dos form.] 1. Having the inflorescence curved or circinate at the end, like a scorpion's tail.
[1913 Webster]

Scorpion
Scor"pi*on (?), n. [F., fr. L. scorpio, scorpius, Gr. &unr_;, perhaps akin to E. sharp.] 1. (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of pulmonate arachnids of the order Scorpiones, having a suctorial mouth, large claw-bearing palpi, and a caudal sting.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Scorpions have a flattened body, and a long, slender post-abdomen formed of six movable segments, the last of which terminates in a curved venomous sting. The venom causes great pain, but is unattended either with redness or swelling, except in the axillary or inguinal glands, when an extremity is affected. It is seldom if ever destructive of life. Scorpions are found widely dispersed in the warm climates of both the Old and New Worlds.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) The pine or gray lizard (Sceloporus undulatus). [Local, U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

3. (Zool.) The scorpene.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Script.) A painful scourge.
[1913 Webster]

My father hath chastised you with whips, but I will chastise you with scorpions. 1 Kings xii. 11.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Astron.) A sign and constellation. See Scorpio.
[1913 Webster]

6. (Antiq.) An ancient military engine for hurling stones and other missiles.
[1913 Webster]

Book scorpion. (Zool.) See under Book. -- False scorpion. (Zool.) See under False, and Book scorpion. -- Scorpion bug, or Water scorpion (Zool.) See Nepa. -- Scorpion fly (Zool.), a neuropterous insect of the genus Panorpa. See Panorpid. -- Scorpion grass (Bot.), a plant of the genus Myosotis. Myosotis palustris is the forget-me-not. -- Scorpion senna (Bot.), a yellow-flowered leguminous shrub (Coronilla Emerus) having a slender joined pod, like a scorpion's tail. The leaves are said to yield a dye like indigo, and to be used sometimes to adulterate senna. -- Scorpion shell (Zool.), any shell of the genus Pteroceras. See Pteroceras. -- Scorpion spiders. (Zool.), any one of the Pedipalpi. -- Scorpion's tail (Bot.), any plant of the leguminous genus Scorpiurus, herbs with a circinately coiled pod; -- also called caterpillar. -- Scorpion's thorn (Bot.), a thorny leguminous plant (Genista Scorpius) of Southern Europe. -- The Scorpion's Heart (Astron.), the star Antares in the constellation Scorpio.
[1913 Webster]

Scorpiones
Scor`pi*o"nes (?), n. pl. [NL.] (Zool.) A division of arachnids comprising the scorpions.
[1913 Webster]

Scorpionidea
Scor`pi*o*nid"e*a (?), n. pl. [NL.] (Zool.) Same as Scorpiones.
[1913 Webster]

Scorpionwort
Scor"pi*on*wort` (?), n. (Bot.) A leguminous plant (Ornithopus scorpioides) of Southern Europe, having slender curved pods.
[1913 Webster]

Scorse
Scorse (? or ?), n. [Cf. It. scorsa a course, and E. discourse.] Barter; exchange; trade. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

And recompensed them with a better scorse. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Scorse
Scorse, v. t. [Written also scourse, and scoss.] 1. To barter or exchange. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. To chase. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Scorse
Scorse, v. i. To deal for the purchase of anything; to practice barter. [Obs.] B. Jonson.
[1913 Webster]

Scortatory
Scor"ta*to*ry (?), a. [L. scortator a fornicator, from scortari to fornicate, scortum a prostitute.] Pertaining to lewdness or fornication; lewd.
[1913 Webster]

Scot
Scot (?), n. A name for a horse. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Scot
Scot, n. [Cf. L. Skoti, pl., AS. Scotta, pl. Skottas, Sceottas.] A native or inhabitant of Scotland; a Scotsman, or Scotchman.
[1913 Webster]

Scot
Scot, n. [Icel. skot; or OF. escot, F. écot, LL. scottum, scotum, from a kindred German word; akin to AS. scot, and E. shot, shoot; cf. AS. sceótan to shoot, to contribute. See Shoot, and cf. Shot.] A portion of money assessed or paid; a tax or contribution; a mulct; a fine; a shot.
[1913 Webster]

Scot and lot, formerly, a parish assessment laid on subjects according to their ability. [Eng.] Cowell. Now, a phrase for obligations of every kind regarded collectivelly.
[1913 Webster] Experienced men of the world know very well that it is best to pay scot and lot as they go along. Emerson.

[1913 Webster]

Scotale
Scotal
{ Scot"al (?), Scot"ale (?), } n. [Scot + ale.] (O. Eng. Law) The keeping of an alehouse by an officer of a forest, and drawing people to spend their money for liquor, for fear of his displeasure.
[1913 Webster]

Scotch
Scotch (?), a. [Cf. Scottish.] Of or pertaining to Scotland, its language, or its inhabitants; Scottish.
[1913 Webster]

Scotch broom (Bot.), the Cytisus scoparius. See Broom. -- Scotch dipper, or Scotch duck (Zool.), the bufflehead; -- called also Scotch teal, and Scotchman. -- Scotch fiddle, the itch. [Low] Sir W. Scott. -- Scotch mist, a coarse, dense mist, like fine rain. -- Scotch nightingale (Zool.), the sedge warbler. [Prov. Eng.] -- Scotch pebble. See under pebble. -- Scotch pine (Bot.) See Riga fir. -- Scotch thistle (Bot.), a species of thistle (Onopordon acanthium); -- so called from its being the national emblem of the Scotch.
[1913 Webster]

Scotch
Scotch, n. 1. The dialect or dialects of English spoken by the people of Scotland.
[1913 Webster]

2. Collectively, the people of Scotland.
[1913 Webster]

Scotch
Scotch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scotched (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scotching.] [Cf. Prov. E. scote a prop, and Walloon ascot a prop, ascoter to prop, F. accoter, also Armor. skoaz the shoulder, skoazia to shoulder up, to prop, to support, W. ysgwydd a shoulder, ysgwyddo to shoulder. Cf. Scoat.] [Written also scoatch, scoat.] To shoulder up; to prop or block with a wedge, chock, etc., as a wheel, to prevent its rolling or slipping.
[1913 Webster]

Scotch
Scotch, n. A chock, wedge, prop, or other support, to prevent slipping; as, a scotch for a wheel or a log on inclined ground.
[1913 Webster]

Scotch
Scotch, v. t. [Probably the same word as scutch; cf. Norw. skoka, skoko, a swingle for flax; perhaps akin to E. shake.] To cut superficially; to wound; to score.
[1913 Webster]

We have scotched the snake, not killed it. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scotched collops (Cookery), a dish made of pieces of beef or veal cut thin, or minced, beaten flat, and stewed with onion and other condiments; -- called also Scotch collops. [Written also scotcht collops.]
[1913 Webster]

Scotch
Scotch, n. A slight cut or incision; a score. Walton.
[1913 Webster]

Scotch-hopper
Scotch"-hop`per (?), n. Hopscotch.
[1913 Webster]

Scotching
Scotch"ing, n. (Masonry) Dressing stone with a pick or pointed instrument.
[1913 Webster]

Scotchman
Scotch"man (?), n.; pl. Scotchmen (&unr_;). 1. A native or inhabitant of Scotland; a Scot; a Scotsman.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Naut.) A piece of wood or stiff hide placed over shrouds and other rigging to prevent chafe by the running gear. Ham. Nav. Encyc.
[1913 Webster]

Scotch rite
Scotch rite. (Freemasonry) The ceremonial observed by one of the Masonic systems, called in full the Ancient and Accepted Scotch Rite; also, the system itself, which confers thirty-three degrees, of which the first three are nearly identical with those of the York rite.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scotch terrier
Scotch terrier. (Zool.) One of a breed of small terriers with long, rough hair.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scoter
Sco"ter (?), n. [Cf. Prov. E. scote to plow up.] (Zool.) Any one of several species of northern sea ducks of the genus Oidemia.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The European scoters are Oidemia nigra, called also black duck, black diver, surf duck; and the velvet, or double, scoter (Oidemia fusca). The common American species are the velvet, or white-winged, scoter (Oidemia Deglandi), called also velvet duck, white-wing, bull coot, white-winged coot; the black scoter (Oidemia Americana), called also black coot, butterbill, coppernose; and the surf scoter, or surf duck (Oidemia perspicillata), called also baldpate, skunkhead, horsehead, patchhead, pishaug, and spectacled coot. These birds are collectively called also coots. The females and young are called gray coots, and brown coots.
[1913 Webster]

Scot-free
Scot"-free" [?], a. Free from payment of scot; untaxed; hence, unhurt; clear; safe.
[1913 Webster]

Do as much for this purpose, and thou shalt pass scot-free. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Then young Hay escaped scot-free to Holland. A. Lang.
[1913 Webster]

Scoth
Scoth (?), v. t. To clothe or cover up. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scotia
Sco"ti*a (?), n. [L., fr. Gr. skoti`a darkness, a sunken molding in the base of a pillar, so called from the dark shadow it casts, from sko`tos darkness.] (Arch.) A concave molding used especially in classical architecture.
[1913 Webster]

Scotia
Sco"ti*a, n. [L.] Scotland [Poetic]
[1913 Webster]

O Scotia! my dear, my native soil! Burns.
[1913 Webster]

Scotist
Sco"tist (?), n. (Eccl. Hist.) A follower of (Joannes) Duns Scotus, the Franciscan scholastic (d. 1308), who maintained certain doctrines in philosophy and theology, in opposition to the Thomists, or followers of Thomas Aquinas, the Dominican scholastic.
[1913 Webster]

Scotograph
Scot"o*graph (?), n. [Gr. sko`tos darkness + -graph.] An instrument for writing in the dark, or without seeing. Maunder.
[1913 Webster]

Scotoma
Sco*to"ma (?), n. [L.] (Med.) Scotomy.
[1913 Webster]

Scotomy
Scot"o*my (?), n. [NL. scotomia, from Gr. &unr_; dizziness, fr. &unr_; to darken, fr. sko`tos darkness: cf. F. scotomie.] 1. Dizziness with dimness of sight. [Obs.] Massinger.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Med.) Obscuration of the field of vision due to the appearance of a dark spot before the eye.
[1913 Webster]

Scotoscope
Sco"to*scope (? or ?), n. [Gr. sko`tos darkness + -scope.] An instrument that discloses objects in the dark or in a faint light. [Obs.] Pepys.
[1913 Webster]

Scots
Scots (?), a. [For older Scottis Scottish. See Scottish.] Of or pertaining to the Scotch; Scotch; Scottish; as, Scots law; a pound Scots (1s. 8d.).
[1913 Webster]

Scotsman
Scots"man (-man), n. See Scotchman.
[1913 Webster]

Scottering
Scot"ter*ing (?), n. The burning of a wad of pease straw at the end of harvest. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scotticism
Scot"ti*cism (?), n. An idiom, or mode of expression, peculiar to Scotland or Scotchmen.
[1913 Webster]

That, in short, in which the Scotticism of Scotsmen most intimately consists, is the habit of emphasis. Masson.
[1913 Webster]

Scotticize
Scot"ti*cize (?), v. t. To cause to become like the Scotch; to make Scottish. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Scottish
Scot"tish (?), a. [From Scot a Scotchman: cf. AS. Scyttisc, and E. Scotch, a., Scots, a.] Of or pertaining to the inhabitants of Scotland, their country, or their language; as, Scottish industry or economy; a Scottish chief; a Scottish dialect.
[1913 Webster]

Scottish terrier
Scot"tish ter"ri*er. (Zool.) Same as Scotch terrier.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scoundrel
Scoun"drel (?), n. [Probably from Prov. E. & Scotch scunner, scouner, to loathe, to disgust, akin to AS. scunian to shun. See Shun.] A mean, worthless fellow; a rascal; a villain; a man without honor or virtue.
[1913 Webster]

Go, if your ancient, but ignoble blood
Has crept through scoundrels ever since the flood.
Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Scoundrel
Scoun"drel, a. Low; base; mean; unprincipled.
[1913 Webster]

Scoundreldom
Scoun"drel*dom (?), n. The domain or sphere of scoundrels; scoundrels, collectively; the state, ideas, or practices of scoundrels. Carlyle.
[1913 Webster]

Scoundrelism
Scoun"drel*ism (?), n. The practices or conduct of a scoundrel; baseness; rascality. Cotgrave.
[1913 Webster]

Scour
Scour (skour), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scoured (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scouring.] [Akin to LG. schüren, D. schuren, schueren, G. scheuern, Dan. skure; Sw. skura; all possibly fr. LL. escurare, fr. L. ex + curare to take care. Cf. Cure.] 1. To rub hard with something rough, as sand or Bristol brick, especially for the purpose of cleaning; to clean by friction; to make clean or bright; to cleanse from grease, dirt, etc., as articles of dress.
[1913 Webster]

2. To purge; as, to scour a horse.
[1913 Webster]

3. To remove by rubbing or cleansing; to sweep along or off; to carry away or remove, as by a current of water; -- often with off or away.
[1913 Webster]

[I will] stain my favors in a bloody mask,
Which, washed away, shall scour my shame with it.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. [Perhaps a different word; cf. OF. escorre, escourre, It. scorrere, both fr. L. excurrere to run forth. Cf. Excursion.] To pass swiftly over; to brush along; to traverse or search thoroughly; as, to scour the coast.
[1913 Webster]

Not so when swift Camilla scours the plain. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

5. To cleanse or clear, as by a current of water; to flush.

If my neighbor ought to scour a ditch. Blackstone.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scouring barrel, a tumbling barrel. See under Tumbling. -- Scouring cinder (Metal.), a basic slag, which attacks the lining of a shaft furnace. Raymond. -- Scouring rush. (Bot.) See Dutch rush, under Dutch. -- Scouring stock (Woolen Manuf.), a kind of fulling mill.
[1913 Webster]

Scour
Scour, v. i. 1. To clean anything by rubbing. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. To cleanse anything.
[1913 Webster]

Warm water is softer than cold, for it scoureth better. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

3. To be purged freely; to have a diarrhoea.
[1913 Webster]

4. To run swiftly; to rove or range in pursuit or search of something; to scamper.
[1913 Webster]

So four fierce coursers, starting to the race,
Scour through the plain, and lengthen every pace.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Scour
Scour, n. 1. Diarrhoea or dysentery among cattle.
[1913 Webster]

2. The act of scouring.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

3. A place scoured out by running water, as in the bed of a stream below a fall.

If you catch the two sole denizens [trout] of a particular scour, you will find another pair installed in their place to-morrow. Grant Allen.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scourage
Scour"age (?; 48), n. Refuse water after scouring.
[1913 Webster]

Scourer
Scour"er (?), n. 1. One who, or that which, scours.
[1913 Webster]

2. A rover or footpad; a prowling robber.
[1913 Webster]

In those days of highwaymen and scourers. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Scourge
Scourge (?), n. [F. escourgée, fr. L. excoriata (sc. scutica) a stripped off (lash or whip), fr. excoriare to strip, to skin. See Excoriate.] 1. A lash; a strap or cord; especially, a lash used to inflict pain or punishment; an instrument of punishment or discipline; a whip.
[1913 Webster]

Up to coach then goes
The observed maid, takes both the scourge and reins.
Chapman.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, a means of inflicting punishment, vengeance, or suffering; an infliction of affliction; a punishment.
[1913 Webster]

Sharp scourges of adversity. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

What scourge for perjury
Can this dark monarchy afford false Clarence?
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scourge
Scourge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scourged (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scourging (?).] [From Scourge, n.: cf. OF. escorgier.] 1. To whip severely; to lash.
[1913 Webster]

Is it lawful for you to scourge a . . . Roman? Acts xxii. 25.
[1913 Webster]

2. To punish with severity; to chastise; to afflict, as for sins or faults, and with the purpose of correction.
[1913 Webster]

Whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth, and scourgeth every son whom he receiveth. Heb. xii. 6.
[1913 Webster]

3. To harass or afflict severely.
[1913 Webster]

To scourge and impoverish the people. Brougham.
[1913 Webster]

