Archive for May, 2005

Who\’s next for the Public Schools?

Tuesday, May 31st, 2005

Today is the last day of work for acting state schools superintendent Patricia Willoughby. Seven months after the elections, neither Willoughby, nor the voters know who’s moving into her office next. Laura Leslie looks at the job and the debate over its future.

Prayer Vigils follow the Cross Burnings

Friday, May 27th, 2005

Several hundred people gathered in Durham for prayer vigils at the sites where large crosses were burned on Wednesday night. The seven foot crosses were found burning in three separate locations in the city. At the time of this report by Jessica Jones, police had no suspects and residents said they\’re feeling anxious.

Note: This story won first place in the spot news category of the Radio Television News Directors Association of the Carolinas contest.

Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Part 2 of 2

Friday, May 27th, 2005

On November 3rd 1979, a group of Ku Klux Klan members and Nazis showed up in Greensboro to confront members of the Communist Workers Party. The CWP had organized a “Death to the Klan” march and rally. Gunfire erupted and four members of the CWP were killed. Rusty Jacobs has the second part of our series about the Truth and Reconciliation Commission looking into the incident.

Note: WUNC\’s coverage of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission won the Radio – Television News Director\’s Association Edward R. Murrow Southeast Regional Radio Award for continuing coverage.

Cross Burnings in Durham

Thursday, May 26th, 2005

Durham police are investigating three cross burnings. The first seven foot cross was set fire on the lawn of a progressive Episcopal church. The second burned on South Roxboro Street and the last was at a downtown intersection. City leaders can\’t remember any other times when such symbols of racial hatred have appeared in Durham. The police and many residents say they\’re shocked that this could happen in a city that even during the height of the Civil Rights movement was well known for its racial civility. Jessica Jones reports.

Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Part 1 of 2

Thursday, May 26th, 2005

This summer in Greensboro, a Truth and Reconciliation Commission will examine the events of November 3rd, 1979. On that day, a group of Nazis and Ku Klux Klan members confronted Communist labor organizers who were holding an anti-Klan rally. Rusty Jacobs has the first in a 2-part series.

Note: WUNC\’s coverage of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission won the Radio – Television News Director\’s Association Edward R. Murrow Southeast Regional Radio Award for continuing coverage.