Scourger
Scour"ger (?), n. One who scourges or punishes; one who afflicts severely.
[1913 Webster]

The West must own the scourger of the world. Byron.
[1913 Webster]

Scourse
Scourse (skōrs), v. t. See Scorse. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scouse
Scouse (skous), n. (Naut.) A sailor's dish. Bread scouse contains no meat; lobscouse contains meat, etc. See Lobscouse. Ham. Nav. Encyc.
[1913 Webster]

Scout
Scout (skout), n. [Icel. skūta a small craft or cutter.] A swift sailing boat. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

So we took a scout, very much pleased with the manner and conversation of the passengers. Pepys.
[1913 Webster]

Scout
Scout, n. [Icel. skūta to jut out. Cf. Scout to reject.] A projecting rock. [Prov. Eng.] Wright.
[1913 Webster]

Scout
Scout (skout), v. t. [Icel. skūta a taunt; cf. Icel. skūta to jut out, skota to shove, skjōta to shoot, to shove. See Shoot.] To reject with contempt, as something absurd; to treat with ridicule; to flout; as, to scout an idea or an apology. “Flout 'em and scout 'em.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scout
Scout, n. [OF. escoute scout, spy, fr. escouter, escolter, to listen, to hear, F. écouter, fr. L. auscultare, to hear with attention, to listen to. See Auscultation.] 1. A person sent out to gain and bring in tidings; especially, one employed in war to gain information of the movements and condition of an enemy.
[1913 Webster]

Scouts each coast light-armèd scour,
Each quarter, to descry the distant foe.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. A college student's or undergraduate's servant; -- so called in Oxford, England; at Cambridge called a gyp; and at Dublin, a skip. [Cant]
[1913 Webster]

3. (Cricket) A fielder in a game for practice.
[1913 Webster]

4. The act of scouting or reconnoitering. [Colloq.]
[1913 Webster]

While the rat is on the scout. Cowper.
[1913 Webster]

5. A boy scout or girl scout (which see, above).
[Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

Syn. -- Scout, Spy. -- In a military sense a scout is a soldier who does duty in his proper uniform, however hazardous his adventure. A spy is one who in disguise penetrates the enemies' lines, or lurks near them, to obtain information.
[1913 Webster]

Scout
Scout, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scouted; p. pr. & vb. n. Scouting.] 1. To observe, watch, or look for, as a scout; to follow for the purpose of observation, as a scout.
[1913 Webster]

Take more men,
And scout him round.
Beau. & Fl.
[1913 Webster]

2. To pass over or through, as a scout; to reconnoiter; as, to scout a country.
[1913 Webster]

Scout
Scout, v. i. To go on the business of scouting, or watching the motions of an enemy; to act as a scout.
[1913 Webster]

With obscure wing
Scout far and wide into the realm of night.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Scovel
Scov"el (skŭv"'l), n. [OF. escouve, escouvette, broom, L. scopae, or cf. W. ysgubell, dim. of ysgub a broom.] A mop for sweeping ovens; a malkin.
[1913 Webster]

Scow
Scow (skou), n. [D. schouw.] (Naut.) A large flat-bottomed boat, having broad, square ends.
[1913 Webster]

Scow
Scow, v. t. To transport in a scow.
[1913 Webster]

Scowl
Scowl (skoul), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scowled (skould); p. pr. & vb. n. Scowling.] [Akin to Dan. skule; cf. Icel. skolla to skulk, LG. schulen to hide one's self, D. schuilen, G. schielen to squint, Dan. skele, Sw. skela, AS. sceolh squinting. Cf. Skulk.] 1. To wrinkle the brows, as in frowning or displeasure; to put on a frowning look; to look sour, sullen, severe, or angry.
[1913 Webster]

She scowled and frowned with froward countenance. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, to look gloomy, dark, or threatening; to lower. “The scowling heavens.” Thomson.
[1913 Webster]

Scowl
Scowl, v. t. 1. To look at or repel with a scowl or a frown. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. To express by a scowl; as, to scowl defiance.
[1913 Webster]

Scowl
Scowl, n. 1. The wrinkling of the brows or face in frowing; the expression of displeasure, sullenness, or discontent in the countenance; an angry frown.
[1913 Webster]

With solemn phiz, and critic scowl. Lloyd.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, gloom; dark or threatening aspect. Burns.
[1913 Webster]

A ruddy storm, whose scowl
Made heaven's radiant face look foul.
Crashaw.
[1913 Webster]

Scowlingly
Scowl"ing*ly, adv. In a scowling manner.
[1913 Webster]

Scrabbed eggs
Scrab"bed eggs` (?). [CF. Scramble.] A Lenten dish, composed of eggs boiled hard, chopped, and seasoned with butter, salt, and pepper. Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

Scrabble
Scrab"ble (skrăb"b'l), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scrabbled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scrabbling (?).] [Freq. of scrape. Cf. Scramble, Scrawl, v. t.] 1. To scrape, paw, or scratch with the hands; to proceed by clawing with the hands and feet; to scramble; as, to scrabble up a cliff or a tree.
[1913 Webster]

Now after a while Little-faith came to himself, and getting up made shift to scrabble on his way. Bunyan.
[1913 Webster]

2. To make irregular, crooked, or unmeaning marks; to scribble; to scrawl.
[1913 Webster]

David . . . scrabbled on the doors of the gate. 1. Sam. xxi. 13.
[1913 Webster]

Scrabble
Scrab"ble, v. t. To mark with irregular lines or letters; to scribble; as, to scrabble paper.
[1913 Webster]

Scrabble
Scrab"ble, n. The act of scrabbling; a moving upon the hands and knees; a scramble; also, a scribble.
[1913 Webster]

Scraber
Scra"ber (?), n. [Cf. Scrabble.] (Zool.) (a) The Manx shearwater. (b) The black guillemot.
[1913 Webster]

Scraffle
Scraf"fle (skrăf"f'l), v. i. [See Scramble: cf. OD. schraeffelen to scrape.] To scramble or struggle; to wrangle; also, to be industrious. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

Scrag
Scrag (skrăg), n. [Cf. dial. Sw. skraka a great dry tree, a long, lean man, Gael. sgreagach dry, shriveled, rocky. See Shrink, and cf. Scrog, Shrag, n.] 1. Something thin, lean, or rough; a bony piece; especially, a bony neckpiece of meat; hence, humorously or in contempt, the neck.
[1913 Webster]

Lady MacScrew, who . . . serves up a scrag of mutton on silver. Thackeray.
[1913 Webster]

2. A rawboned person. [Low] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

3. A ragged, stunted tree or branch.
[1913 Webster]

Scrag whale (Zool.), a North Atlantic whalebone whale (Agaphelus gibbosus). By some it is considered the young of the right whale.
[1913 Webster]

Scrag
Scrag (?), v. t. [Cf. Scrag.] To seize, pull, or twist the neck of; specif., to hang by the neck; to kill by hanging. [Colloq.]

An enthusiastic mob will scrag me to a certainty the day war breaks out. Pall Mall Mag.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scragged
Scrag"ged (?), a. 1. Rough with irregular points, or a broken surface; scraggy; as, a scragged backbone.
[1913 Webster]

2. Lean and rough; scraggy.
[1913 Webster]

Scraggedness
Scrag"ged*ness, n. Quality or state of being scragged.
[1913 Webster]

Scraggily
Scrag"gi*ly (?), adv. In a scraggy manner.
[1913 Webster]

Scragginess
Scrag"gi*ness, n. The quality or state of being scraggy; scraggedness.
[1913 Webster]

Scraggy
Scrag"gy (?), a. [Compar. Scragger (?); superl. Scraggiest.] 1. Rough with irregular points; scragged. “A scraggy rock.” J. Philips.
[1913 Webster]

2. Lean and rough; scragged. “His sinewy, scraggy neck.” Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Scragly
Scrag"ly, a. See Scraggy.
[1913 Webster]

Scrag-necked
Scrag"-necked` (?), a. Having a scraggy neck.
[1913 Webster]

Scram
Scram (skrăm), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scrammed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scramming (?).] to leave; to go away; used mostly as an impolite command to a person to go away from a specific location. [informal]
[PJC]

Scram
Scram (skrăm), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scrammed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scramming (?).] to shut down (a nuclear reactor) quickly, as in an emergency.
[PJC]

Scram
Scram (skrăm), n. the rapid shut down of a nuclear reactor, as in an emergency.
[PJC]

Scramble
Scram"ble (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scrambled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scrambling (?).] [Freq. of Prov. E. scramb to rake together with the hands, or of scramp to snatch at. cf. Scrabble.] 1. To clamber with hands and knees; to scrabble; as, to scramble up a cliff; to scramble over the rocks.
[1913 Webster]

2. To struggle eagerly with others for something thrown upon the ground; to go down upon all fours to seize something; to catch rudely at what is desired.
[1913 Webster]

Of other care they little reckoning make,
Than how to scramble at the shearer's feast.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Scramble
Scram"ble (?), v. t. 1. To collect by scrambling; as, to scramble up wealth. Marlowe.
[1913 Webster]

2. To prepare (eggs) as a dish for the table, by stirring the yolks and whites together while cooking.
[1913 Webster]

Scramble
Scram"ble, n. 1. The act of scrambling, climbing on all fours, or clambering.
[1913 Webster]

2. The act of jostling and pushing for something desired; eager and unceremonious struggle for what is thrown or held out; as, a scramble for office.
[1913 Webster]

Scarcity [of money] enhances its price, and increases the scramble. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

Scrambled eggs
Scram"bled eggs (?). Eggs of which the whites and yolks are stirred together while cooking, or eggs beaten slightly, often with a little milk, and stirred while cooking.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scrambler
Scram"bler (?), n. 1. One who scrambles; one who climbs on all fours.
[1913 Webster]

2. A greedy and unceremonious contestant.
[1913 Webster]

Scrambling
Scram"bling (?), a. Confused and irregular; awkward; scambling. -- Scram"bling*ly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

A huge old scrambling bedroom. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Scranch
Scranch (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scranched (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scranching.] [Cf. D. schransen to eat greedily, G. schranzen. Cf. Crunch, Scrunch.] To grind with the teeth, and with a crackling sound; to craunch. [Prov. Eng. & Colloq. U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scranky
Scrank"y (?), a. Thin; lean. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Scrannel
Scran"nel (?), a. [Cf. Scrawny.] Slight; thin; lean; poor.
[1913 Webster]

Grate on their scrannel pipes of wretched straw. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Scranny
Scran"ny (?), a. [See Scrannel.] Thin; lean; meager; scrawny; scrannel. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Scrap
Scrap (skrăp), n. [OE. scrappe, fr. Icel. skrap trifle, cracking. See Scrape, v. t.] 1. Something scraped off; hence, a small piece; a bit; a fragment; a detached, incomplete portion.
[1913 Webster]

I have no materials -- not a scrap. De Quincey.
[1913 Webster]

2. Specifically, a fragment of something written or printed; a brief excerpt; an unconnected extract.
[1913 Webster]

3. pl. The crisp substance that remains after drying out animal fat; as, pork scraps.
[1913 Webster]

4. pl. Same as Scrap iron, below.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Scrap forgings, forgings made from wrought iron scrap. -- Scrap iron. (a) Cuttings and waste pieces of wrought iron from which bar iron or forgings can be made; -- called also wrought-iron scrap. (b) Fragments of cast iron or defective castings suitable for remelting in the foundry; -- called also foundry scrap, or cast scrap.
[1913 Webster]

Scrapbook
Scrap"book` (?), n. A blank book in which extracts cut from books and papers may be pasted and kept.
[1913 Webster]

Scrape
Scrape (skrāp), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scraped (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scraping.] [Icel. skrapa; akin to Sw. skrapa, Dan. skrabe, D. schrapen, schrabben, G. schrappen, and prob. to E. sharp.] 1. To rub over the surface of (something) with a sharp or rough instrument; to rub over with something that roughens by removing portions of the surface; to grate harshly over; to abrade; to make even, or bring to a required condition or form, by moving the sharp edge of an instrument breadthwise over the surface with pressure, cutting away excesses and superfluous parts; to make smooth or clean; as, to scrape a bone with a knife; to scrape a metal plate to an even surface.
[1913 Webster]

2. To remove by rubbing or scraping (in the sense above).
[1913 Webster]

I will also scrape her dust from her, and make her like the top of a rock. Ezek. xxvi. 4.
[1913 Webster]

3. To collect by, or as by, a process of scraping; to gather in small portions by laborious effort; hence, to acquire avariciously and save penuriously; -- often followed by together or up; as, to scrape money together.
[1913 Webster]

The prelatical party complained that, to swell a number the nonconformists did not choose, but scrape, subscribers. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

4. To express disapprobation of, as a play, or to silence, as a speaker, by drawing the feet back and forth upon the floor; -- usually with down. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

To scrape acquaintance, to seek acquaintance otherwise than by an introduction. Farquhar.
[1913 Webster]

He tried to scrape acquaintance with her, but failed ignominiously. G. W. Cable.
[1913 Webster]

Scrape
Scrape, v. i. 1. To rub over the surface of anything with something which roughens or removes it, or which smooths or cleans it; to rub harshly and noisily along.
[1913 Webster]

2. To occupy one's self with getting laboriously; as, he scraped and saved until he became rich. “[Spend] their scraping fathers' gold.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. To play awkwardly and inharmoniously on a violin or like instrument.
[1913 Webster]

4. To draw back the right foot along the ground or floor when making a bow.
[1913 Webster]

Scrape
Scrape, n. 1. The act of scraping; also, the effect of scraping, as a scratch, or a harsh sound; as, a noisy scrape on the floor; a scrape of a pen.
[1913 Webster]

2. A drawing back of the right foot when bowing; also, a bow made with that accompaniment. H. Spencer.
[1913 Webster]

3. A disagreeable and embarrassing predicament out of which one can not get without undergoing, as it were, a painful rubbing or scraping; a perplexity; a difficulty.
[1913 Webster]

The too eager pursuit of this his old enemy through thick and thin has led him into many of these scrapes. Bp. Warburton.
[1913 Webster]

Scrapepenny
Scrape"pen`ny (?), n. One who gathers and hoards money in trifling sums; a miser.
[1913 Webster]

Scraper
Scrap"er (?), n. 1. An instrument with which anything is scraped. Specifically: (a) An instrument by which the soles of shoes are cleaned from mud and the like, by drawing them across it. (b) An instrument drawn by oxen or horses, used for scraping up earth in making or repairing roads, digging cellars, canals etc. (c) (Naut.) An instrument having two or three sharp sides or edges, for cleaning the planks, masts, or decks of a ship. (d) (Lithography) In the printing press, a board, or blade, the edge of which is made to rub over the tympan sheet and thus produce the impression.
[1913 Webster]

2. One who scrapes. Specifically: (a) One who plays awkwardly on a violin. (b) One who acquires avariciously and saves penuriously.
[1913 Webster]

Scraping
Scrap"ing (?), n. 1. The act of scraping; the act or process of making even, or reducing to the proper form, by means of a scraper.
[1913 Webster]

2. Something scraped off; that which is separated from a substance, or is collected by scraping; as, the scraping of the street.
[1913 Webster]

Scraping
Scrap"ing, a. Resembling the act of, or the effect produced by, one who, or that which, scrapes; as, a scraping noise; a scraping miser. -- Scrap"ing*ly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

Scrappily
Scrap"pi*ly (?), adv. In a scrappy manner; in scraps. Mary Cowden Clarke.
[1913 Webster]

Scrapple
Scrap"ple (?), n. [Dim. of scrap.] An article of food made by boiling together bits or scraps of meat, usually pork, and flour or Indian meal.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scrappy
Scrap"py (?), a. Consisting of scraps; fragmentary; lacking unity or consistency; as, a scrappy lecture.
[1913 Webster]

A dreadfully scrappy dinner. Thackeray.
[1913 Webster]

Scrat
Scrat (?), v. t. [OE. scratten. Cf. Scratch.] To scratch. [Obs.] Burton.
[1913 Webster]

Scrat
Scrat, v. i. To rake; to search. [Obs.] Mir. for Mag.
[1913 Webster]

Scrat
Scrat, n. [Cf. AS. scritta an hermaphrodite, Ir. scrut a scrub, a low, mean person, Gael. sgrut, sgruit, an old, shriveled person.] An hermaphrodite. [Obs.] Skinner.
[1913 Webster]

Scratch
Scratch (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scratched (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scratching.] [OE. cracchen (perhaps influenced by OE. scratten to scratch); cf. OHG. chrazzōn, G. kratzen, OD. kratsen, kretsen, D. krassen, Sw. kratsa to scrape, kratta to rake, to scratch, Dan. kradse to scratch, to scrape, Icel. krota to engrave. Cf. Grate to rub.] 1. To rub and tear or mark the surface of with something sharp or ragged; to scrape, roughen, or wound slightly by drawing something pointed or rough across, as the claws, the nails, a pin, or the like.
[1913 Webster]

Small sand-colored stones, so hard as to scratch glass. Grew.
[1913 Webster]

Be mindful, when invention fails,
To scratch your head, and bite your nails.
Swift.
[1913 Webster]

2. To write or draw hastily or awkwardly.Scratch out a pamphlet.” Swift.
[1913 Webster]

3. To cancel by drawing one or more lines through, as the name of a candidate upon a ballot, or of a horse in a list; hence, to erase; to efface; -- often with out.
[1913 Webster]

4. To dig or excavate with the claws; as, some animals scratch holes, in which they burrow.
[1913 Webster]

To scratch a ticket, to cancel one or more names of candidates on a party ballot; to refuse to vote the party ticket in its entirety. [U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scratch
Scratch, v. i. 1. To use the claws or nails in tearing or in digging; to make scratches.
[1913 Webster]

Dull, tame things, . . . that will neither bite nor scratch. Dr. H. More.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Billiards) To score, not by skillful play but by some fortunate chance of the game. [Cant, U. S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scratch
Scratch, n. 1. A break in the surface of a thing made by scratching, or by rubbing with anything pointed or rough; a slight wound, mark, furrow, or incision.
[1913 Webster]

The coarse file . . . makes deep scratches in the work. Moxon.
[1913 Webster]

These nails with scratches deform my breast. Prior.
[1913 Webster]

God forbid a shallow scratch should drive
The prince of Wales from such a field as this.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Pugilistic Matches) A line across the prize ring; up to which boxers are brought when they join fight; hence, test, trial, or proof of courage; as, to bring to the scratch; to come up to the scratch. [Cant] Grose.
[1913 Webster]

3. pl. (Far.) Minute, but tender and troublesome, excoriations, covered with scabs, upon the heels of horses which have been used where it is very wet or muddy. Law (Farmer's Veter. Adviser).
[1913 Webster]

4. A kind of wig covering only a portion of the head.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Billiards) (a) A shot which scores by chance and not as intended by the player; a fluke. [Cant, U. S.] (b) a shot which results in a penalty, such as dropping the cue ball in a pocket without hitting another ball.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

6. In various sports, the line from which the start is made, except in the case of contestants receiving a distance handicap.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scratch cradle. See Cratch cradle, under Cratch. -- Scratch grass (Bot.), a climbing knotweed (Polygonum sagittatum) with a square stem beset with fine recurved prickles along the angles. -- Scratch wig. Same as Scratch, 4, above. Thackeray. -- start from scratch to start (again) from the very beginning; also, to start without resources.
[1913 Webster]

Scratch
Scratch, a. Made, done, or happening by chance; arranged with little or no preparation; determined by circumstances; haphazard; as, a scratch team; a scratch crew for a boat race; a scratch shot in billiards. [Slang]
[1913 Webster]

Scratch race, one without restrictions regarding the entrance of competitors; also, one for which the competitors are chosen by lot.
[1913 Webster]

Scratchback
Scratch"back` (?), n. A toy which imitates the sound of tearing cloth, -- used by drawing it across the back of unsuspecting persons. [Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scratchbrush
Scratch"brush` (?), n. A stiff wire brush for cleaning iron castings and other metal.
[1913 Webster]

Scratch coat
Scratch" coat` (?). The first coat in plastering; -- called also scratchwork. See Pricking-up.
[1913 Webster]

Scratcher
Scratch"er (?), n. One who, or that which, scratches; specifically (Zool.), any rasorial bird.
[1913 Webster]

Scratch hit
Scratch" hit, n. (Baseball) a base hit which was weakly batted, barely allowing the batter to reach first base safely.
[PJC]

Scratching
Scratch"ing, adv. With the action of scratching.
[1913 Webster]

Scratch runner
Scratch player
{ Scratch player, Scratch runner, etc. } One that starts from the scratch; hence, one of first-rate ability.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scratchweed
Scratch"weed` (?), n. (Bot.) Cleavers.
[1913 Webster]

Scratchwork
Scratch"work` (?), n. See Scratch coat.
[1913 Webster]

Scratchy
Scratch"y (?), a. Characterized by scratches.
[1913 Webster]

Scraw
Scraw (skr&asuml_;), n. [Ir. scrath a turf, sgraith a turf, green sod; akin to Gael. sgrath, sgroth, the outer skin of anything, a turf, a green sod.] A turf. [Obs.] Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Scrawl
Scrawl (?), v. i. See Crawl. [Obs.] Latimer.
[1913 Webster]

Scrawl
Scrawl, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scrawled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scrawling.] [Probably corrupted from scrabble.] To draw or mark awkwardly and irregularly; to write hastily and carelessly; to scratch; to scribble; as, to scrawl a letter.
[1913 Webster]

His name, scrawled by himself. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Scrawl
Scrawl, v. i. To write unskillfully and inelegantly.
[1913 Webster]

Though with a golden pen you scrawl. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Scrawl
Scrawl (skr&asuml_;l), n. Unskillful or inelegant writing; that which is unskillfully or inelegantly written.
[1913 Webster]

The left hand will make such a scrawl, that it will not be legible. Arbuthnot.
[1913 Webster]

You bid me write no more than a scrawl to you. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Scrawler
Scrawl"er (-&etilde_;r), n. One who scrawls; a hasty, awkward writer.
[1913 Webster]

Scrawny
Scraw"ny (skr&asuml_;"n&ybreve_;), a. [Cf. Scrannel.] Meager; thin; rawboned; bony; scranny.
[1913 Webster]

Scray
Scray (skrā), n. [Cf. W. ysgräen, ysgräell, a sea swallow, Armor. skrav.] (Zool.) A tern; the sea swallow. [Prov. Eng.] [Written also scraye.]
[1913 Webster]

Screable
Scre"a*ble (skrē"&adot_;*b'l), a. [L. screare to hawk, spit out.] Capable of being spit out. [Obs.] Bailey.
[1913 Webster]

Screak
Screak (skrēk), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Screaked (skrēkt); p. pr. & vb. n. Screaking.] [Cf. Icel. skraekja to screech. Cf. Creak, v., Screech.] To utter suddenly a sharp, shrill sound; to screech; to creak, as a door or wheel.
[1913 Webster]

Screak
Screak, n. A creaking; a screech; a shriek. Bp. Bull.
[1913 Webster]

Scream
Scream (skrēm), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Screamed (skrēmd); p. pr. & vb. n. Screaming.] [Icel. skraema to scare, terrify; akin to Sw. skräma, Dan. skraemme. Cf. Screech.] To cry out with a shrill voice; to utter a sudden, sharp outcry, or shrill, loud cry, as in fright or extreme pain; to shriek; to screech.
[1913 Webster]

I heard the owl scream and the crickets cry. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

And scream thyself as none e'er screamed before. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Scream
Scream, n. A sharp, shrill cry, uttered suddenly, as in terror or in pain; a shriek; a screech.Screams of horror.” Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Screamer
Scream"er (skrēm"&etilde_;r), n. (Zool.) Any one of three species of South American birds constituting the family Anhimidae, and the suborder Palamedeae. They have two spines on each wing, and the head is either crested or horned. They are easily tamed, and then serve as guardians for other poultry. The crested screamers, or chajas, belong to the genus Chauna. The horned screamer, or kamichi, is Palamedea cornuta.
[1913 Webster]

2. Something so remarkable as to provoke a scream, as of joy. [Slang]
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

3. An exclamation mark. [Printer's Slang]
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Screaming
Scream"ing, a. 1. Uttering screams; shrieking.
[1913 Webster]

2. Having the nature of a scream; like a scream; shrill; sharp.
[1913 Webster]

The fearful matrons raise a screaming cry. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Scree
Scree (skrē), n. A pebble; a stone; also, a heap of stones or rocky débris. [Prov. Eng.] Southey.
[1913 Webster]

Screech
Screech (skrēch), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Screeched (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Screeching.] [Also formerly, scritch, OE. skriken, skrichen, schriken, of Scand. origin; cf. Icel. skrækja to shriek, to screech, skrīkja to titter, Sw. skrika to shriek, Dan. skrige; also Gael. sgreach, sgreuch, W. ysgrechio, Skr. kharj to creak. Cf. Shriek, v., Scream, v.] To utter a harsh, shrill cry; to make a sharp outcry, as in terror or acute pain; to scream; to shriek. “The screech owl, screeching loud.” Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Screech
Screech, n. A harsh, shrill cry, as of one in acute pain or in fright; a shriek; a scream.
[1913 Webster]

Screech bird, or Screech thrush (Zool.), the fieldfare; -- so called from its harsh cry before rain. -- Screech rain. -- Screech hawk (Zool.), the European goatsucker; -- so called from its note. [Prov. Eng.] -- Screech owl. (Zool.) (a) A small American owl (Scops asio), either gray or reddish in color. (b) The European barn owl. The name is applied also to other species.
[1913 Webster]

Screechers
Screech"ers (?), n. pl. (Zool.) The picarian birds, as distinguished from the singing birds.
[1913 Webster]

Screechy
Screech"y (?), a. Like a screech; shrill and harsh.
[1913 Webster]

Screed
Screed (skrēd), n. [Prov. E., a shred, the border of a cap. See Shred.] 1. (Arch.) (a) A strip of plaster of the thickness proposed for the coat, applied to the wall at intervals of four or five feet, as a guide. (b) A wooden straightedge used to lay across the plaster screed, as a limit for the thickness of the coat.
[1913 Webster]

2. A fragment; a portion; a shred. [Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Screed
Screed, n. [See 1st Screed. For sense 2 cf. also Gael. sgread an outcry.] 1. A breach or rent; a breaking forth into a loud, shrill sound; as, martial screeds.
[1913 Webster]

2. An harangue; a long tirade on any subject.
[1913 Webster]

The old carl gae them a screed of doctrine; ye might have heard him a mile down the wind. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Screen
Screen (skrēn), n. [OE. scren, OF. escrein, escran, F. écran, of uncertain origin; cf. G. schirm a screen, OHG. scirm, scerm a protection, shield, or G. schragen a trestle, a stack of wood, or G. schranne a railing.] 1. Anything that separates or cuts off inconvenience, injury, or danger; that which shelters or conceals from view; a shield or protection; as, a fire screen.
[1913 Webster]

Your leavy screens throw down. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Some ambitious men seem as screens to princes in matters of danger and envy. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Arch.) A dwarf wall or partition carried up to a certain height for separation and protection, as in a church, to separate the aisle from the choir, or the like.
[1913 Webster]

3. A surface, as that afforded by a curtain, sheet, wall, etc., upon which an image, as a picture, is thrown by a magic lantern, solar microscope, etc.
[1913 Webster]

4. A long, coarse riddle or sieve, sometimes a revolving perforated cylinder, used to separate the coarser from the finer parts, as of coal, sand, gravel, and the like.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Cricket) An erection of white canvas or wood placed on the boundary opposite a batsman to enable him to see ball better.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

6. a netting, usu. of metal, contained in a frame, used mostly in windows or doors to allow in fresh air while excluding insects. -- Screen door, a door of which half or more is composed of a screen. -- Screen window, a screen inside a frame, fitted for insertion into a window frame.
[PJC]

7. The surface of an electronic device, as a television set or computer monitor, on which a visible image is formed. The screen is frequently the surface of a cathode-ray tube containing phosphors excited by the electron beam, but other methods for causing an image to appear on the screen are also used, as in flat-panel displays.
[PJC]

8. The motion-picture industry; motion pictures. “A star of stage and screen.”
[PJC]

Screen
Screen (skrēn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Screened (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Screening.] 1. To provide with a shelter or means of concealment; to separate or cut off from inconvenience, injury, or danger; to shelter; to protect; to protect by hiding; to conceal; as, fruits screened from cold winds by a forest or hill.
[1913 Webster]

They were encouraged and screened by some who were in high commands. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

2. To pass, as coal, gravel, ashes, etc., through a screen in order to separate the coarse from the fine, or the worthless from the valuable; to sift.
[1913 Webster]

3. to examine a group of objects methodically, to separate them into groups or to select one or more for some purpose. As: (a) To inspect the qualifications of candidates for a job, to select one or more to be hired. (b) (Biochem., Med.) to test a large number of samples, in order to find those having specific desirable properties; as, to screen plant extracts for anticancer agents.
[PJC]

Screening
Screen"ing (skrēn"&ibreve_;ng), n. the process of examining or testing objects methodically to find those having desirable properties. See screen{3}. In the pharmaceutical industry, pharmaceutical screening involves testing a large number of samples of substances to find those having desirable pharmacological activity; those samples which have the property sought are called active or positive in the screen. The substances tested may be pure compounds with known structure, mixtures of pure compounds, or complex mixtures obtained by extraction from living organisms. There are often additional sets of test performed on active samples, called counterscreening to eliminate those samples that may also possess undesirable properties. In the case of screening of mixtures from living organisms, a type of counterscreening called dereplication is usually performed, to determine if the active sample contains a known compound which has previously been studied.
[PJC]

Screenings
Screen"ings (?), n. pl. The refuse left after screening sand, coal, ashes, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Screw
Screw (skr&usuml_;), n. [OE. scrue, OF. escroue, escroe, female screw, F. écrou, L. scrobis a ditch, trench, in LL., the hole made by swine in rooting; cf. D. schroef a screw, G. schraube, Icel. skrūfa.] 1. A cylinder, or a cylindrical perforation, having a continuous rib, called the thread, winding round it spirally at a constant inclination, so as to leave a continuous spiral groove between one turn and the next, -- used chiefly for producing, when revolved, motion or pressure in the direction of its axis, by the sliding of the threads of the cylinder in the grooves between the threads of the perforation adapted to it, the former being distinguished as the external, or male screw, or, more usually the screw; the latter as the internal, or female screw, or, more usually, the nut.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The screw, as a mechanical power, is a modification of the inclined plane, and may be regarded as a right-angled triangle wrapped round a cylinder, the hypotenuse of the marking the spiral thread of the screw, its base equaling the circumference of the cylinder, and its height the pitch of the thread.
[1913 Webster]

2. Specifically, a kind of nail with a spiral thread and a head with a nick to receive the end of the screw-driver. Screws are much used to hold together pieces of wood or to fasten something; -- called also wood screws, and screw nails. See also Screw bolt, below.
[1913 Webster]

3. Anything shaped or acting like a screw; esp., a form of wheel for propelling steam vessels. It is placed at the stern, and furnished with blades having helicoidal surfaces to act against the water in the manner of a screw. See Screw propeller, below.
[1913 Webster]

4. A steam vesel propelled by a screw instead of wheels; a screw steamer; a propeller.
[1913 Webster]

5. An extortioner; a sharp bargainer; a skinflint; a niggard. Thackeray.
[1913 Webster]

6. An instructor who examines with great or unnecessary severity; also, a searching or strict examination of a student by an instructor. [Cant, American Colleges]
[1913 Webster]

7. A small packet of tobacco. [Slang] Mayhew.
[1913 Webster]

8. An unsound or worn-out horse, useful as a hack, and commonly of good appearance. Ld. Lytton.
[1913 Webster]

9. (Math.) A straight line in space with which a definite linear magnitude termed the pitch is associated (cf. 5th Pitch, 10 (b)). It is used to express the displacement of a rigid body, which may always be made to consist of a rotation about an axis combined with a translation parallel to that axis.
[1913 Webster]

10. (Zool.) An amphipod crustacean; as, the skeleton screw (Caprella). See Sand screw, under Sand.
[1913 Webster]

Archimedes screw, Compound screw, Foot screw, etc. See under Archimedes, Compound, Foot, etc. -- A screw loose, something out of order, so that work is not done smoothly; as, there is a screw loose somewhere. H. Martineau. -- Endless screw, or perpetual screw, a screw used to give motion to a toothed wheel by the action of its threads between the teeth of the wheel; -- called also a worm. -- Lag screw. See under Lag. -- Micrometer screw, a screw with fine threads, used for the measurement of very small spaces. -- Right and left screw, a screw having threads upon the opposite ends which wind in opposite directions. -- Screw alley. See Shaft alley, under Shaft. -- Screw bean. (Bot.) (a) The curious spirally coiled pod of a leguminous tree (Prosopis pubescens) growing from Texas to California. It is used for fodder, and ground into meal by the Indians. (b) The tree itself. Its heavy hard wood is used for fuel, for fencing, and for railroad ties. -- Screw bolt, a bolt having a screw thread on its shank, in distinction from a key bolt. See 1st Bolt, 3. -- Screw box, a device, resembling a die, for cutting the thread on a wooden screw. -- Screw dock. See under Dock. -- Screw engine, a marine engine for driving a screw propeller. -- Screw gear. See Spiral gear, under Spiral. -- Screw jack. Same as Jackscrew. -- Screw key, a wrench for turning a screw or nut; a spanner wrench. -- Screw machine. (a) One of a series of machines employed in the manufacture of wood screws. (b) A machine tool resembling a lathe, having a number of cutting tools that can be caused to act on the work successively, for making screws and other turned pieces from metal rods. -- Screw pine (Bot.), any plant of the endogenous genus Pandanus, of which there are about fifty species, natives of tropical lands from Africa to Polynesia; -- named from the spiral arrangement of the pineapple-like leaves. -- Screw plate, a device for cutting threads on small screws, consisting of a thin steel plate having a series of perforations with internal screws forming dies. -- Screw press, a press in which pressure is exerted by means of a screw. -- Screw propeller, a screw or spiral bladed wheel, used in the propulsion of steam vessels; also, a steam vessel propelled by a screw. -- Screw shell (Zool.), a long, slender, spiral gastropod shell, especially of the genus Turritella and allied genera. See Turritella. -- Screw steamer, a steamship propelled by a screw. -- Screw thread, the spiral rib which forms a screw. -- Screw stone (Paleon.), the fossil stem of an encrinite. -- Screw tree (Bot.), any plant of the genus Helicteres, consisting of about thirty species of tropical shrubs, with simple leaves and spirally twisted, five-celled capsules; -- also called twisted-horn, and twisty. -- Screw valve, a stop valve which is opened or closed by a screw. -- Screw worm (Zool.), the larva of an American fly (Compsomyia macellaria), allied to the blowflies, which sometimes deposits its eggs in the nostrils, or about wounds, in man and other animals, with fatal results. -- Screw wrench. (a) A wrench for turning a screw. (b) A wrench with an adjustable jaw that is moved by a screw. -- To put the screws on or To put the screw on, to use pressure upon, as for the purpose of extortion; to coerce. -- To put under the screw or To put under the screws, to subject to pressure; to force. -- Wood screw, a metal screw with a sharp thread of coarse pitch, adapted to holding fast in wood. See Illust. of Wood screw, under Wood.
[1913 Webster]

Screw
Screw (skr&usuml_;), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Screwed (skr&usuml_;d); p. pr. & vb. n. Screwing.] 1. To turn, as a screw; to apply a screw to; to press, fasten, or make firm, by means of a screw or screws; as, to screw a lock on a door; to screw a press.
[1913 Webster]

2. To force; to squeeze; to press, as by screws.
[1913 Webster]

But screw your courage to the sticking place,
And we'll not fail.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hence: To practice extortion upon; to oppress by unreasonable or extortionate exactions.
[1913 Webster]

Our country landlords, by unmeasurable screwing and racking their tenants, have already reduced the miserable people to a worse condition than the peasants in France. swift.
[1913 Webster]

4. To twist; to distort; as, to screw his visage.
[1913 Webster]

He screwed his face into a hardened smile. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

5. To examine rigidly, as a student; to subject to a severe examination. [Cant, American Colleges]
[1913 Webster]

To screw out, to press out; to extort. -- To screw up, (a) to force; to bring by violent pressure. Howell. (b) to damage by unskillful effort; to bungle; to botch; to mess up; as, he screwed up the contract negotiations, and we lost the deal. (c) [intrans.] to fail by unskillful effort, usually causing unpleasant consequences. -- To screw in, to force in by turning or twisting. Screw around, (a) to act aimlessly or unproductively. (b) to commit adultery; to be sexually promiscuous. -- Screw around with, to operate or make changes on (a machine or device) without expert knowledge; to fiddle with. [Colloq.] . -->
[1913 Webster]

Screw
Screw, v. i. 1. To use violent means in making exactions; to be oppressive or exacting. Howitt.
[1913 Webster]

2. To turn one's self uneasily with a twisting motion; as, he screws about in his chair.
[1913 Webster]

screwball
screw"ball, n. 1. An eccentric or crazy person; an oddball.
[PJC]

2. (Baseball) A baseball pitch that curves in the direction opposite to that of a curve ball.
[PJC]

screwball
screw"ball, adj. 1. Eccentric; zany; crazy; as, screwball antics; a screwball comedy.
[PJC]

2. Ridiculously unsound; improbable or doomed to failure; -- of plans or ideas; as, a screwball plan to raise cocoanuts in Alaska.
[PJC]

Screw-cutting
Screw"-cut`ting (?), a. Adapted for forming a screw by cutting; as, a screw-cutting lathe.
[1913 Webster]

Screw-driver
Screwdriver
Screw"driv`er, Screw"-driv`er (?), n. A tool for turning screws so as to drive them into their place. It has a thin end which enters the nick in the head of the screw.
[1913 Webster]

Screwer
Screw"er (?), n. One who, or that which, screws.
[1913 Webster]

Screwing
Screw"ing, a. & n. from Screw, v. t.
[1913 Webster]

Screwing machine. See Screw machine, under Screw.
[1913 Webster]

Scribable
Scrib"a*ble (?), a. [See Scribe.] Capable of being written, or of being written upon. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Scribatious
Scri*ba"tious (?), a. [See Scribe.] Skillful in, or fond of, writing. [Obs.] Barrow.
[1913 Webster]

Scribbet
Scrib"bet (?), n. A painter's pencil.
[1913 Webster]

Scribble
Scrib"ble (?), v. t. [Cf. Scrabble.] (Woolen Manuf.) To card coarsely; to run through the scribbling machine.
[1913 Webster]

Scribble
Scrib"ble, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scribbled (-b'ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Scribbling (-bl&ibreve_;ng).] [From Scribe.] 1. To write hastily or carelessly, without regard to correctness or elegance; as, to scribble a letter.
[1913 Webster]

2. To fill or cover with careless or worthless writing.
[1913 Webster]

Scribble
Scrib"ble, v. i. To write without care, elegance, or value; to scrawl.
[1913 Webster]

If Maevius scribble in Apollo's spite. Pope.
[1913 Webster]

Scribble
Scrib"ble, n. Hasty or careless writing; a writing of little value; a scrawl; as, a hasty scribble. Boyle.
[1913 Webster]

Neither did I but vacant seasons spend
In this my scribble.
Bunyan.
[1913 Webster]

Scribblement
Scrib"ble*ment (?), n. A scribble. [R.] Foster.
[1913 Webster]

Scribbler
Scrib"bler (?), n. One who scribbles; a petty author; a writer of no reputation; a literary hack.
[1913 Webster]

The scribbler, pinched with hunger, writes to dine. Granville.
[1913 Webster]

Scribbler
Scrib"bler, n. A scribbling machine.
[1913 Webster]

Scribbling
Scrib"bling (?), n. [See 1st Scribble.] The act or process of carding coarsely.
[1913 Webster]

Scribbling machine, the machine used for the first carding of wool or other fiber; -- called also scribbler.
[1913 Webster]

Scribbling
Scrib"bling, a. Writing hastily or poorly.
[1913 Webster]

Ye newspaper witlings! ye pert scribbling folks! Goldsmith.
[1913 Webster]

Scribbling
Scrib"bling, n. The act of writing hastily or idly.
[1913 Webster]

Scribblingly
Scrib"bling*ly, adv. In a scribbling manner.
[1913 Webster]

Scribe
Scribe (skrīb), n. [L. scriba, fr. scribere to write; cf. Gr. ska`rifos a splinter, pencil, style (for writing), E. scarify. Cf. Ascribe, Describe, Script, Scrivener, Scrutoire.] 1. One who writes; a draughtsman; a writer for another; especially, an offical or public writer; an amanuensis or secretary; a notary; a copyist.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Jewish Hist.) A writer and doctor of the law; one skilled in the law and traditions; one who read and explained the law to the people.
[1913 Webster]

Scribe
Scribe (skrīb), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scribed (skrībd); p. pr. & vb. n. Scribing.] 1. To write, engrave, or mark upon; to inscribe. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Carp.) To cut (anything) in such a way as to fit closely to a somewhat irregular surface, as a baseboard to a floor which is out of level, a board to the curves of a molding, or the like; -- so called because the workman marks, or scribes, with the compasses the line that he afterwards cuts.
[1913 Webster]

3. To score or mark with compasses or a scribing iron.
[1913 Webster]

Scribing iron, an iron-pointed instrument for scribing, or marking, casks and logs.
[1913 Webster]

Scribe
Scribe, v. i. To make a mark.
[1913 Webster]

With the separated points of a pair of spring dividers scribe around the edge of the templet. A. M. Mayer.
[1913 Webster]

Scriber
Scrib"er (?), n. A sharp-pointed tool, used by joiners for drawing lines on stuff; a marking awl.
[1913 Webster]

Scribism
Scrib"ism (?), n. The character and opinions of a Jewish scribe in the time of Christ. F. W. Robertson.
[1913 Webster]

Scrid
Scrid (?), n. A screed; a shred; a fragment. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Scriggle
Scrig"gle (?), v. i. To wriggle. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scrim
Scrim (?), n. 1. A kind of light cotton or linen fabric, often woven in openwork patterns, -- used for curtains, etc,; -- called also India scrim.
[1913 Webster]

2. pl. Thin canvas glued on the inside of panels to prevent shrinking, checking, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Scrimer
Scri"mer (?), n. [F. escrimeur. See Skirmish.] A fencing master. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scrimmage
Scrim"mage (?; 48), n. [A corruption of skirmish. “Sore scrymmishe.” Ld. Berners.] [Written also scrummage.] 1. Formerly, a skirmish; now, a general row or confused fight or struggle.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Football) The struggle in the rush lines after the ball is put in play.
[1913 Webster]

Scrimp
Scrimp (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scrimped (?; 215); p. pr. & vb. n. Scrimping.] [Cf. Dan. skrumpe, G. schrumpfen, D. krimpen. Cf. Shrimp, Shrink.] To make too small or short; to limit or straiten; to put on short allowance; to scant; to contract; to shorten; as, to scrimp the pattern of a coat.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Scrimp
Scrimp, a. Short; scanty; curtailed.
[1913 Webster]

Scrimp
Scrimp, n. A pinching miser; a niggard. [U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scrimping
Scrimp"ing, a. & n. from Scrimp, v. t.
[1913 Webster]

Scrimping bar, a device used in connection with a calico printing machine for stretching the fabric breadthwise so that it may be smooth for printing. Knight.
[1913 Webster]

Scrimpingly
Scrimp"ing*ly, adv. In a scrimping manner.
[1913 Webster]

Scrimpness
Scrimp"ness, n. The state of being scrimp.
[1913 Webster]

Scrimption
Scrimp"tion (?), n. A small portion; a pittance; a little bit. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

Scrimshaw
Scrim"shaw` (?), v. t. To ornament, as shells, ivory, etc., by engraving, and (usually) rubbing pigments into the incised lines. [Sailor's cant. U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scrimshaw
Scrim"shaw`, n. A shell, a whale's tooth, or the like, that is scrimshawed. [Sailor's cant, U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scrine
Scrine (?), n. [L. scrinium a case for books, letters, etc.: cf. OF. escrin, F. écrin. See Shrine.] A chest, bookcase, or other place, where writings or curiosities are deposited; a shrine. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

But laid them up in immortal scrine. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Scringe
Scringe (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scringed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scringing (?).] [Cf. Cringe.] To cringe. [Prov. Eng. & Local, U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scrip
Scrip (?), n. [OE. scrippe, probably of Scand. origin; cf. Icel. & OSw. skreppa, and also LL. scrippum, OF. esquerpe, escrepe, F. écharpe scarf. Cf. Scrap, Scarf a piece of dress.] A small bag; a wallet; a satchel. [Archaic] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

And in requital ope his leathern scrip. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Scrip
Scrip, n. [From script.] 1. A small writing, certificate, or schedule; a piece of paper containing a writing.
[1913 Webster]

Call them generally, man by man, according to the scrip. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Bills of exchange can not pay our debts abroad, till scrips of paper can be made current coin. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

2. A preliminary certificate of a subscription to the capital of a bank, railroad, or other company, or for a share of other joint property, or a loan, stating the amount of the subscription and the date of the payment of the installments; as, insurance scrip, consol scrip, etc. When all the installments are paid, the scrip is exchanged for a bond share certificate.
[1913 Webster]

3. Paper fractional currency. [Colloq.U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scrippage
Scrip"page (?; 48), n. The contents of a scrip, or wallet. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Script
Script (?), n. [OE. scrit, L. scriptum something written, fr. scribere, scriptum to write: cf. OF. escript, escrit, F. écrit. See Scribe, and cf. Scrip a writing.] 1. A writing; a written document. [Obs.] Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Print.) Type made in imitation of handwriting.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Law) An original instrument or document.
[1913 Webster]

4. Written characters; style of writing.
[1913 Webster]


[1913 Webster]

Scriptorium
Scrip*to"ri*um (?), n.; pl. Scriptoria (#). [LL. See Scriptory.] In an abbey or monastery, the room set apart for writing or copying manuscripts; in general, a room devoted to writing.
[1913 Webster]

Writing rooms, or scriptoria, where the chief works of Latin literature . . . were copied and illuminated. J. R. Green.
[1913 Webster]

Scriptory
Scrip"to*ry (?), a. [L. scriptorius, fr. scribere, scriptum to write.] Of or pertaining to writing; expressed in writing; used in writing; as, scriptory wills; a scriptory reed. [R.] Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Scriptural
Scrip"tur*al (?; 135), a. Contained in the Scriptures; according to the Scriptures, or sacred oracles; biblical; as, a scriptural doctrine.
[1913 Webster]

Scripturalism
Scrip"tur*al*ism (?), n. The quality or state of being scriptural; literal adherence to the Scriptures.
[1913 Webster]

Scripturalist
Scrip"tur*al*ist, n. One who adheres literally to the Scriptures.
[1913 Webster]

Scripturally
Scrip"tur*al*ly, adv. In a scriptural manner.
[1913 Webster]

Scripturalness
Scrip"tur*al*ness, n. Quality of being scriptural.
[1913 Webster]

Scripture
Scrip"ture (?; 135), n. [L. scriptura, fr. scribere, scriptum, to write: cf. OF. escripture, escriture, F. écriture. See Scribe.] 1. Anything written; a writing; a document; an inscription.
[1913 Webster]

I have put it in scripture and in remembrance. Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Then the Lord of Manny read the scripture on the tomb, the which was in Latin. Ld. Berners.
[1913 Webster]

2. The books of the Old and the New Testament, or of either of them; the Bible; -- used by way of eminence or distinction, and chiefly in the plural.
[1913 Webster]

There is not any action a man ought to do, or to forbear, but the Scripture will give him a clear precept or prohibition for it. South.
[1913 Webster]

Compared with the knowledge which the Scriptures contain, every other subject of human inquiry is vanity. Buckminster.
[1913 Webster]

3. A passage from the Bible; a text.
[1913 Webster]

The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Hanging by the twined thread of one doubtful Scripture. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Scripturian
Scrip*tu"ri*an (?), n. A Scripturist. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scripturist
Scrip"tur*ist (?; 135), n. One who is strongly attached to, or versed in, the Scriptures, or who endeavors to regulate his life by them.
[1913 Webster]

The Puritan was a Scripturist, -- a Scripturist with all his heart, if as yet with imperfect intelligence . . . he cherished the scheme of looking to the Word of God as his sole and universal directory. Palfrey.
[1913 Webster]

Scrit
Scrit (?), n. [See Script.] Writing; document; scroll. [Obs.] “Of every scrit and bond.” Chaucer.
[1913 Webster]

Scritch
Scritch (?), n. A screech. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Perhaps it is the owlet's scritch. Coleridge.
[1913 Webster]

Scrivener
Scrive"ner (? or ?), n. [From older scrivein, OF. escrivain, F. écrivain, LL. scribanus, from L. scribere to write. See Scribe.] 1. A professional writer; one whose occupation is to draw contracts or prepare writings. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

The writer better scrivener than clerk. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

2. One whose business is to place money at interest; a broker. [Obs.] Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. A writing master. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

Scrivener's palsy. See Writer's cramp, under Writer.
[1913 Webster]

Scrobicula
Scro*bic"u*la (?), n.; pl. Scrobiculae (#). [NL. See Scrobiculate.] (Zool.) One of the smooth areas surrounding the tubercles of a sea urchin.
[1913 Webster]

Scrobicular
Scro*bic"u*lar (?), a. (Zool.) Pertaining to, or surrounding, scrobiculae; as, scrobicular tubercles.
[1913 Webster]

Scrobiculated
Scrobiculate
{ Scro*bic"u*late (?), Scro*bic"u*la`ted (?), } a. [L. scrobiculus, dim. of scrobis a ditch or trench.] (Bot.) Having numerous small, shallow depressions or hollows; pitted.
[1913 Webster]

Scrode
Scrod
{ Scrod (?), Scrode (?), } n. A young codfish, especially when cut open on the back and dressed. [Written also escrod.] [Local, U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scroddled ware
Scrod"dled ware` (?). Mottled pottery made from scraps of differently colored clays.
[1913 Webster]

Scrofula
Scrof"u*la (?), n. [L. scrofulae, fr. scrofa a breeding sow, because swine were supposed to be subject to such a complaint, or by a fanciful comparison of the glandular swellings to little pigs; perhaps akin to Gr. &unr_; an old sow: cf. F. scrofules. Cf. Scroyle.] (Med.) A constitutional disease, generally hereditary, especially manifested by chronic enlargement and cheesy degeneration of the lymphatic glands, particularly those of the neck, and marked by a tendency to the development of chronic intractable inflammations of the skin, mucous membrane, bones, joints, and other parts, and by a diminution in the power of resistance to disease or injury and the capacity for recovery. Scrofula is now generally held to be tuberculous in character, and may develop into general or local tuberculosis (consumption).
[1913 Webster]

Scrofulide
Scrof"u*lide (? or ?), n. (Med.) Any affection of the skin dependent on scrofula.
[1913 Webster]

Scrofulous
Scrof"u*lous (?), a. [Cf. F. scrofuleux.] 1. Pertaining to scrofula, or partaking of its nature; as, scrofulous tumors; a scrofulous habit of body.
[1913 Webster]

2. Diseased or affected with scrofula.
[1913 Webster]

Scrofulous persons can never be duly nourished. Arbuthnot.
[1913 Webster]

-- Scrof"u*lous*ly, adv. -- Scrof"u*lous*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Scrog
Scrog (?), n. [Cf. Scrag, or Gael. sgrogag anything shriveled, from sgrog to compress, shrivel.] A stunted shrub, bush, or branch. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

Scroggy
Scrog"gy (?), a. Abounding in scrog; also, twisted; stunted. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

Scroll
Scroll (?), n. [A dim. of OE. scroue, scrowe (whence E. escrow), OF. escroe, escroue, F. écrou entry in the jail book, LL. scroa scroll, probably of Teutonic origin; cf. OD. schroode a strip, shred, slip of paper, akin to E. shred. Cf. Shred, Escrow.] 1. A roll of paper or parchment; a writing formed into a roll; a schedule; a list.
[1913 Webster]

The heavens shall be rolled together as a scroll. Isa. xxxiv. 4.
[1913 Webster]

Here is the scroll of every man's name. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Arch.) An ornament formed of undulations giving off spirals or sprays, usually suggestive of plant form. Roman architectural ornament is largely of some scroll pattern.
[1913 Webster]

3. A mark or flourish added to a person's signature, intended to represent a seal, and in some States allowed as a substitute for a seal. [U.S.] Burrill.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Geom.) Same as Skew surface. See under Skew.
[1913 Webster]

Linen scroll (Arch.) See under Linen. -- Scroll chuck (Mach.), an adjustable chuck, applicable to a lathe spindle, for centering and holding work, in which the jaws are adjusted and tightened simultaneously by turning a disk having in its face a spiral groove which is entered by teeth on the backs of the jaws. -- Scroll saw. See under Saw.
[1913 Webster]

Scrolled
Scrolled (?), a. Formed like a scroll; contained in a scroll; adorned with scrolls; as, scrolled work.
[1913 Webster]

Scrophularia
Scroph`u*la"ri*a (?), n. [NL. So called because it was reputed to be a remedy for scrofula.] (Bot.) A genus of coarse herbs having small flowers in panicled cymes; figwort.
[1913 Webster]

Scrophulariaceous
Scroph`u*la`ri*a"ceous (?), a. (Bot.) Of or pertaining to a very large natural order of gamopetalous plants (Scrophulariaceae, or Scrophularineae), usually having irregular didynamous flowers and a two-celled pod. The order includes the mullein, foxglove, snapdragon, figwort, painted cup, yellow rattle, and some exotic trees, as the Paulownia.
[1913 Webster]

Scrotal
Scro"tal (?), a. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the scrotum; as, scrotal hernia.
[1913 Webster]

Scrotiform
Scro"ti*form (?), a. [L. scrotum scrotum + -form.] Purse-shaped; pouch-shaped.
[1913 Webster]

Scrotocele
Scro"to*cele (?), n. [Scrotum + Gr. kh`lh a tumor: cf. F. scrotocèle.] (Med.) A rupture or hernia in the scrotum; scrotal hernia.
[1913 Webster]

Scrotum
Scro"tum (?), n. [L.] (Anat.) The bag or pouch which contains the testicles; the cod.
[1913 Webster]

Scrouge
Scrouge (?), v. t. [Etymol. uncertain.] To crowd; to squeeze. [Prov. Eng. & Colloq. U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scrow
Scrow (? or ?), n. [See Escrow, Scroll.] 1. A scroll. [Obs.] Palsgrave.
[1913 Webster]

2. A clipping from skins; a currier's cuttings.
[1913 Webster]

Scroyle
Scroyle (skroil), n. [Cf. OF. escrouselle a kind of vermin, escrouelles, pl., scrofula, F. écrouelles, fr. (assumed) LL. scrofellae for L. scrofulae. See Scrofula, and cf. Cruels.] A mean fellow; a wretch. [Obs.] Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scrub
Scrub (skrŭb), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scrubbed (skrŭbd); p. pr. & vb. n. Scrubbing.] [OE. scrobben, probably of Dutch or Scand. origin; cf. Dan. skrubbe, Sw. skrubba, D. schrobben, LG. schrubben.] To rub hard; to wash with rubbing; usually, to rub with a wet brush, or with something coarse or rough, for the purpose of cleaning or brightening; as, to scrub a floor, a doorplate.
[1913 Webster]

Scrub
Scrub (skrŭb), v. i. To rub anything hard, especially with a wet brush; to scour; hence, to be diligent and penurious; as, to scrub hard for a living.
[1913 Webster]

Scrub
Scrub (skrŭb), n. 1. One who labors hard and lives meanly; a mean fellow. “A sorry scrub.” Bunyan.
[1913 Webster]

We should go there in as proper a manner as possible; nor altogether like the scrubs about us. Goldsmith.
[1913 Webster]

2. Something small and mean.
[1913 Webster]

3. A worn-out brush. Ainsworth.
[1913 Webster]

4. A thicket or jungle, often specified by the name of the prevailing plant; as, oak scrub, palmetto scrub, etc.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Stock Breeding) One of the common live stock of a region of no particular breed or not of pure breed, esp. when inferior in size, etc. [U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

6. Vegetation of inferior quality, though sometimes thick and impenetrable, growing in poor soil or in sand; also, brush; -- called also scrub brush. See Brush, above. [Australia & South Africa]
[Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

7. (Forestry) A low, straggling tree of inferior quality.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scrub bird (Zool.), an Australian passerine bird of the family Atrichornithidae, as Atrichia clamosa; -- called also brush bird. -- Scrub oak (Bot.), the popular name of several dwarfish species of oak. The scrub oak of New England and the Middle States is Quercus ilicifolia, a scraggy shrub; that of the Southern States is a small tree (Quercus Catesbaei); that of the Rocky Mountain region is Quercus undulata, var. Gambelii. -- Scrub robin (Zool.), an Australian singing bird of the genus Drymodes.
[1913 Webster]

Scrub
Scrub (skrŭb), a. Mean; dirty; contemptible; scrubby.
[1913 Webster]

How solitary, how scrub, does this town look! Walpole.
[1913 Webster]

No little scrub joint shall come on my board. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

Scrub game, a game, as of ball, by unpracticed players. -- Scrub race, a race between scrubs, or between untrained animals or contestants.
[1913 Webster]

Scrubbed
Scrub"bed (skrŭb"b&ebreve_;d), a. Dwarfed or stunted; scrubby.
[1913 Webster]

Scrubber
Scrub"ber (skrŭb"b&etilde_;r), n. 1. One who, or that which, scrubs; esp., a brush or machine used in scrubbing.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

2. (Gas Manuf.) A gas washer. See under Gas.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Manufacturing) a device for removing pollutants from a gas stream, especially for removing sulfur oxides from processes burning coal or oil.
[PJC]

Scrubber
Scrub"ber (skrŭb"b&etilde_;r), n. 1. a stunted or emaciated steer.
[PJC]

2. A person who lives in the bush. [Australian]
[PJC]

3. A domesticated animal which has escaped and lives wild in the bush. [Australian]
[PJC]

Scrubboard
Scrub"board` (skrŭb"bōrd), n. A baseboard; a mopboard.
[1913 Webster]

Scrubby
Scrub"by (skrŭb"b&ybreve_;), a. [Compar. Scrubbier (skrŭb"b&ibreve_;*&etilde_;r); superl. Scrubbiest.] Of the nature of scrub; small and mean; stunted in growth; as, a scrubby cur. “Dense, scrubby woods.” Duke of Argyll.
[1913 Webster]

Scrubstone
Scrub"stone` (?), n. A species of calciferous sandstone. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scruff
Scruff (?), n. [See Scurf.] Scurf. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scruff
Scruff, n. [Cf. Scuff.] The nape of the neck; the loose outside skin, as of the back of the neck.
[1913 Webster]

Scrummage
Scrum"mage (?; 43), n. See Scrimmage.
[1913 Webster]

Scrumptious
Scrump"tious (?), a. Nice; particular; fastidious; excellent; fine. [Slang]
[1913 Webster]

Scrunch
Scrunch (?), v. t. & v. i. [Cf. Scranch, Crunch.] To scranch; to crunch. Dickens.
[1913 Webster]

Scruple
Scru"ple (?), n. [L. scrupulus a small sharp or pointed stone, the twenty-fourth part of an ounce, a scruple, uneasiness, doubt, dim. of scrupus a rough or sharp stone, anxiety, uneasiness; perh. akin to Gr. &unr_; the chippings of stone, &unr_; a razor, Skr. kshura: cf. F. scrupule.] 1. A weight of twenty grains; the third part of a dram.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, a very small quantity; a particle.
[1913 Webster]

I will not bate thee a scruple. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hesitation as to action from the difficulty of determining what is right or expedient; unwillingness, doubt, or hesitation proceeding from motives of conscience.
[1913 Webster]

He was made miserable by the conflict between his tastes and his scruples. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

To make scruple, to hesitate from conscientious motives; to scruple. Locke.
[1913 Webster]

Scruple
Scru"ple, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scrupled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scrupling (?).] To be reluctant or to hesitate, as regards an action, on account of considerations of conscience or expedience.
[1913 Webster]

We are often over-precise, scrupling to say or do those things which lawfully we may. Fuller.
[1913 Webster]

Men scruple at the lawfulness of a set form of divine worship. South.
[1913 Webster]

Scruple
Scru"ple, v. t. 1. To regard with suspicion; to hesitate at; to question.
[1913 Webster]

Others long before them . . . scrupled more the books of heretics than of gentiles. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. To excite scruples in; to cause to scruple. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Letters which did still scruple many of them. E. Symmons.
[1913 Webster]

Scrupler
Scru"pler (?), n. One who scruples.
[1913 Webster]

Scrupulist
Scru"pu*list (?), n. A scrupler. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scrupulize
Scru"pu*lize (?), v. t. To perplex with scruples; to regard with scruples. [Obs.] Bp. Montagu.
[1913 Webster]

Scrupulosity
Scru`pu*los"i*ty (skr&usuml_;`p&uuptack_;*l&obreve_;s"&ibreve_;*t&ybreve_;), n. [L. scrupulositas.] The quality or state of being scrupulous; doubt; doubtfulness respecting decision or action; caution or tenderness from the fear of doing wrong or offending; nice regard to exactness and propriety; precision.
[1913 Webster]

The first sacrilege is looked on with horror; but when they have made the breach, their scrupulosity soon retires. Dr. H. More.
[1913 Webster]

Careful, even to scrupulosity, . . . to keep their Sabbath. South.
[1913 Webster]

Scrupulous
Scru"pu*lous (?), a. [L. scrupulosus: cf. F. scrupuleux.] 1. Full of scruples; inclined to scruple; nicely doubtful; hesitating to determine or to act, from a fear of offending or of doing wrong.
[1913 Webster]

Abusing their liberty, to the offense of their weak brethren which were scrupulous. Hooker.
[1913 Webster]

2. Careful; cautious; exact; nice; as, scrupulous abstinence from labor; scrupulous performance of duties.
[1913 Webster]

3. Given to making objections; captious. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Equality of two domestic powers
Breed scrupulous faction.
Shak.
[1913 Webster]

4. Liable to be doubted; doubtful; nice. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

The justice of that cause ought to be evident; not obscure, not scrupulous. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Cautious; careful; conscientious; hesitating.
[1913 Webster]

-- Scru"pu*lous*ly, adv. -- Scru"pu*lous*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Scrutable
Scru"ta*ble (?), a. Discoverable by scrutiny, inquiry, or critical examination. [R.] Dr. H. More.
[1913 Webster]

Scrutation
Scru*ta"tion (?), n. [L. scrutatio.] Search; scrutiny. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scrutator
Scru*ta"tor (?), n. [L.] One who scrutinizes; a close examiner or inquirer. Ayliffe.
[1913 Webster]

Scrutin de liste
Scru`tin" de liste" (skr&usdot_;`tăN" d&etilde_; lēst). [F., voting by list.] Voting for a group of candidates for the same kind of office on one ticket or ballot, containing a list of them; -- the method, used in France, as from June, 1885, to Feb., 1889, in elections for the Chamber of Deputies, each elector voting for the candidates for the whole department in which he lived, as disting. from scrutin d'arrondissement (d&adot_;`rôN`dēs`mäN"), or voting by each elector for the candidate or candidates for his own arrondissement only.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scrutineer
Scru`ti*neer (?), n. A scrutinizer; specifically, an examiner of votes, as at an election.
[1913 Webster]

Scrutinize
Scru"ti*nize (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scrutinized (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scrutinizing (?).] [From Scrutiny.] To examine closely; to inspect or observe with critical attention; to regard narrowly; as, to scrutinize the measures of administration; to scrutinize the conduct or motives of individuals.
[1913 Webster]

Whose votes they were obliged to scrutinize. Ayliffe.
[1913 Webster]

Those pronounced him youngest who scrutinized his face the closest. G. W. Cable.
[1913 Webster]

Scrutinize
Scru"ti*nize, v. i. To make scrutiny.
[1913 Webster]

Scrutinizer
Scru"ti*ni`zer (?), n. One who scrutinizes.
[1913 Webster]

Scrutinous
Scru"ti*nous (?), a. Closely examining, or inquiring; careful; strict. -- Scru"ti*nous*ly, adv.
[1913 Webster]

Scrutiny
Scru"ti*ny (?), n. [L. scrutinium, fr. scrutari to search carefully, originally, to search even to the rags, fr. scruta trash, trumpery; perhaps akin to E. shred: cf. AS. scrudnian to make scrutiny.] 1. Close examination; minute inspection; critical observation.
[1913 Webster]

They that have designed exactness and deep scrutiny have taken some one part of nature. Sir M. Hale.
[1913 Webster]

Thenceforth I thought thee worth my nearer view
And narrower scrutiny.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Anc. Church) An examination of catechumens, in the last week of Lent, who were to receive baptism on Easter Day.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Canon Law) A ticket, or little paper billet, on which a vote is written.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Parliamentary Practice) An examination by a committee of the votes given at an election, for the purpose of correcting the poll. Brande & C.
[1913 Webster]

Scrutiny
Scru"ti*ny, v. t. To scrutinize. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scrutoire
Scru*toire" (?), n. [OF. escritoire. See Escritoire.] A escritoire; a writing desk.
[1913 Webster]

Scruze
Scruze (?), v. t. [Cf. Excruciate.] To squeeze, compress, crush, or bruise. [Obs. or Low] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Scry
Scry (?), v. t. To descry. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Scry
Scry, n. [From Scry, v.] A flock of wild fowl.
[1913 Webster]

Scry
Scry, n. [OE. ascrie, fr. ascrien to cry out, fr. OF. escrier, F. s'écrier. See Ex-, and Cry.] A cry or shout. [Obs.] Ld. Berners.
[1913 Webster]

Scud
Scud (skŭd), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scudded; p. pr. & vb. n. Scudding.] [Dan. skyde to shoot, shove, push, akin to skud shot, gunshot, a shoot, young bough, and to E. shoot. √159. See Shoot.] 1. To move swiftly; especially, to move as if driven forward by something.
[1913 Webster]

The first nautilus that scudded upon the glassy surface of warm primeval oceans. I. Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

The wind was high; the vast white clouds scudded over the blue heaven. Beaconsfield.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Naut.) To be driven swiftly, or to run, before a gale, with little or no sail spread.
[1913 Webster]

Scud
Scud, v. t. To pass over quickly. [R.] Shenstone.
[1913 Webster]

Scud
Scud, n. 1. The act of scudding; a driving along; a rushing with precipitation.
[1913 Webster]

2. Loose, vapory clouds driven swiftly by the wind.
[1913 Webster]

Borne on the scud of the sea. Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

The scud was flying fast above us, throwing a veil over the moon. Sir S. Baker.
[1913 Webster]

3. A slight, sudden shower. [Prov. Eng.] Wright.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Zool.) A small flight of larks, or other birds, less than a flock. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

5. (Zool.) Any swimming amphipod crustacean.
[1913 Webster]

Storm scud. See the Note under Cloud.
[1913 Webster]

Scuddle
Scud"dle (?), v. i. [Freq. of scud: cf. Scuttle to hurry.] To run hastily; to hurry; to scuttle.
[1913 Webster]

Scudo
Scu"do (?), n.; pl. Scudi (#). [It., a crown, a dollar, a shield, fr. L. scutum a shield. Cf. Scute.] (Com.) (a) A silver coin, and money of account, used in Italy and Sicily, varying in value, in different parts, but worth about 4 shillings sterling, or about 96 cents; also, a gold coin worth about the same. (b) A gold coin of Rome, worth 64 shillings 11 pence sterling, or about $ 15.70.
[1913 Webster]

Scuff
Scuff (skŭf), n. [Cf. D. schoft shoulder, Goth. skuft hair of the head. Cf. Scruff.] The back part of the neck; the scruff. [Prov. Eng.] Ld. Lytton.
[1913 Webster]

Scuff
Scuff, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scuffed (skŭft); p. pr. & vb. n. Scuffing.] [See Scuffle.] To walk without lifting the feet; to proceed with a scraping or dragging movement; to shuffle.
[1913 Webster]

Scuff
Scuff, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scuffed; p. pr. & vb. n. Scuffing.] 1. To cause a blemish on the surface of, by scraping against an object; as, he scuffed his shoe on the ground.
[PJC]

2. To scrape with one's foot; as, he scuffed the chair leg with his shoe.
[PJC]

Scuffle
Scuf"fle (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Scuffled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scuffling (?).] [Freq. of scuff, v.i.; cf. Sw. skuffa to push, shove, skuff a push, Dan. skuffe a drawer, a shovel, and E. shuffle, shove. See Shove, and cf. Shuffle.] 1. To strive or struggle with a close grapple; to wrestle in a rough fashion.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, to strive or contend tumultuously; to struggle confusedly or at haphazard.
[1913 Webster]

A gallant man had rather fight to great disadvantage in the field, in an orderly way, than scuffle with an undisciplined rabble. Eikon Basilike.
[1913 Webster]

Scuffle
Scuf"fle, n. 1. A rough, haphazard struggle, or trial of strength; a disorderly wrestling at close quarters.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, a confused contest; a tumultuous struggle for superiority; a fight.
[1913 Webster]

The dog leaps upon the serpent, and tears it to pieces; but in the scuffle the cradle happened to be overturned. L'Estrange.
[1913 Webster]

3. A child's pinafore or bib. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

4. A garden hoe. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

Scuffler
Scuf"fler (?), n. 1. One who scuffles.
[1913 Webster]

2. An agricultural implement resembling a scarifier, but usually lighter.
[1913 Webster]

Scug
Scug (skŭg), v. i. [Cf. Dan. skygge to darken, a shade, SW. skugga to shade, a shade, Icel. skyggja to shade, skuggi a shade.] To hide. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

Scug
Scug, n. A place of shelter; the declivity of a hill. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

Sculker
Sculk
{ Sculk (skŭlk), Sculk"er (skŭlk"&etilde_;r) }. See Skulk, Skulker.
[1913 Webster]

Scull
Scull (skŭl), n. (Anat.) The skull. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scull
Scull, n. [See 1st School.] A shoal of fish. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Scull
Scull, n. [Of uncertain origin; cf. Icel. skola to wash.] 1. (Naut.) (a) A boat; a cockboat. See Sculler. (b) One of a pair of short oars worked by one person. (c) A single oar used at the stern in propelling a boat.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) The common skua gull. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scull
Scull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sculled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sculling.] (Naut.) To impel (a boat) with a pair of sculls, or with a single scull or oar worked over the stern obliquely from side to side.
[1913 Webster]

Scull
Scull, v. i. To impel a boat with a scull or sculls.
[1913 Webster]

Sculler
Scull"er (?), n. 1. A boat rowed by one man with two sculls, or short oars. [R.] Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

2. One who sculls.
[1913 Webster]

Scullery
Scul"ler*y (skŭl"l&etilde_;r*&ybreve_;), n.; pl. Sculleries (skŭl"l&etilde_;r*&ibreve_;z). [Probably originally, a place for washing dishes, and for swillery, fr. OE. swilen to wash, AS. swilian (see Swill to wash, to drink), but influenced either by Icel. skola, skyla, Dan. skylle, or by OF. escuelier a place for keeping dishes, fr. escuele a dish, F. écuelle, fr. L. scutella a salver, waiter (cf. Scuttle a basket); or perhaps the English word is immediately from the OF. escuelier; cf. OE. squyllare a dishwasher.] 1. A place where dishes, kettles, and culinary utensils, are cleaned and kept; also, a room attached to the kitchen, where the coarse work is done; a back kitchen.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, refuse; filth; offal. [Obs.] Gauden.
[1913 Webster]

Scullion
Scul"lion (skŭl"yŭn), n. (Bot.) A scallion.
[1913 Webster]

Scullion
Scul"lion, n. [OF. escouillon (Cot.) a dishclout, apparently for escouvillon, F. écouvillon a swab; cf. also OF. souillon a servant employed for base offices. Cf. Scovel.] A servant who cleans pots and kettles, and does other menial services in the kitchen.
[1913 Webster]

The meanest scullion that followed his camp. South.
[1913 Webster]

Scullionly
Scul"lion*ly, a. Like a scullion; base. [Obs.] Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Sculp
Sculp (?), v. t. [See Sculptor.] To sculpture; to carve; to engrave. [Obs. or Humorous.] Sandys.
[1913 Webster]

Sculpin
Scul"pin (?), n. [Written also skulpin.] (Zool.) (a) Any one of numerous species of marine cottoid fishes of the genus Cottus, or Acanthocottus, having a large head armed with several sharp spines, and a broad mouth. They are generally mottled with yellow, brown, and black. Several species are found on the Atlantic coasts of Europe and America. (b) A large cottoid market fish of California (Scorpaenichthys marmoratus); -- called also bighead, cabezon, scorpion, salpa. (c) The dragonet, or yellow sculpin, of Europe (Callionymus lyra).
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The name is also applied to other related California species.
[1913 Webster]

Deep-water sculpin, the sea raven.
[1913 Webster]

Sculptile
Sculp"tile (?), a. [L. sculptilis. See Sculptor.] Formed by carving; graven; as, sculptile images. [Obs.] Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

Sculptor
Sculp"tor (?), n. [L. sculptor, fr. sculpere, sculptum, to carve; cf. scalpere to cut, carve, scratch, and Gr. &unr_; to carve: cf. F. sculpteur.] 1. One who sculptures; one whose occupation is to carve statues, or works of sculpture.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, an artist who designs works of sculpture, his first studies and his finished model being usually in a plastic material, from which model the marble is cut, or the bronze is cast.
[1913 Webster]

Sculptress
Sculp"tress (?), n. A female sculptor.
[1913 Webster]

Sculptural
Sculp"tur*al (?; 135), a. Of or pertaining to sculpture. G. Eliot.
[1913 Webster]

Sculpture
Sculp"ture (?; 135), n. [L. sculptura: cf. F. sculpture.] 1. The art of carving, cutting, or hewing wood, stone, metal, etc., into statues, ornaments, etc., or into figures, as of men, or other things; hence, the art of producing figures and groups, whether in plastic or hard materials.
[1913 Webster]

2. Carved work modeled of, or cut upon, wood, stone, metal, etc.
[1913 Webster]

There, too, in living sculpture, might be seen
The mad affection of the Cretan queen.
Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

Sculpture
Sculp"ture (?; 135), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sculptured (&unr_;); p. pr. & vb. n. Sculpturing.] To form with the chisel on, in, or from, wood, stone, or metal; to carve; to engrave.
[1913 Webster]

Sculptured tortoise (Zool.), a common North American wood tortoise (Glyptemys insculpta). The shell is marked with strong grooving and ridges which resemble sculptured figures.
[1913 Webster]

Sculpturesque
Sculp`tur*esque" (?), a. After the manner of sculpture; resembling, or relating to, sculpture.
[1913 Webster]

Scum
Scum (skŭm), n. [Of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. & Sw. skum, Icel. skūm, LG. schum, D. schuim, OHG. scūm, G. schaum; probably from a root meaning, to cover. √158. Cf. Hide skin, Meerschaum, Skim, v., Sky.]
[1913 Webster]

1. The extraneous matter or impurities which rise to the surface of liquids in boiling or fermentation, or which form on the surface by other means; also, the scoria of metals in a molten state; dross.
[1913 Webster]

Some to remove the scum as it did rise. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

2. refuse; recrement; anything vile or worthless.
[1913 Webster]

The great and innocent are insulted by the scum and refuse of the people. Addison.
[1913 Webster]

Scum
Scum, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scummed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scumming (?).] 1. To take the scum from; to clear off the impure matter from the surface of; to skim.
[1913 Webster]

You that scum the molten lead. Dryden & Lee.
[1913 Webster]

2. To sweep or range over the surface of. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Wandering up and down without certain seat, they lived by scumming those seas and shores as pirates. Milton.
[1913 Webster]

Scum
Scum, v. i. To form a scum; to become covered with scum. Also used figuratively.
[1913 Webster]

Life, and the interest of life, have stagnated and scummed over. A. K. H. Boyd.
[1913 Webster]

Scumber
Scum"ber (?), v. i. [Cf. Discumber.] To void excrement. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] Massinger.
[1913 Webster]

Scumber
Scum"ber, n. Dung. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scumble
Scum"ble (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scumbled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scumbling (?).] [Freq. of scum. √ 158.] (Fine Arts) To cover lighty, as a painting, or a drawing, with a thin wash of opaque color, or with color-crayon dust rubbed on with the stump, or to make any similar additions to the work, so as to produce a softened effect.
[1913 Webster]

Scumbling
Scum"bling (?), n. 1. (Fine Arts) (a) A mode of obtaining a softened effect, in painting and drawing, by the application of a thin layer of opaque color to the surface of a painting, or part of the surface, which is too bright in color, or which requires harmonizing. (b) In crayon drawing, the use of the stump.
[1913 Webster]

2. The color so laid on. Also used figuratively.
[1913 Webster]

Shining above the brown scumbling of leafless orchards. L. Wallace.
[1913 Webster]

Scummer
Scum"mer (?), v. i. To scumber. [Obs.] Holland.
[1913 Webster]

Scummer
Scum"mer, n. Excrement; scumber. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scummer
Scum"mer, n. [Cf. OF. escumoire, F. écumoire. See Scum, and cf. Skimmer.] An instrument for taking off scum; a skimmer.
[1913 Webster]

Scumming
Scum"ming (?), n. (a) The act of taking off scum. (b) That which is scummed off; skimmings; scum; -- used chiefly in the plural.
[1913 Webster]

Scummy
Scum"my (?), a. Covered with scum; of the nature of scum. Sir P. Sidney.
[1913 Webster]

Scunner
Scun"ner (?), v. t. [Cf. Shun.] To cause to loathe, or feel disgust at. [Scot. & Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scunner
Scun"ner, v. i. To have a feeling of loathing or disgust; hence, to have dislike, prejudice, or reluctance. [Scot. & Prov. Eng.] C. Kingsley.
[1913 Webster]

Scunner
Scun"ner, n. A feeling of disgust or loathing; a strong prejudice; abhorrence; as, to take a scunner against some one. [Scot. & Prov. Eng.] Carlyle.
[1913 Webster]

Scup
Scup (?), n. [D. schop.] A swing. [Local, U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scup
Scup, n. [Contr. fr. American Indian mishcùp, fr. mishe-kuppi large, thick-scaled.] (Zool.) A marine sparoid food fish (Stenotomus chrysops, or Stenotomus argyrops), common on the Atlantic coast of the United States. It appears bright silvery when swimming in the daytime, but shows broad blackish transverse bands at night and when dead. Called also porgee, paugy, porgy, scuppaug.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; The same names are also applied to a closely allied Southern species (Stenotomus Gardeni).
[1913 Webster]

Scuppaug
Scup"paug (?), n. [Contr. fr. Amer. Indian mishcuppauog, pl. of mishcup.] (Zool.) See 2d Scup.
[1913 Webster]

Scupper
Scup"per (?), n. [OF. escopir, escupir, to spit, perhaps for escospir, L. ex + conspuere to spit upon; pref. con- + spuere to spit. Cf. Spit, v.] (Naut.) An opening cut through the waterway and bulwarks of a ship, so that water falling on deck may flow overboard; -- called also scupper hole.
[1913 Webster]

Scupper hose (Naut.), a pipe of leather, canvas, etc., attached to the mouth of the scuppers, on the outside of a vessel, to prevent the water from entering. Totten. -- Scupper nail (Naut.), a nail with a very broad head, for securing the edge of the hose to the scupper. -- Scupper plug (Naut.), a plug to stop a scupper. Totten.
[1913 Webster]

Scuppernong
Scup"per*nong (skŭp"p&etilde_;r*n&obreve_;ng), n. [Probably of American Indian origin.] (Bot.) An American grape, a form of Vitis vulpina, found in the Southern Atlantic States, and often cultivated.
[1913 Webster]

Scur
Scur (skûr), v. i. [Cf. Scour to run.] To move hastily; to scour. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] Halliwell.
[1913 Webster]

Scurf
Scurf (?), n. [AS. scurf, sceorf, or from Scand.; cf. Sw. skorf, Dan. skurv, Icel. skurfur, D. schurft, G. schorf; all akin to AS. scurf, and to AS. sceorfan to scrape, to gnaw, G. schürfen to scrape, and probably also to E. scrape. Cf. Scurvy.] 1. Thin dry scales or scabs upon the body; especially, thin scales exfoliated from the cuticle, particularly of the scalp; dandruff.
[1913 Webster]

2. Hence, the foul remains of anything adherent.
[1913 Webster]

The scurf is worn away of each committed crime. Dryden.
[1913 Webster]

3. Anything like flakes or scales adhering to a surface.
[1913 Webster]

There stood a hill not far, whose grisly top
Belched fire and rolling smoke; the rest entire
Shone with a glossy scurf.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

4. (Bot.) Minute membranous scales on the surface of some leaves, as in the goosefoot. Gray.
[1913 Webster]

Scurff
Scurff (?), n. The bull trout. [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scurfiness
Scurf"i*ness, n. 1. Quality or state of being scurfy.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) Scurf.
[1913 Webster]

Scurfy
Scurf"y (?), a. [Compar. Scurfier (?); superl. Scurfiest.] Having or producing scurf; covered with scurf; resembling scurf.
[1913 Webster]

Scurrier
Scur"ri*er (?), n. One who scurries.
[1913 Webster]

Scurrile
Scur"rile (?), a. [L. scurrilis, fr. scurra a bufoon, jester: cf. F. scurrile.] Such as befits a buffoon or vulgar jester; grossly opprobrious or loudly jocose in language; scurrilous; as, scurrile taunts.
[1913 Webster]

The wretched affectation of scurrile laughter. Cowley.
[1913 Webster]

A scurrile or obscene jest will better advance you at the court of Charles than your father's ancient name. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Scurrility
Scur*ril"i*ty (?), n. [L. scurrilitas: cf. F. scurrilité.] 1. The quality or state of being scurrile or scurrilous; mean, vile, or obscene jocularity.
[1913 Webster]

Your reasons . . . have been sharp and sententious, pleasant without scurrility. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. That which is scurrile or scurrilous; gross or obscene language; low buffoonery; vulgar abuse.
[1913 Webster]

Interrupting prayers and sermons with clamor and scurrility. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Scurrilousness; abuse; insolence; vulgarity; indecency.
[1913 Webster]

Scurrilous
Scur"ril*ous (?), a. [See Scurrile.] 1. Using the low and indecent language of the meaner sort of people, or such as only the license of buffoons can warrant; as, a scurrilous fellow.
[1913 Webster]

2. Containing low indecency or abuse; mean; foul; vile; obscenely jocular; as, scurrilous language.
[1913 Webster]

The absurd and scurrilous sermon which had very unwisely been honored with impeachment. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Syn. -- Opprobrious; abusive; reproachful; insulting; insolent; offensive; gross; vile; vulgar; low; foul; foul-mouthed; indecent; scurrile; mean.
[1913 Webster]

-- Scur"ril*ous*ly, adv. -- Scur"ril*ous*ness, n.
[1913 Webster]

Scurrit
Scur"rit (?), n. (Zool.) The lesser tern (Sterna minuta). [Prov. Eng.]
[1913 Webster]

Scurry
Scur"ry (?), v. i. [Cf. Scur, Skirr.] To hasten away or along; to move rapidly; to hurry; as, the rabbit scurried away.
[1913 Webster]

Scurry
Scur"ry, n. Act of scurrying; hurried movement.
[1913 Webster]

Scurvily
Scur"vi*ly (?), adv. In a scurvy manner.
[1913 Webster]

Scurviness
Scur"vi*ness (?), n. The quality or state of being scurvy; vileness; meanness.
[1913 Webster]

Scurvy
Scur"vy (?), a. [Compar. Scurvier (?); superl. Scurviest.] [From Scurf; cf. Scurvy, n.] 1. Covered or affected with scurf or scabs; scabby; scurfy; specifically, diseased with the scurvy. “Whatsoever man . . . be scurvy or scabbed.” Lev. xxi. 18, 20.
[1913 Webster]

2. Vile; mean; low; vulgar; contemptible. “A scurvy trick.” Ld. Lytton.
[1913 Webster]

That scurvy custom of taking tobacco. Swift.
[1913 Webster]

[He] spoke spoke such scurvy and provoking terms. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scurvy
Scur"vy, n. [Probably from the same source as scorbute, but influenced by scurf, scurfy, scurvy, adj.; cf. D. scheurbuik scurvy, G. scharbock, LL. scorbutus. Cf. Scorbute.] (Med.) A disease characterized by livid spots, especially about the thighs and legs, due to extravasation of blood, and by spongy gums, and bleeding from almost all the mucous membranes. It is accompanied by paleness, languor, depression, and general debility. It is occasioned by confinement, innutritious food, and hard labor, but especially by lack of fresh vegetable food, or confinement for a long time to a limited range of food, which is incapable of repairing the waste of the system. It was formerly prevalent among sailors and soldiers.
[1913 Webster]

Scurvy grass [Scurvy + grass; or cf. Icel. skarfakāl scurvy grass.] (Bot.) A kind of cress (Cochlearia officinalis) growing along the seacoast of Northern Europe and in arctic regions. It is a remedy for the scurvy, and has proved a valuable food to arctic explorers. The name is given also to other allied species of plants.
[1913 Webster]

Scut
Scut (?), n. [Cf. Icel. skott a fox's tail. √ 159.] [Obs.] The tail of a hare, or of a deer, or other animal whose tail is short, esp. when carried erect; hence, sometimes, the animal itself. “He ran like a scut.” Skelton.
[1913 Webster]

How the Indian hare came to have a long tail, whereas that part in others attains no higher than a scut. Sir T. Browne.
[1913 Webster]

My doe with the black scut. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scuta
Scu"ta (?), n. pl. See Scutum.
[1913 Webster]

Scutage
Scu"tage (?; 48), n. [LL. scutagium, from L. scutum a shield.] (Eng. Hist.) Shield money; commutation of service for a sum of money. See Escuage.
[1913 Webster]

Scutal
Scu"tal (?), a. Of or pertaining to a shield.
[1913 Webster]

A good example of these scutal monstrosities. Cussans.
[1913 Webster]

Scutate
Scu"tate (?), a. [L. scutatus armed with a shield, from scutum a shield.] 1. Buckler-shaped; round or nearly round.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) Protected or covered by bony or horny plates, or large scales.
[1913 Webster]

Scutch
Scutch (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scutched (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Scutching.] [See Scotch to cut slightly.] 1. To beat or whip; to drub. [Old or Prov. Eng. & Scot.]
[1913 Webster]

2. To separate the woody fiber from (flax, hemp, etc.) by beating; to swingle.
[1913 Webster]

3. To loosen and dress the fiber of (cotton or silk) by beating; to free (fibrous substances) from dust by beating and blowing.
[1913 Webster]

Scutching machine, a machine used to scutch cotton, silk, or flax; -- called also batting machine.
[1913 Webster]

Scutch
Scutch, n. 1. A wooden instrument used in scutching flax and hemp.
[1913 Webster]

2. The woody fiber of flax; the refuse of scutched flax. “The smoke of the burning scutch.” Cuthbert Bede.
[1913 Webster]

Scutcheon
Scutch"eon (?), n. [Aphetic form of escutcheon.] 1. An escutcheon; an emblazoned shield. Bacon.
[1913 Webster]

The corpse lay in state, with all the pomp of scutcheons, wax lights, black hangings, and mutes. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

2. A small plate of metal, as the shield around a keyhole. See Escutcheon, 4.
[1913 Webster]

Scutcheoned
Scutch"eoned (?), a. Emblazoned on or as a shield.
[1913 Webster]

Scutcheoned panes in cloisters old. Lowell.
[1913 Webster]

Scutcher
Scutch"er (?), n. 1. One who scutches.
[1913 Webster]

2. An implement or machine for scutching hemp, flax, or cotton, etc.; a scutch; a scutching machine.
[1913 Webster]

Scutch grass
Scutch" grass` (?). (Bot.) A kind of pasture grass (Cynodon Dactylon). See Bermuda grass: also Illustration in Appendix.
[1913 Webster]

Scute
Scute (?), n. [L. scutum a shield, a buckler. See Scudo.] 1. A small shield. [Obs.] Skelton.
[1913 Webster]

2. An old French gold coin of the value of 3s. 4d. sterling, or about 80 cents.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Zool.) A bony scale of a reptile or fish; a large horny scale on the leg of a bird, or on the belly of a snake.
[1913 Webster]

Scutella
Scu*tel"la (?), n. pl. See Scutellum.
[1913 Webster]

Scutella
Scu*tel"la, n.; pl. Scutellae (#). [NL., fem. dim. of L. scutum.] (Zool.) See Scutellum, n., 2.
[1913 Webster]

Scutellated
Scutellate
{ Scu"tel*late (?), Scu"tel*la`ted (?), } a. [L. scutella a dish, salver. Cf. Scuttle a basket.] 1. (Zool.) Formed like a plate or salver; composed of platelike surfaces; as, the scutellated bone of a sturgeon. Woodward.
[1913 Webster]

2. [See Scutellum.] (Zool.) Having the tarsi covered with broad transverse scales, or scutella; -- said of certain birds.
[1913 Webster]

Scutellation
Scu`tel*la"tion (?), n. (Zool.) The entire covering, or mode of arrangement, of scales, as on the legs and feet of a bird.
[1913 Webster]

Scutelliform
Scu*tel"li*form (?), a. [L. scutella a dish + -form.] 1. Scutellate.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) Having the form of a scutellum.
[1913 Webster]

Scutelliplantar
Scu*tel`li*plan"tar (?), a. [L. scutellus a shield + planta foot.] (Zool.) Having broad scutella on the front, and small scales on the posterior side, of the tarsus; -- said of certain birds.
[1913 Webster]

Scutellum
Scu*tel"lum (?), n.; pl. Scutella (#). [NL., neut. dim. of L. scutum a shield.] 1. (Bot.) A rounded apothecium having an elevated rim formed of the proper thallus, the fructification of certain lichens.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) (a) The third of the four pieces forming the upper part of a thoracic segment of an insect. It follows the scutum, and is followed by the small postscutellum; a scutella. See Thorax. (b) One of the transverse scales on the tarsi and toes of birds; a scutella.
[1913 Webster]

Scutibranch
Scu"ti*branch (?), a. (Zool.) Scutibranchiate. -- n. One of the Scutibranchiata.
[1913 Webster]

Scutibranchia
Scu`ti*bran"chi*a (?), n. pl. [NL.] (Zool.) Same as Scutibranchiata.
[1913 Webster]

Scutibranchian
Scu`ti*bran"chi*an (?), n. (Zool.) One of the Scutibranchiata.
[1913 Webster]

Scutibranchiata
Scu`ti*bran`chi*a"ta (?), n. pl. [NL. See Scutum, and Branchia.] (Zool.) An order of gastropod Mollusca having a heart with two auricles and one ventricle. The shell may be either spiral or shieldlike.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; It is now usually regarded as including only the Rhipidoglossa and the Docoglossa. When originally established, it included a heterogenous group of mollusks having shieldlike shells, such as Haliotis, Fissurella, Carinaria, etc.
[1913 Webster]

Scutibranchiate
Scu`ti*bran"chi*ate (?), a. (Zool.) Having the gills protected by a shieldlike shell; of or pertaining to the Scutibranchiata. -- n. One of the Scutibranchiata.
[1913 Webster]

Scutiferous
Scu*tif"er*ous (?), a. [L. scutum shield + -ferous.] Carrying a shield or buckler.
[1913 Webster]

Scutiform
Scu"ti*form (?), a. [L. scutum shield + -form: cf. F. scutiforme.] Shield-shaped; scutate.
[1913 Webster]

Scutiger
Scu"ti*ger (?), n. [NL., fr. L. scutum shield + gerere to bear.] (Zool.) Any species of chilopod myriapods of the genus Scutigera. They sometimes enter buildings and prey upon insects.
[1913 Webster]

Scutiped
Scu"ti*ped (?), a. [L. scutum a shield + pes, pedis, a foot: cf. F. scutipède.] (Zool.) Having the anterior surface of the tarsus covered with scutella, or transverse scales, in the form of incomplete bands terminating at a groove on each side; -- said of certain birds.
[1913 Webster]

Scutter
Scut"ter (?), v. i. [Cf. Scuttle, v. i.] To run quickly; to scurry; to scuttle. [Prov. Eng.]

A mangy little jackal . . . cocked up his ears and tail, and scuttered across the shallows. Kipling.
[Webster 1913 Suppl.]

Scuttle
Scut"tle (?), n. [AS. scutel a dish, platter; cf. Icel. skutill; both fr. L. scutella, dim. of scutra, scuta, a dish or platter; cf. scutum a shield. Cf. Skillet.] 1. A broad, shallow basket.
[1913 Webster]

2. A wide-mouthed vessel for holding coal: a coal hod.
[1913 Webster]

Scuttle
Scut"tle, v. i. [For scuddle, fr. scud.] To run with affected precipitation; to hurry; to bustle; to scuddle.
[1913 Webster]

With the first dawn of day, old Janet was scuttling about the house to wake the baron. Sir W. Scott.
[1913 Webster]

Scuttle
Scut"tle, n. A quick pace; a short run. Spectator.
[1913 Webster]

Scuttle
Scut"tle (skŭt"t'l), n. [OF. escoutille, F. éscoutille, cf. Sp. escotilla; probably akin to Sp. escotar to cut a thing so as to make it fit, to hollow a garment about the neck, perhaps originally, to cut a bosom-shaped piece out, and of Teutonic origin; cf. D. schoot lap, bosom, G. schoss, Goth. skauts the hem of a garnment. Cf. Sheet an expanse.] 1. A small opening in an outside wall or covering, furnished with a lid. Specifically: (a) (Naut.) A small opening or hatchway in the deck of a ship, large enough to admit a man, and with a lid for covering it, also, a like hole in the side or bottom of a ship. (b) An opening in the roof of a house, with a lid.
[1913 Webster]

2. The lid or door which covers or closes an opening in a roof, wall, or the like.
[1913 Webster]

Scuttle butt, or Scuttle cask (Naut.), a butt or cask with a large hole in it, used to contain the fresh water for daily use in a ship. Totten.
[1913 Webster]

Scuttle
Scut"tle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scuttled (skŭt"t'ld); p. pr. & vb. n. Scuttling.] 1. To cut a hole or holes through the bottom, deck, or sides of (as of a ship), for any purpose.
[1913 Webster]

2. To sink by making holes through the bottom of; as, to scuttle a ship.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hence: To defeat, frustrate, abandon, or cause to be abandoned; -- of plans, projects, actions, hopes; as, the review committee scuttled the project due to lack of funds.
[PJC]

scuttlebutt
scut"tle*butt` (skŭt"t'l*bŭt`) , n. 1. See scuttle butt.
[PJC]

2. A drinking fountain on board a ship or at a naval station.
[PJC]

3. The latest gossip; rumors.
[PJC]

Scutum
Scu"tum (?), n.; pl. Scuta (#). [L.] 1. (Rom. Antiq.) An oblong shield made of boards or wickerwork covered with leather, with sometimes an iron rim; -- carried chiefly by the heavy-armed infantry.
[1913 Webster]

2. (O. Eng. Law) A penthouse or awning. [Obs.] Burrill.
[1913 Webster]

3. (Zool.) (a) The second and largest of the four parts forming the upper surface of a thoracic segment of an insect. It is preceded by the prescutum and followed by the scutellum. See the Illust. under Thorax. (b) One of the two lower valves of the operculum of a barnacle.
[1913 Webster]

Scybala
Scyb"a*la (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. sky`balon dung.] (Med.) Hardened masses of feces.
[1913 Webster]

Scye
Scye (sī), n. Arm scye, a cutter's term for the armhole or part of the armhole of the waist of a garment. [Cant]
[1913 Webster]

Scyle
Scyle (sīl), v. t. [AS. scylan to withdraw or remove.] To hide; to secrete; to conceal. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Scylla
Scyl"la (?), n. A dangerous rock on the Italian coast opposite the whirpool Charybdis on the coast of Sicily, -- both personified in classical literature as ravenous monsters. The passage between them was formerly considered perilous; hence, the saying “Between Scylla and Charybdis,” signifying a great peril on either hand.
[1913 Webster]

Scyllaea
Scyl*lae"a (?), n. [NL. See Scylla.] (Zool.) A genus of oceanic nudibranchiate mollusks having the small branched gills situated on the upper side of four fleshy lateral lobes, and on the median caudal crest.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; In color and form these mollusks closely imitate the fronds of sargassum and other floating seaweeds among which they live.
[1913 Webster]

Scyllarian
Scyl*la"ri*an (?), n. (Zool.) One of a family (Scyllaridae) of macruran Crustacea, remarkable for the depressed form of the body, and the broad, flat antennae. Also used adjectively.
[1913 Webster]

Scyllite
Scyl"lite (?), n. (Chem.) A white crystalline substance of a sweetish taste, resembling inosite and metameric with dextrose. It is extracted from the kidney of the dogfish (of the genus Scyllium), the shark, and the skate.
[1913 Webster]

Scymetar
Scym"e*tar (?), n. See Scimiter.
[1913 Webster]

Scypha
Scy"pha (?), n.; pl. Scyphae (#). [NL.] (Bot.) See Scyphus, 2 (b).
[1913 Webster]

Scyphiform
Scy"phi*form (?), a. [L. scyphus a cup + -form.] (Bot.) Cup-shaped.
[1913 Webster]

Scyphistoma
Scy*phis"to*ma (?), n.; pl. Scyphistomata (#), Scyphistomae (#). [NL., fr. Gr. sky`fos a cup + sto`ma the mouth.] (Zool.) The young attached larva of Discophora in the stage when it resembles a hydroid, or actinian.
[1913 Webster]

Scyphobranchii
Scy`pho*bran"chi*i (?), n. pl. [NL., from Gr. sky`fos a cup + bra`gchion a gill.] (Zool.) An order of fishes including the blennioid and gobioid fishes, and other related families.
[1913 Webster]

Scyphomedusae
Scy`pho*me*du"sae (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. sky`fos cup + NL. medusa.] (Zool.) Same as Acraspeda, or Discophora.
[1913 Webster]

Scyphophori
Scy*phoph"o*ri (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. sky`fos a cup + fe`rein to bear.] (Zool.) An order of fresh-water fishes inhabiting tropical Africa. They have rudimentary electrical organs on each side of the tail.
[1913 Webster]

Scyphus
Scy"phus (?), n.; pl. Scyphi (#). [L., a cup, Gr. sky`fos.] 1. (Antiq.) A kind of large drinking cup, -- used by Greeks and Romans, esp. by poor folk.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Bot.) (a) The cup of a narcissus, or a similar appendage to the corolla in other flowers. (b) A cup-shaped stem or podetium in lichens. Also called scypha. See Illust. of Cladonia pyxidata, under Lichen.
[1913 Webster]

Scythe
Scythe (sīth), n. [OE. sithe, AS. sīðe, sigðe; akin to Icel. sigðr a sickle, LG. segd, seged, seed, seid, OHG. segansa sickle, scythe, G. sense scythe, and to E. saw a cutting instrument. See Saw.] [Written also sithe and sythe.] 1. An instrument for mowing grass, grain, or the like, by hand, composed of a long, curving blade, with a sharp edge, made fast to a long handle, called a snath, which is bent into a form convenient for use.
[1913 Webster]

The sharp-edged scythe shears up the spiring grass. Drayton.
[1913 Webster]

Whatever thing
The scythe of Time mows down.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Antiq.) A scythe-shaped blade attached to ancient war chariots.
[1913 Webster]

Scythe
Scythe (?), v. t. To cut with a scythe; to cut off as with a scythe; to mow. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

Time had not scythed all that youth begun. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Scythed
Scythed (?), a. Armed with scythes, as a chariot.
[1913 Webster]

Chariots scythed,
On thundering axles rolled.
Glover.
[1913 Webster]

Scytheman
Scythe"man (?), n.; pl. Scythemen (&unr_;). One who uses a scythe; a mower. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

Scythestone
Scythe"stone` (?), n. A stone for sharpening scythes; a whetstone.
[1913 Webster]

Scythewhet
Scythe"whet` (?), n. (Zool.) Wilson's thrush; -- so called from its note. [Local, U.S.]
[1913 Webster]

Scythian
Scyth"i*an (?), a. Of or pertaining to Scythia (a name given to the northern part of Asia, and Europe adjoining to Asia), or its language or inhabitants.
[1913 Webster]

Scythian lamb. (Bot.) See Barometz.
[1913 Webster]

Scythian
Scyth"i*an, n. 1. A native or inhabitant of Scythia; specifically (Ethnol.), one of a Slavonic race which in early times occupied Eastern Europe.
[1913 Webster]

2. The language of the Scythians.
[1913 Webster]

Scytodermata
Scy`to*der"ma*ta (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. &unr_; a hide + &unr_; a skin.] (Zool.) Same as Holothurioidea.
[1913 Webster]

Sdain
Sdain (?), v. & n. Disdain. [Obs.] Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

'Sdeath
'Sdeath (?), interj. [Corrupted fr. God's death.] An exclamation expressive of impatience or anger. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Sdeign
Sdeign (?), v. t. To disdain. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

But either sdeigns with other to partake. Spenser.
[1913 Webster]

Sea
Sea (sē), n. [OE. see, AS. s&aemacr_;; akin to D. zee, OS. & OHG. sēo, G. see, OFries. se, Dan. , Sw. sjö, Icel. saer, Goth. saiws, and perhaps to L. saevus fierce, savage. √151a.] 1. One of the larger bodies of salt water, less than an ocean, found on the earth's surface; a body of salt water of second rank, generally forming part of, or connecting with, an ocean or a larger sea; as, the Mediterranean Sea; the Sea of Marmora; the North Sea; the Carribean Sea.
[1913 Webster]

2. An inland body of water, esp. if large or if salt or brackish; as, the Caspian Sea; the Sea of Aral; sometimes, a small fresh-water lake; as, the Sea of Galilee.
[1913 Webster]

3. The ocean; the whole body of the salt water which covers a large part of the globe.
[1913 Webster]

I marvel how the fishes live in the sea. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

Ambiguous between sea and land
The river horse and scaly crocodile.
Milton.
[1913 Webster]

4. The swell of the ocean or other body of water in a high wind; motion or agitation of the water's surface; also, a single wave; a billow; as, there was a high sea after the storm; the vessel shipped a sea.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Jewish Antiq.) A great brazen laver in the temple at Jerusalem; -- so called from its size.
[1913 Webster]

He made a molten sea of ten cubits from brim to brim, round in compass, and five cubits the height thereof. 2 Chron. iv. 2.
[1913 Webster]

6. Fig.: Anything resembling the sea in vastness; as, a sea of glory. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

All the space . . . was one sea of heads. Macaulay.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; Sea is often used in the composition of words of obvious signification; as, sea-bathed, sea-beaten, sea-bound, sea-bred, sea-circled, sealike, sea-nursed, sea-tossed, sea-walled, sea-worn, and the like. It is also used either adjectively or in combination with substantives; as, sea bird, sea-bird, or seabird, sea acorn, or sea-acorn.
[1913 Webster]

At sea, upon the ocean; away from land; figuratively, without landmarks for guidance; lost; at the mercy of circumstances. “To say the old man was at sea would be too feeble an expression.” G. W. Cable -- At full sea at the height of flood tide; hence, at the height. “But now God's mercy was at full sea.” Jer. Taylor. -- Beyond seas, or Beyond the sea or Beyond the seas (Law), out of the state, territory, realm, or country. Wharton. -- Half seas over, half drunk. [Colloq.] Spectator. -- Heavy sea, a sea in which the waves run high. -- Long sea, a sea characterized by the uniform and steady motion of long and extensive waves. -- Short sea, a sea in which the waves are short, broken, and irregular, so as to produce a tumbling or jerking motion. -- To go to sea, to adopt the calling or occupation of a sailor.
[1913 Webster]

Sea acorn
Sea" a"corn (?). (Zool.) An acorn barnacle (Balanus).
[1913 Webster]

Sea adder
Sea" ad"der (?). (Zool.) (a) The European fifteen-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus spinachia); -- called also bismore. (b) The European tanglefish, or pipefish (Syngnathus acus).
[1913 Webster]

Sea anchor
Sea" an"chor (?). (Naut.) See Drag sail, under 4th Drag.
[1913 Webster]

Sea anemone
Sea" a*nem"o*ne (?). (Zool.) Any one of numerous species of soft-bodied Anthozoa, belonging to the order Actinaria; an actinian.
[1913 Webster]

&hand_; They have the oral disk surrounded by one or more circles of simple tapering tentacles, which are often very numerous, and when expanded somewhat resemble the petals of flowers, with colors varied and often very beautiful.
[1913 Webster]

Sea ape
Sea" ape` (?). (Zool.) (a) The thrasher shark. (b) The sea otter.
[1913 Webster]

Sea apple
Sea" ap"ple (?). (Bot.) The fruit of a West Indian palm (Manicaria Plukenetii), often found floating in the sea. A. Grisebach.
[1913 Webster]

Sea arrow
Sea" ar"row (?). (Zool.) A squid of the genus Ommastrephes. See Squid.
[1913 Webster]

Sea bank
Sea" bank` (?). 1. The seashore. Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. A bank or mole to defend against the sea.
[1913 Webster]

Sea-bar
Sea"-bar` (?), n. (Zool.) A tern.
[1913 Webster]

Sea barrow
Sea" bar"row (?). (Zool.) A sea purse.
[1913 Webster]

Sea bass
Sea" bass`. (&unr_;). (Zool.) (a) A large marine food fish (Serranus atrarius syn. Centropristis atrarius) which abounds on the Atlantic coast of the United States. It is dark bluish, with black bands, and more or less varied with small white spots and blotches. Called also, locally, blue bass, black sea bass, blackfish, bluefish, and black perch. (b) A California food fish (Cynoscion nobile); -- called also white sea bass, and sea salmon.
[1913 Webster]

Sea bat
Sea" bat` (?). (Zool.) See Batfish (a).
[1913 Webster]

Seabeach
Sea"beach` (?), n. A beach lying along the sea. “The bleak seabeach.” Longfellow.
[1913 Webster]

Sea bean
Sea" bean (?). (Bot.) Same as Florida bean.
[1913 Webster]

Sea bear
Sea" bear` (?). (Zool.) (a) Any fur seal. See under Fur. (b) The white bear.
[1913 Webster]

Seabeard
Sea"beard` (?), n. (Bot.) A green seaweed (Cladophora rupestris) growing in dense tufts.
[1913 Webster]

Sea beast
Sea" beast` (?). (Zool.) Any large marine mammal, as a seal, walrus, or cetacean.
[1913 Webster]

Sea bird
Sea" bird` (?). (Zool.) Any swimming bird frequenting the sea; a sea fowl.
[1913 Webster]

Sea blite
Sea" blite` (?). (Bot.) A plant (Suaeda maritima) of the Goosefoot family, growing in salt marshes.
[1913 Webster]

Sea-blubber
Sea"-blub"ber (?), n. (Zool.) A jellyfish.
[1913 Webster]

Seaboard
Sea"board` (?), n. [Sea + board, F. bord side.] The seashore; seacoast. Ld. Berners.
[1913 Webster]

Seaboard
Sea"board`, a. Bordering upon, or being near, the sea; seaside; seacoast; as, a seaboard town.
[1913 Webster]

Seaboard
Sea"board`, adv. Toward the sea. [R.]
[1913 Webster]

Seaboat
Sea"boat` (?). [AS. s&aemacr_;bāt.] 1. A boat or vessel adapted to the open sea; hence, a vessel considered with reference to her power of resisting a storm, or maintaining herself in a heavy sea; as, a good sea boat.
[1913 Webster]

2. (Zool.) A chiton.
[1913 Webster]

Seabord
Sea"bord` (?), n. & a. See Seaboard.
[1913 Webster]

Sea-bordering
Sea"-bor"der*ing (?), a. Bordering on the sea; situated beside the sea. Drayton.
[1913 Webster]

Sea-born
Sea"-born` (?), a. 1. Born of the sea; produced by the sea. “Neptune and his sea-born niece.” Waller.
[1913 Webster]

2. Born at sea.
[1913 Webster]

Seabound
Sea"bound` (?), a. Bounded by the sea.
[1913 Webster]

Sea bow
Sea" bow` (?). See Marine rainbow, under Rainbow.
[1913 Webster]

Sea boy
Sea" boy` (?). A boy employed on shipboard.
[1913 Webster]

Sea breach
Sea" breach` (?). A breaking or overflow of a bank or a dike by the sea. L'Estrange.
[1913 Webster]

Sea bream
Sea" bream` (?). (Zool.) Any one of several species of sparoid fishes, especially the common European species (Pagellus centrodontus), the Spanish (Pagellus Oweni), and the black sea bream (Cantharus lineatus); -- called also old wife.
[1913 Webster]

Sea brief
Sea" brief` (?). Same as Sea letter.
[1913 Webster]

Sea bug
Sea" bug` (?). (Zool.) A chiton.
[1913 Webster]

Sea-built
Sea"-built` (?), a. Built at, in, or by the sea.
[1913 Webster]

Sea butterfly
Sea" but"ter*fly` (?). (Zool.) A pteropod.
[1913 Webster]

Sea cabbage
Sea" cab"bage (?; 48). (Bot.) See Sea kale, under Kale.
[1913 Webster]

Sea calf
Sea" calf` (?). (Zool.) The common seal.
[1913 Webster]

Sea canary
Sea" ca*na"ry (?). [So called from a whistling sound which it makes.] (Zool.) The beluga, or white whale.
[1913 Webster]

Sea captain
Sea" cap"tain (?). The captain of a vessel that sails upon the sea.
[1913 Webster]

Sea card
Sea" card` (?). Mariner's card, or compass.
[1913 Webster]

Sea cat
Sea catfish
{ Sea" cat`fish (?). Sea" cat` (?). } (Zool.) (a) The wolf fish. (b) Any marine siluroid fish, as Aelurichthys marinus, and Arinus felis, of the eastern coast of the United States. Many species are found on the coasts of Central and South America.
[1913 Webster]

Sea chart
Sea" chart` (?). A chart or map on which the lines of the shore, islands, shoals, harbors, etc., are delineated.
[1913 Webster]

Sea chickweed
Sea" chick"weed` (?). (Bot.) A fleshy plant (Arenaria peploides) growing in large tufts in the sands of the northern Atlantic seacoast; -- called also sea sandwort, and sea purslane.
[1913 Webster]

Sea clam
Sea" clam` (?). (Zool.) Any one of the large bivalve mollusks found on the open seacoast, especially those of the family Mactridae, as the common American species. (Mactra solidissima or Spisula solidissima); -- called also beach clam, and surf clam.
[1913 Webster]

Sea coal<